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Sociology Department
Bryn Mawr College
101 North Merion Avenue
Bryn Mawr, PA 19010-2899
Phone: (610) 526-5030/5331
Fax: (610) 526-5655

Curriculum

This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's master calendar.

Fall 2014

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
SOCL B102-001 Society, Culture, and the Individual Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Taylor Hall F Karen,D.
SOCL B130-001 Sociology of Harry Potter Semester / 1 LEC: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MW Taylor Hall D Nolan,B.
SOCL B205-001 Social Inequality Semester / 1 LEC: 8:25 AM- 9:45 AM TTH Dalton Hall 300 Nolan,B.
SOCL B217-001 The Family in Social Context Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MW Dalton Hall 119 Wright,N.
SOCL B229-001 Black America in Sociological Perspective Semester / 1 Lecture: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTH Dalton Hall 300 Washington,R.
SOCL B302-001 Social Theory Semester / 1 Lecture: 11:40 AM- 1:00 PM MW Dalton Hall 1 Washington,R.
SOCL B303-001 Junior Conference: Discipline-Based Intensive Writing Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTH Dalton Hall 10 Karen,D.
SOCL B309-001 Sociology of Religion Semester / 1 Lecture: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM M Dalton Hall 1 Wright,N.
SOCL B313-001 Sociology of Terrorism and Counterterrorism Semester / 1 LEC: 10:10 AM-11:30 AM MW Dalton Hall 10 Nolan,B.
SOCL B398-001 Senior Conference Semester / 1 Lecture: 7:10 PM- 9:00 PM T Dalton Hall 2 Dept. staff, TBA
SOCL B403-001 Supervised Work Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA
SOCL B403-001 Supervised Work Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA

Spring 2015

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
SOCL B102-001 Society, Culture, and the Individual Semester / 1 LEC: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTH Taylor Hall G Nolan,B.
SOCL B130-001 Sociology of Harry Potter Semester / 1 LEC: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTH Taylor Hall G Nolan,B.
SOCL B201-001 The Study of Gender in Society Semester / 1 LEC: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MW Dalton Hall 119 Nolan,B.
SOCL B227-001 Sports in Society Semester / 1 LEC: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Dalton Hall 119 Karen,D., Washington,R.
SOCL B230-001 Topics in Comparative Urbanism Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MW Taylor Hall B McDonogh,G.
SOCL B257-001 Marginals and Outsiders: The Sociology of Deviance Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTH Taylor Hall E Washington,R.
SOCL B265-001 Research Design and Statistical Analysis Semester / 1 Lecture: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTH Dalton Hall 119 Wright,N.
SOCL B266-001 Schools in American Cities Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTH Taylor Hall G Cohen,J.
SOCL B273-001 Race and the Law in American Context Semester / 1 LEC: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTH Dalton Hall 1 Albert,R.
SOCL B275-001 Introduction to Survey Research Methods Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MW Dalton Hall 1 Consiglio,D.
SOCL B303-001 Junior Conference: Discipline-Based Intensive Writing Semester / 1 Lecture: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM T Dalton Hall 25 Wright,N.
SOCL B354-001 Comparative Social Movements Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 3:30 PM TH Dalton Hall 212A Hager,C.
SOCL B358-001 Higher Education: Structure, Dynamics, Policy Semester / 1 LEC: 1:10 PM- 3:30 PM W Dalton Hall 25 Karen,D.
SOCL B360-001 Topics in Urban Culture and Society: Global Borderlands Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM W Dalton Hall 10 Reyes,V.
SOCL B375-001 Gender, Work and Family Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 3:30 PM F Dalton Hall 212A Golden,M.
SOCL B403-001 Supervised Work Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA
SOCL B403-001 Supervised Work Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA

Fall 2015

(Class schedules for this semester will be posted at a later date.)

