Courses

This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the School's academic calendar. For Social Work courses open to undergraduates, please search the Tri-Co Course Guide for the department "Social Work and Social Research".

Summer 2014

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTRUCTOR(S)
SOWK B401-001 Intro. to Legal Processes First Session / 1 LEC: 3:30 PM- 5:30 PM MTH SW G8 Dept. staff, TBA
SOWK B402-001 Social Functions of Law First Session / 1 LEC: 6:00 PM- 8:00 PM MTH SW G8 Albert,R.
SOWK B503-001 Research Informed Practice I First Session / 1 LEC: 6:00 PM- 9:00 PM MTH SW G7 Alexander,L.
SOWK B504-001 Research Informed Practice II Second Session / 1 LEC: 6:00 PM- 9:00 PM MTH SW G7 Campbell,M.
SOWK B506-001 Assessment and Psychopathology: Across the Lifespan Second Session / 1 LEC: 6:00 PM- 9:00 PM MTH SW 213 - Katherine Lower Conf Pollock,N.
SOWK B515-001 Integrative Practice Second Session / 1 LEC: 9:00 AM-12:00 PM W SW G4 Nath,S., Newberg,S.
SOWK B522-001 Field Education II Second Session / 1
SOWK B522-002 Field Education II First Session / 1
SOWK B540-001 Multiculturalism and Diversity: Advanced Perspectives First Session / 1 LEC: 6:00 PM- 9:00 PM MTH SW 213 - Katherine Lower Conf Harris,D.
SOWK B540-002 Multiculturalism and Diversity: Advanced Perspectives Second Session / 1 LEC: 6:00 PM- 9:00 PM MTH SW G4 Lee,J.
SOWK B559-001 Family Therapy: Theory and Practice First Session / 1 LEC: 6:00 PM- 9:00 PM MTH SW G2 Graves,J.
SOWK B565-001 Clinical Social Work Practice with Children & Adolescents Second Session / 1 LEC: 6:00 PM- 9:00 PM TTH SW G8 Hurster,T.
SOWK B567-001 Clinical Social Work and Substance Abuse Second Session / 1 LEC: 6:00 PM- 9:00 PM MW SW G3 Coffey,W.
SOWK B573-001 Homelessness and Social Welfare in America First Session / 1 LEC: 6:00 PM- 9:00 PM MTH SW G3 Baumohl,J.
SOWK B583-001 Clinical Social Work With The LGBTQ Population: The Psychosocial Impact First Session / 1 LEC: 6:00 PM- 9:00 PM TTH SW G4 Bodenheimer,D.

Fall 2014

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTRUCTOR(S)
SOWK B409-001 Legal Writing and Research Semester / 1 LEC: 2:40 PM- 5:00 PM T SW G8 Corso,L.
SOWK B410-001 Principles of Constitutional Law Semester / 1 LEC: 5:40 PM- 8:00 PM W SW G8 Mathes,M.
SOWK B501-001 Foundation Practice I Semester / 1 LEC: 8:00 AM-10:50 AM T SW G8 Alvare,J.
SOWK B501-002 Foundation Practice I Semester / 1 LEC: 2:40 PM- 5:30 PM T SW G3 Nath,S.
SOWK B501-003 Foundation Practice I Semester / 1 LEC: 8:00 AM-10:50 AM W SW G8 Bowen,E.
SOWK B501-004 Foundation Practice I Semester / 1
SOWK B501-005 Foundation Practice I Semester / 1 LEC: 5:40 PM- 8:30 PM TH SW G7 Bowen,E.
SOWK B501-006 Foundation Practice I Semester / 1 LEC: 9:00 AM-11:50 AM S SW G7 Salmon,J.
SOWK B503-001 Research Informed Practice I Semester / 1 LEC: 11:00 AM- 1:20 PM T SW 213 - Katherine Lower Conf Alexander,L.
SOWK B503-002 Research Informed Practice I Semester / 1 LEC: 5:40 PM- 8:00 PM T SW 213 - Katherine Lower Conf Alexander,L.
SOWK B503-003 Research Informed Practice I Semester / 1 LEC: 8:30 AM-10:50 AM W SW G2 Laster,B.
SOWK B503-004 Research Informed Practice I Semester / 1 LEC: 2:40 PM- 5:00 PM W SW G3 Campbell,M.
SOWK B503-005 Research Informed Practice I Semester / 1
SOWK B505-001 Theoretical Perspectives in Social Work I Semester / 1 LEC: 8:30 AM-10:50 AM T SW G4 Nath,S.
SOWK B505-002 Theoretical Perspectives in Social Work I Semester / 1 LEC: 11:00 AM- 1:20 PM W SW G4 Littell,J.
SOWK B505-003 Theoretical Perspectives in Social Work I Semester / 1 LEC: 5:40 PM- 8:00 PM W SW G2 Littell,J.
SOWK B505-004 Theoretical Perspectives in Social Work I Semester / 1 LEC: 2:40 PM- 5:00 PM W SW 221 - Hathway Rm Martin,M.
SOWK B505-005 Theoretical Perspectives in Social Work I Semester / 1 LEC: 12:10 PM- 2:40 PM S SW G2 Lee,J.
SOWK B507-001 Theoretical Perspectives in Social Work II Semester / 1 LEC: 11:00 AM- 1:20 PM T SW G2 Baumohl,J.
SOWK B507-002 Theoretical Perspectives in Social Work II Semester / 1 LEC: 5:40 PM- 8:00 PM T SW G2 Irving,A.
SOWK B507-003 Theoretical Perspectives in Social Work II Semester / 1 LEC: 11:00 AM- 1:20 PM W SW G2 Baumohl,J.
SOWK B507-004 Theoretical Perspectives in Social Work II Semester / 1
SOWK B507-005 Theoretical Perspectives in Social Work II Semester / 1 LEC: 9:00 AM-11:20 AM S SW G2 Feldman,G.
SOWK B521-001 Field Education I Semester / 1
SOWK B521-002 Field Education I Semester / 1
SOWK B521-003 Field Education I Semester / 1
SOWK B521-004 Field Education I Semester / 1
SOWK B521-005 Field Education I Semester / 1
SOWK B521-006 Field Education I Semester / 1
SOWK B531-001 Community Practice, Policy and Advocacy I Semester / 1 LEC: 5:10 PM- 8:00 PM T SW G7 Sousa,C.
SOWK B535-001 Clinical Social Work Practice I Semester / 1 LEC: 8:00 AM-10:50 AM T SW G7 Harris,D.
SOWK B535-002 Clinical Social Work Practice I Semester / 1 LEC: 2:40 PM- 5:30 PM T SW G2 Martin,J.
SOWK B535-003 Clinical Social Work Practice I Semester / 1 LEC: 5:40 PM- 8:30 PM T SW G4 Graves,J.
SOWK B535-004 Clinical Social Work Practice I Semester / 1 LEC: 8:00 AM-10:50 AM W SW 213 - Katherine Lower Conf Shapiro,J.
SOWK B535-005 Clinical Social Work Practice I Semester / 1 LEC: 2:40 PM- 5:30 PM W SW 213 - Katherine Lower Conf Martin,J.
SOWK B535-006 Clinical Social Work Practice I Semester / 1 LEC: 8:00 AM-10:50 AM W SW G3 Bodenheimer,D.
SOWK B540-001 Multiculturalism and Diversity: Advanced Perspectives Semester / 1 LEC: 8:30 AM-10:50 AM T SW G2 Bowen,E.
SOWK B540-002 Multiculturalism and Diversity: Advanced Perspectives Semester / 1 LEC: 9:00 AM-11:20 AM S SW 213 - Katherine Lower Conf Martin,M.
SOWK B541-001 Field Education III Semester / 1
SOWK B541-002 Field Education III Semester / 1
SOWK B541-003 Field Education III Semester / 1
SOWK B541-004 Field Education III Semester / 1
SOWK B541-005 Field Education III Semester / 1
SOWK B541-006 Field Education III Semester / 1
SOWK B541-007 Field Education III Semester / 1
SOWK B552-001 Perspectives on Inequality in the U.S. Semester / 1 LEC: 11:00 AM- 1:20 PM W SW G3 Vartanian,T.
SOWK B556-001 Adult Development and Aging Semester / 1 LEC: 11:00 AM- 1:20 PM T SW G4 Nath,S.
SOWK B557-001 Organizational Behavior: An Introduction to the Art and Science Semester / 1 LEC: 11:00 AM- 1:20 PM T SW G8 Bailey,D.
SOWK B559-001 Family Therapy: Theory and Practice Semester / 1 LEC: 5:40 PM- 8:00 PM T SW G3 Gerstein,F.
SOWK B559-002 Family Therapy: Theory and Practice Semester / 1 LEC: 11:00 AM- 1:20 PM W SW G8 Polster,J.
SOWK B563-001 Perspectives on Social Welfare: Local and Global Semester / 1 LEC: 11:00 AM- 1:20 PM W SW G7 Sousa,C.
SOWK B564-001 Group Treatment Semester / 1 LEC: 5:40 PM- 8:00 PM W SW G4 Hurster,T.
SOWK B565-001 Clinical Social Work Practice with Children & Adolescents Semester / 1 LEC: 11:00 AM- 1:20 PM W SW 213 - Katherine Lower Conf Shapiro,J.
SOWK B566A-001 Child & Family Well-being Integrative Seminar Semester / 0
SOWK B566C-001 Child and Family Well Being Integrative Seminar Semester / 0
SOWK B570D-001 Public Education: Issues in School Social Work Second Half / 0.5 LEC: 5:10 PM- 7:30 PM W SW G7 Vindler,K.
SOWK B571D-001 Education Law for Social Workers First Half / 0.5 LEC: 5:10 PM- 7:30 PM W SW G7 Fleming,P.
SOWK B572-001 Clinical Social Work and Trauma: Theory and Practice Issues Semester / 1 LEC: 11:00 AM- 1:20 PM T SW G3 Martin,J.
SOWK B577A-001 Home & School Visitor Integrative Seminar I Semester / 0 LEC: 7:45 PM- 9:15 PM W SW G7 Vindler,K.
SOWK B676-001 Pedagogy Semester / 1 LEC: 8:30 AM-10:50 AM TH SW G2 Cook-Sather,A.
SOWK B682-001 Data Analysis I Semester / 1 LEC: 2:40 PM- 5:00 PM W SW G2 Vartanian,T.
SOWK B684-001 Qualitative Inquiry: Methods Semester / 1 LEC: 8:30 AM-10:50 AM W SW 221 - Hathway Rm Alexander,L.
SOWK B688-001 Independent Study Semester / 1
SOWK B688-002 Independent Study Semester / 1
SOWK B688-003 Independent Study Semester / 1

