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Residential Life
Eugenia Chase Guild Hall
Lower Level
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Bryn Mawr College Residence Halls

Bryn Mawr's residential system is comprised of fourteen dormitories, houses, and apartments.  Scroll down to read more about each of our residences.

Batten House

Batten House

Batten House was donated to the College in 1959 by the family of Jane Batten '55. It is settled in a partially wooded area on the edge of campus, next door to Brecon Hall. Batten served as housing for McBride Scholars (matriculated undergraduate students of non-traditional age) for a number of years. Since Fall 1999, Batten has been housed by upperclass students interested in an environmentally focused co-operative living environment. Students wishing to participate in the Co-Op must submit applications during Room Draw each spring. The Batten Co-Operative is open to Bi-College, upperclass (sophomore, junior or senior) women interested in a living and cooking experience that addresses environmental and social justice issues. Students accepted as members of the Co-Op share the responsibilities of cooking vegetarian/vegan dinners, cleaning, recycling, organizing house and campus-wide activities and hosting speakers.

Brecon

Brecon

The building formerly known as "Graduate Student Housing" became an undergraduate dorm in 1981. At this time, it was renamed "Brecon" and dedicated by Lady Brecon. Brecon is the name of the county in Wales in which the town of Bryn Mawr can be found. While some students find Brecon's distance from central campus an inconvenience, many others enjoy the sense of community the shared experience of living "off campus" (it's not really off campus) fosters within the hall. One of Bryn Mawr's smallest residences, most of Brecon's rooms are spacious with large windows, high ceilings and hardwood floors.

Denbigh

Denbigh

Opened in 1891, Denbigh was the third Bryn Mawr residence hall designed by architects John Stewardson and Walter Cope. Stewardson and Cope adapted the architectural styles of Oxford and Cambridge Universities to the Bryn Mawr campus, introducing the first examples of "Collegiate Gothic" architecture to the United States. Denbigh is conveniently located on central campus, near most administrative, academic, and residential buildings. It also houses the Denbigh Dance Studio. Denbigh Green is a popular spot for sunbathing, pick-up softball and frisbee.

Erdman

Erdman

Opened in 1965, Erdman was designed as a modern Scottish castle by renowned architect Louis Kahn. Composed of three connecting units (or "diamonds"), it houses the College's largest dining hall, and several meeting spaces, . The majority of Erdman bedroom spaces are singles. Upperclass students have the option of drawing into two-person suites, which consist of two bedrooms and a shared common area.

New Dorm

The New Dorm has been newly renovated and is scheduled to open for Fall 2015. This new 101 bed building consists of single rooms for upperclass and first year students.  The New Dorm also houses one of the two dining halls on campus.

Merion

Merion

Merion, Bryn Mawr's oldest residence hall, was designed by Addison Hutton and completed in 1885 (the year Bryn Mawr opened). Many of its rooms still contain the fireplaces and window seats used by the College's first students, while its stairwells are decorated with the original stained glass windows. Merion's exterior stonework was recently repointed and the copper detailing replaced. New bedroom spaces were added to the fourth floor in Summer 1998 to complete the hall's renovation. Merion Green, the "center" of campus, serves as the main venue for outdoor events, including picnics, dances, concerts, carnivals, May Day, Commencement and Reunion.

Pembroke East and West

Pembroke East

Pembroke Hall, which consists of East and West wings, was the second hall designed by Cope and Stewardson. Completed in 1894 and renovated in 1982, many rooms in both wings still contain the original fireplaces and window seats.

Pembroke Arch, which connects the East and West wings, is a popular campus landmark and houses a College dance studio. The Arch attic was renovated in Summer 1998 to add ten upperclass rooms to Pembroke East which serve as the Perry House hall group. This new floor has its own bathroom, pantry and study lounge, and spectacular views of the campus.

Perry House

Perry House serves as the Black Cultural Center and residence.  It consists of 29 beds in a combination of double and single rooms.

Perry House is open to members of Sisterhood, BACaSO, Mujeres and Zami, as well as to those students who share a cultural background or personally identify with the ideals of Perry House.  Students wishing to live in Perry House must submit applications during Room Draw each spring.

Radnor

Radnor

Radnor, completed in 1887, was the first residence hall designed by Cope and Stewardson. Bryn Mawr's smallest "traditional" residence, Radnor is conveniently located next door to the Campus Center, Cafe, and Bookshop.

Rhoads North and South

Rhoads North and South

Rhoads Hall, named after James Rhoads, Bryn Mawr's first president, was completed in 1937.  It is comprised of two wings, North and South, which are joined by a common entryway and living room. The South wing closed in December 1998, so the College could begin the first phase of a multi-million dollar renovation. Since August 1999, both North and South have been completely refurbished.

Rockefeller

Rockefeller

Rockefeller, a gift from John D. Rockefeller, was the last residence hall designed by Cope and Stewardson. Completed in 1904, "Rock" is Bryn Mawr's largest residence and houses the College's architectural drafting studio. Rockefeller is most easily identified by its castle-like towers and arch, much like Pembroke Hall.

Common to Bryn Mawr's earliest buildings, many Rockefeller rooms contain the original fireplaces and window seats. One of Rock's most popular and unique features is the leaded glass in the doors of its bedroom spaces. Since students are permitted to decorate the glass (with water-based paint), the hallways become virtual art galleries.