Courses

This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's master calendar.

Fall 2014

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTRUCTOR(S)
PSYC B105-001 Introductory Psychology Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Carpenter Library 21 Rescorla,L.
Laboratory: Date/Time TBA Bettws Y Coed 35
PSYC B160-001 Focus: Psychology of Negotiations Second Half / 0.5 Lecture: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM M Taylor Hall F Egan Brad,L.
PSYC B203-001 Educational Psychology Semester / 1 Lecture: 8:25 AM- 9:45 AM TTH Dalton Hall 119 Cassidy,K.
PSYC B205-001 Experimental Methods and Statistics Semester / 1 Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTH Dalton Hall 300 Thapar,A.
PSYC B208-001 Social Psychology Semester / 1 Lecture: 11:10 AM-12:00 PM MWF Bettws Y Coed 127 McCauley,C.
PSYC B209-001 Abnormal Psychology Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MW Carpenter Library 21 Schulz,M.
PSYC B224-001 Cross-Cultural Psychology Semester / 1 Lecture: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTH Carpenter Library 21 Egan Brad,L.
PSYC B231-001 Health Psychology Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Thomas Hall 110 Peterson,L.
PSYC B250-001 Autism Spectrum Disorders Semester / 1 Lecture: 8:25 AM- 9:45 AM TTH Bettws Y Coed 127 Wozniak,R.
PSYC B312-001 History of Modern American Psychology Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Bettws Y Coed 239 Wozniak,R.
PSYC B323-001 Advanced Topics in Cognitive Neuroscience Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTH Bettws Y Coed 239 Thapar,A.
PSYC B325-001 Judgment and Decision-Making Semester / 1 Lecture: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM T Bettws Y Coed 127 Egan Brad,L.
PSYC B358-001 Political Psychology of Ethnic Conflict Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MW Taylor Hall C McCauley,C.
PSYC B375-001 Movies and Madness: Abnormal Psychology Through Films Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM W Bettws Y Coed 106 Rescorla,L.
PSYC B401-001 Supervised Research in Neural and Behavioral Sciences Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA
PSYC B401-001 Supervised Research in Neural and Behavioral Sciences Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA
PSYC B403-001 Supervised Research Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA
PSYC B403-001 Supervised Research Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA
PSYC B425-001 Praxis III: Independent Study Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA
PSYC B508-001 Social Psychology Semester / 1 Lecture: 11:10 AM-12:00 PM MWF Bettws Y Coed 127 McCauley,C.
PSYC B612-001 Historical Issues in Clinical Developmental Psychology Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Bettws Y Coed 239 Wozniak,R.
PSYC B701-001 Supervised Work Semester / 1 Lecture: Date/Time TBA Rescorla,L.
PSYC B701-002 Supervised Work Semester / 1 Lecture: Date/Time TBA Schulz,M.
PSYC B701-003 Supervised Work Semester / 1 Lecture: Date/Time TBA Neuman,P.
PSYC B701-004 Supervised Work Semester / 1 Lecture: Date/Time TBA Thapar,A.
PSYC B701-006 Supervised Work Semester / 1 Lecture: Date/Time TBA Cassidy,K.