2014-15 Catalog Data

SOWK B401 Intro. to Legal Processes Summer 2014 This course is an introduction to the American legal system and to legal method. It concentrates on fundamental skills of legal analysis and legal reasoning, the processes by which courts, legislatures and administrative agencies resolve problems, and the interdependence of legal institutions.

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SOWK B402 Social Functions of Law Summer 2014 This course explores the strengths and limits of legal processes in promoting, controlling, or otherwise changing personal and social behavior. Students gain an appreciation of the conditions for legal effectiveness and the factors that contribute to the multiple tasks that law performs in American society.

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SOWK B404 Advocacy and Negotiation This course has two foci: The first is advocate roles in settings where social work and law converge. We examine advocacy opportunities in courts, legislatures, and regulatory agencies and in each explore both skill requirements and, more important, the implications for law reform. The second focus is dispute resolution and the civil process, with special attention to theory and tactics associated with negotiation and mediation.

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SOWK B408 Reproduc. Capacity: Sexuality Women's Status in Society The course is designed to explore the ways in which changes in legal status of women have impacted public policy. We will examine this in the context of 1) family law, family court proceedings, with an emphasis on family violence; 2) reproductive and sexual rights, with an emphasis on the impact of legal restrictions to reproductive freedom that impact on poor and young women, and 3) violence against women. Class discussions will include the historical and cultural debates that have framed and shaped legal issues and public policy affecting women.

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SOWK B409 Legal Writing and Research Fall 2014 This course concentrates on some of the distinctive forms of legal writing and provides practical experience writing case analyses and drafting legal arguments. The course also provides guidance in conducting basic legal research, using a law library, and citing legal materials according to conventional protocols. The ultimate aim is to deepen students' understanding of the legal dimensions of professional practice and prepare them to research practice-based issues.

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SOWK B410 Principles of Constitutional Law Fall 2014 This course introduces students to United States constitutional law and its role as a source of principles for addressing social problems. Issues such as equal treatment, fair procedure, personal liberty, privacy, religious freedom, free speech, federalism, and governmental authority will be examined. The unfolding of constitutional law within an evolving American political-economic context will also be explored.