2014-15 Catalog Data

SOCL B102 Society, Culture, and the Individual Fall 2014, Spring 2015 Analysis of the basic sociological methods, perspectives, and concepts used in the study of society, with emphasis on social structure, education, culture, the self, and power. Theoretical perspectives that focus on sources of stability, conflict, and change are emphasized throughout. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies Counts toward International Studies

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SOCL B130 Sociology of Harry Potter Fall 2014, Spring 2015 J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter series is a worldwide phenomenon that has sold hundreds of millions of books and been translated into dozens of languages. Over the last decade, academic studies of Harry Potter have taken root in English and Theology departments, but very few sociologists have taken a scholarly look at the rich society Rowling has created. This course will introduce students to the fundamental concepts of sociology using the lens of the Harry Potter series. We will explore questions of hierarchy, inequality, terrorism, consumption, race, class, and gender, and we will discuss the ways in which stratification in the wizarding world compares and contrasts to similar issues in the Muggle world. Class discussions and exercises will assume that students have read all seven Harry Potter books. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

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SOCL B200 Urban Sociology Not offered 2014-15 This course consists of an overview, as well as an analysis of the physical and social structure of the city. The first part of the course will deal with understanding exactly what a city consists of. The second part will focus on the social structure within cities. Finally, in the third part of the course, we will examine patterns of inequality and segregation in the city. Prerequisite: one social science course or permission of instructor. Cross-listed as CITY B200

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SOCL B201 The Study of Gender in Society Spring 2015 The definition of male and female social roles and sociological approaches to the study of gender in the United States, with attention to gender in the economy and work place, the division of labor in families and households, and analysis of class and ethnic differences in gender roles. Of particular interest in this course is the comparative exploration of the experiences of women of color in the United States. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Counts toward Child and Family Studies Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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SOCL B205 Social Inequality Fall 2014 Introduction to the major sociological theories of gender, racial-ethnic, and class inequality with emphasis on the relationships among these forms of stratification in the contemporary United States, including the role of the upper class(es), inequality between and within families, in the work place, and in the educational system. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Cross-listed as CITY B205 Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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SOCL B217 The Family in Social Context Fall 2014 A consideration of the family as a social institution in the United States, looking at how societal and cultural characteristics and dynamics influence families; how the family reinforces or changes the society in which it is located; and how the family operates as a social organization. Included is an analysis of family roles and social interaction within the family. Major problems related to contemporary families are addressed, such as domestic violence and divorce. Cross-cultural and subcultural variations in the family are considered. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Counts toward Child and Family Studies Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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SOCL B218 Sociology of International Development Not offered 2014-15 This course examines the persistent gap between the Global North and Global South around problems such as poverty, food insecurity, and access to health and education. We will examine theories and perspectives that address this disparity and explore alternatives to Western models of social organization, as put forth by social movements in the Global South. Throughout the course, we will read key primary texts (manifestos, communiqués, oral histories, and world financial institution reports) to understand the role of different players in the international development field, including global economic and governance institutions, non-governmental organizations, and--most importantly--feminist, afro-descendant, indigenous, and other voices emerging in the Global South. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

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SOCL B219 Field Work / Qualitative Methods Not offered 2014-15 Students will learn how to design and conduct a qualitative research study. The course will introduce several types of research approaches (e.g. case study, grounded theory) and provide in-depth instruction in various research methods, especially participant observation, ethnography, and interviewing. Students will read published works that use field work, examining the connections between theories and methods. In addition, each student will design and carry out a field-based study on a topic of her/his own choosing. Students will learn how to collect and analyze qualitative data and write up research findings. Issues of positionality, subjectivity, and representativeness in qualitative research will also be discussed.

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SOCL B225 Women in Society Not offered 2014-15 A study of the contemporary experiences of women of color in the Global South. The household, workplace, community, and the nation-state, and the positions of women in the private and public spheres are compared cross-culturally. Topics include feminism, identity and self-esteem; globalization and transnational social movements and tensions and transitions encountered as nations embark upon development. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Counts toward Africana Studies Counts toward Child and Family Studies Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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SOCL B227 Sports in Society Spring 2015 Using a sociological, historical, and comparative approach, this course examines such issues as the role of the mass media in the transformation of sports; the roles played in sports by race, ethnicity, class, and gender; sports as a means of social mobility; sports and socialization; the political economy of sports; and sports and the educational system. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

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SOCL B229 Black America in Sociological Perspective Fall 2014 This course provides sociological perspectives on various issues affecting black America: the legacy of slavery; the formation of urban ghettos; the struggle for civil rights; the continuing significance of discrimination; the problems of crime and criminal justice; educational under-performance; entrepreneurial and business activities; the social roles of black intellectuals, athletes, entertainers, and creative artists. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Inquiry into the Past (IP) Cross-listed as CITY B269 Counts toward Africana Studies

