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Course Descriptions

This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's master calendar.

Fall 2014

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTRUCTOR(S)
POLS B131-001 Introduction to Comparative Politics Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Taylor Hall E Oh,S.
POLS B141-001 Introduction to International Politics Semester / 1 LEC: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTH Dalton Hall 300 Allen,M.
POLS B220-001 Topics in Constitutional Law Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Dalton Hall 2 Elkins,J.
POLS B224-001 Comparative Political Phil: China, Greece, and the "West" Semester / 1 LEC: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTH Taylor Hall D Salkever,S.
POLS B231-001 Introduction to Political Philosophy: Modern Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MW Dalton Hall 1 Schlosser,J.
POLS B251-001 Politics and the Mass Media Semester / 1 Lecture: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTH Taylor Hall E Chomsky,D.
POLS B324-001 Politics of the Arab Uprisings Semester / 1 LEC: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM T Dalton Hall 212A Hartshorn,I.
POLS B358-001 Political Psychology of Ethnic Conflict Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MW Taylor Hall C McCauley,C.
POLS B367-001 China and the World: Implications of China's Rise Semester / 1 LEC: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM T Dalton Hall 25 Oh,S.
POLS B371-001 Topics in Political Philosophy: State, Society and Law Semester / 1 LEC: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM TH Dalton Hall 212A Elkins,J.
POLS B391-001 International Political Economy Semester / 1 Lecture: 12:10 PM- 2:00 PM W Dalton Hall 2 Allen,M.
POLS B398-001 Senior Conference Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM W Dalton Hall 10 Dept. staff, TBA
POLS B425-001 Praxis III: Independent Study Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA

Spring 2015

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTRUCTOR(S)
POLS B121-001 Introduction to American Politics Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTH Taylor Hall E Golden,M.
POLS B212-001 Qualitative Methods Semester / 1 Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTH Dalton Hall 300 Dept. staff, TBA
POLS B222-001 Environmental Issues: Movements and Policy Making in Comparative Perspective Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MW Taylor Hall D Hager,C.
POLS B228-001 Introduction to Political Philosophy: Ancient and Early Modern Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MW Dalton Hall 1 Salkever,S.
POLS B243-001 African and Caribbean Perspectives in World Politics Semester / 1 Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTH Dalton Hall 1 Allen,M.
POLS B245-001 Philosophy of Law Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Dalton Hall 212A Elkins,J.
POLS B249-001 Politics of Economic Development Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Dalton Hall 1 Oh,S.
POLS B253-001 Feminist Theory Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Dalton Hall 2 Payson,J.
POLS B273-001 Race and the Law in the American Context Semester / 1 LEC: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTH Dalton Hall 1 Albert,R.
POLS B283-001 Introduction to the Politics of the Modern Middle East and North Africa Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MW Taylor Hall D Dept. staff, TBA
POLS B290-001 Power and Resistance Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MW Dalton Hall 6 Schlosser,J.
POLS B334-001 Three Faces of Chinese Power: Money, Might, and Minds Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM T Dalton Hall 10 Oh,S.
POLS B344-001 Development Ethics Semester / 1 Lecture: 11:40 AM- 1:00 PM MW Thomas Hall 116 Payson,J.
POLS B354-001 Comparative Social Movements: Power and Mobilization Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 3:30 PM TH Dalton Hall 212A Hager,C.
POLS B371-001 Topics in Political Philosophy: Hannah Arendt and Her Interlocutors Semester / 1 LEC: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM T Dalton Hall 1 Schlosser,J.
POLS B375-001 Gender, Work and Family Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 3:30 PM F Dalton Hall 212A Golden,M.
POLS B378-001 Origins of American Constitutionalism Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM T Dalton Hall 212A Elkins,J.
POLS B399-001 Senior Essay Semester / 1

Fall 2015

(Class schedules for this semester will be posted at a later date.)

2014-15 Catalog Data

POLS B101 Introduction to Political Science Not offered 2014-15 This course, which is required of all majors, is designed to introduce students to the study of politics in general and to the four thematic categories around which the major is structured: identity and difference, policy formation and political action, interdependence and conflict, and political theory. The course introduces different but related approaches to understanding political phenomena, and focuses in particular on some central questions and problems of democracy politics.

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POLS B121 Introduction to American Politics Spring 2015 An introduction to the major features and characteristics of the American political system. Features examined include voting and elections; the institutions of government (Congress, the Presidency, the courts and the bureaucracy); the policy-making process; and the role of groups (interest groups, women, and ethnic and racial minorities) in the political process.