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SOWK B412 Race, Races and the Law in American Context This course is an examination of the intersection of race and law within the American context. It will evaluate the legal regulation of race in the United States, and the history and meanings of race, and how law, history and the Supreme Court helped shape and produce those meanings. It will draw on materials from law, history, public policy, and critical race theory. Attention will be given to diverse topics to explore the nexus between law and the construction of race as a concept, and therefore the course will examine the legal ordering of individuals as members of racial groups (African American, Asian American, Latinos, and Native American) and their treatment under the law across selected historical periods. The materials for the course will include not only relevant judicial decisions and other materials grounded in an enormous scholarly literature but multimedia, including audiotape/CD, films, and webcasts. Because students complete the Masters of Law and Social Policy (MLSP) degree requirement in conjunction with their Masters of Social Service (MSS) degree, and because several of the MLSP courses are counted towards MSS elective requirements, care is taken to ensure that the LSP courses echo some of the content situated in foundation courses, such as how the practice of social work is anchored by its history and purpose; specify how law is a context for all levels of social work practice; and articulate law's shaping influence on social policy and its associated impact on the delivery of social services. The MLSP coursework occurs against the backdrop of, and therefore presumes, students' awareness of social work's mission, values and ethics as articulated in the National Association of Social Work's Code of Ethics. This includes attention to the rights of clients/patients/consumers, particularly relating to self-determination, privacy, and confidentiality. MLSP course work also reflects the School's mission to promote social and economic justice and enhance individual, regional, national and global well-being, and attends to how these considerations surface within the context of the overlap of law and social work, especially in relation to students' chosen concentration and associated field placement.

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SOWK B481 Supervised Work

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SOWK B501 Foundation Practice I Fall 2014 As the first course in our foundation practice sequence, Foundation Practice I covers the core knowledge, values and skills applicable to practice with individuals, families, small groups, organizations, and communities and is taken by all students in the MSS program. In conjunction with other foundation courses, this course examines the field of social work and forms the base from which students later develop advanced knowledge and skills in our various concentrations and specializations. We teach Foundation Practice from a generalist perspective and as such, focus on elements of the social work knowledge base that are important and relevant to all fields of social work practice. This course explores the history and purpose of the social work profession and introduces students to the unique role of social work, as a distinct field, amongst the helping professions. The mission of social work is conceptualized broadly as reflecting the person-in-environment and strengths perspectives with particular emphasis on working with diverse populations and populations at risk. The course also reflects the school's mission, goals and objectives of promoting a global perspective, social justice and human wellbeing. Over the course of the semester, Foundation Practice students learn about the centrality of social work values and ethics, the critical role of helping relationships across fields of social work practice, the challenges of forming assessments of diverse populations across and within nation borders, building skills of advocacy and cultural competence, the knowledge and skills for developing and analyzing policies and services and the importance of utilizing research-based knowledge and evidence of best practices in evaluating practice effectiveness. Additionally, all students acquire knowledge and skills to formulate community, organizational and biopsychosocial assessments. Critical thinking skills are emphasized as students are taught to integrate policy, theory and research in practice.

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SOWK B502 Foundation Practice II The Foundation Practice sequence of classes, taken concurrently with the first year of field education, introduces the basic components of social work practice applicable to work with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Through an ecological and strengths perspective, emphasis is placed on the helping relationship, assessment, advocacy, intervention planning, and evaluation, especially as they impact the multiple systems and diverse populations with whom social workers work.

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SOWK B503 Research Informed Practice I Summer 2014, Fall 2014 This course prepares students to use and contribute to the knowledge base of social work by: (1) gathering and incorporating research knowledge into social work practice, (2) actively participating in research, and (3) interpreting and disseminating the knowledge gained from research activity. The course enables the student to act independently and with some technical competence in the design, conduct, and evaluation of research. The major research strategies such as the use of existing data, participant observation, experimental design including single-subject designs, and survey techniques are studied.

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SOWK B504 Research Informed Practice II Summer 2014 Following the prerequisite course in Research Informed Practice I (#133), this course enables students to analyze, interpret, and present data. Emphasis is placed on the uses and misuses of data in social work. The course is designed to enhance students' ability to (1) read, understand, and critique research findings and (2) apply basic principles of data analysis to the development of knowledge about social work clients and services in agency and community settings. Univariate and bivariate statistics are taught and structured assignments develop elementary computer skills and familiarity with SPSS. Each student prepares a paper in the style and format of a journal article, based on his/her own analysis of data.

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SOWK B505 Theoretical Perspectives in Social Work I Fall 2014 The Theoretical perspectives in Social Work sequence of courses is grounded in conceptual frameworks in an integrated manner. The courses in the sequence are taught concurrently; one focusing on social theory, the other on behavioral theory. The social (or mezzo-macro) theory course considers theories of culture, regimes, communities, social groups and organizations. The behavioral (or micro) theory course considers theories of human behavior, human development, interpersonal relationships, and families. The semester ends with a discussion of the uses of diverse theoretical lenses to help students develop more integrated, biopsychosocial perspectives on human experience.

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SOWK B506 Assessment and Psychopathology: Across the Lifespan Summer 2014 This course will provide an overview of principles used in the assessment of psychopathology across the lifespan. Emphasis will be placed on assessment issues, theoretical formulations, etiology, and research findings related to each diagnosis, and the clinical manifestations of these conditions will be illustrated through the use of case examples and video presentations. The uses, strengths, and limitations of our present systems of diagnostic classification will be considered. Students will learn to use the DSM-5 as a diagnostic tool and to critically evaluate it as an extension of the medical model of assessing human distress; in addition, students will be introduced to the Person-in-Environment System (PIE) used to assess the strengths and social functioning problems experienced by clients across a range of practice settings. Psychological factors related to physical conditions will be considered, and cultural influences on the expression and diagnosis of mental disorders will be explored. The impact on the assessment process of oppression, discrimination, and trauma, especially as they intersect with race, sex, ethnicity, and sexual orientation, will also be examined. A strengths perspective that leads to a competence model of assessment and intervention that is compatible with social work principles and values will be emphasized.This course supports the assessment skills that are emphasized in Foundation Practice I and II and further developed in Clinical Social Work I and II, and essential to the field instruction experience. Readings and discussions build on the social and behavioral theories introduced in Theoretical Perspectives in Social Work I and II.

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SOWK B507 Theoretical Perspectives in Social Work II Fall 2014 The Theoretical perspectives in Social Work sequence of courses is grounded in conceptual frameworks in an integrated manner. The courses in the sequence are taught concurrently; one focusing on social theory, the other on behavioral theory. The social (or mezzo-macro) theory course considers theories of culture, regimes, communities, social groups and organizations. The behavioral (or micro) theory course considers theories of human behavior, human development, interpersonal relationships, and families. The semester ends with a discussion of the uses of diverse theoretical lenses to help students develop more integrated, biopsychosocial perspectives on human experience.

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SOWK B508 Community Strategies and Assessment: Advocacy and Action Community Strategies and Assessment: Advocacy and Action is designed for students intending to concentrate in Community Practice, Policy, and Advocacy. Students develop capacities to apply basic skills and strategies for policy advocacy and community organizing, to understand and distinguish between various community assessment methods, program planning and to employ a case study methodology to assess differential approaches to practice with individuals, organizations, and communities, especially as they are related to excluded and oppressed populations. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed on the use of multicultural perspectives, advocacy with marginalized and at-risk populations, and practice in a diverse and global landscape.

