Bryn Mawr College Library Special Collections

A. E. Housman Papers, 1859-1936

Part II: Box and Folder List - Incoming Correspondence

Special Collections Department, Bryn Mawr College Library
Collection Number: M57

Copyright © 2007 by Special Collections Department, Bryn Mawr College Library

April 2007
Last Updated: April 4, 2007

Index of Writers

J. M. Barrie
J. G. Frazer
Lewis (?)
Gilbert Murray
F. A. Simpson
Witter Bynner
Herbert French
John Maycock
Herbert Millington
Paul Stevens
John Charrington
Edmund Goss
J. W. Mackail
Emmeline Pankhurst
J. P. Strachey
Walter De La Mare
F. A. Hampton
Malcolm J. MacLaren
Arthur Platt
John Drinkwater
Edward Hampton
Houston Martin
D. Winstanley
J. D. Duff
Thomas Hardy
Mrs. N. M. Martin
Grant Richards
Nat F. Wollf
D. Emyrs Evans
Arthur Henson
John Masefield
Richards Press Ltd
Margaret Woods
E. M. Forster
W. D. Ker
Arthur Mayhew
William Rothenstein
Unidentified


Incoming Correspondence

Box Folder Writer and Contents Date
    J. M. Barrie  
4 1

ALS, London

"I wrote Rothenstein ... that I could not sit as it was a kind of picture I disbelieved in, good as his intention undoubtedly was. I guessed that you and most of the others would have a similar feeling about it."

1928 Feb 24
    Witter Bynner  
4 2

TLS, Santa Fe

Sends his latest book of poetry to Housman "even though I guess before hand that you will care little for it."

1928 Jan 4
4 2

TLS, Santa Fe

"Years ago Laurence gave me copies of a most enchanting ... set of nonsense verses written by you in your early years ... I cannot lay hands on them and am wondering if you will not be so gracious as to let me have new copies."

1935 Jul 17
    John Charrington  
4 3

ALS, Herts

Informs Housman that the verse he has sought - "O that I was where I would be, Then would I be where I am not; But where I am I must be, And where I would be I cannot" - can be found in several sources

1926 Jan 8
    Walter De La Mare  
4 4

TLS, Buckinghamshire

Discusses the delayed publication of the Eighteen-eighties, a collection of literary essays edited by De la Mare

1929 Nov 12
    John Drinkwater  
4 5

ALS, Birmingham

"Will you accept the enclosed from one of the 'Shropshire Lad's' warmest friends?"

1917 Apr 9
4 5 TLS, London (photocopy) 1922 Oct 20
    J. D. Duff  
4 6

ALS, Strathaird

Brings to Housman's attention a Plato passage that he came upon while leafing through Ritter & Preller's Historia philosophiae. "Tell me some time whether it shakes your opinion."

1922 Jul 23
    D. Emyrs Evans  
4 7

ALS, Bangor, Wales

Writes to inform Housman that he is being nominated to receive an honorary literary degree from the University of Wales. Asks Housman to reply as soon as possible as to whether he will allow his name to go forward

1934 Nov 23
    E. M. Forster  
4 8

ALS, n.p.

Thanks Housman for publishing Last Poems which "crossed the line that divides a book from a companion," as did A Shropshire Lad.

1923 Feb 22
4 8

ALS, Dorking

Forster sends a volume of short stories to Housman. "I don't know whether there is such a thing as impersonal affection, but the words best express the feeling I have had towards you, through your poems, for the last thirty years."

1928 Mar 28
    J. G. Frazer  
4 9

ALS, Bedford (2 photocopied pages of)

Frazer thanks Housman for sending him a copy of his Last Poems, expresses the fervent wish that they will not be his last and compares them to Heine and Goethe.

1922 Oct 24
    Herbert French  
4 9 ALS, London (fragment, photocopy) n.d.
    Edmund Goss  
4 10

ALS, London (photocopy)

"How charming of you to send me your Latest (not Last!) Poems." writes a reviewer for The Sunday Times.

1922 Oct 18
    F. A. Hampton  
4 11

ALS, France

"M. Devos, the curé of the village in which we are billeted, happened to find in my room my copy of 'A Shropshire Lad' and this evening brought me 'as a small souvenir' a translation of one of the numbers." Included is a translation of one of Housman's poems, beginning "Lorsque j'avais vingt ans," written on the back of Denis Devos's card

1916 Jul 26
    Edward Hampton  
4 11

TLS, Oxford

Asks Housman if he will permit his poems to be anthologized.

