Marc S. Schulz

 

Marc SchulzRachel C. Hale Chair in the Sciences and Mathematics

Chair of the Psychology Department
Director, Clinical Developmental Psychology Ph.D. Program
B.A.  Amherst College, 1984
Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley, 1994
 Postdoctoral Fellow, Harvard Medical School, 1994-1996
Office: 201 Bettws-y-Coed
Phone: 610-526-5039

Research Interests

Teaching

Publications

Press

Research Interests:

I study emotion and stress processes and the effects of relationships on mental and physical well-being.  My interests include basic questions about the dynamics of emotion processes and the ways in which they affect and are affected by relationships, such as marriage.  I have a particular interest in understanding how we regulate emotions and what the effects of these regulatory efforts might be for our health. I often employ intensive longitudinal designs in an attempt to capture the temporal dynamics of emotion, stress, and relationship processes.  My research also explores how we understand others’ emotions and the impact that emotion understanding can have on personal and relationship well-being.

An important current area of study is the impact of long-term relationships on psychological and physical health, particularly as we age.  Much of this work, done in collaboration with Robert Waldinger, has been done in the context of the Study of Adult Development, which began in 1938 and has followed two large cohorts of men continuously from adolescence into late life.  In a new phase of this research, supported by the National Institute on Aging, we are studying the health of the middle-aged offspring of the original study participants.  The study’s primary goal is to examine pathways between childhood adversity and health in mid-life with particular attention to styles of emotion processing as key mediators of these links.

Cover for  Adolescence and Beyond Strengthening Couple Relationships

More information about past research and student collaborators

Teaching

Undergraduate:
Abnormal Psychology (Psych 209)
Developmental Psychopathology (Psych 351)
Advanced Topics in Clinical Developmental Psychology

Graduate:
Introduction to Psychotherapy (Psych 561)
Multivariate Statistics (Psych 502)
Developmental Psychopathology (Psych 551)


Recent Publications:

 

2012-2014

 

Maneta, E., Cohen, S., Schulz, M.S., & Waldinger, R.J. (in press).  Long-term effects of childhood emotional abuse on marital satisfaction and the role of empathic accuracy, Child Abuse and Neglect.

Waldinger, R.J., Cohen, S., Schulz, M.S., & Crowell, J (in press).  Security of attachment to spouses in late life: Concurrent and predictive links with cognitive and emotional wellbeing. Clinical Psychological Science.

Waldinger, R.J., & Schulz, M.S. (in press).  Defenses as a transdiagnostic window on psychopathology.  In P. Luyten, L. Mayes, P. Fonagy, M. Target, & S.J. Blatt (eds)., Handbook of contemporary psychodynamic approaches to psychopathology.  Guilford Press.

Brandao, T., Schulz, M.S., & Menos-Matos, P. (2014).  Psychological intervention with couples facing breast cancer: A systematic review.  Psychology and Health, 29(14), 491-516.

Maneta, E., Cohen, S., Schulz, M. S., & Waldinger, R. J. (2013). Two to tango: A dyadic analysis of links between borderline personality traits and intimate partner violence. Journal of Personality Disorders, 27, 233-43.

Maneta, E.K., Cohen, S., Schulz, M.S., & Waldinger, R.J. (2012).  Links between childhood physical abuse and intimate partner aggression: The mediating role of anger expression.  Journal of Violence and Victims, 27, 315- 328.

Cohen, S., Schulz, M.S., Weiss, E., & Waldinger, R.J. (2012). Eye of the beholder: The individual and dyadic contributions of empathic accuracy and perceived empathic effort to relationship satisfaction. Journal of Family Psychology, 26, 236-245

Cover for  Adolescence and Beyond P.K.  Kerig, M.S. Schulz, & S.T. Hauser (Eds.) (2012). Adolescence and beyond: Family processes and development. Oxford University Press.

Also published to Oxford Scholarship Online, May 2012.

 

 

Schulz, M.S. & Lazarus, R.S.  (2012). Emotion regulation during adolescence: A cognitive-mediational conceptualization.  In P.K.  Kerig, M.S. Schulz, & S.T. Hauser (Eds.), Adolescence and beyond: Family processes and development (pp. 19-42). Oxford University Press.

Schulz, M.S., & Kerig, P.K. (2012).  Looking Beyond Adolescence:  Translating Basic Research into Clinical Practice.  In P.K.  Kerig, M.S. Schulz, & S.T. Hauser (Eds.), Adolescence and beyond: Family processes and development (pp. 304-313). Oxford University Press.

