Annual Security Report and Annual Fire Safety Report (Clery Act)

Campus Safety Patch

2016 ANNUAL CAMPUS SECURITY & FIRE SAFETY REPORT

BRYN MAWR COLLEGE

September 2016

TABLE OF CONTENTS

MESSAGE FROM THE DIRECTOR

This report is prepared in compliance with the Federal Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, as amended by the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013. The statistics are maintained and compiled by the Campus Safety Department.

These laws require all institutions of higher education within the Commonwealth to provide students and employees with information pertaining to, but not limited to crime statistics, security measures, fire statistics, fire safety measures, policies relating to missing persons, and penalties for drug use, on an annual basis.  These acts also require that this information be available to prospective students and employees upon request. 

The primary purpose of the federal law is to create a national reporting system on crime and safety, as well as fire safety for our nation's colleges and universities. Bryn Mawr College is located in Lower Merion Township, a quiet residential suburb of Philadelphia. Bryn Mawr has a strong crime-prevention and fire safety program that includes the entire community ­ students, staff and faculty. The entire report is available on-line at www.brynmawr.edu/safety/act73.htm plus the link is disseminated via e-mail and handout messages to the Bryn Mawr College Community by October 1st every year as required by law.

http://www.brynmawr.edu/safety/documents/BMC_Geographic_Area_and_Emergency_Phone_Locations.pdf

ABOUT THE CAMPUS SAFETY DEPARTMENT

The Bryn Mawr College's Campus Safety Department operates continuously to provide a safe environment for our faculty, staff, students and visitors that is conducive to both academic achievement and social development. This report is prepared by the Campus Safety Department which is responsible for furthering the safety and security of the Bryn Mawr community from hazards, including crime. We all have a crucial role to play and we thank each of you for doing your part.

The Campus Safety Department is located in the John J. Maloney Building in the Campus Safety Parking Lot also known as the Upper Science lot. The office provides twenty-four hour, seven-days-a-week services to the community that include security, fire safety, and parking. The department has a total of 24 staff members.  There are 18 full time staff members:  1 Director, 1 Captain, 1 Lieutenant, 2 Sergeants, 3 Corporals; 5 Patrol Officers, 3 Dispatchers, and 1 Office Manager.  The department also has 1 Operations Coordinator who, as part of his responsibilities, oversees Access Control.  There are also 6 on-call and part time officers/dispatchers.

Campus Safety reports to the Chief Financial Officer of the College and cooperates with a variety of campus offices and organizations to enhance community safety.   Bryn Mawr College is located in Lower Merion Township and works closely with the Lower Merion Police Department (LMPD), routinely sharing information that takes place on campus as well as incidents that take place in the surrounding areas.  Campus Safety has a very positive working relationship with the Lower Merion Police Department, the State Police and other local law enforcement agencies that fully cooperate with any investigation into criminal matters on College property whenever appropriate.  The campus is bounded by Morris Avenue, New Gulph Road, Roberts Road, Wyndon Avenue, Merion Avenue and Yarrow Road, with one off campus site - the Graduate School of Social Work and Social Research located on Airdale Road in Bryn Mawr.

While Campus Safety Officers do not have the power of arrest, they are empowered to detain individuals whenever that is deemed appropriate. Additionally, Campus Safety must enforce all Bryn Mawr College’s policies and procedures.  Campus Safety Officers have a broad range of experience, including training under Pennsylvania legislation: Act 120, which is the Municipal Police Officers Training, Act 235, Lethal Weapons Training, which addresses the use of force, and Private Security Officers training, which is based on industry standards for security professionals and First Responder Medical Training. In addition, Campus Safety Officers have received training on the Incident Command System (ICS), as well as other training relevant to the services they provide to the community. Training is very important to ensure that Campus Safety Officers respond appropriately and promptly to serious incidents that occur on campus.

All Patrol personnel are required to complete Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR), and, Automated External Defibrillation (AED) training.  Emergency medical assistance and transportation to the Bryn Mawr College Health Center, which is open Monday – Friday from 9AM to 5PM and Saturday and Sunday from 9AM to 2PM during the academic year, or to Bryn Mawr Hospital, which is one-half mile away, are available by contacting Campus Safety.

An on-call transportation service is available during the academic year to provide safe transportation across campus and to the Paoli/Thorndale Line (R5) Bryn Mawr Train Station, as well as the Norristown High Speed line (R100) from 7:00 pm to 1:00 am daily.

The College maintains a proactive approach to crime and its prevention. Campus Safety has instituted a variety of programs to support this philosophy. The programs include bicycle registration, crime prevention and R.A.D (Rape Aggression Defense) self-defense seminars. Campus Safety also assists in grounds and building maintenance by reporting potential safety hazards discovered while patrolling the campus.

The Committee on Campus (Public) Safety, (C.O.P.S.), is a student organization that works closely with Campus Safety. C.O.P.S. representatives are in each residence hall and perform a variety of safety-related services that include: "COPS Quotes" safety reminders and special   Safe-Teas. These special events and / or activities occur a couple of times a semester while school is in session.

BRYN MAWR COLLEGE POLICY STATEMENT ADDRESSING PREPARATION of DISCLOSURE of CRIME STATISTICS

The procedures for preparing the annual disclosure of crime statistics include reporting statistics to the College community obtained from the following sources: the Lower Merion Police Department (LMPD), the Campus Safety Department, and other officials (as defined below). Crime statistics are recorded in the calendar year in which the crime was reported.

A written request for statistical information is made on an annual basis to all Campus Security Authorities (CSA’s) (as defined by federal law). Statistical information is requested and provided to the Campus Safety Department by the employees at the College Counseling and Psychological Services and the Student Health Center. Also, the Title IX Coordinator provides statistics to the Campus Safety Department about cases where the victim chose not to report the incident to the Campus Safety Department and to / or the LMPD.

All of the statistics are gathered, compiled, and reported to the College community in the Annual Security and Fire Safety Report, which is published by the Campus Safety Department. Campus Safety submits the annual crime statistics published in this brochure to the Department of Education (DOE). The statistical information gathered by the Department of Education is available to the public through the DOE website.

REPORTING CRIMES AND OTHER INCIDENTS

In the event of a crime or medical emergency, community members, students, faculty, staff, and guests are encouraged to report all crimes and other safety related incidents to the Bryn Mawr College Campus Safety Department in a timely manner by dialing X7911 or 610-526-7911.  Be prepared to stay on the line and provide as much information as possible. The request to call Campus Safety first is to better assist the local enforcement departments where the emergency is located. However, if 911 is called first, please call Campus Safety X7911 immediately afterwards. 

Campus safety is a shared responsibility. All are encouraged to report crimes and suspicious activity to Campus Safety immediately. When an incident report is generated, it will be investigated accurately and promptly.

You can report any crime to Campus Safety or any Campus Security Authority (CSA) on campus; a College Dean in Guild, Title IX Coordinator in Pensby Center, Athletic coach at Schwartz Gym, Residential Life staff in Guild and any HA located in all the Residence halls.

When an incident is reported, the appropriate support, usually a Campus Safety Officer, is immediately sent to investigate. The community is made aware of incidents that impact the entire community through the appropriate administrator, campus newspaper, or by college-wide posting of safety alerts.

Emergency phones are located in various areas on campus. These phones are painted yellow and do not require dialing. Press the large red button and wait for the Campus Safety dispatcher to answer. The phones are equipped with an enhanced system that identifies your location for the Campus Safety dispatcher.

Lower Merion Township Police, the local police department, in addition to other law enforcement agencies like the Pennsylvania State Police have an excellent working relationship with Campus Safety.  Although there is no written memorandum of understanding, both departments share information needed to provide professional service to the community. 

College crime statistics are prepared annually and sent to the Pennsylvania State Police for inclusion in the Federal Bureau of Investigation Uniform Crime Report and in the Department of Education, Security Report.  These statistics are also furnished to all members of the community and student applicants annually, and to applicants for employment.

REPORTING CRIME ON CAMPUS

Although we encourage the reporting of crime directly to Campus Safety, in some instances members of the campus community may choose to file a report with one of the other campus security authorities (CSA). They include any member of the College Deans, the Director or Associate Director of Residential Life, other Directors and Department Heads, and Athletic Coaches. The Campus Security Authorities (CSA’s) work closely with Campus Safety to ensure the safety of our community.

Allegations of a campus crime that community members are aware of and that were made in good faith must be reported to Campus Safety. “In good faith” means that there is a reasonable basis for reporting a crime, as opposed to basing a report on a rumor.

To report a crime or incident, call 610-526-7911 or (X7911). Dispatchers are available at this number 24 hours a day to answer your call. A report will be taken even if the caller refuses to give their name and follow up will be conducted.

CONFIDENTIAL REPORTING

Bryn Mawr College allows for confidential reporting of crime. Victims or bystanders who do not want to pursue action within the College or the criminal justice system can make a confidential report on any crime. Bryn Mawr Campus Safety can file a report of the incident without revealing the identity of the victim. The Lower Merion Police Department will be notified as well. The College will guide victims through the available options and support the victims in their decision. Various counseling options are available at the College, and outside resources are available as well.

The purpose of such a report is to comply with the victim’s wishes to keep the matter confidential, while taking steps to ensure the future safety of the victim and others. With this information, the College can keep and disseminate accurate records of the number of incidents involving students, determine where there is a pattern of crime with regard to a particular location, method, or assailant, and alert the community to potential danger.

Reports filed on any crime, in this manner, are counted and disclosed in the annual crime statistics for the College. You can view the Annual Security Report (which includes statistics for the previous three years) as well as institutional policies concerning campus security by contacting Campus Safety 610-526-7911 (X7911) or by accessing the website at: http://www.brynmawr.edu/safety/act73.htm

Sample of Campus Security Authorities – CSA’s responsible for reporting criminal activity include:

  • Campus Safety
  • Deans
  • Title IX Coordinator
  • Director & Assistant Residential Life
  • Director of Student Activities & Orientation
  • Graduate Assistants
  • Director & Assistant Directors of Athletics, Coaches and assistant Coaches and Trainers
  • The Hall Advisors (40)
  • Faculty members with counseling responsibilities

Confidential reporting departments

  • Counseling  Services
  • Licensed / ordained religious advisors

CAMPUS EMERGENCY NOTIFICATION SYSTEM

Timely Warnings

The purpose of this policy is to outline procedures that Bryn Mawr College will use to issue Timely Warnings in compliance with the Clery Act.

The College will issue a Timely Warning Notice in the event that it receives notice of an alleged Clery Crime (defined below) occurring on campus, on public property within or immediately adjacent to the campus, or in or on non-campus buildings or property controlled by the College, where the College determines, in its judgment, that the allegations present a serious or continuing threat to the College community.  For purposes of this policy, “timely” means as soon as reasonably practical after an incident has been reported to the Campus Safety Department or the Campus Security Authorities identified by Bryn Mawr College or local police agencies that have concurrent jurisdiction have reported the information to the College.  The Director of the Campus Safety Department, or, in the Director’s absence or unavailability, the Director’s designee, is responsible for determining whether to issue a Timely Warning Notice.  If the Director or the Director’s designee is not available, a member of the Bryn Mawr Emergency Response Team (BERT) will make the determination (See “Emergency Response” policy).

Whether to issue a Timely Warning Notice is determined on a case-by-case basis for Clery Act crimes: homicide, sex offenses (rape, fondling, incest and statutory rape), robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, motor vehicle theft, arson, domestic violence, dating violence, stalking and hate crimes, as defined by the Clery Act.1.  The Director of Campus Safety and the Emergency Response Team, or their  designees may  also  issue  a  Timely  Warning  Notice for  other  crimes,  as  determined necessary. In determining whether to issue a Timely Warning Notice, the College will consider any factors reflecting on whether the alleged crime represents a serious or continuing threat to the College community, including, but not limited to, (a) the nature of the incident; (b) when and where the incident occurred; (c) when it was reported; (d) the continuing danger to the campus community; and (e) the amount of information known by the Campus Safety Department. If there is insufficient information available to determine whether the incident represents a continuing threat to the College community, the College will issue a Timely Warning Notice unless, based on the information available, it appears unlikely that there is an ongoing threat to the community, based on the information available, the College does not have full information to evaluate the nature of the ongoing threat.

The Director of Campus Safety will make efforts to consult with the Director of Communications or a designee, if s/he is available, to develop the content of the Timely Warning Notice.  Time permitting, additional input may be garnered from additional members of the Emergency Response Team, including the Chief Financial Officer, and the Provost. The College’s Title IX Coordinator may also be consulted in appropriate situations.

The reason why the College does or does not issue a Timely Warning Notice for any Clery Crime reported to the College will be documented on the Timely Warning Determination Form and maintained by the Department of Campus Safety for a minimum of seven years.  A copy of the documentation will be attached to the written and electronic copies of the incident report.

The Timely Warning Notice will include, to the extent known, the date, time and nature of the offense, a brief overview of its particular circumstances, a physical description of the actor(s), law enforcement’s immediate actions, a request and method for witnesses to contact law enforcement, and where applicable and appropriate, cautionary advice that would promote safety. In developing the content of the Timely Warning Notice, the College will take all reasonable efforts not to compromise ongoing law enforcement efforts. The “timely warning” withholds the names of victims as confidential and will aid in the prevention of similar occurrences.

The College distributes Timely Warning Notices in various ways.  Once the College determines that an alert will be issued, the Campus Safety Department e-mails the announcement and posts it on its website https://www.brynmawr.edu, and posts alerts on bulletin boards throughout campus.  The College may also send text messages disseminating the notice to those who register their cell phone numbers.

Anyone with information about a serious crime or incident should report the circumstances to the Campus Safety Department by phone at (610-526-7911) or in person at the John J. Maloney Building.  If a report is made to other College administrators, those administrators will immediately notify the Campus Safety Department.

The Bryn Mawr College Emergency Notification System allows the College to contact the community in the event of an emergency by sending messages via:

1) Text message

2) Voice message (mobile or land-line)

3) E-mail

4) Audible siren and loudspeaker

5) Bryn Mawr web site postings

When an emergency occurs that requires community attention or action, the emergency notification system will be activated and you will be notified by the methods noted above using the personal information you have provided. The emergency notification system will continue to try to reach you until you confirm receipt of the message.