Spring 2015

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTRUCTOR(S)
PSYC B105-001 Introductory Psychology Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Carpenter Library 21 Peterson,L.
PSYC B160-001 Focus: Psychology of Negotiations Second Half / 0.5 Lecture: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM M Taylor Hall E Egan Brad,L.
PSYC B206-001 Developmental Psychology Semester / 1 Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:30 AM MW Carpenter Library 21 Egan Brad,L.
PSYC B218-001 Behavioral Neuroscience Semester / 1 LEC: 10:10 AM-11:00 AM MWF Bettws Y Coed 127 Thomas,E.
PSYC B230-001 Forensic Psychology Semester / 1 LEC: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Taylor Hall F Mesiarik,C.
PSYC B240-001 Evolution of Human Nature Semester / 1 Lecture: 11:40 AM- 1:00 PM MW Carpenter Library 21 Egan Brad,L.
PSYC B288-001 Laboratory in Social Psychology Semester / 0.5 LEC: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM F Dalton Hall 1 Moskalenko,S.
PSYC B289-001 Laboratory in Clinical Psychology Semester / 0.5 LEC: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM W Bettws Y Coed 239 Schulz,M.
PSYC B310-001 Advanced Developmental Psychology Semester / 1 Lecture: 8:25 AM- 9:45 AM TTH Bettws Y Coed 239 Wozniak,R.
PSYC B322-001 Culture and Development Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Bettws Y Coed 239 Wozniak,R.
PSYC B342-001 Health Psychology Laboratory Semester / 0.5 LEC: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM T Bettws Y Coed 127 Peterson,L.
PSYC B351-001 Developmental Psychopathology Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Bettws Y Coed 127 Rescorla,L.
PSYC B353-001 Advanced Topics in Clinical Psychology: Mindfullness Semester / 1 Lecture: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTH Bettws Y Coed 106 Schulz,M.
PSYC B395-001 Psychopharmacology Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:00 PM MWF Carpenter Library 21 Thomas,E.
PSYC B399-001 Senior Seminar Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM W Bettws Y Coed 106 Dept. staff, TBA
PSYC B401-001 Supervised Research in Neural and Behavioral Sciences Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA
PSYC B401-001 Supervised Research in Neural and Behavioral Sciences Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA
PSYC B403-001 Supervised Research Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA
PSYC B403-001 Supervised Research Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA
PSYC B701-001 Supervised Work Semester / 1 Lecture: Date/Time TBA Rescorla,L.
PSYC B701-002 Supervised Work Semester / 1 Lecture: Date/Time TBA Cassidy,K.
PSYC B701-003 Supervised Work Semester / 1 Lecture: Date/Time TBA Thapar,A.
PSYC B701-004 Supervised Work Semester / 1 Lecture: Date/Time TBA Neuman,P.
PSYC B701-005 Supervised Work Semester / 1 Lecture: Date/Time TBA Schulz,M.
PSYC B701-006 Supervised Work Semester / 1 Lecture: Date/Time TBA Wozniak,R.

Fall 2015

(Class schedules for this semester will be posted at a later date.)

2014-15 Catalog Data

PSYC B105 Introductory Psychology Fall 2014, Spring 2015 How do biological predispositions, life experiences, culture, contribute to individual differences in human and animal behavior? This biopsychosocial theme will be examined by studying both "normal" and "abnormal" behaviors in domains such as perception, cognition, learning, motivation, emotion, and social interaction thereby providing an overview of psychology's many areas of inquiry. Quantitative Readiness Required (QR) Scientific Investigation (SI)

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PSYC B120 Focus: Psychology of Terrorism Not offered 2014-15 Introduction to the psychology of terrorism. Each week will include reading and a film introducing a different case history: Mohammed Atta, Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols, Weather Underground, Baader-Meinhof Gang, Battle of Algiers, Shaheed, Al-Qaeda and bin Laden. Text is "Friction: How radicalization happens to them and us" (McCauley & Moskalenko, 2011). Each student posts each week on Moodle a max-300-word essay identifying mechanisms of radicalization in the case history, and a comment on one other student's post. Grading includes clicker quizzes, posts, comments, and an optional final paper. This is a half-semester "focus course," no prerequisites.

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PSYC B125 Focus: Psychology of Genocide Not offered 2014-15 This is a half-semester "focus course." Introduction to the psychology of genocide, including perpetrators, leaders, and mass sympathizers. Each week will include reading and a film introducing a difference case history: Cherokee Removal, Armenian Removal, Holocaust, Rwanda, Pol Pot, Khymer Rouge Killers, Darfur-Sudan. Text is "Why not kill them all? The logic and prevention of mass political murder" (Chirot & McCauley, 2010 paperback). Each student posts each week on Moodle a max-300-word essay identifying mechanisms of radicalization in the case history, and a comment on one other student's post. Grading includes clicker quizzes, posts, comments, and an optional final paper.

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PSYC B160 Focus: Psychology of Negotiations Fall 2014, Spring 2015 Explores the psychology, art, and science of negotiations. The core of the course is a series of seven simulations designed to allow students to experiment with negotiation techniques. Debriefings and discussions of negotiation theory and behavioral research complement the simulations. This is a half-semester, 0.5 unit course. Course does not meet an Approach

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PSYC B201 Learning/Behavior Analysis Not offered 2014-15 This course covers the basic principles of behavior, and their application to the understanding of the human condition. Topics include the distinction between closed-loop (selection by consequences) and open-loop (elicitation and adjunctive behavior) relations, the distinction between contingency-shaped behavior and behavior under instructional control, discrimination and concept formation, choice, functional analysis of verbal behavior and awareness and problem solving. Behavior Analysis is presented as a distinct research methodology with a distinct language, as well as a distinct theoretical approach within psychology. Scientific Investigation (SI) Counts toward Neuroscience