Hauser, S.T., Allen, J.P., & Schulz, M.S. (2012). Exceptional Outcomes: Using Narratives and Family Observations to Understand Resilience.  In P.K.  Kerig, M.S. Schulz, & S.T. Hauser (Eds.), Adolescence and beyond: Family processes and development (pp. 231-248).  Oxford University Press.

2009-2011

Liu, L., Cohen, S., Schulz, M.S., & Waldinger, R.J. (2011). Sources of somatization: Exploring the roles of insecurity in relationships and styles of anger experience and expression.  Social Science and Medicine, 73, 1436-1443.

Waldinger, R.J., Kensinger, E.A., & Schulz, M.S. (2011).  Neural activity, neural connectivity, and the processing of emotionally-valenced information in older adults: Links with life satisfaction.  Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Neuroscience, 11, 426-436.

Strengthening Couple RelationshipsSchulz, M.S., Pruett, M.K., Kerig, P.K., & Parke, R.D. (editors; 2010).  Strengthening Couple Relationships for Optimal Child Development: Lessons from Research and InterventionWashington, DC:  American Psychological Association.

 

 

Schulz, M.S. & Waldinger, R.J.  (2010). Capturing the Elusive:  Studying Emotion Processes in Couple Relationships.  In M.S. Schulz, M.S., M.K. Pruett, P.K. Kerig, & R.D. Parke (eds.).  Strengthening Couple Relationships for Optimal Child Development: Lessons from Research and Intervention.  Washington, DC:  American Psychological Association.

Schulz, M.S., Kerig, P.K., Pruett, M.K., & Parke, R.D. (2010).  Introduction:  Feathering the nest.  In M.S. Schulz, M.S., M.K. Pruett, P.K. Kerig, & R. D. Parke (eds.).  Strengthening Couple Relationships for Optimal Child Development: Lessons from Research and Intervention.  Washington, DC:  American Psychological Association.  

Parke, R.D., Schulz, M.S., Pruett, M.K., & Kerig, P.K. (2010).  Tracing the development of the couples and family research tradition: The enduring contributions of Philip and Carolyn Pape Cowan.  In M.S. Schulz, M.S., M.K. Pruett, P.K. Kerig, & R.D. Parke (eds.).  Strengthening Couple Relationships for Optimal Child Development: Lessons from Research and Intervention.  Washington, DC:  American Psychological Association.  

Schulz, M.S., Kerig, P.K., Pruett, M.K., & Parke, R.D. (2010).  Coda:  Looking to the Future.  In M.S. Schulz, M.S., M.K. Pruett, P.K. Kerig, & R. D. Parke (eds.).  Strengthening Couple Relationships for Optimal Child Development: Lessons from Research and Intervention.  Washington, DC:  American Psychological Association.  

Waldinger, R.J., & Schulz, M.S. (2010). Facing the music or burying our heads in the sand?: Adaptive emotion regulation in midlife and late life.  Research in Human Development, 7, 292-306.

Waldinger, R.J., & Schulz, M.S. (2010). What’s love got to do with it? Social functioning, perceived health, and daily happiness in married octogenerians, Psychology and Aging, 25, 422-431.

 

2004-2008

Whitton, S.W., Waldinger, R.J., Schulz, M.S., Allen, J.P., Crowell, J.A., & Hauser, S.T. (2008). Prospective associations from family-of-origin interactions to adult marital interactions and relationship adjustment. Journal of Family Psychology, 22, 274-286.

Waldinger, R.J. & Schulz, M.S.  (2006). Linking hearts and minds in couple interactions: Intentions, attributions and overriding sentiments.  Journal of Family Psychology, 20, 494-504.

Schulz, M.S., Cowan, P.A., & Cowan, C.P. (2006). Promoting healthy beginnings: A randomized controlled trial of a preventive intervention to preserve marital quality during the transition to parenthood. Journal of Clinical and Consulting Psychology, 74, 20-31.

Waldinger, R.J., Schulz, M.S., Barsky, A.J., & Ahern, D.K. (2006). Mapping the road from childhood trauma to adult somatization: The role of attachment. Journal of Psychosomatic Medicine, 68, 129-135.

Schulz, M.S., & Waldinger, R.J. (2005). The value of pooling "naïve" expertise. American Psychologist, 60, 656-657.

Schulz, M.S., Waldinger, R.J., Hauser, S.T., & Allen, J.P. (2005). Adolescents' behavior in the presence of interparental hostility: Developmental and emotion regulatory influences. Development and Psychopathology, 17, 489-507.