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SOWK B515 Integrative Practice Summer 2014 This course is designed to prepare incoming advanced standing students for the advanced practice concentrations; namely Clinical Social Work or Policy, Practice, and Advocacy. The course serves to bridge the theory, knowledge, and practice skills students encountered at the undergraduate level with the advanced study of the social work helping relationship, evidence-based practice, and skills for assessing and intervening with individuals, families, groups, communities, organizations, and policies. Furthermore, the course provides knowledge and skills for evaluating the effectiveness of social work interventions. The course uses social and behavioral theory, the person-in-environment perspective, and a strengths-based approach to inform social work assessment and intervention. Critical thinking skills are emphasized as students are taught to integrate theory, practice knowledge, and research. The course relies on and critically examines research-based knowledge, empirical literature, and evidence of best practices for guiding practice knowledge, behaviors, and decisions.Throughout the course, practice with diverse populations and vulnerable groups, adherence to social work ethics, and promotion of social justice are highlighted. The course focuses on issues that may arise when workers and clients differ in terms of gender, age, race, ethnicity, class, sexual orientation, and other differences.This course follows the structure of all practice courses with some class time devoted to discussion of field-based practice experiences in order to continuously promote reflection on work with clients.

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SOWK B517 Social Policy Foundations & Analysis This course deepens students' understanding of current controversies in U.S. social welfare policy and their relevance for professional social work. The course provides historical background on the evolution of U.S. social welfare policy with comparison to other nations' social welfare approaches; critically examines the concepts of social and economic justice and the rise and development of professional social work in the U.S.; and gives practice in analyzing the underlying assumptions of social policy, particularly in relation to issues of race, gender, and class conflict. The emphasis throughout is on helping students develop a thoughtful, conceptually sophisticated position on the policy and advocacy aspects of their profession and their practice within it. Individual projects allow students to pursue their own interests in specific policy areas.

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SOWK B521 Field Education I Fall 2014 Supervised experience in using social work skills is provided in a field setting. The field instructors are agency staff members and are responsible for facilitating the student's learning. Field Education I and II are taken concurrently with B106 and B106 Foundation Practice I and II. Students spend two full days per week in the field during the regularly scheduled hours of the assigned agency.

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SOWK B522 Field Education II Summer 2014 Supervised experience in using social work skills is provided in a field setting. The field instructors are agency staff members and are responsible for facilitating the student's learning. Field Education I and II are taken concurrently with B106 Foundation Practice II. Students spend two full days per week in the field during the regularly scheduled hours of the assigned agency.

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SOWK B531 Community Practice, Policy and Advocacy I Fall 2014 This is first of the two practice seminars in the Policy Practice and Advocacy concentration (PPA). It builds on the student's knowledge of social work practice with individuals, communities and organizations acquired in the first year practice classes including issues of advocacy for social change. The emphasis in this course is on finding one's own voice as an advocate, learning the diverse roles and relationships involved in advocacy, working the policy system as an advocate to promote social change, and developing skills to advocate in the policy process effectively. Case studies, examples from the field and learning from successful advocates will be featured in a class that allows students to develop their own particular relationship with advocacy for social change.

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SOWK B532 Community Practice, Policy, & Advocacy II This course is the last of the concentration year practice classes in the Community Practice, Policy, and Advocacy (PPAV) concentration. The second semester will focus in depth on skills used by policy advocates in developing social policies and programs. Emphasis is on policy analysis, program development, planning, evaluation, service coordination and management.

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SOWK B535 Clinical Social Work Practice I Fall 2014 This is the first of the concentration year practice classes in the Clinical Social Work (CLSW) concentration. The primary goal of this seminar is the refinement of knowledge and skills in differential diagnosis and treatment. Content of the course emphasizes biological, psychological, social, and systemic assessment as the basis for interventions. Students are encouraged to develop a range and variety of roles in the service of specific populations with specific needs. Attention is given to current practice research.

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SOWK B536 Clinical Social Work II This is the last of the concentration year practice classes in the Clinical Social Work (CLSW) concentration. This is an integrative seminar which builds on and extends the content of the first semester. Additional content is determined by seminar participants who select problems, populations, methods of intervention, and professional issues for study.

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SOWK B540 Multiculturalism and Diversity: Advanced Perspectives Summer 2014, Fall 2014 This foundation course focuses on the development of awareness and understanding of the potential obstacles to effective communication and interaction between individuals from culturally diverse backgrounds. The impact of culture, race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and gender on differences in values, beliefs, communication style, family functioning, help-seeking behavior, and problem-solving processes will be examined. Particular attention will be paid to the sociopolitical factors affecting minority and immigrant life chances and to the negative consequences of biases and stereotypes. Implications of this cultural awareness and knowledge for effective, ethical social work practices will be examined. All students must take the course in Advanced Perspectives on Multiculturalism and Diversity (254).

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SOWK B541 Field Education III Fall 2014 Second year field education provides an opportunity for the student to focus on the further development of skills. It is taken concurrently with Clinical Social Work, or Community Policy Practice and Advocacy. Concentration year students are assigned to a field setting for three days per week for each of the two semesters (263, 264). Their work is supervised by an agency staff member who assumes responsibility for facilitating the student's learning.

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SOWK B542 Field Education IV Second year field education provides an opportunity for the student to focus on the further development of skills. It is taken concurrently with Clinical Social Work or Community Policy Practice and Advocacy. Concentration year students are assigned to a field setting for three days per week for each of the two semesters (263, 264). Their work is supervised by an agency staff member who assumes responsibility for facilitating the student's learning.

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SOWK B552 Perspectives on Inequality in the U.S. Fall 2014 This course will examine the U.S. economic landscape and the effects of government policy choices. It will provide students an ample opportunity to examine and discuss policy issues related to income and other forms of inequality. Some of the issues that will be explored include welfare and welfare reform, issues related to poverty, income inequality, health care policies, unemployment, environmental policies, crime, education, and tax policy. Differences between radical, liberal, conservative, and other approaches will be examined. Current events will be studied extensively by reading both academic articles and articles from current periodicals. The course will emphasize the differential effect of government policy choices on women, ethnic minorities, and other disadvantaged groups.