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PSYC B203 Educational Psychology Fall 2014 Topics in the psychology of human cognitive, social, and affective behavior are examined and related to educational practice. Issues covered include learning theories, memory, attention, thinking, motivation, social/emotional issues in adolescence, and assessment/learning disabilities. This course provides a Praxis Level I opportunity. Classroom observation is required. Prerequisite: PSYC B105 (Introductory Psychology) Course does not meet an Approach Counts toward Child and Family Studies Counts toward Praxis Program

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PSYC B205 Experimental Methods and Statistics Fall 2014 An introduction to experimental design, general research methodology, and the analysis and interpretation of data. Emphasis will be placed on issues involved with conducting psychological research. Topics include descriptive and inferential statistics, experimental design and validity, analysis of variance, and correlation and regression. Each statistical method will also be executed using computers. Lecture three hours, laboratory 90 minutes a week. Quantitative Methods (QM) Scientific Investigation (SI)

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PSYC B206 Developmental Psychology Spring 2015 A topical survey of psychological development from infancy through adolescence, focusing on the interaction of personal and environmental factors in the ontogeny of perception, language, cognition, and social interactions within the family and with peers. Topics include developmental theories; infant perception; attachment; language development; theory of mind; memory development; peer relations, schools and the family as contexts of development; and identity and the adolescent transition. Prerequisite: PSYC B105 or PSYC H100 Course does not meet an Approach Counts toward Child and Family Studies

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PSYC B208 Social Psychology Fall 2014 A survey of theories and data in the study of human social behavior. Special attention to methodological issues of general importance in the conduct and evaluation of research with humans. Topics include group dynamics (conformity, leadership, encounter groups, crowd behavior, intergroup conflict); attitude change (consistency theories, attitudes and behavior, mass media persuasion); and person perception (stereotyping, essentializing, moral judgment). Prerequisite: PSYC B105 or H100 (Introductory Psychology), or instructor's permission. Scientific Investigation (SI)

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PSYC B209 Abnormal Psychology Fall 2014 This course will cover the main psychological disorders manifested by individuals as they develop across the life span. The semester will begin with an historical overview of how psychopathology has been conceptualized and treated across many centuries of Western history. The course will then review the assumptions of the major models which have been formulated to explain psychopathology: the biological, the psychodynamic, the behavioral, and the cognitive. We will begin with childhood and adolescent disorders and then cover the main disorders of adults. Among the disorders covered will be: attention deficit disorder, anorexia/bulimia, conduct disorder/antisocial personality, borderline personality disorder, anxiety disorders, psychophysiological disorders, substance abuse, depression, and schizophrenia. For each disorder, we will explore issues of classification, theories of etiology, risk and prevention factors, research on prognosis, and studies of treatment. Prerequisite: Introductory Psychology (PSYC B105 or H100). Course does not meet an Approach Counts toward Child and Family Studies Counts toward Health Studies

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PSYC B212 Human Cognition Not offered 2014-15 This course deals with the scientific study of human cognition. Topics include perception, pattern recognition, attention, memory, visual imagery, language, reasoning, decision making, and problem solving. Historical as well as contemporary perspectives will be discussed, and data from cognitive psychology, cognitive neuroscience, and computational modeling will be reviewed. The laboratory consists of experiments related to these topics. Lecture three hours, laboratory 90 minutes a week. Prerequisite: Introductory Psychology (PSYC 105) Scientific Investigation (SI) Counts toward Neuroscience

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PSYC B214 Applied Behavior Analysis Not offered 2014-15 This course covers the basic principles of behavior and their relevance and application to clinical problems. Applied Behavior Analysis is an empirically-based treatment approach focusing less on treatment techniques and more on treatment evaluation. The course covers the techniques used (data gathering and analysis) to determine the effectiveness of treatments while in progress. To do this, examples of human problems may include eating disorders, anxiety disorders, addictive behavior, autistic behavior, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and oppositional/conduct disorder. Scientific Investigation (SI)

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PSYC B218 Behavioral Neuroscience Spring 2015 An interdisciplinary course on the neurobiological bases of experience and behavior, emphasizing the contribution of the various neurosciences to the understanding of basic problems of psychology. An introduction to the fundamentals of neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and neurochemistry with an emphasis upon synaptic transmission; followed by the application of these principles to an analysis of sensory processes and perception, emotion, motivation, learning, and cognition. Lecture three hours a week. Prerequisite: Introductory Psychology (PSYC 105). Course does not meet an Approach Counts toward Neuroscience