All student email addresses and cell phone numbers are automatically uploaded into the system.  Faculty, staff and other members of our community are strongly encouraged to provide their cell phone number to Human Resources to ensure that their information is also loaded in the system. All faculty and staff can update their personal information, including cell phone numbers, using BIONIC under “Self-Service”.  It is imperative that contact information is accurate and up-to-date in order for you to receive emergency notifications. All current Bryn Mawr College emails will be used in the Everbridge system.

In addition to these steps, a recorded message may be placed on the Emergency Hot line, extension x7310, and information may also be posted on the college homepage.  In the event of an immediate hazard or a serious or ongoing threat to campus safety, a text message will be sent out via Everbridge, and a public alert siren will be sounded, if necessary. The siren will be followed by instructions. When the crisis has passed, an all-clear will be sounded. For more information please refer to the Bryn Mawr College Emergency Response Guide. http://www.brynmawr.edu/emergency/

The emergency notification system will be tested once a semester and over each summer. Additional testing may be conducted as part of drills and exercises, or as necessary.

1 A hate crime is defined as: “A crime reported to local police agencies or to a campus security authority that manifests evidence that the victim was intentionally selected because of the perpetrator’s bias against the victim. [T]he categories of bias include the victim’s actual or perceived race, religion, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, ethnicity, national origin, and disability. 

BRYN MAWR’S EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAM

Bryn Mawr’s approach to situations that have had a significant impact on an individual member or the entire campus community has succeeded over the years because of the dedication and conscientiousness of various members of the College community.

As is required, we test our emergency response and evacuation procedures, including the use of electronic and cellular communication, better known as the Everbridge system, on a semi-annual basis.

Tests may be unannounced or unannounced (Test is defined as a regularly scheduled drill or exercise, and appropriate follow-up activities, designed for assessment and evaluation of emergency plans and capabilities)

Notification Process Scenario

Although there is no one ‘typical’ response since there is much variety in the types of incidents that the Bryn Mawr Emergency Response Team (BERT) will respond to, there is a general template of response to a critical incident. Some examples of the kinds of incidents/events include hostile intruders or other criminal acts, hazardous materials incidents and lab accidents, disasters such as fires, storms, and more slowly unfolding events such as disease outbreaks and prevention measures.

In incidents requiring immediate action, the ERT notification will typically be a Campus Safety dispatcher contacting the BERT ‘Command Group’.

If possible, the BERT Command Group will meet in one of the identified Emergency Operations Centers (EOC) to decide the appropriate actions to take in response to the emergency. Determinations of who will respond to the scene of an incident, to the hospital, to a police station, etc. will be communicated by the emergency notification system.

The members of the Bryn Mawr College Emergency Response Team Command Group have been trained in Incident Command System (ICS) and the basics of this nationally standardized management approach will be employed.  An Incident Commander will be the responder (not necessarily the BERT team member; police, fire, etc.) who takes control at the scene of an incident as it unfolds. Senior administrators are in charge of the campus and will be overseeing management of the impact of the incident on and off campus; the Incident Commander will be in charge of the incident scene itself.  

In this way, a clear chain of command will be established, prompt and more efficient communication will take place, and integration of the necessary responders will be more efficient.

Chain of Command


 

Emergency Response Team

 

CRIME LOGS

Bryn Mawr College Campus Safety maintains a daily crime log that contains specific information pertaining to all crimes that occur within the patrol jurisdiction of Campus Safety and that are reported.  The daily crime log may be viewed at the John J. Maloney Building, Bryn Mawr College.

Certain information may be withheld from the crime log under specified circumstances, primarily information that would jeopardize the success of an investigation or the safety of a person in the investigation. The Campus Safety Department makes the crime log for the most recent 60-day period open to public inspection during normal business hours, while crime logs containing material more than 60 days old are retained for seven years for public inspection upon two days’ notice.

BUILDING SECURITY

Campus Safety has responsibility for locking and unlocking campus buildings based on use, class schedule, and special events. Access to institutional facilities by employees is on an as-needed basis and incorporates strict key and access control procedures. Visitors to the campus seeking access to campus buildings and facilities for special events must do so through an individual host, a sponsoring department, or reservation.

The policy at Bryn Mawr College is to provide easy access to authorized individuals. That access must be consistent with safety and the security of community members' property and that of the College. Questions or suggestions related to authorized access should be directed to the Access Coordinator, x7911.   

Facilities maintenance and landscaping are maintained in a manner that minimizes hazardous conditions. Bryn Mawr Campus Safety regularly patrols the main campus and the Graduate School of Social Work and Social Research and reports malfunctioning lights and other unsafe physical conditions to the Facilities Department for repair. Other members of the College community should promptly report safety problems to the Bryn Mawr College Campus Safety Department at 610-526-7911.

There are twelve residence halls on campus. All resident areas are locked 24 hours a day and have access control. Buildings that contain classrooms, offices and dining centers are opened and locked in accordance with a schedule. Visitors to the campus can enter most academic buildings during normal business hours from 8am to 6pm Monday through Friday.

Access to housing facilities is limited to those with authorization. Resident students have card-access to their residence halls and keys to their individual rooms. Guests of a resident must be accompanied by the resident.

All unauthorized persons on campus will be investigated by Campus Safety.

For further protection during low-occupancy periods, such as school breaks and vacations, residence hall access is restricted to authorized community members.

ALCOHOL, CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES and WEAPONS

Bryn Mawr College complies with federal, state and local laws including those which regulate the: manufacture, sale, purchase, transportation, possession and use of alcoholic beverages, controlled substances, and weapons. Regulations will be enforced by Campus Safety and the LMPD. A person less than 21 years of age commits a summary offense if he or she engages in:

  • Manufacture, sale , transporting, furnishing, possessing, etc. of intoxicating liquor
  • Maintaining unlawful drinking places
  • Bootlegging and operating a still
  • Furnishing liquor to a minor or intemperate person
  • Underage possession
  • Using a vehicle for illegal transportation of liquor
  • Drinking on a train or public conveyance
  • Attempts to commit any of the above

 A person who is convicted of violating this section may be subjected to a fine, jail and/or license suspension.

 

BI-COLLEGE ALCOHOL AND DRUG POLICIES

All students are responsible for acting in accordance with the College’s Alcohol and Drug Policies, which are distributed to students each year via calendar and Student Handbook. These policies assert that each student is responsible for conducting herself or himself in ways consistent with federal, state and local laws, for following College party rules and for assisting those impaired by alcohol or drug use in the interests of their health and well-being. Impairment due to alcohol or drug use is never an excuse for misconduct. The College will not contribute to the cost of a legal defense for those who violate drug or alcohol laws and rules. Alcohol or drug policy infractions may result in a Dean’s Panel, Honor Board proceeding, or other College or SGA disciplinary action.

The care and concern for other individuals which are embodied in the Social Honor Code should govern a student’s response to a violation of the Bi-College alcohol and drug policies. When a student is concerned about another student’s alcohol or drug use or its self-destructive potential, she or he may express that concern and, if appropriate, encourage that student to seek confidential help from one of the counselors, nurses or physicians on either campus or from a professional off campus. A student with questions about how best to confront or intervene on behalf of another student may seek guidance from a drug and alcohol counselor, counselor or dean. Advice may be sought without revealing the identity of the student needing help, if that seems best.

ALCOHOL POLICY

The Alcohol Policy, in conjunction with planned educational activities and support services, is designed to achieve the following goals:

  • to remind students of the laws of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and of the Social Honor Codes, both of which govern their behavior with respect to alcohol;
  • to stress moderation, safety and individual accountability for those who choose to drink;
  • to maintain a Bi-College social atmosphere that is free of coercion for those who choose not to drink and a climate in which alcohol is not the focus of parties or other social events;
  • to maintain a Bi-College community in which alcohol abuse and its effects are minimal;
  • to provide confidential and effective guidance for those with specific needs related to alcohol use and alcoholism; and to provide information and education about the effects of alcohol for all students.

All members of the Bi-College community are expected to be familiar with and abide by the principles of the Alcohol Policy.

It is the duty of all students to conduct themselves in a manner consistent with the Honor Codes, in addition to helping others to do the same. With regard to the consumption of alcohol, students are responsible for their own well-being. Behavior that puts students at mental, physical and/or legal risk cannot be condoned.

Alcohol Effects

Alcohol consumption causes a number of marked changes in behavior. Even low doses significantly impair the judgment and coordination required to drive a car safely, increasing the likelihood that the driver will be involved in an accident. Low to moderate doses of alcohol also increase the incidence of a variety of aggressive acts, including spouse and child abuse. Moderate to high doses of alcohol cause marked impairments in higher mental functions, severely altering a person’s ability to learn and remember information. Very high doses cause respiratory depression and death. If combined with other depressants of the central nervous system, much lower doses of alcohol will produce the effects just described.

Repeated use of alcohol can lead to dependence. Sudden cessation of alcohol intake is likely to produce withdrawal symptoms, including severe anxiety, tremors, hallucinations and convulsions. Alcohol withdrawal can be life-threatening. Long-term consumption of large quantities of alcohol, particularly when combined with poor nutrition, can also lead to permanent damage to vital organs such as the brain and the liver.

Mothers who drink alcohol during pregnancy may give birth to infants with fetal alcohol syndrome. These infants may have irreversible physical abnormalities and mental challenges. In addition, research indicates that children of alcoholic parents are at greater risk than other youngsters of becoming alcoholics.

  • Students who choose to consume, provide or serve alcohol, with an understanding of the responsibilities imposed by Pennsylvania law, should do so with a sense of responsibility and concern for themselves and others. Students also have the responsibility to confront others whose behavior under the influence of alcohol is inconsistent with their welfare and concern for others in the community. When community members lose their ability to reason and control their actions due to excessive alcohol consumption, it is threatening to them, to those around them, and ultimately to the community as a whole. Students are urged to accept responsibility for preventing themselves and others from ever reaching that point.

  • Since the majority of students are under 21, the legal drinking age in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, alcoholic beverages are not to be served or consumed at student parties open to and/or advertised in the College, Bi-College, or Tri-College community. Additionally, alcoholic beverages can neither be served nor consumed at open parties held in public spaces. These include:

    • At Bryn Mawr: Cambrian Row, the Campus Center, Guild Hall, Thomas Hall, Goodhart, Applebee Barn, Schwartz Gymnasium, all corridors, stairwells, landings, basements, attics and courtyards, laundries, all dining halls, Arnecliffe Studio, Pembroke Dance Studio, classroom buildings, the Dorothy Vernon Room, Canaday Library, outdoors on College grounds.

    • At Haverford: Founders Great Hall and Common Room, the Dining Center, Lunt Party Room, the Old Gymnasium and Alumni Field House, Marshall Auditorium, MacCrate Recital Hall, all corridors, stairwells, roofs and attics, Stokes Auditorium, classroom buildings, Magill Library, outdoors on College grounds. With special permission, parties at which only those 21 years of age and older are served alcohol may be held in public spaces.

  • Students who consume alcohol where it is forbidden under Section 2 of this Policy, and thereby place the hosts, the Colleges, and the students who administer party funds at risk and in jeopardy, should be asked to refrain from violating the Policy by the host or other party guests. In incidents where students feel that a violation of the Alcohol Policy has occurred and where the confronting party and the confronted individual fail to reach a resolution, they should follow the procedure of the campus on which the incident occurred. At Haverford, disregard for these Alcohol and other Party Policies should be brought to the attention of the joint Student-Administration Alcohol Policy Panel, composed of three members of Student Council, three members of Honor Council, two appointed members at large, and two deans.

This panel will address strictly procedural violations of the Policy. Referrals can be made by the Honor Council. At Bryn Mawr, disregard for these Alcohol and other Party Policies should be dealt with under the procedures outlined in the Social Honor Code.

  • Inebriation shall not be seen as an acceptable or justifiable excuse for disruptive behavior and confrontation for such behavior shall be dealt with as in the realm of each campus’s Social Honor Code.

  • When confronting an individual does not or cannot lead to a satisfactory resolution of a problem, the individual whose behavior allegedly violates the Codes and expected conduct of the Colleges, in accordance with the procedures of the Social Honor Codes, shall ultimately be brought to the attention of the Honor Board or Honor Council.

  • The Honor Board/Council will bring a case to the attention of the Office of the Dean of the appropriate College if there is a threat to the lives or safety of individuals or of damage to College or private property resulting from inebriation or a violation of the Alcohol Policy. Flagrant or repeated violations of party guidelines could constitute such a case. Such behavior may result in separation or exclusion of the confronted person(s) from the Colleges.

  • In some cases, the Honor Board/Council or the Office of the Dean will consult counselors who have expertise in alcohol abuse and alcoholism if such expertise is deemed relevant. Such consultation will take place only with the confronted person’s knowledge.

  • Coordinators of parties and other social events must abide by the Party Policy of the host campus.
  • It is expected that hosts will inform their guests of the provisions of the Honor Codes, including the Alcohol Policy. Should the provisions of this Policy be violated by non-Bi- College members, their further access to these campuses may be restricted.

  • Faculty and staff members who entertain students should be aware of the responsibilities and risks to the Colleges and to themselves as individual social hosts under the laws of the Commonwealth.

  • Groups sponsoring social events must abide by the host campus’ Party Policy. If party guidelines are not followed by guests or hosts, it is the responsibility of students aware of the violation to approach those in violation and seek a resolution.

Services and Referrals

Both Bryn Mawr and Haverford Colleges provide services and referral for individuals who need help with an alcohol-related problem. For confidential assistance, contact:

Kay Kerr, M.D., Medical Director, Bryn Mawr College Health Services, The Health Center,

610-526-7360.

Reggie Jones, LCSW, Counseling Director, Bryn Mawr College Health Services, The Health

Center, 610-526-7360.

Alcoholics Anonymous Information Center, 444 N. 3rd St., Suite 3E, Philadelphia,

215-923-7900.

DRUG POLICY

Drug Violations

  • Violations of laws prohibiting the production, distribution, and/or use of certain controlled substances and the equipment or devices utilized in their preparation and/or use.
  • Arrests for violations of state and local laws, specifically those related to the unlawful Possession, Sale, Use, Growing, Manufacturing or Making of narcotic drugs
  • The unlawful cultivation, manufacture, distribution, sale, purchase, use, possession, transportation or importation of any controlled drug or narcotic substance, including opium or cocaine and their derivatives (morphine, heroin, codeine); marijuana; synthetic narcotics (Demerol, methadone) or dangerous nonnarcotic drugs (barbituates, Benzedrine)

The drug policy, in conjunction with planned educational activities and support services, is designed to achieve the following goals:

  • to remind students that the Social Honor Codes, the federal laws and the laws of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania do apply to their behavior with respect to the use of drugs;
  • to stress individual accountability for those who choose to use illegal drugs;
  • to maintain a Bi-College community where the harmful effects of drug use can be minimized;
  • to inform the members of the Bi-College community of the availability of confidential and effective guidance and resources for those with questions and concerns related to drug use, dependence and abuse; and
  • to encourage all members of the Bi-College community to become familiar with the physiological, psychological and legal aspects of drug use, dependence and abuse.

