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Bryn Mawr College
101 N. Merion Ave.
Bryn Mawr. PA 19010-2899
Phone: 610-526-5013

Courses

This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's master calendar.

Students must choose a major subject and may choose a minor subject. Students may also select from one of seven concentrations, which are offered to enhance a student's work in the major or minor and to focus work on a specific area of interest.

Concentrations are an intentional cluster of courses already offered by various academic departments or through general programs. These courses may also be cross-listed in several academic departments. Therefore, when registering for a course that counts toward a concentration, a student should register for the course listed in her major or minor department. If the concentration course is not listed in her major or minor department, the student may enroll in any listing of that course.

Fall 2014

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTRUCTOR(S)
BIOL B202-001 Introduction to Neuroscience Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Park 229 Mietlicki-Baase,E.
BIOL B364-001 Developmental Neurobiology Semester / 1 Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:30 AM MW Park 227 Lippman-Bell,J.
PSYC B323-001 Advanced Topics in Cognitive Neuroscience Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTH Bettws Y Coed 239 Thapar,A.
PSYC B401-001 Supervised Research in Neural and Behavioral Sciences Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA
PSYC B401-001 Supervised Research in Neural and Behavioral Sciences Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA

Spring 2015

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTRUCTOR(S)
BIOL B244-001 Behavioral Endocrinology Semester / 1 Lecture: 8:25 AM- 9:45 AM TTH Park 20 Brodfuehrer,P.
BIOL B250-001 Computational Methods in the Sciences Semester / 1 Lab/Lec: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTH Park 259 Record,S., Record,S.
LEC: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM W Park 10
CMSC B372-001 Artificial Intelligence Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Park 336 Kumar,D.
GEOL B250-001 Computational Methods in the Sciences Semester / 1 Lab/Lec: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTH Park 227 Record,S.
LEC: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM W Park 10
PHIL B244-001 Philosophy and Cognitive Science Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MW Thomas Hall 129 Prettyman,A.
PSYC B218-001 Behavioral Neuroscience Semester / 1 LEC: 10:10 AM-11:00 AM MWF Bettws Y Coed 127 Thomas,E.
PSYC B351-001 Developmental Psychopathology Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Bettws Y Coed 127 Rescorla,L.
PSYC B395-001 Psychopharmacology Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:00 PM MWF Carpenter Library 21 Thomas,E.
PSYC B401-001 Supervised Research in Neural and Behavioral Sciences Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA
PSYC B401-001 Supervised Research in Neural and Behavioral Sciences Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA

Fall 2015

(Class schedules for this semester will be posted at a later date.)

Courses at Haverford

Spring 2011

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/UNITS MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTRUCTOR(S)

Fall 2011

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/UNITS MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTRUCTOR(S)

2014-15 Catalog Data

BIOL B202 Introduction to Neuroscience Fall 2014 An introduction to the nervous system and its broad contributions to function. The class will explore fundamentals of neural anatomy and signaling, sensory and motor processing and control, nervous system development and examples of complex brain functions. Lecture three hours a week. Prerequisites: One semester of Bio 110-111 or permission of instructor. Scientific Investigation (SI) Counts toward Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Counts toward Neuroscience

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BIOL B244 Behavioral Endocrinology Spring 2015 An interdisciplinary-based analysis of the nature of hormones, how hormones affect cells and systems, and how these effects alter the behavior of animals. Topics will be covered from a research perspective using a combination of lectures, discussions and student presentations. Prerequisites: One semester of BIOL 110-111 or one of the following courses: BIOL B202, PSYC B218 or PSYC H217. Scientific Investigation (SI) Counts toward Neuroscience

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BIOL B250 Computational Methods in the Sciences Spring 2015 A study of how and why modern computation methods are used in scientific inquiry. Students will learn basic principles of visualizing and analyzing scientific data through hands-on programming exercises. The majority of the course will use the R programming language and corresponding open source statistical software. Content will focus on data sets from across the sciences. Six hours of combined lecture/lab per week. Writing Attentive Quantitative Methods (QM) Quantitative Readiness Required (QR) Scientific Investigation (SI) Cross-listed as GEOL B250 Cross-listed as CMSC B250 Counts toward Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Counts toward Environmental Studies Counts toward Neuroscience

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BIOL B321 Neuroethology Not offered 2014-15 This course provides an opportunity for students to understand the neuronal basis of behavior through the examination of how particular animals have evolved neural solutions to specific problems posed to them by their environments. The topics will be covered from a research perspective using a combination of lectures, discussions and student presentations. Prerequisite: BIOL 202, PSYC 218 or PSYC 217 at Haverford. Counts toward Neuroscience

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BIOL B326 From Channels to Behavior Not offered 2014-15 Introduces the principles, research approaches, and methodologies of cellular and behavioral neuroscience. The first half of the course will cover the cellular properties of neurons using current and voltage clamp techniques along with neuron simulations. The second half of the course will introduce students to state-of-the-art techniques for acquiring and analyzing data in a variety of rodent models linking brain and behavior. Prerequisites: one semester of BIOL 110-111 and one of the following: PSYC 218, PSYC 217 at Haverford, or BIOL 202. Writing Attentive Cross-listed as PSYC B326 Counts toward Neuroscience