1931 Sep 6
    Thomas Hardy  
4 12

ALS, Dorchester

Hardy thanks Housman for sending Montague Rhodes James's Ghost-stories of an antiquary. "Two or three of them have been read aloud ... and I was agreeably sensible of their eeriness, even though the precaution was taken of keeping them at a safe distance from bed-time."

1913 Nov 15
    Arthur Henson  
4 12

ALS, Cambridge (photocopy)

"This is only a line to say what a great pleasure and something more than a pleasure it has been to acquire my copy of the poems."

1922 Oct 16
    W. D. Ker  
4 13

ALS, Kent

Writes Housman "to report NO GO in the Shelley MSS as far as I am informed by careful enquirers particularly Mr. Peck of Exeter as per letters enclosed which have been given to me by Mr. O. Doughty."

1922 Jul 7
    [Lewis]  
4 14

AL, London

From publisher or bookseller "We will send the remaining volume (or vols.) as published."

n.d.
    John Maycock  
4 15

ALS, London

Housman's friend and former co-worker at the Patent Office congratulates him heartily on being appointed Professor of Latin at London University. "It is funny to think how I used to chaff you about your work producing no money, and all the time you were working silently on with that strength of purpose which I can admire but can't imitate ... Dear old pal I'm as pleased as if I'd done something good myself."

1892 Jun 15
    J. W. Mackail  
4 16

ALS, London

"Pray find room among your collection of pamphlets for this" [The Progress of Poesy].

1906 Mar 11
4 16 ALS, London

Mackail sends Housman another book: "I don't suppose that you will find the enclosed little piece of connoisseurship either very interesting or very valuable. Still I should like you to have it from me."

1917 Dec 6
    Malcolm J. MacLaren  
4 17

ALS, Oxford

At the bottom of a typed French translation of No. XLVIII of A Shropshire lad, MacLaren writes: "May I once more ask your permission to publish this translation (which I have revised) of your poem, in a French journal?"

1933 Oct 30
    Houston Martin  
4 18 ALS, Philadelphia

Sends greetings to Housman on his seventy-fifth birthday. Martin includes quotations on the genius of Housman from Edwin Arlington Robinson, Robert Frost, Allen Tate, Louis Untermeyer, Robinson Jeffers, and William Rose Benét

1934 Mar 26
    Mrs. N. M. Martin  
4 19

Typescript copy, n.p.

"You, Mr. Housman, are to me the greatest living poet. I fear coming ages will judge you too negative to sit on high with the Olympians, not knowing that in your negation you have read our times aright. May there be more to live for and less to weep for in the better times to come."

Folder also includes AL fragment 1970 Nov 15 "Dear Adele" (See Box 2: 11)

n.d.
    John Masefield  
4 20

ALS, Cirencester

Thanks Housman for his kind letter

1935 Jun 4
    Arthur Mayhew  
4 21

ALS, "near Reading"

Writing for his ill brother-in-law, Sir Henry Head, Mayhew sends an extract of an article published in Brain in 1908 in which Head and a colleague refer to "tests of the nervous sensibility of the hairs of the human body." Having read Housman's lecture on Leslie Stephens, Head "thinks that you might like to know that the physical experience which you have found aesthetically so significant has been scientifically recorded. It seems to be an example of the longstanding association between
Medicine and Letters which has meant personally so very much to Sir Henry."

1933 (?) Jul 31
    Gilbert Murray  
4 22

ALS, Oxford (photocopy)

"I c May 25, 2007

1922 Oct 22
    Herbert Millington  
4 23

ALS, Bromsgrove

The Headmaster of Bromsgrove School thanks Housman for a gift. "I accept it with true gratitude & Sainsbury shall do his best to set it [into] song."

1898 Jul 30
    [Sylvia Oldham]  
4 24

TLS, Cambridge (photocopy)

Oldham writes to say how much she admires Housman's "new" poems.

n.y. Nov
    Emmeline Pankhurst  
4 25

ALS, London

"Even if you do not see eye to eye with us on our Anti Govt-Coalition Policy there is no reason that I can see why you should not give us one of your delightful speeches on the general question"

1912 Nov 1
4 25

ALS, London

"I fear our talk must stand over until next week... My daughter is dealing with some of the points you raise in The Suffragette this week. It seems to me that to support Mr. Lansbury in his efforts to make the Labour Party do its duty to women as a party is the essential preliminary to giving them individual support in elections."