All members of the Bi-College community are expected to be familiar with and abide by the principles of the drug policy. This policy stresses prevention and concern; it charges the community with the responsibility for drug education, intervention and heightened awareness of campus resources for dealing with drug problems. It also asks us to consider the relationship between the individual and the community, and the question of responsibility to one’s peers. In many cases, choosing not to intervene in another person’s abuse of drugs is not a neutral position. By not interfering, we become an enabler. In claiming to allow abusers their individual freedom of choice, we may in fact be limiting their choices by reinforcing their attitudes and behavior. In summary, we have a responsibility not to withdraw from the community either by abusing drugs or by ignoring the abuse of drugs.

1. The illegal possession, use, sale or distribution of drugs is in violation of the law, and the Colleges will not protect students from prosecution under federal, state or local law.

2.  Students have the responsibility to confront and/or intervene on the behalf of individuals whose use of drugs or actions under the influence of drugs presents a danger to themselves and/or to the community at large.

3.  The Colleges as educational institutions, being concerned about the harmful effects of the illegal use, possession, sale or distribution of drugs on the individual, and on the integrity, safety and security of this academic community, do not condone the illegal use, possession, sale or distribution of drugs. The administrations of Bryn Mawr and Haverford Colleges reserve the right to act when they have reason to believe that involvement with drugs is having an adverse effect upon the life and/or academic performance of students or adversely affects or legally implicates others in the academic community. College action may take such forms as education, counseling, and referral to outside agencies, separation or exclusion, depending on the situation.

Procedures

A student’s response to a violation of the Bi-College drug policy should be governed, first of all, by the care and concern for other individuals which are embodied in the Social Honor Codes. The following guidelines are not meant to cover all situations. They are intended, instead, to remind students of the variety of resources available and to reassure them about the consequences of seeking help.

When a student is concerned about another student’s drug use and its self-destructive potential, he or she should express his or her concern and, if appropriate, encourage that student to seek confidential help from one of the counselors, nurses or physicians on either campus or from a professional off campus. If confrontation does not seem appropriate or proves ineffective, the concerned individual should turn to the drug and alcohol counselor, a counselor, the counseling director, the medical director or dean for advice on how to intervene and help. Advice may be sought without revealing the identity of the student needing help.

If a student’s behavior as a result of drug use has disturbed or harmed other individuals or the community in a more general sense, the behavior itself should be dealt with through the usual Honor Code procedure at either college, beginning with confrontation. If mediation is necessary, the members of the Bryn Mawr Honor Board or the Haverford Honor Council should be consulted. The drug use that may have caused the behavior should not be viewed as an excuse, but as a second problem for which the individual may be encouraged to seek help from a professional counselor. In cases where the Honor Council or Board is asked to intervene, they will deal with the specific behavior that has been brought to them and may recommend that the individual go to a counselor for evaluation and help with any underlying substance abuse. Problems with behavior related to drug use that involve Bryn Mawr graduate students or special students who are not bound by the Social Honor Code should be referred to the Deans of the Graduate Schools if they cannot be resolved by the individual concerned.

If an individual’s involvement with drugs is such that it, or behavior associated with it, is violent or life-threatening, it should be brought to the attention of a dean or College physician without delay by any member of the community who becomes aware of the situation. Thus, a counselor, peer educator, dean, physician, or Honor Board/Council member who was working with a student on any aspect of his or her involvement with drugs would, as in any other life-threatening situation, be bound to report the problem to the Dean of the appropriate college when the potential for violence or loss of life requires immediate administrative action.

Some cases, such as the sale or distribution of drugs, may not present immediate danger to life but may have legal implications which are administrative concerns, as well as social consequences which are student concerns. In these situations, joint action by the Dean and the Honor Board/Council may be necessary.

Policy on Drug-Free Schools

The Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act of 1989: 

A person of 18 years of age or older who is convicted in any court of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania of a violation of the Controlled Substance, Drug, Device and Cosmetic Act, shall, if the delivery or possession with the intent to deliver the controlled substance occurred within 1,000 feet of a public, private, or parochial school or a college or university or within 250 feet of the real property on which is located a recreation center or playground or on a school bus shall be sentenced to a minimum sentence of at least two years of total confinement (up to four years). 

The unlawful possession, use or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol poses a threat to the health and safety of all members of the Bryn Mawr College community and is not permitted.

The sanctions for the unlawful possession, use or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol are defined in the Pennsylvania Controlled Substance, Drug, Device and Cosmetic Act (35P.S. Sections 780-101 to 780-144); Controlled Substances Forfeiture (42 Pa.C.S. Sections 6801-6802); the Pennsylvania Crimes Code (18 Pa. C.S. 6307-6314); the Pennsylvania Motor Vehicle Code (75 Pa. C.S. 1546-1547; 3715, 3731); and the Lower Merion Township Code (Article IV, Section 111-4). These statutes are on file at the reference desk in Canaday Library. A summary of federal law and relevant sanctions is also on file.

The College’s policies on disciplinary sanctions for students are stated in this Handbook. Policies on sanctions for faculty and staff are stated in the handbooks appropriate to them.

This policy is instituted effective immediately, to comply with the Drug Free Schools and Communities Act of 1989 (P.L. #101-226). No institution will receive federal financial assistance of any kind after October 1, 1990, unless it has certified that it has “adopted and implemented a program to prevent the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by students and employees.”

The College will conduct a biennial review of its program to determine its effectiveness, implement needed changes, and ensure that it is consistently enforced.

Policy on a Drug-Free Workplace

The College, as an employer, and students as employees of the College have obligations under the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 (41 U.S.C. Section 701). The College’s statement of compliance is reproduced here.

The use of illegal drugs poses a threat to the health and safety of members of the Bryn Mawr College community. Therefore, the illegal use, possession, dispensation, distribution or manufacture of controlled substances (as defined in federal statutes) by any faculty, staff or student employees in the workplace is not permitted.

As a condition of College employment, every employee shall abide by the terms of this policy, and he or she shall notify his or her supervisor of any criminal conviction for a violation occurring in the College workplace no later than five days after such conviction.

Any employee found in violation of these prohibitions and regulations may be required to participate in a drug-abuse assistance or rehabilitation program and shall be subject to disciplinary action, which action might include dismissal. Information regarding such assistance or rehabilitation is available through the Health Center, the campus physician and Crossroads. All of the insurance programs offered to staff, faculty and students through the College provide some form of support to persons in various forms of treatment for substance-abuse problems.

This policy is instituted, effective immediately, to comply with federal laws and regulations. Federal agencies cannot legally award any contract over $25,000 or any grant monies without certification that the College has implemented a drug-free workplace program.

The College also complies with the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act of 1989 (P.L.

#101-226). Information on federal and state law imposing sanctions for unlawful possession, use or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol is available at the reference desk of Canaday Library and in the Dean’s Office.

Information on counseling, treatment and rehabilitation programs is contained in the College’s drug and alcohol policies.

This Handbook’s statements on policies and procedures relating to alcohol and controlled substances form part of the College’s compliance with the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act.

Commonwealth Law:

State law prohibits the unauthorized possession, use and sale enforced by Campus safety and LMPD manufacture, sale, delivery and possession of controlled substances. Persons may be subject to 30 days imprisonment and a $500 fine for simple possession of a small amount of marijuana (misdemeanor), a maximum of 15 years imprisonment and a $25,000 fine for the manufacture, delivery or possession of a Schedule I or II controlled narcotic drug such as cocaine, PCP and LSD (felony). Sentences can be doubled for second and subsequent convictions. Sentences can also be doubled for distribution of controlled substances to persons under the age of 18. Penalties range from a mandatory minimum sentence of (1) one year and a $5,000 fine for the first conviction to a mandatory minimum sentence of (7) seven years and a $50,000 fine for subsequent convictions for the manufacture, delivery or possession of 100 grams or more of a Schedule I or II controlled narcotic drug.

Health Risks Associated with the Use of Illicit Drugs

Narcotics                                                            
Drugs Physical Dependence Psychological Dependence Possible Effects Effects of Overdose Withdrawal Syndrome
Heroin  High  High

Euphoria Drowsiness

Respiratory depression

Constricted pupils Nausea

Slow and shallow breathing

Clammy skin Convulsions Coma 
Possible death

Yawning Loss of appetite

Irritability Tremors Panic Cramps Nausea Runny Nose

Chills and sweating

Watery eyes

MorphineHigh High
Codeine Moderate Moderate
HydrocodoneHighHigh
Hydromorphone HighHigh
OxycodoneHighHigh
Methadone, LAAMHighHigh
Fentanyl and                      AnalogsHighHigh
Other NarcoticsHigh-Low  High-Low
Depressants                                                                       
Drugs Physical Dependence Psychological Dependence Possible Effects Effects of Overdose Withdrawal Syndrome
Chloral Hydrate ModerateModerate

Slurred Speech Disorientation

Drunken behavior without the odor of alcohol

Shallow respiration

Clammy skin Dilated pupils

Weak and rapid pulse

Coma

Possible death

Anxiety Insomnia Tremors Delirium Convulsions Possible death

BarbituatesHigh-ModerateHigh-Moderate
BenzodiazepinesLowLow
GlutethimideHighModerate
Other DepressantsModerateModerate
Stimulants                                 Possible     
Drugs Physical Dependence Psychological Dependence Possible Effects Effects of Overdose Withdrawal Syndrome
Cocaine       Possible            High

Increased alertness

Euphoria

Increased pulse rate and blood pressure

Excitation Insomnia

Loss of appetite

Agitation

Increased body temperature

Hallucinations Convulsions Possible death

Apathy

Long periods of sleep

Irritability Depression Disorientation

Amphetamine/ Methamphetamine  Possible   High
Methylpheni-     date              High
Other Stimulants                                          Possible           High

Cannabis

           
Drugs Physical Dependence Psychological Dependence Possible Effects Effects of Overdose Withdrawal Syndrome
Marijuana        Unknown     Moderate       

Euphoria Relaxed inhibitions Excitation Increased appetite Disorientation

Fatigue Paranoia Possible psychosis Occasional reports of insomnia Hyperactivity Decreased appetite
TetrahydrocannabinolUnknownModerate
Hashish and hashish oilUnknownModerate

Hallucinogens

                                                                                      
Drugs Physical Dependence Psychological Dependence Possible Effects Effects of Overdose Withdrawal Syndrome
LSDNoneUnknown

Illusions and hallucinations

Altered perception of time and distance

Longer, more intense “trip” episodes

Psychosis Possible death

Unknown

Mescaline and Peyote NoneUnknown
Amphetamine VariantsUnknownUnknown
Phencyclidine and AnalogsUnknownHigh
Other HallucinogensNoneUnknown

Summary of Pennsylvania Statutes Relating to Unlawful Sale, Possession, Use, Manufacture or Distribution of Illicit Drugs or Alcohol

Statute Offense Possible sanctions
18 Pa. CS 6307 Misrepresentation of age to secure alcohol $500 and suspension of operating privileges
18 Pa. CS 6308 Purchase, consumption, possession or transportation of alcohol by a person under 21 years of age $500 and suspension of operating privileges
18 Pa. CS 6309 Representing that a minor (under 21) is of age $300
18 Pa. CS 6310 Inducement of minors (under 21) to buy alcohol $300
18 Pa. CS 6310.1 Selling or furnishing alcohol to a minor (under 21) $1,000-2,500
18 Pa. CS 6310.2 Manufacture or sale of false ID card $1,000-2,500
18 Pa. CS 6310.3 Possession, carrying or use of false ID card $500 and suspension of operating privileges (or ineligibility to obtain a license)
18 Pa. CS 6310.4 Violation of 6307, 6308 or 6310.3 Suspension of  operating privileges (or ineligibility to obtain a license)
18 Pa. CS 6314 Trafficking drugs to minors (under 18) Fines from $5,000-50,000; imprisonment for a minimum of one year, depending on offense
35 PS 780-101 et seq. Illicit manufacture, sale, delivery, possession of controlled substances Fines from $5,000-250,000; imprisonment from 1 to 15 years, depending on offense
42 Pa. CS 6801-2 Illicit manufacture, sale, delivery, possession of controlled substances Loss of property rights to Commonwealth of all controlled substances, paraphernalia, raw materials, conveyances, money, negotiable instruments and real property acquired in violation of the Controlled Substance, Drug, Device and Cosmetic Act
42 PS 4-491 Possession, sale or transportation of liquor within Pennsylvania unless purchased from a State Store in accordance with Liquor Control Board Regulations Fines of varying amount
75 Pa. CS 3715 Consumption of alcohol or drugs while driving Summary offense fine
75 Pa. CS 3731 Driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol $300-5,000 and imprisonment from 48 hours to 1 year; suspension or revocation of operating privileges
63 PS 390-8 Procuring drugs by fraud, forgery, alteration of Rx, etc. Imprisonment for 3 years, $5,000 fine, or both

Pennsylvania law imposes “social host” liability on persons who furnish alcohol to individuals under 21 years of age. The Pennsylvania Crimes Code defines “furnish” as “to supply, give, or provide to, or allow a minor to possess on the premises or property owned or controlled by the person charged.”