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POLS B131 Introduction to Comparative Politics Fall 2014 This course is designed to provide an introduction to the discipline of comparative politics. We will explore the primary approaches and concepts scholars employ in order to systematically analyze the political world. In doing so, we will also examine the political structures, institutions, and behaviors of a number of countries around the world. Questions we will engage include: What is power and how is it exercised? What are the differences between democratic and authoritarian regimes? How do different countries develop their economies? What factors affect the way countries behave in the international arena? By the end of this course, students will be equipped to answer these questions and prepared for further study in political science. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

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POLS B141 Introduction to International Politics Fall 2014 An introduction to international relations, exploring its main subdivisions and theoretical approaches. Phenomena and problems in world politics examined include systems of power management, imperialism, globalization, war, bargaining, and peace. Problems and institutions of international economy and international law are also addressed. This course assumes a reasonable knowledge of modern world history. Counts toward International Studies Counts toward Peace, Justice and Human Rights

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POLS B211 Politics of Humanitarianism Not offered 2014-15 This course examines the international politics and history that underlie the ideas, social movement, and system of organizations designed to regulate the conduct of war and improve the welfare of those victimizes by war. It begins with ethical, legal and organizational foundations, and then examines to post-Cold War cases and beyond. Topics include just war theory, international humanitarian law, humanitarian action and intervention, and transitional justice. Prerequisites: one class in Political Science or comparable course by permission of the instructor. Counts toward Peace, Justice and Human Rights

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POLS B212 Qualitative Methods Spring 2015 This course will critically introduce leading models and debates in qualitative methods for social science research and argumentation. Emphasizing the criteria, practices, and discourses of reliable knowledge in political science, we will also examine key texts in anthropology, sociology, and philosophy. We will explore hermeneutics, structuralism, discourse analysis, immanent critique, causality, and other analytical dilemmas in the broad category of ethnographic suasion. The course hopes to sharpen students' skills in applied methods, i.e., the techniques of argumentation, rhetoric, and persuasion. Course does not meet an Approach

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POLS B220 Topics in Constitutional Law Fall 2014 Through a reading of (mostly) Supreme Court cases and other materials, this course takes up some central theoretical questions concerning the role of constitutional principles and constitutional review in mediating the relationship between public and private power with respect to both difference and hierarchy. Critical Interpretation (CI)

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POLS B222 Environmental Issues: Movements and Policy Making in Comparative Perspective Spring 2015 An exploration of the ways in which different cultural, economic, and political settings have shaped issue emergence and policy making. We examine the politics of particular environmental issues in selected countries and regions, paying special attention to the impact of environmental movements. We also assess the prospects for international cooperation in addressing global environmental problems such as climate change. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Cross-listed as CITY B222 Counts toward Environmental Studies

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POLS B224 Comparative Political Phil: China, Greece, and the "West" Fall 2014 An introduction to the dialogic construction of comparative political philosophy, using texts from several cultures or worlds of thought: ancient and modern China, ancient Greece, and the modern West. The course will have three parts. First, a consideration of the synchronous emergence of philosophy in ancient (Axial Age) China and Greece; second, the 19th century invention of the modern "West" and Chinese responses to this development; and third, the current discussions and debates about globalization, democracy, and human rights now going on in China and the West. Prerequisite: At least one course in either Philosophy, Political Theory, or East Asian Studies, or consent of the instructor. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Critical Interpretation (CI) Cross-listed as PHIL B224

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POLS B225 Global Ethical Issues Not offered 2014-15 The need for a critical analysis of what justice is and requires has become urgent in a context of increasing globalization, the emergence of new forms of conflict and war, high rates of poverty within and across borders and the prospect of environmental devastation. This course examines prevailing theories and issues of justice as well as approaches and challenges by non-western, post-colonial, feminist, race, class, and disability theorists. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Critical Interpretation (CI) Cross-listed as PHIL B225 Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies Counts toward International Studies

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POLS B228 Introduction to Political Philosophy: Ancient and Early Modern Spring 2015 An introduction to the fundamental problems of political philosophy, especially the relationship between political life and the human good or goods. Readings from Aristotle, Hobbes, Machiavelli, Plato, and Rousseau. Writing Intensive Critical Interpretation (CI) Cross-listed as PHIL B228