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SOWK B554 The Social Determinants of Health and Health Equity This main purpose of this course is to provide students with knowledge and an understanding of how structural factors (racism, sexism, homophobia, classism, discrimination, the built environment, poverty, working conditions, and the unequal distribution of power, income, goods, and services) contribute to racial/ ethnic and gender disparities in health and well-being. "These inequities in health, avoidable health inequalities, arise because of the circumstances in which people grow, live, work, and age, and the systems put in place to deal with illness. The conditions in which people live and die are, in turn, shaped by political, social, and economic forces" (World Health Organization, Commission on Social Determinants of Health, 2008, Executive Summary). You will learn about the most recent findings, while critically examining the health disparities literature, debate the causes and consequences of social inequalities in health and the differential assumptions underlying various explanatory paradigms, and engage in meaningful dialogue regarding the processes through which these disparities in health occur. You will also analyze and discuss the strategies, policies, interventions and programs, across the whole of society, that have been designed to address the social determinants of health and improve health equity. Taking action to tackle these inequities - the huge and remediable differences in health between and within countries - is a matter of social justice.The recently released Institute of Medicine Report clearly documented the relationship between racial and ethnic disparities in health status and health care. In the report, David Williams and others set out the multidimensional nature of the problem between health disparities and health care, linking both to a myriad of conditions within the greater society. They noted that the reasons for health status disparities were complex and that in situations where individual risks were pronounced; those individual risks were also confounded by socioeconomic position and environmental health conditions. These and other risks factors associated with health and poor health, illustrate that racial and ethnic disparities in health status largely reflect differences in social, socioeconomic, and behavioral risk factors and environmental living conditions. (House and Williams, 2000 in Unequal Treatment: Confronting Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care, 2002, pp. 30). Healthcare is therefore necessary but insufficient in and of itself to redress racial and ethnic disparities in health status (Williams, 1999 in Unequal Treatment: Confronting Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care, 2002, pp. 30). Counts toward Child and Family Studies

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SOWK B555 Ethics and Social Work Practice: Considerations, Actions and Leadership Social workers are often called the "conscience" of society. Intimately involved with the details of clients' lives, social workers practice at the highly charged intersection of ethical, moral and legal issues. Balancing a need to be sensitive to differences in culture and a responsibility to confront oppression requires a finely nuanced ability to identify ethical dilemmas. Once identified these issues are complex to sort through. Whether acting as a therapist, a community organizer, policy or legal advocate, social workers have a responsibility to make ethical decisions that are informed by thoughtful and thorough ethical reasoning process. In establishing themselves as ethical practitioners, social workers have a responsibility to become competent in: •fostering and maintaining their own ethical practice; •stimulating and participating in discussions about ethics with clients and colleagues;•facilitating the often charged ethical discussions that ensue;•and then helping to bring such discussion to closure and subsequent action The purpose of this ethics workshop is to provide a provocative look at the study of ethics. The objectives are as follows:•Delineate different definitions of ethical practice. •Articulate the numerous challenges to maintaining an ethical practice in the social work field. •Apply the concept of an "ethical work-up" to analyze ethical dilemmas.

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SOWK B556 Adult Development and Aging Fall 2014 The course broadly explores the biological, psychological, and social aspects of aging into middle and late adulthood for individual, families, communities, and society at large. This is accomplished through exploration of a.) the psychological and social developmental challenges of adulthood, b.) the core biological changes that accompany this stage of life, c.) research methodology for inquiry into aging, d.) the demands and impact on care givers and families, e.) psychopathology common in older adults, f.) social welfare policies and programs designed to ameliorate stress and promote well-being among older adults, and g.) the political, social, and academic discourse around the concept of aging successfully in the 21st century. Throughout the course, the experience of aging, and the ways in which this experience differs by race, ethnicity, gender, class, culture, and sexual orientation are considered. Linkage to Social Work CurriculumThis course builds on theory, knowledge, and skills of social work with older adults introduced in Foundation Practice and Human Behavior in the Social Environment I and III. This course is relevant to the clinical, management, and policy concentrations, in that it focuses on the concepts, theories, and policies central to effective assessment and intervention with older adults.

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SOWK B557 Organizational Behavior: An Introduction to the Art and Science Fall 2014 Whether as an administrator, staff /service provider or board member, or even as a consumer, we all have multiple opportunities to interact with organizations. This course explores the 10 basic components of organizations which impact people, place, processes, and placement. In this seminar-style class, students will contribute as both teachers and learners in the study of how people, as individuals and as groups, operate within the context of change that surrounds today's organizations. The skills taught in this course will help students think about, advocate within, elicit change from, and lead organizations.We will use a "10-S" model of organizational practice to guide our thinking. This model champions multicultural competency and examines a number of mezzo- and macro-level influencing factors. For instance, we will consider how even an organization's physical setting impacts the delivery of its mission. Also examined is the leadership style of organizational administrations as well as the types of staff and their skills, and the agency's shared values, strategy, structure, systems, and the services provided to diverse stakeholders.In the course of the semester, students will explore these organizational components, their interrelatedness, and reciprocal impacts through individual and small group presentations, self-reflection exercises, and a final paper. A particular emphasis will be placed on ways to invoke both 'right brain' /synthesizing and non-linear thinking with more 'left-brain'/ analytical methods to better understand the responsibilities and various styles of effective leaders. This class will be interactive, co-constructed, and provide foundational theories and practical skills.

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SOWK B558 Managing the Work of Others This elective course has as its focus understanding the work for which a supervisor or manager is responsible, the context of that work and the tasks into which the work can be divided. Focusing on the work to be accomplished, the course includes administrative, educational and clinical models of supervision and management. It presumes that most master's prepared social workers will be overseeing the work of others, either as program directors, managers or supervisors. Literature for the course is drawn from social work, psychology, business, organizational development and social science.

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SOWK B559 Family Therapy: Theory and Practice Summer 2014, Fall 2014 This seminar considers contemporary theories of family therapy within a historical perspective. Building on approaches associated with communication, inter-actional, structural, intergenerational, feminist, symbolic and psychodynamic theories, the seminar emphasizes practitioner decision-making in family treatment. Experiential learning methods utilizing practice simulations and videotapes are used to focus on a range of social work practice issues including family developmental stages, economic strains, single parent, minority and multi-problem families. Students who have not completed Foundation Practice and the first semester of practicum must have the instructor's permission to take this course.. Counts toward Child and Family Studies

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SOWK B560 Attachment -Based Psychotherapy This course is limited to MSS students who are in their second year of field education (including Advanced Standing students). Attachment Theory provides an overarching framework from which to understand our clients' distress and their attempts to cope with that distress, as well the reparative potential of the therapy relationship. We will consider the centrality of attachment in early development and our ongoing attachment needs and challenges throughout the lifespan. The neurobiological underpinnings of attachment and its central role in affect regulation and neural integration will be discussed. We will look at characteristics of attachment security and styles of attachment insecurity that develop as adaptations to one's early and current relational world. We will consider how attachment insecurity can become maladaptive, underlying personality organization, symptoms of anxiety and depression, anger expression and relationship dynamics. We will apply our knowledge of attachment theory to our clinical work by taking a view of the therapeutic (clinical) relationship as an attachment relationship with goals of promoting self-integration, affect regulation, reflectiveness, and the capacity for healthy dependency. In particular we will consider how to understand and work with clients who have early histories of significant trauma, loss, neglect, and/or abuse. The role of nonverbal communication will be emphasized as will the influence of the social worker's own attachment style. Work with individual adults, couples and families will be discussed, with attention to the interplay of attachment dynamics with culture, class, race, ethnicity, gender expression and sexual orientation. Students will have a chance to draw on attachment theory to better understand the population they work with and apply it to their clinical approach with their clients. The instructor will bring in case examples to discuss from her psychotherapy and supervision practice.