Federal Penalties and Sanctions for Illegal Trafficking and
Possession of a Controlled Substance

Controlled Substances Act Schedule*

Drug

Quantity

1st Offense

2nd Offense

I and II Others (law does not include marijuana, hashish, or hash oil)     Any Not more than 20 years If death or serious injury, not less than 20 years, not more than life Fine $1 million individual, $5 million not individual Not more than 30 years If death or serious injury, life Fine $2 million individual, $10 million not individual
III All (included in Schedule III are anabolic steroids, codeine and hydrocodone with aspirin or Tylenol® and some barbituates)     Any Not more than 5 years Fine not more than $250,000 individual, $1 million not individual Not more than 10 years Fine not more than $500,000 individual, $2 million not individual
IV All (included in Schedule IV are Darvon®, Talwin®, Equanil®, Valium®, and Xanax®)    Any Not more than 3 years Fine not more than $250,000 individual, $1 million not individual Not more than 6 years Fine not more than $500,000 individual, $2 million not individual
V All (over-the-counter cough medicines with codeine are classified in Schedule V)    Any Not more than 1 year Fine not more than $100,000 individual, $250,000 not individual Not more than 2 years Fine not more than $200,000 individual, $500,000 not individual

Controlled Substances Act Schedule

1st

Offense

2nd

Offense

Quantity

Drug

Quantity

1st Offense

2nd

Offense

I and II Not less than 5 years. Not more than 40 years. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 years or more than life Fine of not more than $2 million individual, $5 million other than individual 100-999g mixture Not less than 10 years. Not more than life If death or serious injury, not less than life Fine of not more than $4 million individual, $10 million other than individual 10-99g pure or 100-999g mixture Metham- phetamine 100g or more pure or 1kg or more mixture Not less than 10 years. Not more than life If death or serious injury, not less than 20 years or more than life Fine of not more than $4 million individual, $10 million other than individual Not less than 20 years. Not more than life If death or serious injury, not less than life Fine of not more than $8 million individual, $20 million other than individual
100-999g mixture Heroin 100-999g mixture
500- 4,999g mixture Cocaine 5 kg or more mixture
5-49g mixture Cocaine Base 50g or more mixture
10-99g pure or 100-999g mixture PCP 100g or more pure or 1kg or more mixture
1-9g mixture LSD 10g or more mixture
40-399g mixture Fentanyl 400g or more mixture
10-99g mixture Fentanyl
Analogue
100g or more mixture

*The Controlled Substances Act (1970) places all substances regulated under federal law into one of five schedules based on the substance’s medical use, potential for abuse, and safety or dependence liability.

Description

Quantity

1st Offense

2nd Offense

Marijuana

1,000 kg or more mixture; 1,000 or more plants

Not less than 10 years, not more than life

If death or serious injury, not less than 20 years, not more than life Fine not more than $4 million

individual, $10 million other than individual

Not less than 20 years, not more than life

If death or serious injury, not more than life

Fine not more than $8 mil- lion individual, $20 million other than individual

Marijuana

100 kg to 999 kg mixture; or 100-999 plants

Not less than 5 years, not more than 40 years

If death or serious injury, not less than 20 years, not more than life Fine not more than $2 million

individual, $5 million other than

individual

Not less than 10 years, not more than life

If death or serious injury, not more than life

Fine not more than $4 million individual, $10 mil- lion other than individual

Marijuana

50 to 99 kg mixture; or

50 to 99 plants

Not more than 20 years

If death or serious injury, not less than 20 years, not more than life

Fine $1 million individual, $5 million other than individual

Not more than 30 years

If death or serious injury, not more than life

Fine $2 million individual, $10 million other than individual

Marijuana

Less than 50 kg mixture

Not more than 5 years

Fine not more than $250,000 individual, $1 million other than individual

Not more than 10 years

Fine $500,000 individual, $2 million other than individual

Hashish

10 kg or more

Hashish Oil

1 kg or more

Federal Penalties and Sanctions for Illegal Possession of a Controlled Substance

21 U.S.C. 844(A)

1st conviction: Up to 1 year imprisonment and fined at least $1,000 but not more than $100,000 or both.

After 1 prior drug conviction: At least 15 days in prison, not to exceed 2 years and fined at least $2,500 but not more than $250,000 or both.

After 2 or more prior drug convictions: At least 90 days in prison, not to exceed 3 years and fined at least

$5,000 but not more than $250,000, or both.

Special sentencing provision for possession of crack cocaine: Mandatory at least 5 years in prison, not to exceed 20 years and fined up to $250,000, or both, if:

(a)  1st conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds 5 grams,

(b)  2nd crack conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds 3 grams,

(c)  3rd or subsequent crack conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds 1 gram.

21 U.S.C. 853(A)(2) AND 881(A)(7)

Forfeiture of personal and real property used to possess or to facilitate possession of a controlled substance if that offense is punishable by more than 1 year imprisonment. (See special sentencing provisions re: crack)

21 U.S.C. 881(A)(4)

Forfeiture of vehicles, boats, aircraft or any other conveyance used to transport or conceal a controlled substance.

21 U.S.C. 844A

Civil fine of up to $10,000 (pending adoption of final regulations).

21 U.S.C. 853A

Denial of Federal benefits, such as student loans, grants, contracts and professional and commercial licenses, up to 1 year for first offense, up to 5 years for second and subsequent offenses.

18 U.S.C. 922(G)

Ineligible to receive or purchase a firearm.

Miscellaneous

Revocation of certain Federal licenses and benefits, e.g., pilot licenses, public housing tenancy, etc., are vested within the authorities of individual Federal agencies.

Note: These are only Federal penalties and sanctions. Additional State penalties and sanctions may apply.

WEAPONS LAW VIOLATIONS 

The violation of laws or ordinances prohibiting the: manufacture, sale, purchase, transportation, possession, concealment, or use of firearms, cutting instruments, explosives, incendiary devices, or other deadly weapons. This classification encompasses weapons offenses that are regulatory in nature. Agencies must include:

    

* Manufacture, sale, or possession of deadly weapons;

* Carrying deadly weapons, concealed or openly;

*Using, manufacturing, etc. of silencers;

*Furnishing deadly weapons to minors;

*Aliens possessing deadly weapons; and

*Attempts to commit any of the above

Penalties for Gun Carry Violations

In Pennsylvania, it is a third degree felony to carry a concealed weapon without a permit. Penalties include a fine of up to $15,000, up to seven years in prison, or both. (18 Penn. Rev. Stat. and Con. Stats. § 1101.)

It is a second degree felony for a person prohibited from carrying a weapon to do so. Penalties include a fine of up to $25,000, up to ten years in prison, or both. (18 Penn. Stat. and Con. Stat. § 6105.)

It is a misdemeanor in the first degree to carry a firearm into a court facility. Penalties include a fine of up to $10,000, up to five years in prison, or both. (18 Penn. Rev. Stat. and Con. Stats. § 913.)

§ 303.10. Guideline sentence recommendations: enhancements.

 (a)  Deadly Weapon Enhancement.

(1) When the court determines that the offender possessed a deadly weapon during the commission of the current conviction offense, the court shall consider the DWE/Possessed Matrix (§  303.17(a)).

      An offender has possessed a deadly weapon if any of the following were on the offender’s person or within his immediate physical control:

          (i)   Any firearm, (as defined in 42 Pa.C.S. § 9712) whether loaded or unloaded, or

          (ii)  Any dangerous weapon (as defined in 18 Pa.C.S. § 913), or

          (iii)  Any device, implement, or instrumentality designed as a weapon or capable of producing death or serious bodily injury where the court determines that the offender intended to use the weapon to threaten or injure another individual.

Bryn Mawr College Weapon Policy

  • Possession or use of weapons, including but not limited to air rifles, pellet guns, pistols, firearms, ammunition, hunting equipment, knives and swords, is expressly prohibited.
  • Possession or use of dangerous substances, including but not limited to gunpowder, fireworks, explosives, gasoline and kerosene, is expressly prohibited.

Violators will be subject to disciplinary action, including but not limited to fines, relocation, denial of College housing and exclusion from the College, as well as civil and criminal liability. If dangerous articles or substances are discovered in a room, they will be impounded.

ALCOHOL AND DRUG AWARENESS TRAINING

In addition to separate Customs presentations (New Student Orientation) held annually for all new students by Campus Safety, Residential Life, and the Dean’s Office (The Dean of the College conducts separate training on “Staying Safe ” and bystander intervention to all new students and “Sexual Misconduct – Response and Support for Victims” to the DLT’s (Dorm Leadership Team members), there is ongoing training/informational sessions which typically include discussions on sexual assault, alcohol and other drugs prevention for all students throughout the year in the form of:

Dorm Safety Meetings

In conjunction with working with the Hall Advisors (HA’s) and the Dorm Leadership Team members (DLT) on many issues, the dorm safety meetings are a great place where students meet Campus Safety Officers and exchange ideas and information. The meetings are requested to discuss safety issues such as alcohol awareness on campus or within the dormitory. Students are strongly encouraged to participate and contribute. Forming a partnership with the students is an essential goal of the department and benefits the entire community. These meetings occur at least once a semester or when requested by the Hall Presidents.

C.O.P.S. (Committee on Public (Campus) Safety)

The Campus (Public) Safety Department works closely with a student group focused on reporting safety matters on campus and specifically within the residence halls.  The C.O.P.S. representatives are nominated by dorm and there are two students who are elected as Co-heads to represent the group at Student Government Association (SGA) who meet Monthly. The Co-heads also have regular meetings with the Director of Campus Safety.  The group also collaborates on bringing presenters to campus and identifying topics for general safety discussions at least once a semester.  Additionally, the C.O.P.S. representatives are the liaisons to students reminding them that they are also responsible for their own safety, on and off campus.

Safe-Teas

There are many open forum discussions during the academic year aimed at awareness and providing safety information to students, such as sexual assault, domestic violence, stalking, bullying, bystander awareness, alcohol and other drugs awareness and identity theft.

Additional training is provided by the Health Center – Counseling Service.   It includes drug prevention activities such as:
* Counseling Staff provide outreach and programming on prevention and abuse to student groups -  Customs, Hall Advisors (HA’s), Dorm Leadership Team (DLT) and student affinity groups on campus.
* Drug and substance abuse educational information, including handouts distributed during  freshwomen Wellness course.
* Individual counseling and education for students, who are self-referred, referred by the Dean's Office, Residential Life, the Athletics department, faculty, staff and other students.
* Web-based College alcohol educational program for all new students and dorm leadership team members.

Written materials distributed to all new students:
* Top Ten Myths About Alcohol
* Disease Concept of Addiction
* Alcohol Impairment Chart Blood Alcohol Levels and Behavior
* How to Help a Friend With a Drinking Problem

The Health Center website contains numerous links to information about alcohol and drug abuse.  http://www.brynmawr.edu/healthcenter/drugsandalcohol/


A written Statement about Standards of Conduct concerning Drug and Alcohol Education and Counseling Services is also included in the Student Handbook PP. 148 at:   http://www.brynmawr.edu/activities/docs/handbook.pdf

In addition, the Student Handbook has extensive information on both the Drug and Alcohol Policies;

Alcohol Policy                                                    p. 148

Effects of Alcohol                                               p. 149

Services and Referrals Information                       p. 150

Drug Policy                                                        p. 150

Policy on Drug Free Schools                               p. 151

Policy on Drug Free Workplace                           p. 152

Health Risks Associated with Drugs                     p. 152

Pa. Criminal Statues Drugs and Alcohol                p. 154

Federal Statutes on Illegal Drugs                          p. 155

http://www.brynmawr.edu/activities/docs/handbook.pdf

The educational materials are included in the College's written policies instituted to comply with this legislation. 

http://www.dol.gov/elaws/asp/drugfree/require.htm.

https://www.suny.edu/sunypp/documents.cfm?doc_id=440.

Drug and Alcohol assessment, counseling and treatment within the scope of Bryn Mawr’s services are provided by the Health Center - Counseling Service. Students needing more intensive treatment are referred off-campus. During Counseling Service staff's orientation week, Dorm Leadership Team (DLT) members and first year student students are encouraged to utilize the counseling services for consultation, education and/or treatment related to drug and alcohol concerns/issues. All students can receive up to six free sessions each academic year.

A "report" is generated of students who have had an alcohol/substance incident that comes to the attention of Campus Safety. The Health Center nurse is sent a copy of the report and calls each student listed to schedule an appointment to see the Drug and Alcohol Counselor. The deans also intervene and refer students listed on the Campus Safety Report to Health Center - Counseling Service to see the Drug and Alcohol Counselor for education, assessment, treatment and possible referral in accordance with our policy.

Additional information regarding these topics is included in the student, faculty and staff handbooks.

Faculty has been issued a copy of Helping Students: A Faculty Guide for Assisting Students in Need.  Information on identifying and responding to substance abuse – and/or possible addictive issues can be found on p. 17 at:  http://www.brynmawr.edu/deans/faculty/

Employees 

To promote a safe and healthy campus environment, the College developed its Alcohol and Other Drug policies to assist community members in making decisions about alcohol or other drugs and to provide important information about resources available when addressing issues or situations involving alcohol or other drugs.  These policies are contained within the student, faculty and staff handbooks, respectively, as well as on our Drug and Alcohol Prevention Program webpage: http://www.brynmawr.edu/daapp

The Staff Handbook provides information on and policies pertaining to drugs and alcohol (pages 51-52).  The Staff Handbook can be found on the Human Resources website: http://www.brynmawr.edu/humanresources/policies.html. The College offers employees the benefit of an Employee Assistance Program (EAP) and its services, which include assistance with substance abuse.  These benefits are described in the Benefits Overview document of the EAP: http://www.brynmawr.edu/humanresources/benefits.html. Employees are made aware of these polices and benefits in a meeting with Human Resources on their first day of employment and when they attend the mandatory New Employee Orientation.  In addition, employees are reminded of these policies and benefits through an email that Campus Safety sends annually that provides the Annual Campus Safety Crime and Fire Report. 

FEDERAL CLERY ACT DEFINITIONS of DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, DATING VIOLENCE, SEXUAL ASSAULT and STALKING (VAWA)

Bryn Mawr College prohibits the offenses of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking (as defined by the Clery Act) and reaffirms its commitment to maintaining a campus environment that emphasizes the dignity and worth of all members of the College community. Toward that end, Bryn Mawr College issues this statement of policy to inform the campus community of our programs to address domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking as well as the procedures for institutional disciplinary action in cases of alleged dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking, which will be followed regardless of whether the incident occurs on or off campus when it is reported to a College official. 