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SOCL B230 Topics in Comparative Urbanism
Section 001 (Spring 2014): Global Exurbia Spring 2015 This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: Probing the relations of power at the heart of power and society in many cities worldwide, this class uses case studies to test urban theory, forms and practice. In order to grapple with colonialism and its aftermaths, we will focus on cities in North Africa (and France), Northern Ireland, Hong Kong and Cuba, systematically exploring research, writing and insights from systematic interdisciplinary comparisons.
Writing Intensive Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Inquiry into the Past (IP) Cross-listed as CITY B229 Cross-listed as HART B229 Counts toward Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples & Cultures

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SOCL B231 Punishment and Social Order Not offered 2014-15 A cross-cultural examination of punishment, from mass incarceration in the United States, to a widened "penal net" in Europe, and the securitization of society in Latin America. The course addresses theoretical approaches to crime control and the emergence of a punitive state connected with pervasive social inequality. Cross-listed as CITY B231 Counts toward Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples & Cultures

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SOCL B238 Perspectives on Urban Poverty Not offered 2014-15 This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to 20th century urban poverty knowledge. The course is primarily concerned with the ways in which historical, cultural, political, racial, social, spatial/geographical, and economic forces have either shaped or been left out of contemporary debates on urban poverty. Of great importance, the course will evaluate competing knowledge systems and their respective implications in terms of the question of "what can be known" about urban poverty in the contexts of social policy and practice, academic research, and the broader social imaginary. We will critically analyze a wide body of literature that theorizes and explains urban poverty. Course readings span the disciplines of sociology, anthropology, critical geography, urban studies, history, and social welfare. Primacy will be granted to critical analysis and deconstruction of course texts, particularly with regard to the ways in which poverty knowledge creates, sustains, and constricts channels of action in urban poverty policy and practice interventions. Critical Interpretation (CI)

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SOCL B249 Asian American Communities Not offered 2014-15 This course is an introduction to the study of Asian American communities that provides comparative analysis of major social issues confronting Asian Americans. Encompassing the varied experiences of Asian Americans and Asians in the Americas, the course examines a broad range of topics--community, migration, race and ethnicity, and identities--as well as what it means to be Asian American and what that teaches us about American society. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Inquiry into the Past (IP) Cross-listed as CITY B249 Cross-listed as ANTH B249

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SOCL B253 Fixing Inequality: History/Philosophy of Social Intervention Not offered 2014-15 This course engages seminar participants in critical and historical analysis of state attempts to fix inequality in capitalistic, liberal democratic society. Focusing primarily on the US and secondarily in international contexts, we will trace the evolution of philosophical, moral, ideological, and political-economic forces that have shaped the welfare state-building projects of the 19th and 20th centuries. We will analyze how concepts such as labor regulation, federalism, veterans' benefits, geopolitics, professionalism, civil society, private benefits, path dependencies, race, class, gender, and modern governance intersect with the formation and reformation of policy and practice interventions designed to fix social inequality. Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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SOCL B257 Marginals and Outsiders: The Sociology of Deviance Spring 2015 An examination of unconventional and criminal behavior from the standpoint of different theoretical perspectives on deviance (e.g., social disorganization, symbolic interaction, structural functionalism, Marxism) with particular emphasis on the labeling and social construction perspectives; and the role of conflicts and social movements in changing the normative boundaries of society. Topics will include alcoholism, drug addiction, homicide, homosexuality, mental illness, prostitution, robbery, and white-collar crime. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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SOCL B258 Sociology of Education Not offered 2014-15 Major sociological theories of the relationships between education and society, focusing on the effects of education on inequality in the United States and the historical development of primary, secondary, and post-secondary education in the United States. Other topics include education and social selection, testing and tracking, and micro- and macro-explanations of differences in educational outcomes. This is a Praxis I course; placements are in local schools. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Counts toward Child and Family Studies Counts toward Praxis Program

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SOCL B259 Comparative Social Movements in Latin America Not offered 2014-15 An examination of resistance movements to the power of the state and globalization in three Latin American societies: Mexico, Columbia, and Peru. The course explores the political, legal, and socio-economic factors underlying contemporary struggles for human and social rights, and the role of race, ethnicity, and coloniality play in these struggles. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Cross-listed as POLS B259 Cross-listed as CITY B220 Counts toward Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples & Cultures

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SOCL B261 Transitions to Adulthood Not offered 2014-15 Adolescence and early adulthood is a critical period in our lives. During this time we experience a number of of major life events that mark the transition into adult roles and relationships, and that are of major consequence for the rest of our lives. We leave school, start working, form romantic relationships, begin sexual activity, leave home, become financially independent, get married, and start having children. This seminar explores how adolescent transitions are studied, how they compare across different national contexts, and how individual, family, and community factors affect the type and timing of different transitions. Prerequisite: one introductory social science class.

