Current Faculty

Elizabeth Cheresh Allen

 

 

Elizabeth Cheresh Allen

Professor of Russian and Comparative Literature
Office: Russian Center, 2nd Floor
Phone: 610-526-5188
Email: eallen@brynmawr.edu

Elizabeth Cheresh Allen is Professor of Russian and Comparative Literature. She has been on the faculty at Bryn Mawr since 1991. Her scholarship combines broad interests in European cultural history, comparative literature, and relations of aesthetics to ethics with particular interests in the close analysis of Russian literary texts and the critical interpretation of individual Russian writers. She draws upon all these interests in her studies of the nineteenth-century Russian authors Ivan Turgenev and Mikhail Lermontov. She has written two books: Beyond Realism: Turgenev’s Poetics of Secular Salvation (Stanford University Press, 1992) and A Fallen Idol is Still a God: Lermontov and the Quandaries of Cultural Transition (Standford University Press, 2007), in which she reevaluates the places of these two pivotal figures in Russian and European literary history while reassessing such vexed historical concepts as “realism” and “Romanticism,” and exploring such perennial critical themes as the nature of hybrid genres, the ambiguities of literary influence, and the dynamics of cultural transition. Her next book will address the relation between narrative and ethics in both nineteenth- and twentieth-century Russian authors. Professor Allen has also edited an anthology of Turgenev's fiction and non-fiction, The Essential Turgenev (Northwestern University Press, 1994), and has co-edited a collection of essays entitled Freedom and Responsibility in Russian Literature (Northwestern University Press, 1995). She teaches courses on the 19th-c. Russian novel, on individual major Russian authors, on European romanticism, and on European realism.

Dan Davidson

 

Dan E. Davidson

Professor of Russian and Second Language Acquisition and Director of Russian Language Institute
Office: Russian Center, 2nd Floor
Phone: 610-526-5184
Email: ddavidso@brynmawr.edu

Dan E. Davidson received A. M. and Ph.D. degrees in Slavic Languages and Literatures from Harvard University, and has studied as well at Bonn, Moscow State University and the Harvard Institute for Social Enterprise. He is author or editor of forty-four books and more than 60 scholarly articles in the fields of language, culture, and educational development, including a major 20-year longitudinal investigation of adult second language acquisition in the overseas immersion context.

Dr. Davidson is professor of Russian and Second Language Acquisition, Myra T. Cooley Lectureship in Russian Studies, and has directed or co-directed 36 Ph.D. dissertations in the field of Russian and second-language acquisition over his years at Bryn Mawr. He currently teaches departmental courses on language policy and identity in Russophone Eurasia, the social dynamics of Russian, Russian in the disciplines, and has serves as course director and master class instructor of Russian 001-002. Dr. Davidson has taught previously or served as a visiting faculty member at Harvard University, Amherst College, Columbia University, the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Maryland/College Park. 

Dr. Davidson is president and co-founder of the American Councils for International Education: ACTR/ACCELS, which, since beginning operation on the Bryn Mawr campus in 1976, has developed into one of the premier international education federally funded exchange organizations, focusing its expertise on the design and implementation of advanced level language and area studies, professional development, curriculum and test development, research and evaluation, and institution building in 65 countries of the world. Its association division, the American Council of Teachers of Russian (ACTR), is dedicated to strengthening the study and teaching of Russian language and literature throughout the United States.

From 1992–1995, Dr. Davidson served as co-chairman of the Transformation of the Humanities and Social Sciences initiative sponsored by philanthropist George Soros. The program produced over four hundred experimental textbooks for schools and colleges in Eurasia. During the past 25 years, Dr. Davidson has contributed to the design and implementation of a range of US and foreign government education reform and international exchange programs.  

Dr. Davidson currently chairs the World Language Academic Advisory Committee of the College Board is immediate past president of the Joint National Committee for Languages (JNCL), vice-chair of the Board of Governors of the European Humanities University (Vilnius), vice president of the International Association of Teachers of Russian Language and Literature (MAPRIAL), member of the Executive Committee and past-chair of the Alliance for International Educational and Cultural Exchange, the U. S. National Foreign Language Standards Collaborative, and Chair of the Board of the Center for Educational Testing and Methodology (Kyrgyzstan), the first independent educational testing center in Central Asia.  He is an elected foreign member of the Russian and the Ukrainian Academies of Education and recipient of an honorary professorship from Kyrgyz National University (Bishkek) and of honorary doctoral degrees from Almaty State University (Kazakhstan), the Russian Academy of Sciences (Division of Language and Literature), and the State University of World Languages (Uzbekistan). He has received awards for distinguished service to the profession from the American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages (AATSEEL) in 1995 and the Association of Departments of Foreign Languages of the Modern Language Association (ADFL/MLA) in 1997. In 2005 he received the Kyrgyz National Medal of Honor (“Dank”).