The Clery Act defines the crimes of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking as follows:

Domestic Violence:

        i.     A   Felony or misdemeanor crime of violence committed—

    • By a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim;
    • By a person with whom the victim shares a child in common;
    • By a person who is cohabitating with, or has cohabitated with, the victim as a spouse or intimate partner;
    • By a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred; or
    • By any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred.
  • For the purposes of complying with the requirements of this section and 668.41, any incident meeting this definition is considered a crime for the purposes of Clery Act reporting.
  • Dating Violence: Violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim.
  • The existence of such a relationship shall be based on the reporting party’s statement and with consideration of the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship.
  • For the purposes of this definition—
    • Dating Violence includes, but is not limited to, sexual or physical abuse or the threat of such abuse.
    • Dating violence does not include acts covered under the definition of domestic violence.
  • For the purposes of complying with the requirements of this section and §668.41, any incident meeting this definition is considered a crime for the purposes of Clery Act reporting.
  • Sexual Assault: An offense that meets the definition of rape, fondling, incest, or statutory rape as used in the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) program. Per the National Incident-Based Reporting System User Manual from the FBI UCR Program, a sex offense is “any sexual act directed against another person, without the consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent.”
  • Rape is defined as the penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus with any body part or object, or oral penetration by a sex organ of another person, without the consent of the victim.
  • Fondling is defined as the touching of the private parts of another person for the purposes of sexual gratification, without the consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/her age or because of his/her temporary or permanent mental incapacity.
  • Incest is defined as sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degrees wherein marriage is prohibited by law.
  • Statutory Rape is defined as sexual intercourse with a person who is under the statutory age of consent.
  • Stalking:

i.  Engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to—

    •  Fear for the person’s safety or the safety of others; or
    • Suffer substantial emotional distress.

ii. For the purposes of this definition—

    • Course of conduct means two or more acts, including, but not limited to, acts which the stalker directly, indirectly, or through third parties, by any action, method, device, or means follows, monitors, observes, surveils, threatens, or communicates to or about, a person, or interferes with a person’s property.
    • Reasonable person means a reasonable person under similar circumstances and with similar identities to the victim.
    • Substantial emotional distress means significant mental suffering or anguish that may, but does not necessarily, require medical or other professional treatment or counseling.
  • For the purposes of complying with the requirements of this section and section 668.41, any incident meeting this definition is considered a crime for the purposes of Clery Act reporting.

Jurisdictional Definitions of Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, Sexual Assault and Stalking

  • Domestic Violence: The state of Pennsylvania defines domestic violence as follows: 

        “Domestic abuse” as one or more of the following acts (including the attempt to commit one or more the following acts) between family or household members:

 • bodily injury, rape, or incest

• putting a protected person in reasonable fear of immediate, serious bodily injury

• false imprisonment

• physical or sexual abuse of a child, and

• other actions that repeatedly put a protected person in reasonable fear of serious           bodily injury, such as stalking or harassment.

  • Dating Violence: The state of Pennsylvania does not have a definition of dating violence. However, the College follows the Clery Act definition:

Violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim.

i. The existence of such a relationship shall be based on the reporting party’s

   statement and with consideration of the length of the relationship, the type of

   relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in

   the relationship.

ii. For the purposes of this definition—

     a. Dating Violence includes, but is not limited to, sexual or physical abuse or the threat   of such abuse.

     b. Dating violence does not include acts covered under the definition of domestic violence.

iii. For the purposes of complying with the requirements of this section and §668.41, any incident meeting this definition is considered a crime for the purposes of Clery Act reporting.

  • Sexual Assault: Rape (18 Pa. C.S. § 3121)

(a) Offense Defined – A person commits a felony of the first degree when the person      engages in sexual intercourse with a complainant:

     1.  By forcible compulsion.

     2.  By threat of forcible compulsion that would prevent resistance by a person of reasonable  resolution;

     3.  Who is unconscious or where the person knows that the complainant is unaware that the sexual intercourse is occurring.

     4.  Where the person has substantially impaired the complainant's power to appraise or control his or her conduct by administering or employing, without the knowledge of the complainant, drugs, intoxicants, or other means for the purpose of preventing resistance.

     5. Who suffers from a mental disability which renders the complainant incapable of consent.

  • Stalking: § 2709.1. 

(a)  Offense defined.--A person commits the crime of stalking when the person either:

 (1)  engages in a course of conduct or repeatedly commits acts toward another person, including following the person without proper authority, under circumstances which demonstrate either an intent to place such other person in reasonable fear of bodily injury or to cause substantial emotional distress to such other person; or

(2)   engages in a course of conduct or repeatedly communicates to another person under circumstances which demonstrate or communicate either an intent to place such other person in reasonable fear of bodily injury or to cause substantial emotional distress to such other person.

Consent:

The State of Pennsylvania doesn’t specifically define consent. However, Bryn Mawr College follows this definition of consent: Consent is an affirmative, voluntary and knowing agreement to engage in sexual activity.

  • Consent is not equivalent to the absence of no. Silence or the absence of resistance does not imply consent.
  • Consent must be mutually and unambiguously communicated.
  • Past consent does not imply future consent.
  • Consent to engage in sexual activity with one person does not imply consent to engage in sexual activity with another.
  • Consent can be withdrawn at any time.
  • Coercion, force, or threat of either invalidates consent.
  • Consent is only possible if all parties involved are able to act under their own free will.
  • A person who is incapacitated cannot give consent. Incapacitation may result from the influence of alcohol or other drugs, when a person is asleep or unconscious, or because of a disability that prevents a person from having the capacity to give consent.

HOW TO BE AN ACTIVE BYSTANDER

Bystanders play a critical role in the prevention of sexual and relationship violence. They are “individuals who observe violence or witness the conditions that perpetuate violence. They are not directly involved but have the choice to intervene, speak up, or do something about it.”  We want to promote a culture of community accountability where bystanders are actively engaged in the prevention of violence without causing further harm. We may not always know what to do even if we want to help. Below is a list of some ways to be an active bystander. If you or someone else is in immediate danger, call (610-526-7911) from on campus or 911 while off campus.

      • Watch out for your friends and fellow students/employees. If you see someone who looks like they could be in trouble or need help, ask if they are ok.
      • Confront people who seclude, hit on, try to make out with, or have sex with people who are incapacitated.
      • Speak up when someone discusses plans to take sexual advantage of another person.
      • Believe someone who discloses sexual assault, abusive behavior, or experience with stalking.
      • Refer people to on or off campus resources listed in this document for support in health, counseling, or with legal assistance.

Risk Reduction

With no intent to victim blame and recognizing that only abusers are responsible for their abuse, the following are some strategies to reduce one’s risk of sexual assault or harassment (taken from Rape, Abuse, & Incest National Network, www.rainn.org)

  • Be aware of your surroundings. Knowing where you are and who is around you may help you to find a way to get out of a bad situation.
  • Try to avoid isolated areas. It is more difficult to get help if no one is around.
  • Walk with purpose. Even if you don’t know where you are going, act like you do.
  • Trust your instincts. If a situation or location feels unsafe or uncomfortable, it probably isn’t the best place to be.
  • Try not to load yourself down with packages or bags as this can make you appear more vulnerable.
  • Make sure your cell phone is with you and charged and that you have cab money.
  • Don't allow yourself to be isolated with someone you don’t trust or someone you don’t know.
  • Avoid putting music headphones in both ears so that you can be more aware of your surroundings, especially if you are walking alone.
  • When you go to a social gathering, go with a group of friends. Arrive together, check in with each other throughout the evening, and leave together. Knowing where you are and who is around you may help you to find a way out of a bad situation.
  • Trust your instincts. If you feel unsafe in any situation, go with your gut. If you see something suspicious, contact law enforcement immediately (local authorities can be reached by calling 911 in most areas of the U.S.).
  • Don't leave your drink unattended while talking, dancing, using the restroom, or making a phone call. If you’ve left your drink alone, just get a new one.
  • Don't accept drinks from people you don't know or trust. If you choose to accept a drink, go with the person to the bar to order it, watch it being poured, and carry it yourself. At parties, don’t drink from the punch bowls or other large, common open containers.
  • Watch out for your friends, and vice versa. If a friend seems out of it, is way too intoxicated for the amount of alcohol they’ve had, or is acting out of character, get him or her to a safe place immediately.
  • If you suspect you or a friend has been drugged, contact Campus Safety X7911 or law enforcement immediately by calling 911. Be explicit with doctors so they can give you the correct tests (you will need a urine test and possibly others).
  • If you need to get out of an uncomfortable or scary situation here are some things that you can try:
    • Remember that being in this situation is not your fault. You did not do anything wrong, it is the person who is making you uncomfortable that is to blame.
    • Be true to yourself. Don't feel obligated to do anything you don't want to do. "I don't want to" is always a good enough reason. Do what feels right to you and what you are comfortable with.
    • Have a code word with your friends or family so that if you don’t feel comfortable you can call them and communicate your discomfort without the person you are with knowing. Your friends or family can then come to get you or make up an excuse for you to leave.
    • Lie. If you don’t want to hurt the person’s feelings it is better to lie and make up a reason to leave than to stay and be uncomfortable, scared, or worse. Some excuses you could use are: needing to take care of a friend or family member, not feeling well, having somewhere else that you need to be, etc.
  • Try to think of an escape route. How would you try to get out of the room? Where are the doors? Windows? Are there people around who might be able to help you? Is there an emergency phone nearby?
  • If you and/or the other person have been drinking, you can say that you would rather wait until you both have your full judgment before doing anything you may regret later.

PROCEDURES VICTIMS SHOULD FOLLOW IF A CRIME OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, DATING VIOLENCE, SEXUAL ASSAULT AND STALKING

Bryn Mawr College prohibits the offenses of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking (as defined by the Clery Act) and reaffirms its commitment to maintaining a campus environment that emphasizes the dignity and worth of all members of the College community. Toward that end, Bryn Mawr College issues this statement of policy to inform the campus community of our programs to address domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking as well as the procedures for institutional disciplinary action in cases of alleged dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking, which will be followed regardless of whether the incident occurs on or off campus when it is reported to a College official. 

After an incident of sexual assault, dating violence or domestic violence, the victim should consider seeking medical attention as soon as possible at Bryn Mawr Hospital where a Rape Kit can be used to collect physical evidence or forensic evidence. A sexual assault nurse examiner (SANE) is a registered nurse (RN) who has specialized forensic training in treating sexual assault victims. They are usually available at Bryn Mawr hospital or on call 24-hours a day to help victims of sexual assault. They not only examine a victim as a health professional, but they approach their work with special sensitivity and knowledge about sex crimes, and they also assess, document, and preserve evidence for the legal aspects of their cases. Their work is vital to adequately serving victims of sexual assault, and their job is multi-faceted and specialized beyond typical medical examinations or emergency care.

In Pennsylvania, evidence may be collected even if you chose not to make a report to law enforcement. (Lower Merion Police Department will be called by Bryn Mawr Hospital in all cases of sexual assault)

 

It is important that a victim of sexual assault not bathe, douche, smoke, change clothing or clean the bed/linen/area where they were assaulted if the offense occurred within the past 96 hours so that evidence may be preserved that may assist in proving that the alleged criminal offense occurred/or is occurring or may be helpful in obtaining a protection order. In circumstances of sexual assault, if victims do not opt for forensic evidence collection, health care providers can still treat injuries and take steps to address concerns of pregnancy and/or sexually transmitted infections. Victims of sexual assault, domestic violence, stalking, and dating violence are encouraged to also preserve evidence by saving text messages, instant messages, social networking pages, other communications, and keeping pictures, logs or other copies of documents, if they have any, that would be useful to College Dean’s/investigators or police.

As time passes, evidence may dissipate or become lost or unavailable, thereby making investigation, possible prosecution, disciplinary proceedings, or obtaining protection from abuse orders related to the incident more difficult. If a victim chooses not to make a complaint regarding an incident, he or she nevertheless should consider speaking with Campus Safety or other local law enforcement to preserve evidence in the event that the victim decides to report the incident to law enforcement or the College at a later date to assist in proving that the alleged criminal offense occurred or that may be helpful in obtaining a protection order.

Involvement of Law Enforcement and Campus Authorities:

Although the college strongly encourages all members of its community to report violations of this policy to law enforcement (including on campus safety/or local police), it is the victim’s choice whether or not to make such a report. Furthermore, victims have the right to decline to notify law enforcement. However, the College’s Investigator will assist any victim with notifying law enforcement if the victim so desires. Lower Merion Police Department may also be reached directly by calling (911) or 610-642-4200, in person at 75 East Lancaster Avenue, Ardmore, PA 19003-2323.

Reporting Incidents of Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, Sexual Assault and Stalking

If you have been the victim of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking, you should report the incident promptly to the Title IX Coordinator, Stephanie Nixon, Assistant Dean of the College for Diversity, Social Justice and Inclusion and Title IX Coordinator located in the Pensby Center, 2nd floor. Stephanie can be reached by calling X6571 or (610)526-6571 or email her at snixon01@brynmawr.edu. Or coming into the Title IX office to report in person and/or Campus Safety if the victim so desires.

Reports of all domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking made to Campus Safety will automatically be referred to the Title IX Coordinator for investigation regardless of if the complainant choses to pursue criminal charges. Also, Campus Safety will inform the Dean of the College that an assault has occurred. If it is necessary to alert the community at large that an assault has taken place, both the Campus Safety Department and the Dean’s Office will make every effort to protect your privacy.  If it is necessary to disclose confidential information (in cases involving legal requirements, requirements of the College policy on sexual assault, or if personal safety is at issue), the College will inform you that this is taking place.

As a reminder, Lower Merion Township Police can also provide transportation to Bryn Mawr Hospital and emergency medical care if necessary. If you do decide to report the assault to the police, the College will make every effort to provide a support person if you would like help through the process. Making a police report concerning the assault does not mean that you must prosecute the assailant.

PROCEDURES THE COLLEGE WILL FOLLOW WHEN A CRIME OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, DATING VIOLENCE, SEXUAL ASSAULT AND STALKING IS REPORTED

The College has procedures in place that serve to be sensitive to victims who report sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking, including informing individuals about their right to file criminal charges as well as the availability of counseling, health, mental health, victim advocacy, legal assistance, visa and immigration assistance and other services on and/or off campus as well as additional remedies to prevent contact between a complainant  and an accused party, such as housing, academic, transportation and working accommodations, if reasonably available. The College will make such accommodations, if the victim requests them and if they are reasonably available, regardless of whether the victim chooses to report the crime to Campus Safety or to local law enforcement. Students and employees should contact Campus Safety X7911 to assist with all accommodations.

Also, when a student or employee reports to the institution that the student or employee has been a victim of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking, whether the offense occurred on or off campus, the college will provide the student or employee with a written explanation of the student or employee’s rights and options.

If a report of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault or stalking is reported to the College, below are the procedures that the College will follow:

SEXUAL ASSAULT

While the College attempts through its programs and policies to prevent sexual assault from occurring, it recognizes that significant numbers of women throughout the nation are sexually assaulted while they are college students. The college therefore commits itself to assisting any of its students who have experienced sexual assault in making a timely emotional, psychological, and physical recovery and to respecting the choices a student makes about this process. Any student who is sexually assaulted is strongly encouraged to seek help either from resources available through the College or from outside sources.