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POLS B231 Introduction to Political Philosophy: Modern Fall 2014 A continuation of POLS 228, although 228 is not a prerequisite. Particular attention is given to the various ways in which the concept of freedom is used in explaining political life. Readings from Hegel, Locke, Marx, J.S. Mill, and Nietzsche. Critical Interpretation (CI) Cross-listed as PHIL B231

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POLS B232 American Foreign Policy Not offered 2014-15 This course introduces basic elements of American foreign policy and examines the modern legacy and continuing impact of U.S. foreign policy on the world. We consider how different forces - domestic, international, institutional, cultural, or personal - shape policy goals and examine the nature and implications of American power in contemporary politics. Prerequisites: One course in political science or comparable course by permission of the instructor.

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POLS B240 Environmental Ethics Not offered 2014-15 This course surveys rights- and justice-based justifications for ethical positions on the environment. It examines approaches such as stewardship, intrinsic value, land ethic, deep ecology, ecofeminism, Asian and aboriginal. It explores issues such as obligations to future generations, to nonhumans and to the biosphere. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Critical Interpretation (CI) Cross-listed as PHIL B240 Counts toward Environmental Studies

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POLS B241 The Politics of International Law and Institutions Not offered 2014-15 An introduction to international law, which assumes a working knowledge of modern world history and politics since World War II. The origins of modern international legal norms in philosophy and political necessity are explored, showing the schools of thought to which the understandings of these origins give rise. Significant cases are used to illustrate various principles and problems. Prerequisite: POLS B250. Critical Interpretation (CI) Counts toward International Studies

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POLS B243 African and Caribbean Perspectives in World Politics Spring 2015 This course makes African and Caribbean voices audible as they create or adopt visions of the world that explain their positions and challenges in world politics. Students learn analytical tools useful in understanding other parts of the world. Prerequisite: POLS 141 or 1 course in African or Latin American history. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Counts toward Africana Studies

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POLS B244 Great Empires of the Ancient Near East Not offered 2014-15 A survey of the history, material culture, political and religious ideologies of, and interactions among, the five great empires of the ancient Near East of the second and first millennia B.C.E.: New Kingdom Egypt, the Hittite Empire in Anatolia, the Assyrian and Babylonian Empires in Mesopotamia, and the Persian Empire in Iran. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Inquiry into the Past (IP) Cross-listed as ARCH B244 Cross-listed as HIST B244

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POLS B245 Philosophy of Law Spring 2015 Introduces students to a variety of questions in the philosophy of law. Readings will be concerned with the nature of law, the character of law as a system, the ethical character of law, and the relationship of law to politics, power, authority, and society. Readings will include abstract philosophical arguments about the concept of law, as well as theoretical arguments about the nature of law as they arise within specific contexts, and judicial cases. Most or all of the specific issues discussed will be taken from Anglo-American law, although the general issues considered are not limited to those legal systems. Critical Interpretation (CI) Cross-listed as PHIL B245

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POLS B249 Politics of Economic Development Spring 2015 How do we explain the variations of political and economic systems in the world? What is the relationship between the state and the market? To what extent does the timing of industrialization affect the viability of certain developmental strategies? This seminar introduces the intellectual history of comparative political economy and development studies with readings on both comparative political economy and international political economy. First, we will examine the debates on the dynamics of the state and the market in the development and globalization process. Second, we will explore specific case studies to discuss: 1) how the political and economic processes have changed in response to the interaction of the domestic and international arenas, 2) whether and how the late developers learned from the experiences of early developers, 3) how the international economy and international financial crisis shaped domestic development strategies. Lastly, we will analyze the developmental concerns at the sub-national level with financial liberalization.

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POLS B251 Politics and the Mass Media Fall 2014 A consideration of the mass media as a pervasive fact of U.S. political life and how they influence American politics. Topics include how the media have altered American political institutions and campaigns, how selective attention to particular issues and exclusion of others shape public concerns, and the conditions under which the media directly influence the content of political beliefs and the behavior of citizens. Prerequisite: one course in political science, preferably POLS 121.