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SOCL B262 Who Believes What and Why: The Sociology of Public Opinion Not offered 2014-15 This course explores public opinion: what it is, how it is measured, how it is shaped, and how it changes over time. Specific attention is given to the role of elites, the mass media, and religion in shaping public opinion. Examples include racial/ethnic civil rights, abortion, gay/lesbian/transgendered sexuality, and inequalities. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Inquiry into the Past (IP) Cross-listed as POLS B262 Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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SOCL B265 Research Design and Statistical Analysis Spring 2015 An introduction to the conduct of empirical, especially quantitative, social science inquiry. In consultation with the instructor, students may select research problems to which they apply the research procedures and statistical techniques introduced during the course. Using SPSS, a statistical computer package, students learn techniques such as cross-tabular analysis, ANOVA, and multiple regression. Limited to Bryn Mawr Sociology majors and minors. Quantitative Methods (QM) Quantitative Readiness Required (QR)

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SOCL B266 Schools in American Cities Spring 2015 This course examines issues, challenges, and possibilities of urban education in contemporary America. We use as critical lenses issues of race, class, and culture; urban learners, teachers, and school systems; and restructuring and reform. While we look at urban education nationally over several decades, we use Philadelphia as a focal "case" that students investigate through documents and school placements. This is a Praxis II course (weekly fieldwork in a school required) Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Cross-listed as EDUC B266 Cross-listed as CITY B266 Counts toward Africana Studies Counts toward Child and Family Studies Counts toward Praxis Program

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SOCL B273 Race and the Law in American Context Spring 2015 An examination of the intersection of race and law, evaluating the legal regulations of race, the history and meanings of race, and how law, history and the Supreme Court helped shape and produce those meanings. It will draw on materials from law, history, public policy, and critical race theory. Cross-listed as POLS B273

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SOCL B275 Introduction to Survey Research Methods Spring 2015 The purpose of this course is to give the students the tools necessary to critically evaluate survey collection processes and the resulting data, as well as equip them with the skills to develop, execute, and analyze their own surveys to produce meaningful results. Topics include: proposal development, instrument design, question design, measurement, sampling techniques, survey pretesting, survey collection media, interviewing, index and scale construction, data analysis, interpretation and report writing. The course also examines the effects of demographic and socioeconomic factors in contemporary survey data collection. Quantitative Readiness Required (QR)

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SOCL B284 Modernity and Its Discontents Not offered 2014-15 This course examines the nature, historical emergence, dilemmas, and prospects of modern society in the west, seeking to build up an integrated analysis of the processes by which this kind of society developed over the past two centuries and continues to transform itself. Its larger aim is to help students develop a coherent frame­work with which to understand what kind of society they live in, what makes it the way it is, and how it shapes their lives. Some central themes (and controversies) will include the growth and transformations of capitalism; the significance of the democratic and industrial revolutions; the social impact of a market economy; the culture of individualism and its dilemmas; the transformations of intimacy and the family; mass politics and mass society; and the different kinds of inter­play between social structure and personal experience. No specific prerequisites, but some previous familiarity with modern European and American history and/or with social and political theory would be useful. Inquiry into the Past (IP) Cross-listed as POLS B284 Cross-listed as HIST B284

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SOCL B302 Social Theory Fall 2014 Analysis of classical and modern theorists selected because of their continuing influence on sociological thought. Among the theoretical conceptions examined are: alienation, bureaucracy, culture, deviance, modernization, power, religion and the sacred, social change, social class, social conflict, social psychology of self, and status. Theorists include: Durkheim, Firestone, Gramsci, Marx, Mead, Mills, and Weber. Prerequisite: Bryn Mawr Sociology majors and minors.