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SOWK B560D Introduction to Attachment Based Couples Therapy-7 Week This seminar introduces participants to psychodynamic, behavioral, and systems approaches to clinical social work with couples. In addition to reviewing research related to each approach, participants consider methods of evaluating their own practice effectiveness. Readings, written assignments, and videotaped role plays facilitate the application of theory to practice. Students who have not completed first year Practice and Field Instruction must have the instructor's permission to take this course

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SOWK B561 Perspectives on Special Education: The Role of Social Workers Perspectives on Special Education: The Role of Social Workers is designed as a survey course. The goal is to introduce graduate-level social work students interested in working in schools to a range of topics, challenges, dilemmas and strategies in understanding and educating all learners, especially those considered to have special learning needs.. The field of 'Special Education 'is vast, thus the nature of a survey course; however, through the assignments students will have an opportunity to narrow their area of interest through a research paper and area of interest by developing a comprehensive learning profile or IEP for a specific student. Throughout the course federal and state legislation, and rules and regulations governing educational law specific to special education populations will be referred to to guide the discussion. However the emphasis will be on clinical material and examples to help students to develop a greater understanding of the populations they will encounter, and how best to work with them and their families.

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SOWK B562 Uses of Gestalt Therapy: From Psychoanalytic Theory to New Narratives Use of the Therapeutic Relationship in Gestalt Therapy: This course introduces the use of Gestalt Therapy with clients. Louis Cozolino, Ph.D., who specializes in therapy and neuroscience, wrote in 2002: "Gestalt therapy is a unique expression of psychodynamic therapy that is particularly relevant to neural integration." Gestalt therapy does this by encompassing the practice of working with the body as part of the mind, as well as ways to construct something new in each session. In the gestalt tradition, learning will take place through the use of active participation, exercises, role plays, non-verbal communication, experiments, discussion, and reading assignments.

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SOWK B563 Perspectives on Social Welfare: Local and Global Fall 2014 This course is open to graduate and undergraduate students and has relevance for students in Praxis, field education, study abroad and various internships (although these practice experiences are not required for the course). Globalization increasingly dictates the availability of social and economic resources as well as access to them, and at the same time presents a shared set of problems such as violence (particularly against women and children), unemployment, HIV-AIDS, poverty and starvation, threats to indigenous populations, and environmental destruction, among others. Changes from globalization require new ways to conceptualize and implement the welfare state and an envisioning of social justice that crosses borders. A domestic perspective and the lens of cultural context are no longer adequate; they require expansion to include geographic context as well as ideas and practices to address troubles shared by nations (such as assimilation) and by populations crossing borders (into areas not always welcoming of them).

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SOWK B564 Group Treatment Fall 2014 This seminar explores the group dynamics, theory and processes that are applicable to all groups and explores the specific techniques of group therapies. There is an experiential component of this course. A portion of the time will be devoted to examining our own group functioning. Readings and discussions will focus on the major theories of groups and interventions. Topics include leadership skills, client selection, sub-grouping, group conflicts and clinical management of beginning, maintaining and termination stages of groups. Concurrent practice with groups is desirable.

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SOWK B565 Clinical Social Work Practice with Children & Adolescents Summer 2014, Fall 2014 The purpose of this course is to introduce students to some of the theoretical and practice issues related to adapting the clinical social work process to work with children and adolescents. Work in the course will concentrate on a social work framework that stresses the complexity of the person-environment transactions and emphasizes strengths and competencies Counts toward Child and Family Studies

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SOWK B566A Child & Family Well-being Integrative Seminar Fall 2014

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SOWK B566B Child and Family Well Being Integrative Seminar

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SOWK B566C Child and Family Well Being Integrative Seminar Fall 2014

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SOWK B566D Child and Family Well Being Integrative Seminar

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SOWK B567 Clinical Social Work and Substance Abuse Summer 2014 This course will introduce students to a range of theories about heavy drinking and addiction, provide an overview of commonly abused substances, and evaluate assessment and treatment strategies employed in work with both individuals and families. Assigned readings and class discussions will explore the special needs and concerns of specific population groups including adolescents, older adults, women, racial and ethnic minorities, and gays and lesbians. The class will examine psychosocial factors affecting both the identification and treatment of substance abusers.

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SOWK B568 Master's Paper A Master's Paper may be undertaken with the permission of two faculty persons who would serve as readers, or as the result of a research project in a particular interest area with one instructor and a second reader. Whether students are enrolled in such research projects or whether students are developing a Master's Paper independently with first and second readers, one course credit will be given after satisfactory completion of the Master's Paper. This course requires prior approval of the Dean.

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SOWK B569 Master's Paper A Master's Paper may be undertaken with the permission of two faculty persons who would serve as readers, or as the result of a research project in a particular interest area with one instructor and a second reader. Whether students are enrolled in such research projects or whether students are developing a Master's Paper independently with first and second readers, one course credit will be given after satisfactory completion of the Master's Paper. This course requires prior approval of the Dean.

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SOWK B570D Public Education: Issues in School Social Work Fall 2014 This course is designed to prepare the students to integrate the practice of social work into the unique context of the public educational system. The students will examine the various roles and responsibilities of school social workers. By also examining the hierarchy of the educational and legal systems in the United States, the student will gain an understanding of the organizations that school social workers work within and the implications of educational laws and regulations on their work.

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SOWK B571D Education Law for Social Workers Fall 2014 This course will provide social work students with a working knowledge of the education and related laws that relate to minors in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, with an emphasis on analyzing and interpreting primary legal sources. The students will learn to identify, locate and discriminate among the various sources of law, as well as understand the hierarchy of the various Federal, State and Local laws and regulations, and how that hierarchy governs their implementation. Students will also examine the complexities of the overlapping, and sometimes conflicting, responsibilities of various agencies involved in the supervision and education of Pennsylvania children, and the role of the social worker within this complex legal and educational framework.

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SOWK B572 Clinical Social Work and Trauma: Theory and Practice Issues Fall 2014 This course is intended to provide social work graduate students the opportunity to expand and enrich their knowledge and intervention skills related to trauma theory and clinical practice. The course will emphasize the assessment of trauma exposure, early interventions after trauma exposure, and effective interventions for trauma related distress and disorders. The course will provide students an opportunity to examine theory and practice issues in the context of biological, psychological, social, and spiritual dimensions of trauma. Students will be able to use this course to address specific stress and trauma topics that are important to their own social work education, field experiences, and /or personal interests. Each student will be expected to consider issues of cultural diversity as they relate to and interact with trauma theory and clinical practice.