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POLS B253 Feminist Theory Spring 2015 Beliefs that gender discrimination has been eliminated and women have achieved equality have become commonplace. We challenge these assumptions examining the concepts of patriarchy, sexism, and oppression. Exploring concepts central to feminist theory, we attend to the history of feminist theory and contemporary accounts of women's place and status in different societies, varied experiences, and the impact of the phenomenon of globalization. We then explore the relevance of gender to philosophical questions about identity and agency with respect to moral, social and political theory. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy or permission of instructor. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Critical Interpretation (CI) Cross-listed as PHIL B252 Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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POLS B259 Comparative Social Movements in Latin America Not offered 2014-15 An examination of resistance movements to the power of the state and globalization in three Latin American societies: Mexico, Columbia, and Peru. The course explores the political, legal, and socio-economic factors underlying contemporary struggles for human and social rights, and the role of race, ethnicity, and coloniality play in these struggles. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Cross-listed as SOCL B259 Cross-listed as CITY B220

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POLS B262 Who Believes What and Why: the Sociology of Public Opinion Not offered 2014-15 This course explores public opinion: what it is, how it is measured, how it is shaped, and how it changes over time. Specific attention is given to the role of elites, the mass media, and religion in shaping public opinion. Examples include racial/ethnic civil rights, abortion, gay/lesbian/transgendered sexuality, and inequalities. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Inquiry into the Past (IP) Cross-listed as SOCL B262 Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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POLS B264 Politics of Global Commodities Not offered 2014-15 This class critically analyzes the international politics that underpin the production and distribution of global commodities. Marketization and privatization pressures that have produced economic arrangements are examined for their impact in altering governance systems, distorting markets and development, and fomenting conflicts. The course starts with concepts, theories, and history, and then investigates key case studies. Prerequisites: The prerequisites for the class are either International Politics (POLS B250) or International Political Economy (POLS B391), or permission of the instructor.

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POLS B273 Race and the Law in the American Context Spring 2015 An examination of the intersection of race and law, evaluating the legal regulations of race, the history and meanings of race, and how law, history and the Supreme Court helped shape and produce those meanings. It will draw on materials from law, history, public policy, and critical race theory. Cross-listed as SOCL B273

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POLS B282 The Exotic Other: Gender and Sexuality in the Middle East Not offered 2014-15 This course is concerned with the meanings of gender and sexuality in the Middle East, with particular attention to the construction of tradition, its performance, reinscription, and transformation, and to Western interpretations and interactions. Prerequisite: one course in social science or humanities. Previous gender or Middle East course is a plus. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Critical Interpretation (CI) Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies Counts toward Middle Eastern Studies

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POLS B283 Introduction to the Politics of the Modern Middle East and North Africa Spring 2015 This course is a multidisciplinary approach to understanding the politics of the region, using works of history, political science, political economy, film, and fiction as well as primary sources. The course will concern itself with three broad areas: the legacy of colonialism and the importance of international forces; the role of Islam in politics; and the political and social effects of particular economic conditions, policies, and practices. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Cross-listed as HIST B283 Cross-listed as HEBR B283 Counts toward Middle Eastern Studies

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POLS B284 Modernity and Its Discontents Not offered 2014-15 This course examines the nature, historical emergence, dilemmas, and prospects of modern society in the west, seeking to build up an integrated analysis of the processes by which this kind of society developed over the past two centuries and continues to transform itself. Its larger aim is to help students develop a coherent frame­work with which to understand what kind of society they live in, what makes it the way it is, and how it shapes their lives. Some central themes (and controversies) will include the growth and transformations of capitalism; the significance of the democratic and industrial revolutions; the social impact of a market economy; the culture of individualism and its dilemmas; the transformations of intimacy and the family; mass politics and mass society; and the different kinds of inter­play between social structure and personal experience. No specific prerequisites, but some previous familiarity with modern European and American history and/or with social and political theory would be useful. Inquiry into the Past (IP) Cross-listed as SOCL B284 Cross-listed as HIST B284

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POLS B286 Topics in the British Empire Not offered 2014-15 This is a topics course covering various "topics" in the study of the British Empire. Course content varies. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Inquiry into the Past (IP) Cross-listed as HIST B286 Cross-listed as CITY B286

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POLS B287 Media and Politics: The Middle East Transformed Not offered 2014-15 The events of 2011 transformed the Middle East, overthrowing or threatening regimes across the region. The course will focus on the media technologies, the political actors, and international events that produced these changes, as well as examine works on political transitions, revolutions, and social movements. Prerequisite: A previous social science or history course is strongly recommended, or a previous course on media. Counts toward Middle Eastern Studies