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SOCL B303 Junior Conference: Discipline-Based Intensive Writing Fall 2014, Spring 2015 This course will introduce students to a range of qualitative methods in the discipline and will require students to engage, through reading and writing, a wide range of sociological issues. The emphasis of the course will be to develop a clear, concise writing style, while maintaining a sociological focus. Substantive areas of the course will vary depending on the instructor. Prerequisite: Bryn Mawr Sociology Major, Junior Standing Writing Intensive

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SOCL B309 Sociology of Religion Fall 2014 This course will investigate what sociology offers to an historical and contemporary understanding of religion. Most broadly, the course explores how religion has fared under the conditions of modernity given widespread predictions of secularization yet remarkably resilient and resurgent religious movements the world over. The course is structured to alternate theoretical approaches to religion with specific empirical cases that illustrate, test, or contradict the particular theories at hand. It focuses primarily on the West, but situated within a global context.

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SOCL B313 Sociology of Terrorism and Counterterrorism Fall 2014 Terrorism -- the use or threat of violence to achieve political, religious, or social goals -- is a centuries-old phenomenon, but terrorism has become a distressing feature of social life during the last three decades in particular. Since the early 1980s, the world has seen over 10,000 separate acts of terror that have caused thousands of deaths and billions of dollars in damage. This seminar, taught by a former CIA counterterrorism officer, will give students a sociological perspective on terrorism, including the ways in which the threat of terrorism has changed over time, the motivations of different terrorist groups, and the circumstances under which terrorism succeeds and fails. We will also explore America's counterterrorism efforts and grapple with some of the most challenging questions facing the U.S. intelligence community today: what are the best ways to combat terrorism? How do we define and recognize success and failure in the War on Terror? Prerequisite: Introductory level social science course.

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SOCL B314 Immigrant Experiences Not offered 2014-15 This course is an introduction to the causes and consequences of international migration. It explores the major theories of migration (how migration is induced and perpetuated); the different types of migration (labor migration, refugee flows, return migration) and forms of transnationalism; immigration and emigration policies; and patterns of migrants' integration around the globe. It also addresses the implications of growing population movements and transnationalism for social relations and nation-states. Prerequisite: At least one prior social science course or permission of the instructor. Counts toward Latin Amer/Latino/Iberian Peoples & Cultures Counts toward Peace, Justice and Human Rights

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SOCL B331 Global Sociology: Capital, Power, and Protest in World-Historical Perspective Not offered 2014-15 This course examines the social, economic and political dynamics underlying globalization. Through an analysis of global capitalism, the inter-state system, and transnational social movements, we will trace the local-global connections at the basis of contemporary issues like natural resource extraction, human rights violations, and labor insecurity.

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SOCL B335 Community Based Research Not offered 2014-15 This course links each student researcher to a community organization to carry out and complete a research project. Students learn the specific needs of the organization and develop the necessary research skills for their particular project. Projects will be available in a variety of local schools and non-profit organizations in Philadelphia and Montgomery County. Students may contact the department in advance for information about the types of participating organizations during a particular semester. Prerequisite: at least one social science course and permission of the instructor. Counts toward Praxis Program

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SOCL B340 Race and Ethnic Relations in Comparative Perspective Not offered 2014-15 This seminar addresses one of the most complex and pervasive problems in the modern world --- the problem of strained racial--ethnic relations within national societies. It begins by examining major theoretical perspectives on racial ethnic relations. Comparing the United States, Brazil, Great Britain, Malaysia, South Africa, and Rwanda, it focuses on the historical backgrounds, current developments (including levels of poverty, education, political representation, social integration, and intermarriage), and government policies, with the objective of identifying the social conditions that have conduced to the worst and the most successful ethnic- racial relations --- in terms of social equality and human rights. Prerequisites: Open to juniors and seniors who have completed at least two courses in Sociology, Political Science, or Anthropology.

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SOCL B346 Advanced Topics in Environment and Society Not offered 2014-15 This is a topics course. Topics vary. Cross-listed as CITY B345 Cross-listed as HIST B345 Counts toward Environmental Studies

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SOCL B350 Movements for Social Justice in the US Not offered 2014-15 Throughout human history, powerless groups of people have organized social movements to improve their lives and their societies. Powerful groups and institutions have resisted these efforts in order to maintain their own privilege. Some periods of history have been more likely than others to spawn protest movements. What factors seem most likely to lead to social movements? What determines their success/failure? We will examine 20th-century social movements in the United States to answer these questions. Includes a film series. Prerequisite: At least one prior social science course or permission of the instructor. Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies Counts toward Peace, Justice and Human Rights