Any Bryn Mawr College student who believes she/he has been sexually assaulted or that an act of sexual assault has taken place may notify any Campus Security Authority, such as the Dean of the Undergraduate College, a Hall Adviser (HA), a Graduate Assistant (GA) an Associate or Assistant Dean, the Title IX Coordinator, the Director of Campus Safety, Campus Safety Officers or the Director of Institutional Diversity, the Director and Associate Director of Residential Life or and Athletic Coach.

The first concern of any official to whom an assault is reported will be the well-being of the student reporting the assault. In particular, the official will inform the student of both on- and off-campus resources available to her/him and help the student make contact with the resources she/he chooses.

• You may contact the Bryn Mawr College Health Center (x7360) to receive medical care, to speak to a counselor, and/or to discuss other options confidentially.

• You may go to Bryn Mawr Hospital (130 South Bryn Mawr Avenue, Bryn Mawr, PA 19010) to receive a medical examination, which is admissible in court as evidence of an assault.

• You may call Bryn Mawr College Campus Safety (x7911 or 911 in emergencies to call the local Police- off campus) to arrange for transportation to the Health Center or to Bryn Mawr Hospital, and/or to report that a sexual assault has taken place.

• You may call Lower Merion Township Police (911) to arrange transportation to Bryn Mawr Hospital, to report a sexual assault or to request emergency medical assistance. 

• If you are assaulted or need help in Philadelphia, call 911 immediately, or you may want to call Women Organized Against Rape at 215-985- 3333.

• If you are assaulted or need help at Haverford please call Campus Safety at 610-896-1111 or Swarthmore, Public Safety 610-328-8333 or 911 from any campus or you can call Delaware County Women Against Rape at 610-566-4342.

Medical Care:

You are strongly encouraged to receive some type of medical care after an assault.

Because sexual assault can be physically and emotionally traumatic, you may not know whether or not you have been injured. Medical personnel at the Health Center or the hospital can answer questions you may have about health concerns. A follow-up exam is recommended to retest for pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), and to be sure that no other injuries were sustained during the assault.

The Health Center is able to counsel you on your options for medical care after an assault.  An examination done at the Health Center is NOT admissible in court as evidence that an assault has taken place. If you think you may wish to press charges at any time, the Health Center personnel will recommend that you go to Bryn Mawr Hospital, where medical evidence can be preserved for the police.

The Health Center is able to check for internal injuries, test for pregnancy and STDs and provide someone with whom you can talk. The Health Center can also provide information and testing for HIV (HIV testing at the Health Center is confidential). The Health Center can provide medication to help prevent STDs. In addition, emergency contraception is available to prevent pregnancy if you go to the Health Center within 72 hours of the assault.

The Health Center will keep all information confidential; the assault will not be reported to the police, Campus Safety, parents or other College personnel without your permission. If it is determined that you or another member of the College community is in danger, necessary information will be released to the appropriate administrators without revealing your identity.  The Health Center can assist you in finding any medical or emotional support that you need, including counseling on- or off-campus.

Bryn Mawr Hospital will also test for pregnancy and sexually transmitted disease (STDs), offer medication to prevent (STDs), and prescribe emergency contraception. The hospital is required to notify the police that a sexual assault may have occurred.

In addition to on-campus resources, there are numerous off-campus resources in the Bryn Mawr College area that are available to assist students who have been affected by sexual misconduct. This list is by no means comprehensive, but highlights some of the larger organizations with which Bryn Mawr collaborates.

Women Organized Against Rape

215-985-3333

WOAR is one of the largest organizations in Philadelphia dedicated to education and support for victims of sexual assault. Information about resources: counseling services, education and training; court and legal information can be found on their comprehensive website.

Victim Services Center of Montgomery County

610-277-5200

Sexual violence crisis hotline: has a crisis-intervention counselor who is able to explain procedures and answer questions you may have. A 24-hour hot line is available for anyone with questions or concerns about sexual assault, or who would like to speak to a crisis counselor.

The Crime Victims Law Project provides legal assistance for sexual assault, dating violence, and stalking victims in the Bucks, Chester, Delaware and Montgomery Counties of Pennsylvania.

Women Against Abuse

1-866-723-3014

Confidential 24 hour Philadelphia Domestic Violence Hotline:

Women Against Abuse provides support and information for people in abusive relationships. It provides the only emergency shelter for women who have been victims of domestic abuse and their children

Delaware County Women Against Rape

610 566-4342

Victims of Sexual Assault

At DCWAR's 24 hour hotline, callers can request information; referrals; counseling; and/or accompaniment to the police station, hospital, or court.

Procedure the College will follow:

  • Depending on when reported (immediate vs delayed report), Bryn Mawr College will provide complainant with access to medical care
  • Will assess immediate safety needs of complainant
  • Will assist complainant with contacting Lower Merion Police if complainant/victim/survivor requests AND provide the him/her with contact information for Lower Merion Police Department
  • Will provide complainant with referrals to on and off campus mental health providers
  • Will assess need to implement interim or long-term protective measures, if appropriate.
  • Will provide the victim with a written explanation of the victim’s rights and options
  • Will provide a “No trespass” (PNG) directive to accused party if deemed appropriate
  • Will provide written instructions on how to apply for Protective Order
  • Will provide a copy of the policy applicable to Sexual Assault to the complainant and inform the same regarding timeframes for inquiry, investigation and resolution
  • Will inform the complainant of the outcome of the investigation, whether or not the accused will be administratively charged and what the outcome of the hearing is
  • Will enforce the anti-retaliation policy and take immediate and separate action against parties that retaliate against a person for complaining of sex-based discrimination or for assisting in the investigation

All are encouraged to report sexual assaults to Campus Safety immediately. However, individuals may also report the crime to any Campus Security Authority, such as a Dean, the Director and Associate Director of Residential Life or an Athletic Coach and the Title IX Coordinator. The Campus Security Authorities work closely with Campus Safety to ensure the safety of our community.

The College is also committed to helping any of its students who have experienced sexual assault. Counselors, health center personnel, residential life staff, campus safety officers, and deans will support a student as he/she goes through the recovery process. The College is also committed to investigating all reported cases of sexual assault; assisting a student in lodging charges with local police, if the student so desires; holding disciplinary hearings to adjudicate formal accusations; and disciplining any student found to have violated the policy concerning sexual assault.

All proceedings will include a prompt, fair, and impartial process from the initial investigation to the final result/outcome. The proceedings, better known as the Dean’s Panel or proceeding will be conducted by officials who receive annual training on issues related to dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking and annual training on how to conduct an investigation and hearing process that protects the safety of victims and promotes accountability.

An individual accused of sexual assault may be subject to prosecution under Pennsylvania criminal statutes. A victim is free to bring charges through the College system and the criminal system simultaneously; however, the two processes are separate. It is not necessary for a student to pursue the matter in a criminal court in order to initiate a Dean’s Panel proceeding. Also, the College is not obligated to wait until prosecution procedures are initiated or until a judgment is reached in court in order to proceed with its own decision-making process or to impose penalties.

No member of the community may retaliate, intimidate, threaten, coerce, or otherwise discriminate against any individual for exercising their rights or responsibilities under any provision in this section.

Charges of sexual assault brought by a Bryn Mawr student against a member of the faculty or staff will be handled through the College’s procedures concerning sexual harassment and other forms of harassment and discrimination. The above procedures are outlined in the "Faculty section", see policy. www.brynmawr.edu/deans/documents/SexualAssaultGuide.pdf

STALKING

 It is the policy of Bryn Mawr College to maintain a work and academic environment free from discrimination and offensive or degrading remarks or conduct. Unlawful discrimination, including sexual harassment and sexual violence, will not be tolerated.

Procedure the College will follow:

  • Bryn Mawr College will assess immediate safety needs of complainant
  • Will assist the student with contacting Lower Merion Police if complainant requests AND provide the complainant with contact information for Lower Merion Police Department
  • Will provide written instructions on how to apply for Protective Order
  • Will provide written information to complainant on how to preserve evidence
  • Will assess need to implement interim or long-term protective measures to protect the complainant, if appropriate
  • Will provide the victim with a written explanation of the victim’s rights and options
  • Will provide a “No trespass” (PNG) directive to accused party if deemed appropriate

DATING VIOLENCE

It is the policy of Bryn Mawr College to maintain a work and academic environment free from discrimination and offensive or degrading remarks or conduct. Unlawful discrimination, including sexual harassment and sexual violence, will not be tolerated.

Procedure the College will follow:

  • Bryn Mawr College will assess immediate safety needs of complainant
  • Will assist complainant with contacting Lower Merion Police if complainant requests AND provide the complainant with contact information for Lower Merion Police Department
  • Will provide written instructions on how to apply for Protective Order
  • Will provide written information to complainant on how to preserve evidence
  • Will assess need to implement interim or long-term protective measures to protect the complainant, if appropriate
  • Will provide the victim with a written explanation of the victim’s rights and options
  • Will provide a “No trespass” (PNG) directive to accused party if deemed appropriate

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

It is the policy of Bryn Mawr College to maintain a work and academic environment free from discrimination and offensive or degrading remarks or conduct. Unlawful discrimination, including sexual harassment and sexual violence, will not be tolerated.

Procedure the College will follow:

  • Bryn Mawr College will assess immediate safety needs of complainant
  • Will assist complainant with contacting Lower Merion Police if complainant requests AND complainant provided with contact information for Lower Merion Police Department
  • Will provide written instructions on how to apply for Protective Order
  • Will provide written information to complainant on how to preserve evidence
  • Will assess need to implement interim or long-term protective measures to protect the complainant, if appropriate
  • Will provide the victim with a written explanation of the victim’s rights and options
  • Will provide a “No trespass” (PNG) directive to accused party if deemed appropriate

Assistance for Victims: Rights & Options

Regardless of whether a victim elects to pursue a criminal complaint or whether the offense is alleged to have occurred on or off campus, the College will assist victims of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking and will provide each victim with a written explanation of their rights and options. Such written information will include:

  • the procedures victims should follow if a crime of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault or stalking has occurred;
  • information about how the College will protect the confidentiality of victims and other necessary parties;
  • a statement that the College will provide written notification to students and employees about victim services within the institution and in the community;
  • a statement regarding the College’s provisions about options for, available assistance in, and how to request accommodations and protective measures; and
  • an explanation of the procedures for the College’s disciplinary action (Dean’s Panel)

All proceedings will include a prompt, fair, and impartial process from the initial investigation to the final result/outcome. The proceedings, better known as the Dean’s Panel or proceeding will be conducted by officials who receive annual training on issues related to dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking and annual training on how to conduct an investigation and hearing process that protects the safety of victims and promotes accountability.

Assistance for Victims: Rights & Options

Regardless of whether a student victim elects to pursue a criminal complaint or whether the offense is alleged to have occurred on or off campus, the College will assist student victims of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking and will provide each victim with a written explanation of their rights and options. Such written information will include as applicable:

  

*the procedures victims should follow if a crime of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual

 assault or stalking has occurred;

*information about how the institution will protect the confidentiality of victims and other

necessary parties;

*a statement that the institution will provide written notification to students and employees

about victim services within the institution and in the community;  

*a statement regarding the institution’s provisions about options for, available assistance in, and

how to request accommodations and protective measures; and  

*an explanation of the procedures for institutional disciplinary action (Deans Panel)

All proceedings will include a prompt, fair, and impartial process from the initial investigation to the final result/outcome. The proceedings, better known as the Dean's Panel or proceeding will be conducted by officials who receive annual training on issues related to dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking and annual training on how to conduct an investigation and hearing process that protects the safety of victims and promotes accountability.

RIGHTS OF VICTIMS AND THE COLLEGE’S RESPONSIBILITIES FOR PROTECTION FROM ABUSE, “NO CONTACT” ORDERS, RESTRAINING ORDERS, OR SIMILAR LAWFUL ORDERS ISSUED BY A CRIMINAL, CIVIL, OR TRIBAL COURT OR BY THE COLLEGE

Bryn Mawr College complies with Pennsylvania Protection from the Abuse Act which is the law in Pennsylvania recognizing protection from abuse (PFA) cases. Montgomery County, where Bryn Mawr College is located, is where you can obtain a PFA or to take your State protection from abuse order to add Bryn Mawr College, Lower Merion Township to the order. By updating your existing protection from abuse or no contact order, it can be shared with Campus Safety, the Title IX Coordinator and the Lower Merion Police Department.   A complainant may then meet with Campus Safety to develop a Safety Action Plan, which is a plan for Campus Safety and the victim to reduce risk of harm while on campus or coming and going from campus. Some examples of other arrangements are: escorts, special parking arrangements, changing classroom location, etc. The College cannot apply for a legal PFA on behalf of a victim.

The victim is required to apply directly for a Protection From Abuse (PFA) order at:

Montgomery County Courthouse

Norristown, PA 19404-0311

Phone: 610-278-3000

You must appear in person any day Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. To qualify for a PFA order, there must be either a family relationship or an intimate relationship with the person you want to file for protection from. The Protection from Abuse Department is located on the first floor of the Montgomery County Courthouse.

Accommodations and Protective Measures Available for Victims

Upon receipt of a report of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault or stalking, Bryn Mawr College will provide written notification to students and employees about accommodations available to them, including academic , living (change dorm or room), transportation (providing escorts) and working situations (changes in work location and or time). The written notification will include information regarding accommodations and obtaining protective measures.

Other resources:

Protection from Abuse department - 610-278-1191

Women’s Center of Montgomery County - 610-279-1548

Women’s Center of Montgomery County 24-hour Hotline - 1-800-773-2424

Montgomery County Emergency Operation Center - 610-275-1222 (for after-hours requests)

Laurel House 24/7 hotline - 800-642-3150

Confidentiality

Victims may request that directory information on file with the College be withheld.

Please call (610-526-5519) or email the Registrar’s Office if you have such a request.

The College does not publish the name of crime victims or other identifiable information regarding victims in the Daily Crime Log or in the annual crime statistics that are disclosed in compliance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act. Furthermore, if a Timely Warning Notice is issued on the basis of a report of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault or stalking, the name of the victim and other personally identifiable information about the victim will be withheld.