1912 Nov 4
    Arthur Platt  
4 26

ALS, London

Platt writes enthusiastically about the newly published Last Poems: "I read you through three times on end ... today I find that what I didn't much care about at first so grows on me that I give up any selection as hopeless." Also discusses the reactions of critics and colleagues. Encloses "a sonnet to amuse" Housman entitled "To William Shakespeare of Stratford who did not write his own plays."

1922 Oct 20
    Alfred Pollard  
4 26a

ALS, Wimbledom Common

Pollard writes regarding Last Poems. He praises the volume, writing: "I can't think of anyone else who says as much in eight lines as you can."

1922 Oct 20
    Grant Richards  
4 27

TLS, London

"My dear Housman, Shall I give this man the usual permission?" Initialed by Housman with the reply "Yes" and the date of 1917 Jun 2.

Removed from RBR PR 4809 H15 A68 1936b

1917 Jun 1
4 27

TLS, London

Richards responds to H.'s proofreading of Double Life.

1920 Jul 5
4 27

ALS, London

Richards discusses a review which appeared in The Daily Mail.

1924 Sep 18
4 27

ALS (initials only), London

Richards gives Housman advice on where to dine while in Paris.

1932 May 31
4 27

ALS, London

Richards gives Housman advice on where to dine while in Paris.

1932 Jun 2
4 27 Typewritten 2 pages of copies of letters to Richards from Shaw, Bernard and Dobell, T. J. and to Housman from Richards n.d.
4 27

ALS, London

Richards is sending manuscripts to Housman.

1932 Sep 9
4 27

ALS, London

Sends to Housman for his approval, references made to Last
Poems
, which are to appear in Richards' second book of memoirs.

Folder also includes empty envelope in Grant Richard's hand: "2 photographs of AEH taken by Mrs. Grant Richards."

n.d.
    Richards Press Ltd. (G. W. Wiggins)  
4 28

TLS, London

Response to Housman's query regarding the number of copies of Last poems in stock

1932 Nov 28
    William Rothenstein  
4 29 ALS, London (photocopy)

Thanks Housman for his copy of Last Poems. "Hardy long ago prepared me for this sheaf. But we are never prepared for either excellence or stupidity. Stupidity is the commoner commodity. And though I have never been moved by the doctrine of Christ taking the sins of man upon himself that men may be saved, it looks as though a few men do actually preserve a generation from damnation by futurity. I doubt whether you have looked on yourself in the light of a savior: I imagine you rather scornful of the role."

n.d.
    F. A. Simpson  
4 29

ALS, Cambridge

Thanks Housman for commenting on his book Louis Napoleon and the recovery of France, 1848-1856. "Very many thanks for the corrigenda ... I am very glad to have these now as they may just save me from stereotyping my errors."

"Friday"
    [Paul] Stevens  
4 30

ALS, n.p.

Folder of 12 poems (See reply in 3: 13). Folder also contains separate handwritten poem Atlas by Stevens and ALS from Binyon, Lawrence to Stevens thanking Stevens for the poem.

1928 Oct 29
    H.F. Stewart  
4 30a
In regards to Housman's poem, "For my Funeral," which he apparently gave to Stewart so that it could be used at the appropriate time.
 
    J. P. Strachey  
4 31

TLS, Cambridge

Informs Housman that "the edition of Dryden is a Clarendon Press one ... edited by C.H. Firth ... The note is on page 231."

1921 Nov 17
   

Herbert Warren

 
4 31a
Warren thanks Housman for a copy of his Last Poems "with the author's complements."
1922 Oct 21
    D. A. Winstanley  
4 32

ALS, Cambridge

"A letter, written by Edmund Burke to Lord Rockingham, is dated 'Beconsfield, Tuesday, December 5th, 1769.'"

1920 Sep 30
    Nat F. Wollf  
4 33

ALS, Woods Hole, MA

An American collector recounts tales of the effects of A Shropshire Lad on various acquaintances. He also asks Housman the favor of copying out 2 verses

1921 Jul 18
    Margaret Woods  
4 34

ALS, Godalming (photocopy)

"I can't tell you how kind I think it of you to have remembered me and sent me your beautiful book, which everyone is running to get..."

n.y. Nov 8
    Unidentified Correspondents  
4 35

fragments of ALsS and ALsS photocopies

n.d.

PART I: Collection Description
PART II: Box and Folder List

  • Incoming Correspondence
  • Outgoing Correspondence
  • Third Party Correspondence
  • Writings
  • Other Materials
  • Personal and Family Materials
  • Graphic Material
  • Full List of Guides to the Collections
    Abbreviations Used in Guides

    Last Update May 25, 2007. Special Collections