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PSYC B224 Cross-Cultural Psychology Fall 2014 Explores human behavior as a product of cultural context. Why are some aspects of human behavior the same across cultures, while others differ? Topics include the relationships between culture and development, cognition, the self, and social behaviors. Discussions include implications of cross-cultural psychology for psychological theory and applications. Pre-requites: ANTH101, PSYCB105, PSYCH100, SOCL102 or permission of instructor Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

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PSYC B230 Forensic Psychology Spring 2015 The major goal of this course is to provide students with a broad overview of the field of forensic psychology and the numerous ways that psychology interacts with the law. Throughout this course, students will develop an understanding of the nature, scope, and basic methods used in forensic psychology and how these methods can be applied to a variety of legal questions. We will begin with an introduction, which will encompass the definition of the area, the scope of the field, and an overview of the relevant methods used in the practice of forensic psychology. We will then consider a number of legal questions for which judges and attorneys can be informed by forensic psychological evaluation; these legal questions will include criminal, civil, and family law. Prerequisite: PSYC B105 or H100.

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PSYC B231 Health Psychology Fall 2014 This course will provide an overview of the field of health psychology using lecture, exams, videos, assignments, and an article critique. We will examine the current definition of health psychology, as well as the theories and research behind many areas in health psychology (both historical and contemporary). The course will focus on specific health and social psychological theories, empirical research, and applying the theory and research to real world situations. Prerequisite: Introductory Psychology (PSYC B105) or Foundations of Psychology (PSYC H100) Course does not meet an Approach

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PSYC B240 Evolution of Human Nature Spring 2015 Explores human nature as a product of evolutionary processes. The course will begin by introducing the evolutionary perspective and the roles of sex and mating strategies within the context of the animal kingdom. Topics will include the evolutionary origins of altruism, social structures, language, domestic and intergroup violence, and religion. Prerequisite: ANTH101, BIOL110/B111, ECON105, PSYCB105, PSYCH100, SOCL102, or permission of instructor

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PSYC B250 Autism Spectrum Disorders Fall 2014 Focuses on theory of and research on Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Topics include the history of autism; classification and diagnosis; epidemiology and etiology; major theories; investigations of sensory and motor atypicalities, early social communicative skills, affective, cognitive, symbolic and social factors; the neuropsychology of ASD; and current approaches to intervention. Prerequisite: Introductory Psychology (PSYC 105). Course does not meet an Approach Counts toward Child and Family Studies

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PSYC B257 Identity under Pressure Not offered 2014-15 This course explores psychological understandings of identity formation and change, particularly in times of upheaval and migration. Examples of identity formation will be drawn from psychological studies, the family histories of class participants, oral history projects, and the experiences of Jews in Hamburg, Germany before and during World War II.

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PSYC B260 The Psychology of Mindfulness Not offered 2014-15 This course focuses on psychological theory and research on mindfulness and meditative practices. Readings and discussion will introduce students to modern conceptualizations and implementation of mindfulness practices that have arisen in the West. Students will be encouraged to engage in mindfulness activities as part of their involvement in this 360. Course does not meet an Approach Counts toward Health Studies

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PSYC B288 Laboratory in Social Psychology Spring 2015 This laboratory course will offer experience in designing and conducting research in social psychology, statistical analysis of research results, and research reporting in the style of a journal article in psychology. Each student will participate in two research projects. This is a 0.5 unit course that meets for the full semester. Prerequisites: Introductory Psychology (PSYC 105 or equivalent) and Statistics (PSYC 205 or equivalent). Writing Intensive Quantitative Readiness Required (QR) Scientific Investigation (SI)

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PSYC B289 Laboratory in Clinical Psychology Spring 2015 At its core, this laboratory course is designed to explore how it is that psychologists come to know (or think they know) things and how they communicate what they think they know. The class focuses on the scientific principles and practices underlying research in psychology with an emphasis on techniques and topics important to the subfield of clinical psychology. This course is intended to provide hands-on training in how to conduct research. Through lab activities and class projects, students will learn about important methodological issues and steps in the research process including how to identify important questions, measurement issues such as reliability and validity, different modes of data collection, and how to collect, analyze, and interpret data. Special attention will be given to method issues relevant to observation, to the study of emotion, to couple relationships and to the collection of data across time. This class is a writing intensive class and, as a .5 unit class, is designed to meet half of the writing requirement in the major. Prerequisites: PSYC B105 (Introduction to Psychology). Recommended: PSYC B205: Methods and Statistics. Writing Intensive Quantitative Readiness Required (QR) Scientific Investigation (SI)

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PSYC B301 Advanced Research Methods Not offered 2014-15 This course focuses on psychology research and design methodology. An important purpose of the course is to help students with their undergraduate thesis research. Topics include: internal and external validity, reliability, strengths and weaknesses of various methods (survey, case, observational, and experimental), data coding, levels of measurement, research ethics, and data analysis.