ADJUDICATION OF VIOLATIONS FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, DATING VIOLENCE, SEXUAL ASSAULT AND STALKING

Sexual Assault:

An individual accused of sexual assault may be subject to prosecution under Pennsylvania criminal statutes. A victim is free to bring charges through the College system and the criminal system simultaneously; however, the two processes are separate. It is not necessary for a student to pursue the matter in a criminal court in order to initiate a Dean’s Panel proceeding. Also, the College is not obligated to wait until prosecution procedures are initiated or until a judgment is reached in court in order to proceed with its own decision-making process or to impose penalties.

Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, Sexual Assault and Stalking Proceedings

Title IX Administrative Resolution

If reasonable suspicion exists to move to the administrative resolution phase of the process, this phase of the process will typically begin within ten (10) business days following the completion of the investigative report.  The respondent and complainant will each have the opportunity to review the investigative report and the documentation from the investigation.  Given the sensitive nature of the information provided in the investigative report, the review of the report must occur in person with the Title IX Coordinator or Title IX investigator. Ample time will be afforded to the complainant and respondent, within reason, to review the report prior to responding to the allegations.

Following the review of the investigative report, the respondent will be given the opportunity to respond to the alleged violation of policy in the following ways: 1) No response; 2) Not Responsible; or 3) Responsible.

If the respondent accepts responsibility, the Dean of the respondent’s school will be notified and will determine the sanction based on the evidence provided in the investigative report and documentation.  The complainant and respondent will be made aware of the sanctioning decision within five (5) business days whenever possible and will be provided an opportunity to meet with the Dean to review the sanctioning decision.  The respondent and complainant will then have the opportunity to appeal the sanctioning decision.  The acceptance of responsibility however, is not appealable (see Appeals Process).

If the respondent declines responsibility, or chooses not to respond, a hearing panel may be convened.

Title IX Hearing Panel

A Title IX Hearing Panel is conducted in the spirit of the values affirmed in the Bryn Mawr Honor Code: a belief in the integrity of each individual, a concern for others, and a commitment to dialogue. A Title IX Hearing Panel may be convened to resolve concerns related to the College’s Policy on Sexual Assault.  All members of the community should realize that being called before a Title IX Hearing Panel in no way implies a presumption of guilt.

a.     Purpose

In general, a Title IX Hearing Panel will be convened to deal with alleged violations of the College’s Policy on Sexual Assault by a Bryn Mawr student. In determining whether or not a Title IX Hearing Panel is appropriate, the Title IX Coordinator will consult with the complainant and such members of the professional staff of the College as circumstances indicate. The Panel will be convened in a timely manner, soon after a Title IX complaint has been investigated.

b.     Composition of the Title IX Hearing Panel

The Title IX Hearing Panel shall be appointed by the Dean or Title IX Coordinator and will be composed of at least three members. Generally the panel will include three members of the Dean’s staff and/or other College administrators who have been trained to serve on Title IX Panels.  Neither the Dean of the Undergraduate College nor the Title IX Coordinator shall serve as a hearing panel member, but rather, serve as advisers to the process. The Dean will appoint one of the Associate or Assistant Deans as chair of the panel.

c.     Notification

Each student being brought before a Title IX Hearing Panel will be notified by letter or email from the chair that a Title IX Hearing Panel is being convened. This letter will specify the behavior or issue that gave rise to the concern and direct the student to schedule a meeting prior to the hearing with the chair or Title IX Coordinator. This meeting shall be for the purpose of (a) reviewing the Title IX Hearing Panel procedures for the student; (b) obtaining from the student the name of a support person from the Bryn Mawr community to be present at the hearing; and (c) obtaining from the student the names of witnesses to consider including for the Title IX Hearing Panel.

d.     Scheduling

The hearing will be convened as soon as practicable after the student’s initial meeting with the chair or Title IX Coordinator. In the event that the student does not schedule such a meeting, the Title IX Hearing  Panel process will be obliged to go forward without the student. Any student notified of a Title IX Hearing is required to appear when instructed. The Title IX Hearing will make reasonable efforts to take into consideration the scheduling preferences of any student being brought before it; however, if these preferences cannot reasonably be honored, the student or students will nevertheless be expected to appear for the hearing. Should a student fail to appear, the Panel will be convened as announced and proceed without the student, and the student will be bound by any of its resolutions.

e.     The Hearing Procedure

The hearing panel will have the opportunity to thoroughly review the investigative report and documentation submitted by the investigator(s) prior to the hearing. The general course of the hearing procedure will be as follows, whenever possible:

   

*Complainant statement

*Respondent statement      

*Questions to the complainant

           

*Questions to the respondent

           

*Witness testimony and questioning (if the hearing panel determines it is necessary)

        

*Clarification from the investigator (if the hearing panel determines it is necessary)

*Closing statement by complainant

           

*Closing statement by respondent

The panel may determine the relevance of and may place restrictions on any witnesses or information presented. When the complainant and respondent are not able to be present for the hearing panel, arrangements will be made for the parties to participate via alternate means (e.g. phone).

f.     Procedures Regarding Witnesses

 * Any student brought before the Panel will have access to any written statements submitted by

witnesses.

* The support person of any student called before a Title IX Hearing Panel will not ordinarily be

allowed to address the Panel or to serve as a witness.            

*Questioning. Only the panel may ask questions of the parties and of any witnesses. Both parties have the opportunity to put forth questions of the other party and of witnesses. This is done by submitting questions to the panel in written format. The panel may determine which questions are relevant and which are duplicative in nature. The panel reserves the right to revise or remove submitted questions.

g.     Title IX Hearing Panel Deliberations

After taking statements and gathering information, the Panel will deliberate in private first to determine if there is a finding of responsibility of a violation of the College’s Policy on Sexual Assault.

The panel will use “preponderance of evidence” as the standard of proof to determine whether a policy violation occurred. Preponderance of evidence means that a panel must be convinced based on the information provided that a policy violation was more likely to have occurred than to not have occurred in order to find a student responsible for violating a policy.

Based on this standard, the panel may find a student responsible for an alleged violation of policy based on a majority vote. The panel may also vote by majority to dismiss the charge based on the same evidentiary standard.

If there is a finding of responsibility, the Panel will determine sanctions or resolutions for the respondent. Both the complainant and respondent will be informed of the Title IX Hearing Panel’s finding of responsibility and resolutions orally at the first opportunity. In addition, the chair will send the complainant and respondent a written summary of the Panel’s finding and resolutions within five (5) business days following the conclusion of the hearing.

h.     Appeal

The respondent and complainant may appeal: 1) the decision made by the hearing panel, and/or 2) the sanctions determined by the hearing panel.

The resolution of the Dean’s Panel is final and binding on the student brought before the Panel unless (1) the student submits a valid written appeal to the President within ten days after having received the formal letter setting forth the Panel’s finding and  resolutions; or (2) the Panel’s resolution was that the respondent brought before the Panel is to be separated or excluded from the College, in which case the Panel itself shall automatically submit the matter to the President of the College for review. The decision of the President on appeal is final and binding.

i.     Grounds for Appeal

The grounds upon which a complainant or respondent may appeal the decision and/or sanctions are (a) the student believes a procedural error occurred, which the student feels may change or affect the outcome of the decision; (b)the student has substantive new evidence that was not available at the time of the hearing and that may change the outcome of the decision; or (c)the student feels that the severity of the sanction is inappropriate given the details of the case.

The student’s appeal shall identify the procedural error(s) if applicable or the new evidence and its relevancy as well as explain when it became available. In making a decision on a student’s written appeal, the President will review all materials from the hearing, the Panel’s resolution, and the written appeal submitted by the student. The President may uphold the Panel’s determination, reverse its determination, or require a new Title IX Panel hearing.

j.     Record

A report by the Chair of the Title IX Hearing Panel will be provided to the Dean of the College and the Title IX Coordinator, to include the names of the parties, the alleged charge(s), the names of witnesses, the names of Panel members, the timeline for the proceedings, the finding of violation or non-violation and the resolutions, if any. The Title IX Coordinator retains records of Title IX Hearing Panels.

Disciplinary proceedings conducted by the College are subject to the Family Educational Records and Privacy Act (FERPA), a federal law governing the privacy of student information. FERPA generally limits disclosure of student information outside the College without the student’s consent, but it does provide for release of student disciplinary information without a student’s consent in certain circumstances. Any information gathered in the course of an investigation may be subpoenaed by law enforcement authorities as part of a parallel investigation into the same conduct, or required to be produced through other compulsory legal process.

POLICY CONCERNING SEXUAL RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN STUDENTS AND FACULTY

Fulfilling the mission of Bryn Mawr College to provide a rigorous education and to encourage the pursuit of knowledge as preparation for life and work depends upon the existence of a relationship of trust, respect and fairness between faculty or staff members and students.  Romantic and/or sexual relationships between faculty or staff members (including teaching assistants) and students threaten this relationship.  Further, the unequal nature of their respective roles calls into question a student’s ability to fully consent to a romantic and/or sexual relationship with a faculty or staff member.  The College considers such a relationship, even if believed to be consensual, to violate the integrity of the student/faculty or student/staff relationship, and to be unethical and unacceptable.

In acting on complaints regarding sexual relationships that come to the College’s attention, it will be presumed that any complaint by a student against a faculty or staff member is valid if sexual relations have occurred between them.  In addition, third parties, including other students, parents, and other faculty/staff members, may report suspected violations of this policy.  All complaints will be investigated and should allegations of such a relationship be substantiated, the College will take appropriate disciplinary action against the involved faculty or staff member, up to and including termination of employment.

CRIME STATISTICS

Crime statistics for the past three calendar years are shown here.

Total Students and Employees

                                                                        2013

2014

2015                     

Students                                                          1738

1709

1695

 

Full-Time Employees                                       533

(Not including p/t faculty and staff)

548

556

 

Murder/Manslaughter by Negligence

LOCATION

2013

2014

2015

Unfounded Crimes

   On Campus

0

0

0

0

Residential Facilities

0

0

0

0

Non Campus

0

0

0

0

Public Property

0

0

0

0

Total

0

0

0

0

Manslaughter by Negligence

LOCATION

2013

2014

2015

Unfounded Crimes

   On Campus

0

0

0

0

Residential Facilities

0

0

0

0

Non Campus

0

0

0

0

Public Property

0

0

0

0

Total

0

0

0

0

Sexual Offenses, Total

LOCATION

2013

2014

2015

Unfounded Crimes

   On Campus

4

1

5

0

Residential Facilities

4

1

5

0

Non Campus

0

0

0

0

Public Property

0

0

0

0

Total

4

1

5

0

Rape

LOCATION

2013

2014

2015

Unfounded Crimes

   On Campus

4

1

1

0

Residential Facilities

4

1

1

0

Non Campus

0

0

0

0

Public Property

0

0

0

0

Total

4

1

1

0

Fondling

LOCATION

2013

2014

2015

Unfounded Crimes

   On Campus

0

5

4

0

Residential Facilities

0

5

4

0

Non Campus

0

0

0

0

Public Property

0

0

0

0

Total

0

5

4

0

Incest

LOCATION

2013

2014

2015

Unfounded Crimes

On Campus

0

0

0

0

Residential Facilities

0

0

0

0

Non Campus

0

0

0

0

Public Property

0

0

0

0

Total

0

0

0

0

Statutory Rape

LOCATION

2013

2014

2015

Unfounded Crimes

On Campus

0

0

0

0

Residential Facilities

0

0

0

0

Non Campus

0

0

0

0

Public Property

0

0

0

0

Total

0

0

0

0

Robbery

LOCATION

2013

2014

2015

Unfounded Crimes

   On Campus

0

0

0

0

Residential Facilities

0

0

0

0

Non Campus

0

0

0

0

Public Property

0

0

0

0

Total

0

0

0

0

Aggravated Assault

LOCATION

2013

2014

2015

Unfounded Crimes

   On Campus

0

0

0

0

Residential Facilities

0

0

0

0

Non Campus

0

0

0

0

Public Property

0

0

0

0

Total

0

0

0

0

Theft

LOCATION

2013

2014

2015

Unfounded Crimes

   On Campus

13

29

17

0

Residential Facilities

6

29

17

0

Non Campus

0

0

0

0

Public Property

0

0

0

0

Total

15

29

17

0

Burglary

LOCATION

2013

2014

2015

Unfounded Crimes

   On Campus

4

1

5

0

Residential Facilities

4

1

5

0

Non Campus

0

0

0

0

Public Property

0

0

0

0

Total

4

1

5

0

Motor Vehicle Theft

LOCATION

2013

2014

2015

Unfounded Crimes

   On Campus

0

0

0

0

Residential Facilities

0

0

0

0

Non Campus

0

0

0

0

Public Property

0

0

0

0

Total

0

0

0

0

Arson

LOCATION

2013

2014

2015

Unfounded Crimes

   On Campus

0

0

0

0

Residential Facilities

0

0

0

0

Non Campus

0

0

0

0

Public Property

0

0

0

0

Total

0

0

0

0

Liquor Law Arrests

LOCATION

2013

2014

2015

Unfounded Crimes

   On Campus

7

12

14

0

Residential Facilities

6

9

9

0

Non Campus

0

3

0

0

Public Property

0

0

5

0

Total

7

12

14

0

Liquor Law Violations and Intoxication

LOCATION

2013

2014

2015

Unfounded Crimes

   On Campus

9

20

14

0

Referred for Further

Action Residential Facilities

8

18

14

0

Non Campus

1

0

0

0

Public Property

0

2

0

0

Total

9

20

14

0

Drug Law Arrests

LOCATION

2013

2014

2015

Unfounded Crimes

   On Campus

1

2

1

0

Residential Facilities

0

0

1

0

Non Campus

0

0

0

0

Public Property

0

2

0

0

Total

1

2

1

0

Drug Law Violations

LOCATION

2013

2014

2015

Unfounded Crimes

   On Campus

2

22

13

0

Referred for Further

Action

Residential Facilities

2

22

12

0

Non Campus

0

0

0

0

Public Property

0

0

1

0

Total

2

22

13

0

Illegal Weapons Possession Arrests

LOCATION

2013

2014

2015

Unfounded Crimes

   On Campus

0

0

0

0

Residential Facilities

0

0

0

0

Non Campus

0

0

0

0

Public Property

0

0

0

0

Total

0

0

0

0

Illegal Weapons Possession

LOCATION

2013

2014

2015

Unfounded Crimes

   On Campus

0

0

0

0

Residential Facilities

0

0

0

0

Non Campus

0

0

0

0

Public Property

0

0

0

0

Total

0

0

0

0

Violence Against Women’s Act (VAWA)

Dating Violence

LOCATION

2013

2014

2015

Unfounded Crimes

   On Campus

0

0

0

0

Residential Facilities

0

0

0

0

Non Campus

0

0

0

0

Public Property

0

0

0

0

Total

0

0

0

0

Domestic Violence

LOCATION

2013

2014

2015

Unfounded Crimes

   On Campus

0

1

0

0

Residential Facilities

0

1

0

0

Non Campus

0

0

0

0

Public Property

0

0

0

0

Total

0

1

0

0

Stalking

LOCATION

2013

2014

2015

Unfounded Crimes

   On Campus

2

1

1

0

Residential Facilities

0

1

1

0

Non Campus

0

0

0

0

Public Property

0

0

0

0

Total

2

1

1

0

Sexual Offenses Caveats

1. One sexual assault occurred in 2014 but reported in 2015

2. One fondling occurred in 2012 but reported in 2015

3. One sexual harassment occurred in 2014 and reported in 2015--study abroad

4. One fondling occurred in 2014 but reported in 2015

Hate Crimes

In 2015, there were two (2) acts of vandalism above- which manifested evidence of prejudice based on race and sexual orientation.