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SOWK B573 Homelessness and Social Welfare in America Summer 2014 This is a course in the historical sociology of homelessness and its management in the United States from the early 19th century to the present. It is the story of the various human circumstances and administrative constructions that we refer to under the rubric of homelessness, made intelligible by reference to the history of American livelihood and the development of institutions of social welfare and social control. In some part, then, the course examines the history of social welfare and social control through the lens of a complex problem. The learning objectives for the course are straightforward: Students will learn the history of homelessness in the United States, including its historically variable definitions; students will learn the history of institutions of social control and social welfare; and students will learn the contours of current policy and programmatic considerations in the management of homelessness.

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SOWK B574 Child Welfare Policy, Practice & Research This course examines social policies and interventions that address problems of child abuse, neglect, and abandonment. First, child maltreatment and dependency are considered in historical, cross-national, and political contexts. Then, theories and research on the causes and consequences of child maltreatment are studied. The legal and political structure of child welfare services in the U.S. is considered, along with the extent to which this system provides a continuum of care, copes with residual problems of other service sectors (e.g., welfare, mental health, substance abuse, and housing), and prevents or perpetuates oppression of women, children, people of color, and other disadvantaged groups. The course focuses on micro-, meso-, and macro-level practice issues and research findings in the areas of child protection, in-home services, out-of-home care, adoption, treatment, and prevention of child maltreatment. Issues of cultural sensitivity and new directions for practice are considered in each of these areas. Counts toward Child and Family Studies

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SOWK B575 Global Public Health This course will use three overarching concepts of globalization, social justice and community to help students to define and explore the idea of public health and to decide for themselves where responsibilities for the public health lie. The first half of the course will have a global focus with an exploration of the evolution of some public health policy infrastructures in parts of Africa, India, the former Soviet Union and the United States. The second half will focus on the attempts of the UnitedStates to manage the public health through an exploration of examples of federal health legislation and the populations that they are intended to address. Major health legislation includes: soldiers' and veterans' benefits, Maternal and Child Health, Medicaid, Medicare, and laws related to the protection of the frail elderly. The subject of HIV/AIDS will be used to review all of the concepts and issues of the course. Counts toward Child and Family Studies

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SOWK B576 HSV Field Instruction This course is intended for post-master's students who are able to fulfill their required HSV practicum hours in one term.

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SOWK B576B HSV Field Instruction Completion This course, taken in conjunction with B365A, is intended for post-master's students who begin their required HSV practicum hours in the fall term and complete them in the spring term.

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SOWK B577A Home & School Visitor Integrative Seminar I Fall 2014 The Home and School Visitor Integrative Seminar is a supervisory group for students interested in pursuing the Home and School Visitor Certification and/or school social work practice. This seminar focuses on the integration of the practice of social work into the unique context of the public educational system in Pennsylvania. The various roles and responsibilities of Home and School Visitors and social workers in an educational environment will be examined. This seminar will allow further exploration of the application of knowledge learned.

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SOWK B577B Home & School Visitor Integrative Seminar II The Home and School Visitor Integrative Seminar is a supervisory group for students interested in pursuing the Home and School Visitor Certification and/or school social work practice. This seminar focuses on the integration of the practice of social work into the unique context of the public educational system in Pennsylvania. The various roles and responsibilities of Home and School Visitors and social workers in an educational environment will be examined. This seminar will allow further exploration of the application of knowledge learned.

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SOWK B578 Human Sexuality Sexual issues are present in all aspects of social work practice. Taking a bio/psycho/social approach to human sexuality, this course is designed to increase the student's comfort and sensitivity to the diversity of sexual issues people face. Course material will improve the student's skills in identifying, addressing, and treating sexual issues in practice. Sexual concerns of clients will be examined in a variety of practice settings such as case management, psychotherapy, schools, child welfare, aging, and group work. A variety of sex related topics will be covered including sex through the life span, diagnostic interviewing, sexual development, treatment for sexual concerns and dysfunctions, sexual wellness, sex education, sexual physiology, sexual neurology, and sexual diversity. All materials will be taught using the framework of NASW's Code of Ethics for social workers dealing with sexually related matters.

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SOWK B579 Independent Study

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SOWK B580 Adolescents in Family Therapy This course combines an emphasis on adolescent development and family psychology with family therapy theory and techniques of intervention. Readings and assignments will address the challenges families with adolescents face as well as clinical challenges for the practitioner, including engagement, maintenance of multiple alliances, and work with extrafamilial systems (e.g., schools, the juvenile justice system). Each class session will include both theoretical and practice components. Students will learn an empirically validated and widely used model that integrates the knowledge of adolescent development with family systems theory, cognitive-behavioral theory, and attachment theory. There will be a strong emphasis on sociocultural diversity with respect to family forms and functions. The course will be structured into several units: first, adolescent development within the context of the family; second, family theory and therapy; and third, application of an integrative model to specific populations and problems (e.g., single-parent families; adolescent substance abuse). It is expected that students will have access to families in their field placements. In order to sharpen their skills case conceptualization and intervention, students will view videotapes of family therapy sessions and participate in role plays and case presentations. Counts toward Child and Family Studies

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SOWK B581E Enhanced Educational Opportunity

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SOWK B583 Clinical Social Work With The LGBTQ Population: The Psychosocial Impact Summer 2014 This practice course, which will incorporate several macro level issues, will examine: variations in gender presentation and the complex issues associated with different types of gender transitions; the work of managing dual oppressions for LGBTQ communities of color; the differential experience of countertransference and transference with the LGBTQ population; the use and abuse of drugs and alcohol in the LGBTQ population; current practice concerns related to the treatment of HIV/AIDS; work with the developmental stages of "coming out" to oneself and one's community; alternative family construction and family structures with the LGBTQ population; managing self-disclosure and use of self with LGBTQ clients; attention to policy issues (particularly local ones) that have an impact on LGBTQ societal functioning, access to health care and overall experiences of inequality.

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SOWK B675 Intro. to the History of Amer. Social Welfare & Social Reform After brief considerations of the British origins of American social welfare, this course focuses on the development of social welfare and social work in the context of American reform movements. In addition to providing students with a chronological understanding of the development of social welfare policy and the profession of social work, the course emphasizes comparative historiography; that is, critical appraisals of different interpretations of social welfare history. Its overall goal is to help students understand the development of social welfare and social work in the context of American political-economic and social history.

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SOWK B676 Pedagogy Fall 2014 full semester-1 unit courseSupported by the Teaching and Learning Institute (TLI) and a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, this series of pedagogy workshops for graduate students may be taken in its entirety for course credit, or individual workshops may be attended as stand-alone sessions. Seven two-hour workshops focused on a variety of pedagogical issues (e.g., course design, teaching styles, creating culturally responsive classrooms, grading) are scheduled for both the fall and the spring semesters.* These are interactive workshops, some of which require the completion of reading in advance and some of which include discussion of texts during the workshops themselves, but all of which focus on active, collaborative explorations of pedagogical issues. A full list of the workshop topics is available through the Dean's Office. These workshops count toward the completion of the Dean's Certificate in Pedagogy (http://www.brynmawr.edu/gsas/Resources/certificate.html).