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PSYC B310 Advanced Developmental Psychology Spring 2015 This course details theory and research relating to the development of children and adolescents with family, school, and cultural contexts. We examine topics including (but not limited to): developmental theory, infant perception, language, attachment, self-awareness, social cognition, symbolic thought, memory, parent-child relations, peer relations, and gender issues. Prerequisite: PSYC 206 or permission of the instructor.

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PSYC B312 History of Modern American Psychology Fall 2014 An examination of major 20th-century trends in American psychology and their 18th- and 19th-century social and intellectual roots. Topics include physiological and philosophical origins of scientific psychology; growth of American developmental, comparative, social, and clinical psychology; and the cognitive revolution. Prerequisite: any 200-level survey course.

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PSYC B322 Culture and Development Spring 2015 This course focuses on development and enculturation within nested sets of interacting contexts (e.g. family, village, classroom/work group, peer group, culture). Topics include the nature of culture, human narrativity, acquisition of multiple literacies, and the way in which developing mind, multiple contexts, cultures, narrativity, and literacies help forge identities. Prerequisites: PSYC 105 and PSYC 206, or Permission of the Instructor Counts toward Child and Family Studies

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PSYC B323 Advanced Topics in Cognitive Neuroscience Fall 2014 A seminar course dealing with state-of-the-art developments in the cognitive neuroscience of human memory. The goal of this course is to investigate the neuroanataomy of episodic memory and the cellular and molecular correlates of episodic memory. Topics include memory consolidation, working memory, recollection and familiarity, forgetting, cognitive and neural bases of false memories, emotion and memory, sleep and memory, anterograde amnesia, and implicit memory. Within each topic we will attempt to integrate the results from different neuropsychological approaches to memory, including various psychophysiological and functional imaging techniques, clinical studies, and research with animal models. Prerequisite: a course in cognition (PSYC B212, PSYC H213, PSYC H260) or behavioral neuroscience (either PSYC B218 or PSYC H217). Counts toward Neuroscience

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PSYC B325 Judgment and Decision-Making Fall 2014 This course will explore the psychology of reasoning and decision-making processes in depth. We will examine affective, cognitive, and motivational processes, as well as recent research in neuroscience. Among other topics, we will discuss notions of rationality and irrationality, accuracy, heuristics, biases, metacognition, evaluation, risk perception, and moral judgment. Prerequisites: ECONB136, ECONH203, PSYCB205 or PSYCH200, and PSYCB212, PSYCH260 or permission of instructor.

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PSYC B326 From Channels to Behavior Not offered 2014-15 Introduces the principles, research approaches, and methodologies of cellular and behavioral neuroscience. The first half of the course will cover the cellular properties of neurons using current and voltage clamp techniques along with neuron simulations. The second half of the course will introduce students to state-of-the-art techniques for acquiring and analyzing data in a variety of rodent models linking brain and behavior. Prerequisites: one semester of BIOL 110-111 and one of the following: PSYC 218, PSYC 217 at Haverford, or BIOL 202. Writing Attentive Cross-listed as BIOL B326 Counts toward Neuroscience

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PSYC B340 Women's Mental Health Not offered 2014-15 This course will provide an overview of current research and theory related to women's mental health. We will discuss psychological phenomena and disorders that are particularly salient to and prevalent among women, why these phenomena/disorders affect women disproportionately over men, and how they may impact women's psychological and physical well-being. Psychological disorders covered will include: depression, eating disorders, dissociative identity disorder, borderline personality disorder, and chronic pain disorders. Other topics discussed will include work-family conflict for working mothers, the role of sociocultural influences on women's mental health, and mental health issues particular to women of color and to lesbian women. Prerequisite: PSYC B209 or PSYC B351 (or equivalent 200-level course). Counts toward Child and Family Studies Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies Counts toward Health Studies

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PSYC B342 Health Psychology Laboratory Spring 2015 This laboratory/writing intensive/scientific inquiry quarter course will provide a hands-on experience conducting health psychology research and writing APA-style manuscripts. Students will be exposed to various aspects of the scientific process such as: literature reviews, hypothesis-generation, data collection, analysis, writing (drafting and polishing), peer-reviewing, and oral dissemination of scientific findings. The course will focus on biopsychosocial theory and challenge students to apply the theory to their own research project(s) and write papers on the results. Prerequisite: Introductory Psychology (PSYC B105) or Foundations of Psychology (PSYC H100). Writing Intensive