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SOCL B354 Comparative Social Movements Spring 2015 A consideration of the conceptualizations of power and "legitimate" and "illegitimate" participation, the political opportunity structure facing potential activists, the mobilizing resources available to them, and the cultural framing within which these processes occur. Specific attention is paid to recent movements within and across countries, such as feminist, environmental, and anti-globalization movements, and to emerging forms of citizen mobilization, including transnational and global networks, electronic mobilization, and collaborative policymaking institutions. Cross-listed as POLS B354 Counts toward Environmental Studies

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SOCL B358 Higher Education: Structure, Dynamics, Policy Spring 2015 This course examines the structure and dynamics of the "non-system" of higher education in the US in historical and comparative perspective. Focusing on patterns of access, graduation, and allocation into the labor market, the course examines changes over time and how these vary at different types of institutions and cross-nationally. Issues of culture, diversity (especially with respect to class, race/ethnic, and gender), and programming will be examined. The main theoretical debates revolve around the relationship between higher education and the society (does it reproduce or transform social structure) in which it is embedded.

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SOCL B360 Topics in Urban Culture and Society
Section 001 (Spring 2014): City, Nature and Identity in Brazil
Section 001 (Spring 2015): Global Borderlands Spring 2015 This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: This course is a social scientific examination of various types of borderlands - spaces of cross-national and cross-cultural exchange - around the world. We will explore the social, cultural, political, and geographic processes and interactions that occur within these spaces. Specific types of borderlands explored in the course may include geo-political borders, bordertowns, suburbs, frontiers, divided cities, and global borderlands.
Cross-listed as CITY B360 Cross-listed as HART B359

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SOCL B363 Sociology of Sex and Gender Seminar Not offered 2014-15 We examine the concepts of sex and gender from from a sociological perspective. In the first part of the course, we examine different perspectives on gender, with a particular focus on the social constructionist view. We also explore concepts of feminist epistemology, femininity and masculinity, herernormativity, and intersectionality. In the second part of the course, we focus on gender and inequality within the institutions of family, work, and politics. Prerequisite: one social science course.

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SOCL B374 Education Politics & Policy in the U.S. Not offered 2014-15 This course will examine education policy through the lens of federalism and federalism through a case study of education policy. The dual aims are to enhance our understanding of this specific policy area and our understanding of the impact that our federal system of government has on policy effectiveness. Cross-listed as POLS B374 Cross-listed as EDUC B374

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SOCL B375 Gender, Work and Family Spring 2015 As the number of women participating in the paid workforce who are also mothers exceeds 50 percent, it becomes increasingly important to study the issues raised by these dual roles. This seminar will examine the experiences of working and nonworking mothers in the United States, the roles of fathers, the impact of working mothers on children, and the policy implications of women, work, and family. Cross-listed as POLS B375 Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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SOCL B393 U.S. Welfare Politics: Theory and Practice Not offered 2014-15 Major theoretical perspectives concerning the welfare state with a focus on social policy politics, including recent welfare reforms and how in an era of globalization there has been a turn to a more restrictive system of social provision. Special attention is paid to the ways class, race, and gender are involved in making of social welfare policy and the role of social welfare policy in reinforcing class, race, and gender inequities. Prerequisite: POLS B121 or SOCL B102. Cross-listed as POLS B393

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SOCL B398 Senior Conference This course introduces the fascinating terrain of cultural sociology by focusing on major theoretical perspectives and studies in the field. Ranging from functionalist and materialist to reception, symbolic action and hegemonic perspectives, this seminar explores the dimension of sociology that is most closely related to the humanities. That is the exploration of the origins and impact of socially constructed meanings and images in such spheres as advertising, cartoons, music, movies, television, politics, art, and literature. Through studying the interactions between social structure and cultural constructions, students learn the ways in which cultural products influence and shape human social consciousness by conditioning perceptions of gender, race, and class as well as the broader social reality. Each student will required to write several short analytical essays and a medium length research paper.

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SOCL B403 Supervised Work Students have the opportunity to do individual research projects under the supervision of a faculty member.

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SOCL B403 Supervised Work Students have the opportunity to do individual research projects under the supervision of a faculty member.

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SOCL B425 Praxis III: Independent Study Praxis III courses are Independent Study courses and are developed by individual students, in collaboration with faculty and field supervisors. A Praxis courses is distinguished by genuine collaboration with fieldsite organizations and by a dynamic process of reflection that incorporates lessons learned in the field into the classroom setting and applies theoretical understanding gained through classroom study to work done in the broader community. Counts toward Praxis Program

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