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POLS B290 Power and Resistance Spring 2015 What more is there to politics than power? What is the force of the "political" for specifying power as a practice or institutional form? What distinguishes power from authority, violence, coercion, and domination? How is power embedded in and generated by cultural practices, institutional arrangements, and processes of normalization? This course seeks to address questions of power and politics in the context of domination, oppression, and the arts of resistance. Our general topics will include authority, the moralization of politics, the dimensions of power, the politics of violence (and the violence of politics), language, sovereignty, emancipation, revolution, domination, normalization, governmentality, genealogy, and democratic power. Writing projects will seek to integrate analytical and reflective analyses as we pursue these questions in common. Critical Interpretation (CI) Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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POLS B300 Three Approaches to the Phiolosophy of Praxis: Nietzsche, Kant and Plato Not offered 2014-15 A study of three important ways of thinking about theory and practice in Western political philosophy. Prerequisites: POLS 228 and 231, or PHIL 101 and 201. Cross-listed as PHIL B300

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POLS B310 Comparative Public Policy Not offered 2014-15 A comparison of policy processes and outcomes across space and time. Focusing on particular issues such as health care, domestic security, water and land use, we identify institutional, historical, and cultural factors that shape policies. We also examine the growing importance of international-level policy making and the interplay between international and domestic pressures on policy makers. Prerequisite is one course in Political Science or public policy. Counts toward Environmental Studies

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POLS B312 The Intelligence Community: Practice, Problems & Prospects Not offered 2014-15 The events of 9/11 and ongoing "War on Terror" focused new attention on issues of national intelligence. We will examine the origins, structure and functions of the U.S. Intelligence Community, its relationship to national security policy, interactions with policymakers, and the challenges defining its future role. Prerequisites: One course in political science or comparable coursework with instructor permission.

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POLS B316 The Politics of Ethnic, Racial, and National Groups Not offered 2014-15 An analysis of ethnic and racial conflict and cooperation that will compare and contrast the experiences of racial minorities in the United States and Muslim minorities in Europe. Particular attention is paid to the processes of group identification and political organization; the politicization of racial and ethnic identity; patterns of conflict and cooperation between minorities and the majority population over time; and different paths to citizenship. The course will emphasize how the politics of differentiation has similarities across setting and historical periods as well as important differences Counts toward Peace, Justice and Human Rights

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POLS B320 Topics in Greek Political Philosophy Not offered 2014-15 This is a topics course, course content varies. Past topics include: Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics and Politics and Thucydides,Plato, Aristotle. Prerequisites: At least two semesters of philosophy or political theory, including some work with Greek texts, or consent of the instructor. Cross-listed as PHIL B321

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POLS B321 Technology and Politics Not offered 2014-15 An multi-media analysis of the complex role of technology in political and social life. We focus on the relationship between technological change and democratic governance. We begin with historical and contemporary Luddism as well as pro-technology movements around the world. Substantive issue areas include security and surveillance, electoral politics, warfare, social media, internet freedom, GMO foods and industrial agriculture, climate change and energy politics. Cross-listed as CITY B321 Counts toward Environmental Studies

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POLS B324 Politics of the Arab Uprisings Fall 2014 The recent uprisings in Arab countries have shocked the world. Long-entrenched authoritarian regimes have fallen. US allies have been ousted. This seminar is designed to introduce the politics of these recent uprisings. Their origins will be viewed through the lens of political and economic theories of authoritarianism and revolution. The outcomes will be assessed with an eye toward existing ideas about democracy. The course will aim to establish what political science can tell us about these events, and how political science must grow in reaction to them. Prerequisite: One course in political science or Middle East studies or consent of instructor. Counts toward International Studies

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POLS B327 Political Philosophy in the 20th Century Not offered 2014-15 A study of 20th- and 21st-century extensions of three traditions in Western political philosophy: the adherents of the German and English ideas of freedom and the founders of classical naturalism. Authors read include Hannah Arendt, Michel Foucault, Jurgen Habermas, and John Rawls. Topics include the relationship of individual rationality and political authority, the "crisis of modernity," and the debate concerning contemporary democratic citizenship. Prerequisites: POLS 228 and 231, or PHIL 101 and 201. Enrollment is limited to 18 students. Cross-listed as PHIL B327

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POLS B333 Transformations in American Politics, 1955-2000 Not offered 2014-15 The American political system has changed dramatically over the past 60 years. This seminar examines the ways in which American political institutions and processes have been transformed -- by design and by accident-- and the causes and consequences of those changes. Special attention will be paid to the effect that these changes have had on the democratic character of the American political system and on its ability to govern.