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PSYC B346 Pediatric Psychology Not offered 2014-15 This course uses a developmental-ecological perspective to understand the psychological challenges associated with physical health issues in children. The course explores how different environments support the development of children who sustain illness or injury and will cover topics including: prevention, coping, adherence to medical regimens, and pain management. The course will consider the ways in which cultural beliefs and values shape medical experiences. Suggested Preparations: PSYC B206 highly recommended. Counts toward Child and Family Studies Counts toward Health Studies

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PSYC B350 Developmental Cognitive Disorders Not offered 2014-15 This course uses a developmental and neuropsychological framework to study major development cognitive disorders manifested by children and adolescents, such as language delay/impairment, specific reading disability, math disability, nonverbal learning disability, intellectual disability, executive function disorder, autism, and traumatic brain injury. Cognitive disorders are viewed in the context of the normal development of language, memory, attention, reading, quantitative abilities, and executive functions. Students enrolled in the course will learn about the assessment, classification, outcome, remediation, and education of the major cognitive disorders manifested by children and adolescents. Students will participate in a course-related Praxis placement approximately 3 - 4 hours a week. Counts toward Child and Family Studies Counts toward Neuroscience Counts toward Praxis Program

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PSYC B351 Developmental Psychopathology Spring 2015 This course will examine emotional and behavioral disorders of children and adolescents, including autism, attention deficit disorder, conduct disorder, phobias, obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression, anorexia, and schizophrenia. Major topics covered will include: contrasting models of psychopathology; empirical and categorical approaches to assessment and diagnosis; outcome of childhood disorders; risk, resilience, and prevention; and therapeutic approaches and their efficacy .Prerequisite: PSYC 206 or 209. Counts toward Child and Family Studies Counts toward Health Studies Counts toward Neuroscience

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PSYC B353 Advanced Topics in Clinical Psychology
Section 001 (Spring 2015): Mindfullness Spring 2015 This course provides an in-depth examination of research and theory in a particular area of clinical psychology. Topics will vary from year to year. Prerequisite: PSYC 209 or 351

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PSYC B358 Political Psychology of Ethnic Conflict Fall 2014 This seminar explores the common interests of psychologists and political scientists in ethnic identification and ethnic-group conflict. Rational choice theories of conflict from political science will be compared with social psychological theories of conflict that focus more on emotion and essentializing. Each student will contribute a 200-300 word post in response to a reading or film assignment each week. Students will represent their posts in seminar discussion of readings and films. Each student will write a final paper analyzing the origins and trajectory of a case of violent ethnic conflict chosen by agreement with the instructor. Grading includes posts, participation in discussion, and the final paper. Prerequisite: PSYC B208, or PSYC B120, or PSYC B125, or one 200 level course in political science, or instructor's permission. Cross-listed as POLS B358 Counts toward Peace, Justice and Human Rights

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PSYC B375 Movies and Madness: Abnormal Psychology Through Films Fall 2014 This writing-intensive seminar (maximum enrollment = 16 students) deals with critical analysis of how various forms of psychopathology are depicted in films. The primary focus of the seminar will be evaluating the degree of correspondence between the cinematic presentation and current research knowledge about the disorder, taking into account the historical period in which the film was made. For example, we will discuss how accurately the symptoms of the disorder are presented and how representative the protagonist is of people who typically manifest this disorder based on current research. We will also address the theory of etiology of the disorder depicted in the film, including discussion of the relevant intellectual history in the period when the film was made and the prevailing accounts of psychopathology in that period. Another focus will be how the film portrays the course of the disorder and how it depicts treatment for the disorder. This cinematic presentation will be evaluated with respect to current research on treatment for the disorder as well as the historical context of prevailing treatment for the disorder at the time the film was made. Prerequisite: PSYC B209. Writing Intensive Counts toward Film Studies Counts toward Health Studies

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PSYC B395 Psychopharmacology Spring 2015 A study of the role of drugs in understanding basic brain-behavior relations. Topics include the pharmacological basis of motivation and emotion; pharmacological models of psychopathology; the use of drugs in the treatment of psychiatric disorders such as anxiety, depression, and psychosis; and the psychology and pharmacology of drug addiction. Prerequisite: PSYC B218 or BIOL B202 or PSYC H217 or permission of instructor. Counts toward Health Studies Counts toward Neuroscience

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PSYC B396 Topics in Neuroscience Not offered 2014-15 A seminar course dealing with current issues in neuroscience. It provides advanced students minoring in neuroscience with an opportunity to read and discuss in depth seminal papers that represent emerging thought in the field. In addition, students are expected to make presentations of their own research. Cross-listed as BIOL B396 Counts toward Neuroscience

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PSYC B399 Senior Seminar This seminar is intended to serve as a capstone experience for senior psychology majors who have opted not to do a senior thesis. The focus of the seminar will be on analyzing the nature of public discourse (coverage in newspapers, magazines, on the internet) on a variety of major issues, identifying material in the psychological research literature relating to these issues, and to the extent possible relating the public discourse to the research.