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BIOL B364 Developmental Neurobiology Fall 2014 A lecture/discussion course on major topics in the development of the nervous system. Lecture three hours a week. Prerequisite: BIOL 201 or 271, BIOL 202 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. Counts toward Neuroscience

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BIOL B396 Topics in Neuroscience Not offered 2014-15 A seminar course dealing with current issues in neuroscience. It provides advanced students minoring in neuroscience with an opportunity to read and discuss in depth seminal papers that represent emerging thought in the field. In addition, students are expected to make presentations of their own research. Cross-listed as PSYC B396 Counts toward Neuroscience

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CMSC B325 Computational Linguistics Not offered 2014-15 Introduction to computational models of understanding and processing human languages. How elements of linguistics, computer science, and artificial intelligence can be combined to help computers process human language and to help linguists understand language through computer models. Topics covered: syntax, semantics, pragmatics, generation and knowledge representation techniques. Prerequisite: CMSC 206 , or H106 and CMSC 231 or permission of instructor. Cross-listed as PHIL B324 Cross-listed as LING B325 Counts toward Neuroscience

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CMSC B361 Emergence Not offered 2014-15 A multidisciplinary exploration of the interactions underlying both real and simulated systems, such as ant colonies, economies, brains, earthquakes, biological evolution, artificial evolution, computers, and life. These emergent systems are often characterized by simple, local interactions that collectively produce global phenomena not apparent in the local interactions. Prerequisite: CMSC 206 or H106 and CMSC 231 or permission of instructor. Cross-listed as BIOL B361 Counts toward Neuroscience

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CMSC B371 Cognitive Science Not offered 2014-15 Cognitive science is the interdisciplinary study of intelligence in mechanical and organic systems. In this introductory course, we examine many topics from computer science, linguistics, neuroscience, mathematics, philosophy, and psychology. Can a computer be intelligent? How do neurons give rise to thinking? What is consciousness? These are some of the questions we will examine. No prior knowledge or experience with any of the subfields is assumed or necessary. Prerequisite: CMSC B206 or H106 and CMSC B231 or permission of instructor. Counts toward Neuroscience

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CMSC B372 Artificial Intelligence Spring 2015 Survey of Artificial Intelligence (AI), the study of how to program computers to behave in ways normally attributed to "intelligence" when observed in humans. Topics include heuristic versus algorithmic programming; cognitive simulation versus machine intelligence; problem-solving; inference; natural language understanding; scene analysis; learning; decision-making. Topics are illustrated by programs from literature, programming projects in appropriate languages and building small robots. Prerequisites: CMSC B206 or H106 and CMSC B231 or permission of instructor Cross-listed as PHIL B372 Counts toward Neuroscience

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GEOL B250 Computational Methods in the Sciences Spring 2015 A study of how and why modern computation methods are used in scientific inquiry. Students will learn basic principles of simulation-based programming through hands-on exercises. Content will focus on the development of population models, beginning with simple exponential growth and ending with spatially-explicit individual-based simulations. Students will design and implement a final project from their own disciplines. Six hours of combined lecture/lab per week. Writing Attentive Quantitative Methods (QM) Quantitative Readiness Required (QR) Scientific Investigation (SI) Cross-listed as BIOL B250 Cross-listed as CMSC B250 Counts toward Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Counts toward Environmental Studies Counts toward Neuroscience

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PHIL B244 Philosophy and Cognitive Science Spring 2015 Cognitive science is a multidisciplinary approach to the study of human cognition, spanning philosophy, linguistics, psychology, computer science, and neuroscience. A central claim of cognitive science is that the mind is like a computer. We will critically examine this claim by exploring issues surrounding mental representation and computation. We'll address such questions as: does the mind represent the world? Could our minds extend into the world beyond the brain and body? Is there a language of thought? Critical Interpretation (CI) Counts toward Neuroscience

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PHIL B319 Philosophy of Mind Not offered 2014-15 The conscious mind remains a philosophical and scientific mystery. In this course, we will explore the nature of consciousness and its place in the physical world. Some questions we will consider include: How is consciousness related to the brain and the body? Are minds a kind of computer? Is the conscious mind something non-physical or immaterial? Is it possible to have a science of consciousness, or will consciousness inevitably resist scientific explanation? We will explore these questions from a philosophical perspective that draws on relevant literature from cognitive neuroscience. Counts toward Neuroscience

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PSYC B201 Learning/Behavior Analysis Not offered 2014-15 This course covers the basic principles of behavior, and their application to the understanding of the human condition. Topics include the distinction between closed-loop (selection by consequences) and open-loop (elicitation and adjunctive behavior) relations, the distinction between contingency-shaped behavior and behavior under instructional control, discrimination and concept formation, choice, functional analysis of verbal behavior and awareness and problem solving. Behavior Analysis is presented as a distinct research methodology with a distinct language, as well as a distinct theoretical approach within psychology. Scientific Investigation (SI) Counts toward Neuroscience