Waldinger, R.J., Schulz, M.S., Hauser, S.T., Allen, J.P., & Crowell, J.A. (2004). Reading others' emotions: The role of intuitive judgments in predicting marital satisfaction, quality and stability. Journal of Family Psychology, 18 , 58-71.

Schulz, M.S., Cowan, P.A., Cowan, C.P., & Brennan, R. T .(2004). Coming home upset: Gender, marital satisfaction and the daily spillover of workday experience into marriage .Journal of Family Psychology, 18, 250-263.

Schulz, M.S. & Waldinger, R.J. (2004). Looking in the mirror: Participants as observers of their own and their partners' emotions in marital interactions. In P. Kerig & D. Baucom (Eds.), Couple observational coding systems (pp. 257-270).Mahwah , NJ : Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Please send any questions or comments to Marc Schulz.


Press

In the News

Psychology’s Marc Schulz and Students Continue Work with Long-Running Study of Human Development:  Starting in 1938 and continuing to this day, The Study of Adult Development is one of the longest-running and influential longitudinal studies of human development ever undertaken. For 76 years, two groups of men have been studied from adolescence into late life to identify the predictors of healthy aging.For more than 12 years, Bryn Mawr Professor of Psychology Marc Schulz has been working closely with data from the study….

Bryn Mawr Psychology Prof and Alumna Co-Author Study on Relationships Between Men and Women: Bryn Mawr College Professor of Psychology Marc Schulz and Emily Weiss, Ph.D. ’08, are among the authors of a new study that offers fresh insight into the role empathy plays in men’s and women’s satisfaction with their relationships.

            Other coverage of this study includes:           

BBC: Upset Men And The Happy Women Who Love Them
Time Magazine:  What Women Really Want in a Relationship
ABCNEWS:  Happy Wife, Happy Life Huffington Post: Women's Happiness In Relationships Tied To Men's Empathy
Go News!  What Women Want: Men Who Get It
Women Happier in Relationships when Men Share their Pain

Study Highlights Success of Bryn Mawr’s Clinical Developmental Psychology Program:  A study published in Training and Education in Professional Psychology identifies Bryn Mawr’s Clinical Developmental Psychology Program (CDPP) as one of five “top programs”  in clinical psychology out of 233 programs across the country.  The rankings are based on analysis of outcomes such as internship match and licensure exam performance.

Undergraduate and Ph.D. Candidate Join Forces to Study Effects of Children's Moods: Although a boost in mood improves adults' performance of many mental tasks, happiness may equip very young children with rose-colored glasses that reduce their accuracy in identifying the emotions of others. That's the finding of Tracy Hills '04 and Ph.D. student Deanna Hamilton, who collaborated on a research project that formed the basis of Hills' undergraduate thesis in psychology and will be incorporated into Hamilton's dissertation.

Study links responses to workday stress with marital satisfaction, APA Monitor: After a tough day, women are more likely than men to criticize or show anger toward their spouses, while men tend to respond to daytime stress by withdrawing from their mates--yet all these behaviors may be signs of a happy marriage for both sexes, according to a study in the March issue of the Journal of Family Psychology (Vol. 18, No. 1)…Wives who are happier with their marriages may feel more comfortable and freer to vent frustrations to their spouse after a stressful day… suggests lead researcher Marc S. Schulz, PhD, associate professor of psychology at Bryn Mawr College.

Emotions Reveal Troubled Marriages: Men's Hostility, Women's Sadness May Reveal a Troubled Marriage WebMD Medical News: June 18, 2004 -- It may not take an expert to spot a marriage bound for trouble. A new study shows a group of college students was able to predict with more than 80% accuracy which couples would still be together five years later by just observing their emotional interactions…Researchers pooled their assessments, and found that the students predicted with 85% accuracy which couples would still be together after five years. "How women and men express their emotions can affect the quality and stability of their marriage," says researcher Marc Schulz, associate professor of psychology at Bryn Mawr College…

Voices in the Family, WHYY (National Public Radio) 10/08/01 Show on Childhood, Terrorism and War; Interview with Marc Schulz: Many children have … play dates and are under pressure to succeed academically. Children also have to deal with the impact of violence in their schools and neighborhoods, and more recently, with the aftermath of the terrorist attacks on America. Dr. Dan Gottlieb and his guests discuss childhood and how children deal with trauma.

Research at the Nexus of Clinical and Developmental Psychology: It's not surprising that the media have been devoting attention to the Bryn Mawr Family Research Center. Director Marc Schulz's goal is one that resonates with many people: gleaning insights that can help make marriages happier and children emotionally healthie