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PSYC B401 Supervised Research in Neural and Behavioral Sciences Laboratory or field research on a wide variety of topics. Students should consult with faculty members to determine their topic and faculty supervisor, early in the semester prior to when they will begin. Counts toward Neuroscience

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PSYC B401 Supervised Research in Neural and Behavioral Sciences Laboratory or field research on a wide variety of topics. Students should consult with faculty members to determine their topic and faculty supervisor, early in the semester prior to when they will begin. Counts toward Neuroscience

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PSYC B403 Supervised Research Laboratory or field research on a wide variety of topics. Students should consult with faculty members to determine their topic and faculty supervisor, early in the semester prior to when they will begin.

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PSYC B403 Supervised Research Laboratory or field research on a wide variety of topics. Students should consult with faculty members to determine their topic and faculty supervisor, early in the semester prior to when they will begin.

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PSYC B425 Praxis III: Independent Study Praxis III courses are Independent Study courses and are developed by individual students, in collaboration with faculty and field supervisors. A Praxis courses is distinguished by genuine collaboration with fieldsite organizations and by a dynamic process of reflection that incorporates lessons learned in the field into the classroom setting and applies theoretical understanding gained through classroom study to work done in the broader community. Counts toward Praxis Program

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PSYC B502 Multivariate Statistics Not offered 2014-15 This course is designed to introduce students to advanced statistical techniques that are becoming increasingly important in developmental, clinical and school psychology research. We focus on understanding the advantages and limitations of common multivariate analytic techniques that permit simultaneous prediction of multiple outcomes. Emphasis is placed on helping students critically evaluate applications of these techniques in the literature and the utility of applying these techniques to their own work. Topics covered include path modeling, ways of analyzing data collected over multiple points in time (e.g., a growth curve capturing change in a developmental variable during childhood), confirmatory factor analysis, and measurement models. Students use existing data sets to gain experience with statistical software that can be used for multivariate analyses.

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PSYC B508 Social Psychology Fall 2014 Provides an introduction to basic social psychological theories and research. Topics covered include: group dynamics, stereotypes and group conflict, attitude measurement, and attitudes and behavior. An emphasis is placed on research methods in the study of social psychology.

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PSYC B529 Cognitive/Neuropsychology Not offered 2014-15 This course explores the cognitive bases of behavior, emphasizing an information processing approach. The major areas of cognitive psychology are surveyed. These areas include perception, attention, memory, language, and thinking and decision making. The application of basic knowledge in these areas to developmental and clinical psychology is also explored. In addition, the course deals with the basics of human neuropsychology, providing an introduction to disorders of language, spatial processing, memory, emotion, and planning/attention as a result of brain injury.

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PSYC B551 Developmental Psychopathology Not offered 2014-15 An examination of research and theory addressing the origins, course, and consequences of maladaptive functioning in children, adolescents, and families. Major forms of childhood and adolescent psychopathology (e.g., antisocial behavior, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and depression) are examined and faimly-based risk factors for psychopathology, such as parenting quality and marital conflict, are explored. An important focus of the course is on the identification of risk and protective factors for psychopathology. Topics covered include contrasting models of psychopathology; assessment and classification of childhood disorders; models of individual and family risk; social and cultural factors influencing the development of psychopathology; and therapeutic efforts to prevent or ameliorate disorders.

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PSYC B561 Intro. to Psychotherapy Not offered 2014-15 This course provides an introduction to the principles and practice of individual psychotherapy with an emphasis on working with children and adolescents. Students are encouraged to think critically about the nature and process of psychotherapy and to apply creatively their knowledge and skills to the task of helping those in need. emphasis is placed on formulating therapeutic goals and conceptualizing therapeutic change. The course provides an overview of dominant conceptualizations of therapy, especially psychodynamic and cognitive/behavioral approaches. Therapeutic techniques and challenges in work with children and adolescents are presented. Concurrent with the course, students have an introductory therapy experience in a school or clinic in which they conduct psychotherapy with one or two clients and receive supervision.