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POLS B334 Three Faces of Chinese Power: Money, Might, and Minds Spring 2015 China's extraordinary growth for the past 30 years has confirmed the power of free markets, while simultaneously challenging our thoughts on the foundations and limits of the market economy. Moreover, China's ever-increasing economic freedom and prosperity have been accompanied by only limited steps toward greater political freedom and political liberalization, running counter to one of the most consistent patterns of political economic development in recent history. This course examines China's unique economic and political development path, and the opportunities and challenges it accompanies. This course has three aims: 1) to facilitate an in-depth understanding of the political and economic development with Chinese characteristics, 2) to conduct a comprehensive analysis of three dimensions of Chinese economic, political and cultural power, and 3) to construct a thorough understanding of challenges and opportunities for China from its extraordinary developmental path. Prerequisite: two courses either in Political Science or East Asian Studies

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POLS B344 Development Ethics Spring 2015 This course explores the meaning of and moral issues raised by development. In what direction and by what means should a society "develop"? What role, if any, does the globalization of markets and capitalism play in processes of development and in systems of discrimination on the basis of factors such as race and gender? Answers to these sorts of questions will be explored through an examination of some of the most prominent theorists and recent literature. Prerequisites: a philosophy, political theory or economics course or permission of the instructor. Writing Intensive Cross-listed as PHIL B344 Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies Counts toward International Studies

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POLS B348 Culture and Ethnic Conflict Not offered 2014-15 An examination of the role of culture in the origin, escalation, and settlement of ethnic conflicts. This course examines the politics of culture and how it constrains and offers opportunities for ethnic conflict and cooperation. The role of narratives, rituals, and symbols is emphasized in examining political contestation over cultural representations and expressions such as parades, holy sites, public dress, museums, monuments, and language in culturally framed ethnic conflicts from all regions of the world. Prerequisites: two courses in the social sciences. Cross-listed as CITY B348 Counts toward Peace, Justice and Human Rights

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POLS B352 Feminism and Philosophy Not offered 2014-15 It has been said that one of the most important feminist contributions to theory is its uncovering of the ways in which theory in the Western tradition, whether of science, knowledge, morality, or politics has a hidden male bias. This course will explore feminist criticisms of and alternatives to traditional Western theory by examining feminist challenges to traditional liberal moral and political theory. Specific questions may include how to understand the power relations at the root of women's oppression, how to theorize across differences, or how ordinary individuals are to take responsibility for pervasive and complex systems of oppression. Cross-listed as PHIL B352 Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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POLS B354 Comparative Social Movements: Power and Mobilization Spring 2015 A consideration of the conceptualizations of power and "legitimate" and "illegitimate" participation, the political opportunity structure facing potential activists, the mobilizing resources available to them, and the cultural framing within which these processes occur. Specific attention is paid to recent movements within and across countries, such as feminist, environmental, and anti-globalization movements, and to emerging forms of citizen mobilization, including transnational and global networks, electronic mobilization, and collaborative policymaking institutions. Prerequisite: one course in POLS or SOCL or permission of instructor. Cross-listed as SOCL B354 Counts toward Environmental Studies

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POLS B358 Political Psychology of Ethnic Conflict Fall 2014 This seminar explores the common interests of psychologists and political scientists in ethnic identification and ethnic-group conflict. Rational choice theories of conflict from political science will be compared with social psychological theories of conflict that focus more on emotion and essentializing. Each student will contribute a 200-300 word post in response to a reading or film assignment each week. Students will represent their posts in seminar discussion of readings and films. Each student will write a final paper analyzing the origins and trajectory of a case of violent ethnic conflict chosen by agreement with the instructor. Grading includes posts, participation in discussion, and the final paper. Prerequisite: PSYC B208, or PSYC B120, or PSYC B125, or one 200 level course in political science, or instructor's permission. Cross-listed as PSYC B358 Counts toward Peace, Justice and Human Rights

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POLS B363 Islamism in Theory, Practice, and Comparison Not offered 2014-15 This seminar examines whether Islam possesses "a politics." Does "Islam" explain protest, activism, economics, gender, nationalism, sectarianism, revolution, assimilation, the Arab uprisings, or even jihad in the Muslim world? We begin with theories of identification and Muslim affiliation, invoking materials from philosophy, anthropology, social science, history, and primary resources. The course is an "advanced introduction" and is thus eclectic - its objectives are both empirical and methodological: we examine social and political problems and the tools we need to approach them fruitfully. Together and in individual research, we will explore case studies of "Muslim politics" to apply, test, or stretch theories of religious identification, political action, and social power. Prerequisite: POLS B101.