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SOWK B676A Pedagogy I Supported by the Teaching and Learning Institute (TLI) and a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, this series of pedagogy workshops for graduate students may be taken in its entirety for course credit, or individual workshops may be attended as stand-alone sessions. Seven two-hour workshops focused on a variety of pedagogical issues (e.g., course design, teaching styles, creating culturally responsive classrooms, grading) are scheduled for both the fall and the spring semesters.* These are interactive workshops, some of which require the completion of reading in advance and some of which include discussion of texts during the workshops themselves, but all of which focus on active, collaborative explorations of pedagogical issues. A full list of the workshop topics is available through the Dean's Office. These workshops count toward the completion of the Dean's Certificate in Pedagogy (http://www.brynmawr.edu/gsas/Resources/certificate.html).* Students taking the course for credit must register for and satisfactorily complete both semesters; however there is no tuition charged and no credit earned for the fall semester. Tuition will be charged and credit granted in the spring semester.

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SOWK B676B Pedagogy II Supported by the Teaching and Learning Institute (TLI) and a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, this series of pedagogy workshops for graduate students may be taken in its entirety for course credit, or individual workshops may be attended as stand-alone sessions. Seven two-hour workshops focused on a variety of pedagogical issues (e.g., course design, teaching styles, creating culturally responsive classrooms, grading) are scheduled for both the fall and the spring semesters.* These are interactive workshops, some of which require the completion of reading in advance and some of which include discussion of texts during the workshops themselves, but all of which focus on active, collaborative explorations of pedagogical issues. A full list of the workshop topics is available through the Dean's Office. These workshops count toward the completion of the Dean's Certificate in Pedagogy (http://www.brynmawr.edu/gsas/Resources/certificate.html).* Students taking the course for credit must register for and satisfactorily complete both semesters; however there is no tuition charged and no credit earned for the fall semester. Tuition will be charged and credit granted in the spring semester.

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SOWK B677 Foundations of Social Policy The seminar has three primary objectives: to provide a background in the classic literature of social policy, to orient students to the underlying assumptions informing different views of social policy and to enhance each student's skill at theoretical analysis of formal argument. While the texts chosen vary from year to year, the underlying organization of the seminar remains. Texts are chosen which provide background in relevant concepts from philosophy and important social science knowledge regarding the political limitations facing social policy in the United States. Policy texts are chosen to provide insight into the thinking informing the continental welfare state in Europe, the British welfare state and the current approach to human need in the United States. The last sessions of the seminar are devoted to a major policy issue. Students are required to write three short papers spread throughout the semester, each of which analyzes the assumptions informing some part of the argument in the assigned texts and to respond to an examination question.

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SOWK B679 Developmental Theory and Research on Indicators of Child and Adolescent Wellbeing This course examines how core concepts of child development are critical elements of building an integrated approach to research, practice and policy development relating to the well-being of children in the context of their families. Developmental science has made important contributions to our work by increasing our understanding of the nature of human development. It is critically important that social work professionals who seek to work in the broad area of "child and family well-being" become skilled in the translation of developmental concepts and methods to a broad range of social problems affecting children and families.

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SOWK B680 Theories of Mind, Personality and Self in Society This course examines major theories of personality development, addressing the context within which concepts of the self in society have been fashioned over more than a century. Theories will be analyzed as social, political, and historical constructions and viewed critically for their utility in informing practice and research.

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SOWK B681 Social Theory This seminar covers a range of theories useful for understanding social structure and social process at various levels of social organization. The purpose is (1) to increase familiarity with different theoretical perspectives, and (2) to allow practice in identifying and using conceptual frameworks suitable for guiding analysis in dissertations or other professional and scholarly work. In addition to assigned readings discussed in class, students will have the opportunity to prepare and present individual papers based on original texts by one or more major social theorists of their choice.

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SOWK B682 Data Analysis I Fall 2014 Data analysis is seen as one step in the research process. Statistical methods of analysis include descriptive and inferential statistics with major emphasis on partial and multiple correlation and regression, and analysis of variance and covariance. Knowledge of the assumptions and conditions under which statistical methods are valid, and discrimination in the selection, application, and interpretation of statistical tests are developed.

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SOWK B684 Qualitative Inquiry: Methods Fall 2014 This course is the first of a two-semester sequence in qualitative inquiry. Both semesters address the philosophical underpinnings, ethical conundrums, and the assessment of rigor within qualitative research. Course aims for the entire sequence are both conceptual and practical. These courses prepare students for qualitative research that is ethical, rigorous, reflexive, and relevant to social work practice and the enhancement of social work's evidence base. The first course in this sequence, offered in Semester 1, is B684: Qualitative Inquiry: Methods which prepares students to conceptualize, design, and carry out research by providing an in-depth understanding of methods, focusing on open-ended interviews, focus groups and ethnographic observations, all designed to deepen students' understanding of qualitative inquiry and to promote sophistication in using these methods, either alone or with quantitative approaches. The first semester also covers issues such as the role qualitative approaches play in social work research and related disciplines; the development of research problems appropriate for qualitative methods; development of conceptual lens to guide inquiry; reflexivity; sampling strategies; development of interview guides, with appropriate probes; and an introduction to mixed methods. Assignments will include learning how to critique existing qualitative research studies and to plan and collect one's own data. Students will develop a small class project, consisting of either two intensive interviews or one focus group. These data will be transcribed and loaded into NVivo for analysis in the second course in this sequence, Qualitative Inquiry: Analysis.

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SOWK B685 Research Methodology I This course considers major issues in the design and conduct of empirical research. Students are introduced to historical trends, landmark studies, epistemological and methodological debates, and current issues in social work research. Emphasis is on developing the knowledge and skills necessary to identify relevant and manageable research topics. Experimental and naturalistic research methods are covered, and students read and critique examples of research in these two traditions. Integration of qualitative and quantitative approaches is considered a strength in research design. Examples of faculty research are provided to illustrate applications of research methods at all levels of social work practice.

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SOWK B686 Research Methodology II This is a continuation of Research Methodology I. Survey research and secondary analysis of data are discussed and examples are examined. Important methodological details are then considered along with adaptations required for different types of research. Topics include: sampling, statistical power, measurement, data collection, data management, and the initial phases of data analysis. The course focuses on the knowledge and skills necessary to read research articles critically, plan and cost research proposals, develop research proposals, acquire funding, write research reports, and achieve publication of research findings. Protection of the rights of human subjects and other ethical concerns are taken up throughout the course.

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SOWK B688 Independent Study Fall 2014 Motion of High Net Worth Donors: An Exploration of Social Justice Philanthropy

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SOWK B689 Applied Development Theory and Translational Research

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