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PSYC B595 Psychopharmacology Not offered 2014-15 A study of the role of drugs in understanding basic brain-behavior relations. Topics include the pharmacological basis of motivation and emotion; pharmacological models of psychopathology; the use of drugs in the treatment of psychiatric disorders such as anxiety, depression, and psychosis; and the psychology and pharmacology of drug addiction. Prerequisite: PSYC 218.

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PSYC B612 Historical Issues in Clinical Developmental Psychology Fall 2014 Familiarizes students with 20th century developments in clinical psychology and with the 18th and 19th century social and intellectual trends from which they emerged. Topics include: Mesmerism and the rise of dynamic psychiatry in Europe and America; changing patterns in the institutionalization of the insane; the Bost Group (James, Prince, Sidis) and the development of abnormal psychology and psychotherapy; the American reception of psychoanalysis; the Mental Hygiene and Child Guidance movements; the growth of psychometrics; personality theories and theorists; and trends in the professionalization of clinical psychology after WWII.

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PSYC B642 Consultation & Practice Issues in School Psychology Not offered 2014-15 The third and final course in the CDPP psychological assessment sequence, this course prepares students for the professional practice of clinical developmental and school psychology. The course deals with models of special education; consultation approaches in school psychology; categories of exceptionality; multicultural issues in the delivery of school psychology services; principles of educational psychology; the structure and organization of schools; and assessment of preschoolers. The class includes a weekly "Diagnostic and Personality Assessment Lab". While taking this course, and continuing through the second semester, each student works in an assessment practicum in a school, clinic, or pupil service agency. In small weekly lab groups, which are held throughout the academic year, students and instructors discuss ongoing cases and consider such clinical issues as test selection, scoring, report writing, working with parents, consultation, and programming recommendations.

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PSYC B660 Family Therapy Not offered 2014-15 This course introduces students to the theoretical and practical foundations of treating couples and families from a systems perspective. Treatment issues are covered through the use of videotapes, didactic presentations, role plays, and student presentations. In conjunction with the weekly one-semester course, students can elect to participate in a one-morning per week family therapy supervision group at CSI. While enrolled in this course, and in the subsequent semester, students engage in psychotherapy practicum in a clinic, school, pupil service agency, or other approved setting arranged by the department.

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PSYC B690 Ethical Issues in Psychology Seminar Not offered 2014-15 This course deals with ethical issues in the science and practice of psychology. Students give class presentations and lead discussions about the APA, PA Licensing Board, and NASP Ethics codes, and about professional issues related to academic and applied psychology. It is taught in the year in which students are engaged in their assessment practicum (usually their third year in the program). Specific ethical issues discussed include competence, informed consent, confidentiality, child abuse reporting, and the duty to warn, with particular emphasis on situations likely to arise in the provision of psychological services to children and families. (Discussion of ethical conduct of research and practice also occurs in the weekly Research Brown Bag lunch meeting and in the Research Methods course, as well as in meetings between individual students and their research advisors). (Roberts,C)

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PSYC B701 Supervised Work Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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PSYC B702 Supervised Research Not offered 2014-15

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Psychology Courses at Haverford College


Certain courses currently offered at Haverford College may be substituted for the equivalent Bryn Mawr courses for purposes of the Bryn Mawr psychology major.

Introductory psychology at Haverford may be substituted for 101/102.
PSYC 200 at Haverford may be substituted for PSYC 205.

The following courses at Haverford will count as 200-level courses for the major:
PSYC 213 (Memory and Cognition)
PSYCH 215 (Introduction to Personality Psychology)
PSYC 217 (Biological Psychology)
PSYC 224 (Social Psychology)
PSYC 238 (Psychology of Language)
PSYC 260 (Cognitive Neuroscience).

The following Haverford courses will count as 300-level courses for the major:
PSYC 214 (Psychology of Adolescence)
PSYC 220 (The Psychology of Time)
PSYC 221 (The Primate Origins of Society)
PSYC 222 (Evolution and Behavior)
PSYCH 225 (Self and Identity)
PSYC 240 (Psychology of Pain and Pain Inhibition)
PSYC 250 (Biopsychology of Emotion and Personality)
PSYC 311 (Advanced Personality Psychology: Freud)
PSYC 325 (The Psychology of Close Relationships)
PSYC 340 (Human Neuropsychology)
PSYC 350 (Biopsychology of Stress)

Students who take Haverford courses with the half credit laboratory attachments may count the lab portion of the course toward fulfilling the advanced lab requirement for the Bryn Mawr major.