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POLS B365 Erotica: Love and Art in Plato and Shakespeare Not offered 2014-15 The course explores the relationship between love and art, "eros" and "poesis," through in-depth study of Plato's "Phaedus" and "Symposium," Shakespeare's "As You Like It" and "Antony and Cleopatra," and essays by modern commentators (including David Halperin, Anne Carson, Martha Nussbaum, Marjorie Garber, and Stanley Cavell). We will also read Shakespeare's Sonnets and "Romeo and Juliet." Cross-listed as ENGL B365 Cross-listed as PHIL B365 Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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POLS B367 China and the World: Implications of China's Rise Fall 2014 In the 20th Century, China's rise has been one of the most distinctive political affairs changing the landscape of regional and world politics. Especially, China's breathtaking growth has challenged the foundations and limits of the market economy and political liberalization theoretically and empirically. This course examines the Chinese economic and political development and its implications for other Asian countries and the world. This course has three aims: 1) to facilitate an in-depth understanding of the Chinese Economic development model in comparison to other development models, 2) to conduct a comprehensive analysis of political and socio-economic exchanges of China and its relations with other major countries in East Asia, and 3) to construct a thorough understanding of challenges and opportunities for China from its extraordinary economic growth. Prerequisite: junior or senior.

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POLS B371 Topics in Political Philosophy
Section 001 (Spring 2015): Hannah Arendt and Her Interlocutors
Section 001 (Fall 2013): Politics and Aggression
Section 001 (Fall 2014): State, Society and Law Fall 2014, Spring 2015 An advanced seminar on a topic in political or legal philosophy/theory. Topics vary by year. Prerequisite: At least one course in political theory or philosophy or consent of instructor.
Current topic description: Over the last few decades there has been a great deal of attention to the idea of "civil society." That term is usually meant to refer to a realm of voluntary associations and transactions, distinct from both the "private" and the "state." In this course, we explore the idea of civil society, its history, and the question its relation to the state and politics. Among the topics that we will explore are: "civil society and social movements," "law and civil society," and "civil society and capitalism."
Current topic description: Pursuing a close study of Hannah Arendt's The Human Condition (1958), one of the most influential works of political theory written in the twentieth century, this course will investigate Arendt's magnum opus in its contexts: situated in the history of political thought, in the political debates of the 1950s, and as political thought of urgent relevance today.
Cross-listed as PHIL B371

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POLS B374 Education Politics & Policy Not offered 2014-15 This course will examine education policy through the lens of federalism and federalism through a case study of education policy. The dual aims are to enhance our understanding of this specific policy area and our understanding of the impact that our federal system of government has on policy effectiveness. Cross-listed as SOCL B374 Cross-listed as EDUC B374

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POLS B375 Gender, Work and Family Spring 2015 As the number of women participating in the paid workforce who are also mothers exceeds 50 percent, it becomes increasingly important to study the issues raised by these dual roles. This seminar will examine the experiences of working and nonworking mothers in the United States, the roles of fathers, the impact of working mothers on children, and the policy implications of women, work, and family. Cross-listed as SOCL B375 Counts toward Child and Family Studies Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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POLS B378 Origins of American Constitutionalism Spring 2015 This course will explore some aspects of early American constitutional thought, particularly in the periods immediately preceding and following the American Revolution. The premise of the course is that many of the questions that arose during that period--concerning, for example, the nature of law, the idea of sovereignty, and the character of legitimate political authority--remain important questions for political, legal, and constitutional thought today, and that studying the debates of the revolutionary period can help sharpen our understanding of these issues. Prerequisites: sophomore standing and previous course work in American history, American government, political theory, or legal studies. Cross-listed as HIST B378

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POLS B379 The United Nations and World Order Not offered 2014-15 Initially founded in 1945 to address the challenges of international armed aggression, the United Nations has since evolved, and is now charged with confronting a wide range of threats, including atrocities, poverty, hunger, disease, and climate change. This class examines the organization's pre-eminent role in international peace and security, economic development, and human rights and humanitarian affairs. Prerequisites: Students are required to have completed at least a year of Political Science or Peace and Conflict Studies courses (one class must be International Politics (POLS B250) or have the permission of the instructor. Counts toward Peace, Justice and Human Rights