Tim Harte

 

Tim Harte

Chair, Associate Professor of Russian, and Co- Director of the Russian Language Flagship Program
Office: Russian Center, 2nd Floor
Phone: 610-526-5190
Email: tharte@brynmawr.edu

Tim Harte received his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 2001, joining the faculty at Bryn Mawr a year later. His research interests center on early 20th-century Russian literature, film, painting, and culture. His book Fast Forward: The Aesthetics and Ideology of Speed in Russian Avant-Garde Culture, 1910-1930 (http://uwpress.wisc.edu/books/4531.htm), published in 2010 by the University of Wisconsin Press, explores the modernist “cult of speed” that emerged in Russian avant-garde painting, poetry, and cinema.  Currently he is working on a book project that explores the intersection of modern athletics and early 20th-century Russian artistic culture.  Tim has also published articles on Vladmir Nabokov, the cinema of Mikhail Kalatozov, Aleksandr Sokurov’s film Russian Ark, the “ferroconcrete poetry” of Vasilii Kamensky, and the treatment of modern athletics in the verse of Osip Mandel’stam.  His teaching interests include courses on 20th-century Russian literature (Nabokov, Chekhov), avant-garde culture, contemporary Russian culture, silent cinema, Soviet and Eastern European cinema of the 1960s, and, last but not least, the Russian language. 

Marina Rojavin

 

 

Marina Rojavin

Lecturer in Russian
Office: Russian Center, 2nd Floor
Phone: 610-526-5185
Email: mrojavin@brynmawr.edu

Marina Rojavin was born in Ukraine. A journalist by college education, she worked as an editor in the USSR. She received her Ph.D. in Russian Linguistics at the O. Potebnia Institute for Linguistics, National Academy of Sciences, Ukraine. Her dissertation focuses on The Category of Gender in Modern Russian. She has taught Russian language, literature, cinema, and culture at Temple University, Swarthmore College, and for a number of summers at Middlebury College’s Kathryn Wasserman-Davis School of Russian in its graduate program.   

Some of her scholarly and academic interests are semantics and functional grammar, comparative cultural studies, and the Russian grammatical gender as a source of metaphorical thinking. Marina’s teaching interests include courses on literature of the Soviet and post-Soviet Period, Russian philosophers and intellectuals in Imperial Russia, History of Russian cinema, Russian intelligentsia in Soviet cinema, Women in Soviet and Post-Soviet Cinema, Jews in Russian literature, film, and culture, and the Russian language. She and Allan Reid published A Guide to Russian Words and Expressions that Cause Difficulties (The Edwin Mellen Press) in 2004. With her colleagues, she has completed the textbook Russian for Advanced Students published in 2013 by Dunwoody Press. Marina has also published articles on the semantic category of gender in Russian and Ukrainian, and on the category of gender in Russian and on applied linguistics.

Marina loves grammar and tries to convince her students that grammar is an appealing thing, sharing funny stories about punctuation marks and parts of sentences with them. She likes tongue-twisters, proverbs, and sayings. She also likes hard rock and classical music. When work overwhelms her she cooks. She enjoys food in restaurants as well. She enjoys trips – hiking or traveling by car through Alaska or the Apennine Mountains or the Alps.

Emeritus

George Pahomov

 

George Pahomov

Professor Emeritus of Russian
Email: gpahomov@brynmawr.edu

George Pahomov holds a Ph.D. in Russian Language and Literature from New York University and is currently a professor in the Russian Department of Bryn Mawr College. In the past, he has taught at Queens College in New York and for a number of summers at the Russian School of Middlebury College. He has studied at Moscow University and has made numerous trips to the Soviet Union and Russia.

His scholarly and academic interests include Russian prose at the juncture of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, Russian culture and civilization, and Eastern Orthodoxy as a spiritual and cultural phenomenon. He is the author of two books and a number of articles on such figures as Zhukovsky, Pushkin, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Bunin and the modern poet, Ivan Elagin. Though he has published primarily literary and cultural topics, there have been several articles on applied linguistics and teaching methodology. Most recently he has been completing an anthology on Russian culture and civilization.

Before entering academic life he had been in the world of publishing and later served as principal editor of the five-volume translation of the Nikonian Chronicle. George Pahomov was born in the Soviet Union, but came to the United States at an early age, grew up and was educated in the multicultural world of New York City where one could hear the Charles Mingus ensemble and a Russian Orthodox liturgy within several hours and blocks of each other. He has lived in Europe for several years and served in the U.S. Army.