In 2013 and 2014, there were none of the crimes listed above that manifested evidence of prejudice based on race, gender, gender identity, national origin, religion, ethnicity, disability or sexual orientation as outlined by the Hate Crime Statistics Act.

Note: Crime offenses on public property that are within the reasonably contiguous area of Bryn Mawr College reported by local law enforcement are included in these statistics. (*) Crimes reported in teh Residential Facilities column are included in the On-Campus Category.

Unfounded Crimes

No reported crime may be considered unfounded unless a determination of such has been made by the Lower Merion Township Police Department.

There were no crimes or reported incidents that were unfonded by investigation in the above reporting years (2013, 2014 & 2015)

CRIME PREVENTION AND SAFETY AWARENESS PROGRAMS

Title IX Bystander Intervention

Bystander interventions that may be carried out by an individual or individuals in a safe and positive way to prevent harm or intervene when there is a risk of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault or stalking. Bystander intervention includes recognizing situations of potential harm, understanding institutional structures and cultural conditions that facilitate violence, overcoming barriers to intervening, identifying safe and effective intervention options, and taking action to intervene. This training program is offered a couple of times during the academic year.

Safe-Tea/Dorm Meetings

Safe-tea and dorm meetings are ongoing prevention and awareness conversations specifically discussing initiatives and strategies and include Hall Advisors (HA’s) and the Dorm Leadership Team members (DLT). The dorm safety meetings are a great place where students meet Campus Safety Officers and exchange ideas and information. The meetings are requested to discuss safety issues such as alcohol awareness, dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assaults and stalking on campus or within the dormitory. Students are strongly encouraged to participate and contribute. Forming a partnership with the students is an essential goal of the Campus Safety Department and benefits the entire community. These meetings occur at least once a semester or when requested by the Hall Presidents. However, many meetings are scheduled each semester to deal with hot topics such as VAWA.

Safe Ride Program

The Safe Ride Program, in partnership with Main Line Taxi ensures the safe return to campus in the event that a student is stranded off campus, at any time.  Any Bryn Mawr College student who is stranded off campus simply contacts Campus Safety at 610-526-7911 and requests a transport.  The Campus Safety Communications Officer will contact Main Line Taxi and authorize the transport.  When the student is safely back on campus a voucher will be completed and the cost of the cab fare will be charged to the student’s account.

Lantern Van Service

The Lantern Van, the student run escort service, runs Monday through Sunday between the hours of 7:00 PM and 1:00 AM, during the academic year, except break periods. To request a ride call the Campus Safety Office at 610-526-7900. Student Drivers will be dispatched to pick-up from campus locations, the R-5 Train Station (Paoli/Thorndale Line) and the R-100 (Norristown High Speed Line) Train Station only.

Bicycle Registration

Campus Safety also offers free bicycle registration for members of the Bryn Mawr College community. Once the form is completed a decal will be placed on the bicycle, which clearly marks the bike and is a deterrent to theft. A copy of the registration form will be on file with Campus Safety and the owner will retain a copy. Bicycle registration is an important prevention tool and in the unfortunate event that the bicycle is stolen the information can be shared with police. We also encourage our students to either register their own bicycles or to join the bike share program. http://bicobikeco.weebly.com/

Operation Identification

Campus Safety has several engravers that can be signed out by members of the Bryn Mawr College community. The engravers are used to mark items such as computers, and other valuables. In addition to using the engravers, Campus Safety will also furnish a form to record important information such as serial numbers and make and model information which are crucial to law enforcement agencies in the event that your property is stolen.

Self Defense Classes for Women

Campus Safety offers self-defense classes to the Bryn Mawr College community. Campus Safety provides certified instructors of the Rape Aggression Defense Systems (R.A.D.), which is an international program specifically designed for women. The program involves a two-fold process combining education and practical self-defense techniques for women only. This system is taught at more than 350 colleges and universities. The objective is to develop and enhance the options of self-defense, so they may become viable considerations to the woman who is attacked.

Though many of the programs are offered for students, they are recommended  for all members of the College community. The R.A.D. program is offered multiple times a semester. Registration is with the Athletic Department.

SEX OFFENDER REGISTRY AND ACCESS TO RELATED INFORMATION

The federal Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act, which went into effect in October of 2002, requires that colleges and universities issue a statement informing the community where state law enforcement agency information pertaining to registered sex offenders may be found. 

Pennsylvania's Megan's Law requires that the State Police establish and maintain a registry of individuals who have either been convicted of, pled guilty to, or were adjudicated delinquent of certain sex offenses.  In addition the PA State Police are required to provide certain information on registered sex offenders to the public through a website.

Information regarding registered sex offenders on the Bryn Mawr College campus may be obtained from the following resources:  Family Watchdog http://www.familywatchdog.us/  or at the Pennsylvania State Police Megan’s Law http://www.pameganslaw.state.pa.us/

MISSING STUDENT

If a member of the College community has reason to believe that a student who resides in on-campus housing is missing, contact Campus Safety immediately 610-526-7911. Campus Safety will generate a missing person report and initiate an investigation.

After investigating the missing person report, should Campus Safety determine that the student is missing and has been missing for more than 24 hours, regardless of whether the student has identified a contact person, is above the age of 18, or is an emancipated minor, the Lower Merion Police Department will be informed within 24 hours. A dean will call the student’s emergency contact after the student is determined to be missing.  If the missing student is under the age of 18 and is not an emancipated individual, a Dean from the College will notify the student’s parent or legal guardian immediately after Campus Safety has determined that the student has been missing for more than 24 hours.

In addition to registering an emergency contact, students have the option to annually identify confidentially an individual to be contacted by BMC in the event the student is determined to be missing for 24 hours.  If a student has identified such an individual, BMC will notify that individual after the student is determined to be missing.  Students who wish to identify a confidential contact can do so through BIONIC by clicking the Missing Persons Contact Information.

CAMPUS FIRE SAFETY ACT of 2009

FIRE SAFETY

Fire and smoke detection equipment is installed in all campus buildings. These alarms are monitored by Campus Safety and, as a fail-safe, an independent monitoring company. Sprinkler systems and smoke detectors are checked annually, to ensure proper working order. Fire drills are held a minimum of once a semester, to evaluate evacuation procedures.

Fire safety is a major concern of the Campus Safety Department and affects all members of the Bryn Mawr community. Each residence hall is equipped with automatic smoke detection systems that report to the Campus Safety Office. Fire Exit Drills are conducted in each residence hall each semester so that students become familiar with proper building evacuation procedures. The Campus Safety Department works with the Residential Life Office, Hall Advisors and Facilities Services to identify and correct any fire, safety, or security hazards.

Fire Alarms

It is a violation of the Lower Merion Township Fire Code and College Policy to interfere with the operation of any fire alarm system. This includes covering or otherwise preventing the proper operation of any smoke detector or fire alarm system.

Fire Protection Systems

Effective fire prevention occurs only when individuals are aware of the principal causes of fires and take certain simple steps to eliminate them.

For residents’ safety, individual rooms are equipped with individual smoke detectors. All common areas in residence halls are equipped with smoke detectors and manual-pull stations, both of which set off alarms (horns and strobes) located throughout the building.  Activation of common area smoke detectors or pull stations sends an alert electronically to the dispatcher at Campus Safety.  If the smoke detector in a student’s room activates, the building alarms will not sound unless the student uses the pull-station or the smoke from the student’s room activates a smoke detector in a common area, or a sprinkler is activated.

Automatic Sprinkler Systems 

The majority of College buildings, including most dormitories, are equipped with automatic sprinkler systems.  Sprinkler heads are placed throughout the building and are designed to activate individually when exposed to the heat of a fire.  The heads typically activate within minutes of the start of a fire and direct a generous spray of water over an area or room.  In a typical situation, a fire starts in a single location, activates one or two nearby sprinkler heads, and the fire is contained or extinguished where it started.  A series of pipes connects sprinkler heads in all areas to a major water line and is always on.  When water flows through any sprinkler head, the building evacuation alarms are sounded and an alert is automatically sent to Campus Safety. 

Since the sprinkler system is always charged and sprinkler heads are relatively delicate, it is important to never hang objects from sprinkler heads and to protect them from mechanical damage.

Fire Alarm Misuse

It is illegal to interfere with the operation of any fire alarm system.  This includes covering or otherwise preventing the proper operation of any smoke detector or fire alarm system.

FIRE PREVENTION

Effective fire prevention occurs when individuals are aware of the principal causes of fires and take reasonable steps to eliminate them.

Fire can exist wherever there are combustible materials and some means of bringing them to kindling temperature. Frequent causes of fires at colleges include candles, careless smoking, over-loaded electrical outlets, cooking in dorm rooms, halogen lamps.

Smoking is prohibited in all College buildings.  The burning of candles, use of halogen lamps, except those with safety guards, and the use of cooking or heating appliances, except those provided by the College in pantry kitchens are prohibited in College housing.

The use of hot-plates, large refrigerators (in dorms without kitchens), and other major electrical appliances can easily overload the electrical system. Only safe, low-wattage appliances may be used in College-housing: lamps, radios, televisions, stereos, computers, electric blankets, thermostatically controlled coffee makers and the like.

Fire Evacuation Drills

Fire Evacuation Drills are supervised and conducted by the Campus Safety Officers once per semester. Hall Advisors assist by informing their residents about the procedures, closest evacuation doors and meeting locations when the building is evacuated.  Self-evacuation by all occupants is mandatory whenever the fire alarm system activates.

Fire Safety Education and Training

Fire Safety Education and Training is provided to all first year students as part of their Customs Week orientation. Hall Advisors (students with oversight responsibility in residence halls) receive additional training regarding their responsibilities in fire safety and building evacuation. Faculty and students who work in science laboratories receive training in fire prevention, extinguishing, and evacuation. Fire safety is an ongoing agenda item in the Deans Safety Meeting and Residence Counsel, and is included in all presentations to new employees.

FIRE EVACUATION INSTRUCTIONS FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS

 * If you discover a fire or smoke condition, notify the Campus Safety Department by telephone (610-526-7911) X7911 or campus emergency phone from a safe area. Give the Dispatcher your name, location and nature of the fire. If the building fire alarm system is not sounding, activate the nearest fire alarm pull station.  Fire alarm pull stations are located within 5 feet of an exit door.

* Upon activation of a fire alarm all occupants should exit the building at once.

* Feel the door to your room before opening it.  If the door feels hot or smoke is seeping in, do not open it.  Seal off the cracks in the door with a coat or blankets and open outside windows for ventilation.  Call Campus Safety and explain your situation, giving your name and location. Signal your location by waving a towel or bed sheet out of your window.

* If the door feels cool, open it slowly.  Be prepared to slam the door if the hall is full of smoke or heat.  If the hall is clear, proceed to the nearest stairs and exit the building.  Should you encounter heavy smoke while exiting the building, turn back and find a room that provides a safe area of refuge. Contact Campus Safety immediately. Become familiar with two escape routes from the building.

* If you get caught in smoke or heat, crawl on the floor and take short breaths through your nose until you reach an area of safe refuge.

* Remember to assist any physically challenged persons in your area to safety in the event of an emergency.

* Once you have left the building, do not return for any reason.  Someone from Campus Safety will notify you when it is safe to return to the building.

* Students evacuating the residence halls should meet in their Designated Meeting Area.

IN CASE OF FIRE ALERT THE RESIDENTS / EVACUATE THE BUILDING CALL (610) 526-7911

All addresses are located in Bryn Mawr, PA 19010

Location/Address

Monitored Alarm

Fire Sprinkler Systems

Fire Alarm and

Smoke Detection

Evacuation Drills

Brecon Hall/320 N. Roberts Rd.

Yes

All Areas

Yes

2

Denbigh Hall/800 New Gulph Rd.

Yes

All Areas

Yes

2

Enid Cook Center (ECC) 815 Yarrow Yes All Areas Yes 2

Erdman Hall/150 Morris Ave.

Yes

Not in all of the areas

Yes

2

New Dorm/815 Yarrow St.

Yes

All Areas

Yes

2

Merion Hall/804 New Gulph Rd.

Yes

All Areas

Yes

2

Pembroke East/220 N. Merion Ave.

Yes

All Areas

Yes

2

Pembroke West/218 N. Merion Ave.

Yes

All Areas

Yes

2

Radnor Hall/820 New Gulph Rd.

Yes

All Areas

Yes

2

Rhoads Hall/210 N. Merion Ave.

Yes

All Areas

Yes

2

Rockefeller Hall/200 N. Merion Ave.

Yes

All Areas

Yes

2

Batten House/330 N. Roberts Rd.

Yes

None

Yes

2

Fire Statistics

Campus Fire Log 2013

Number and cause of each fire……

Location                                                               Date                      Time                      Cause / Nature

None reported

Campus Fire Log 2014

Number and cause of each fire……

Location                                                               Date                      Time                      Cause / Nature

Pembroke West bathroom fan fire       8/9/14                     2pm                        Fan motor burnt out causing small flame and smoke. Quickly extinguished by fire extinguisher. The Fire Department on location.

Cost to replace fan motor and other damage to the ceiling: $5,130

No Injuries reported

Campus Fire Log 2015

Number and cause of each fire……

Location                                                              Date                      Time                   Cause/Nature     

None reported