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POLS B380 Persons, Morality and Modernity Not offered 2014-15 What demands does the modern world impose on those who live in it? What kinds of persons does the modern world bring into being? What kinds of ethical claims can that world make on us? What is the relationship between public and private morality, and between each of us as public citizens and private persons? This course explores such questions through an examination of a variety of texts in political theory and philosophy. Cross-listed as PHIL B380

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POLS B381 Nietzsche Not offered 2014-15 This course examines Nietzsche's thought, with particular focus on such questions as the nature of the self, truth , irony, aggression, play, joy, love, and morality. The texts for the course are drawn mostly from Nietzsche's own writing, but these are complemented by some contemporary work in moral philosophy and philosophy of mind that has a Nietzschean influence. Cross-listed as PHIL B381

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POLS B383 Two Hundred Years of Islamic Reform, Radicalism, and Revolution Not offered 2014-15 This course will examine the transformation of Islamic politics in the past two hundred years, emphasizing historical accounts, comparative analysis of developments in different parts of the Islamic world. Topics covered include the rationalist Salafy movement; the so-called conservative movements (Sanussi of Libya, the Mahdi in the Sudan, and the Wahhabi movement in Arabia); the Caliphate movement; contemporary debates over Islamic constitutions; among others. The course is not restricted to the Middle East or Arab world. Prerequisites: a course on Islam and modern European history, or an earlier course on the Modern Middle East or 19th-century India, or permission of instructor. Cross-listed as HIST B383 Counts toward Middle Eastern Studies

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POLS B385 Democracy and Development Not offered 2014-15 From 1974 to the late 1990's the number of democracies grew from 39 to 117. This "third wave," the collapse of communism and developmental successes in East Asia have led some to argue the triumph of democracy and markets. Since the late 1990's, democracy's third wave has stalled, and some fear a reverse wave and democratic breakdowns. We will question this phenomenon through the disciplines of economics, history, political science and sociology drawing from theoretical, case study and classical literature. Prerequisite: one year of study in political science or economics. Cross-listed as ECON B385 Counts toward International Studies Counts toward Peace, Justice and Human Rights

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POLS B391 International Political Economy Fall 2014 This seminar examines the growing importance of economic issues in world politics and traces the development of the modern world economy from its origins in colonialism and the industrial revolution, through to the globalization of recent decades. Major paradigms in political economy are critically examined. Aspects of and issues in international economic relations such as development, finance, trade, migration, and foreign investment are examined in the light of selected approaches. One course in International Politics or Economics is required. Preference is given to seniors although juniors are accepted. Counts toward International Studies

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POLS B392 State in Theory and History Not offered 2014-15 This class connects the fields of historical sociology and international relations to survey the roots of states as the predominant form of political authority, to assess its behavior in global affairs, and to consider its future. Concepts include: class coalitions, democracy, capitalism, socialism, authoritarianism, revolutions, international organizations, and empires. Prerequisites: two courses in Political Science, or Peace and Conflict Studies, or permission of the instructor. Enrollment is limited to 18 students.

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POLS B393 U.S. Welfare Politics: Theory and Practice Not offered 2014-15 Major theoretical perspectives concerning the welfare state with a focus on social policy politics, including recent welfare reforms and how in an era of globalization there has been a turn to a more restrictive system of social provision. Special attention is paid to the ways class, race, and gender are involved in making of social welfare policy and the role of social welfare policy in reinforcing class, race, and gender inequities. Prerequisite: POLS B121 or SOCL B102. Cross-listed as SOCL B393 Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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POLS B398 Senior Conference Required of senior majors. In weekly group meetings as well as individual tutorials, faculty work with students on research strategies, on refining research topics, and on supervising research progress for the senior thesis.

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POLS B399 Senior Essay

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POLS B403 Supervised Work

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POLS B403 Supervised Work

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POLS B425 Praxis III: Independent Study Praxis III courses are Independent Study courses and are developed by individual students, in collaboration with faculty and field supervisors. A Praxis courses is distinguished by genuine collaboration with fieldsite organizations and by a dynamic process of reflection that incorporates lessons learned in the field into the classroom setting and applies theoretical understanding gained through classroom study to work done in the broader community. Counts toward Praxis Program

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