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PSYC B212 Human Cognition Not offered 2014-15 This course deals with the scientific study of human cognition. Topics include perception, pattern recognition, attention, memory, visual imagery, language, reasoning, decision making, and problem solving. Historical as well as contemporary perspectives will be discussed, and data from cognitive psychology, cognitive neuroscience, and computational modeling will be reviewed. The laboratory consists of experiments related to these topics. Lecture three hours, laboratory 90 minutes a week. Prerequisite: Introductory Psychology (PSYC 105) Scientific Investigation (SI) Counts toward Neuroscience

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PSYC B218 Behavioral Neuroscience Spring 2015 An interdisciplinary course on the neurobiological bases of experience and behavior, emphasizing the contribution of the various neurosciences to the understanding of basic problems of psychology. An introduction to the fundamentals of neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and neurochemistry with an emphasis upon synaptic transmission; followed by the application of these principles to an analysis of sensory processes and perception, emotion, motivation, learning, and cognition. Lecture three hours a week. Prerequisite: Introductory Psychology (PSYC 105). Course does not meet an Approach Counts toward Neuroscience

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PSYC B323 Advanced Topics in Cognitive Neuroscience Fall 2014 A seminar course dealing with state-of-the-art developments in the cognitive neuroscience of human memory. The goal of this course is to investigate the neuroanataomy of episodic memory and the cellular and molecular correlates of episodic memory. Topics include memory consolidation, working memory, recollection and familiarity, forgetting, cognitive and neural bases of false memories, emotion and memory, sleep and memory, anterograde amnesia, and implicit memory. Within each topic we will attempt to integrate the results from different neuropsychological approaches to memory, including various psychophysiological and functional imaging techniques, clinical studies, and research with animal models. Prerequisite: a course in cognition (PSYC B212, PSYC H213, PSYC H260) or behavioral neuroscience (either PSYC B218 or PSYC H217). Counts toward Neuroscience

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PSYC B326 From Channels to Behavior Not offered 2014-15 Introduces the principles, research approaches, and methodologies of cellular and behavioral neuroscience. The first half of the course will cover the cellular properties of neurons using current and voltage clamp techniques along with neuron simulations. The second half of the course will introduce students to state-of-the-art techniques for acquiring and analyzing data in a variety of rodent models linking brain and behavior. Prerequisites: one semester of BIOL 110-111 and one of the following: PSYC 218, PSYC 217 at Haverford, or BIOL 202. Writing Attentive Cross-listed as BIOL B326 Counts toward Neuroscience

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PSYC B350 Developmental Cognitive Disorders Not offered 2014-15 This course uses a developmental and neuropsychological framework to study major development cognitive disorders manifested by children and adolescents, such as language delay/impairment, specific reading disability, math disability, nonverbal learning disability, intellectual disability, executive function disorder, autism, and traumatic brain injury. Cognitive disorders are viewed in the context of the normal development of language, memory, attention, reading, quantitative abilities, and executive functions. Students enrolled in the course will learn about the assessment, classification, outcome, remediation, and education of the major cognitive disorders manifested by children and adolescents. Students will participate in a course-related Praxis placement approximately 3 - 4 hours a week. Counts toward Child and Family Studies Counts toward Neuroscience Counts toward Praxis Program

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PSYC B351 Developmental Psychopathology Spring 2015 This course will examine emotional and behavioral disorders of children and adolescents, including autism, attention deficit disorder, conduct disorder, phobias, obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression, anorexia, and schizophrenia. Major topics covered will include: contrasting models of psychopathology; empirical and categorical approaches to assessment and diagnosis; outcome of childhood disorders; risk, resilience, and prevention; and therapeutic approaches and their efficacy .Prerequisite: PSYC 206 or 209. Counts toward Child and Family Studies Counts toward Health Studies Counts toward Neuroscience

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PSYC B395 Psychopharmacology Spring 2015 A study of the role of drugs in understanding basic brain-behavior relations. Topics include the pharmacological basis of motivation and emotion; pharmacological models of psychopathology; the use of drugs in the treatment of psychiatric disorders such as anxiety, depression, and psychosis; and the psychology and pharmacology of drug addiction. Prerequisite: PSYC B218 or BIOL B202 or PSYC H217 or permission of instructor. Counts toward Health Studies Counts toward Neuroscience

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PSYC B396 Topics in Neuroscience Not offered 2014-15 A seminar course dealing with current issues in neuroscience. It provides advanced students minoring in neuroscience with an opportunity to read and discuss in depth seminal papers that represent emerging thought in the field. In addition, students are expected to make presentations of their own research. Cross-listed as BIOL B396 Counts toward Neuroscience

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PSYC B401 Supervised Research in Neural and Behavioral Sciences Laboratory or field research on a wide variety of topics. Students should consult with faculty members to determine their topic and faculty supervisor, early in the semester prior to when they will begin. Counts toward Neuroscience

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PSYC B401 Supervised Research in Neural and Behavioral Sciences Laboratory or field research on a wide variety of topics. Students should consult with faculty members to determine their topic and faculty supervisor, early in the semester prior to when they will begin. Counts toward Neuroscience

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