Courses at Bryn Mawr

This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's master calendar.

Students must choose a major subject and may choose a minor subject. Students may also select from one of seven concentrations, which are offered to enhance a student's work in the major or minor and to focus work on a specific area of interest.

Concentrations are an intentional cluster of courses already offered by various academic departments or through general programs. These courses may also be cross-listed in several academic departments. Therefore, when registering for a course that counts toward a concentration, a student should register for the course listed in her major or minor department. If the concentration course is not listed in her major or minor department, the student may enroll in any listing of that course.

Fall 2014

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTRUCTOR(S)
EDUC B210-001 Perspectives on Special Education Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM M Bettws Y Coed 127 Flaks,D.
ENGL B270-001 American Girl: Childhood in U.S. Literatures, 1690-1935 Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MW English House Lecture Hall Schneider,B.
PSYC B203-001 Educational Psychology Semester / 1 Lecture: 8:25 AM- 9:45 AM TTH Dalton Hall 119 Cassidy,K.
PSYC B209-001 Abnormal Psychology Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MW Carpenter Library 21 Schulz,M.
PSYC B250-001 Autism Spectrum Disorders Semester / 1 Lecture: 8:25 AM- 9:45 AM TTH Bettws Y Coed 127 Wozniak,R.
SOCL B217-001 The Family in Social Context Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MW Dalton Hall 119 Wright,N.

Spring 2015

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTRUCTOR(S)
EDUC B200-001 Critical Issues in Education Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MW Bettws Y Coed 127 Lesnick,A.
EDUC B266-001 Schools in American Cities Semester / 1 Lecture: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTH Taylor Hall G Cohen,J.
POLS B375-001 Gender, Work and Family Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 3:30 PM F Dalton Hall 212A Golden,M.
PSYC B206-001 Developmental Psychology Semester / 1 Lecture: 8:25 AM- 9:45 AM TTH Carpenter Library 21 Egan Brad,L.
PSYC B322-001 Culture and Development Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Bettws Y Coed 239 Wozniak,R.
PSYC B351-001 Developmental Psychopathology Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Thomas Hall 224 Rescorla,L.
SOCL B266-001 Schools in American Cities Semester / 1 Lecture: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTH Taylor Hall G Cohen,J.

Fall 2015

(Class schedules for this semester will be posted at a later date.)

Courses at Haverford

Fall 2013

COURSES TITLE MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTRUCTOR(S)

EDUC 200

Critical Issues in Education

TTh 11:30am-1pm

  Curl, H.

 

Spring 2014

COURSES TITLE MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTRUCTOR(S)

BIOL 217

Biological Psychology

 

  Gillihan, S.

EDUC 200

Critical Issues in Education

 

  Curl, H.

PSYC 213

Memory and Cognition

 

  Boltz, M.

Courses at Swarthmore

Fall 2013

COURSES TITLE MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTRUCTOR(S)

EDUC 14

Introduction to Education M 1:15-4pm Kohlberg 115 Jones-Walker, C.
EDUC 17 Curriculum and Methods Seminar     Smulyan, L.
EDUC 21 Educational Psychology T 7:15-10pm Lang Center 112 Renninger, K.
EDUC 23A Adolescents and Attachment      
EDUC 26 Special Education: Issues and Practice TTh 1:15-2:30pm Trotter Hall 203 Linn, M.
EDUC 41  Educational Policy M 1:15-4pm Trotter Hall 203 Costelloe, S.

EDUC 45

Literacies and Social Identities F 2-5pm Kohlberg 115 Anderson, D.

Spring 2014

COURSES TITLE MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTRUCTOR(S)

 

 

 

   

2014-15 Catalog Data

ANTH B281 Language in Social Context Not offered 2014-15 Studies of language in society have moved from the idea that language reflects social position/identity to the idea that language plays an active role in shaping and negotiating social position, identity, and experience. This course will explore the implications of this shift by providing an introduction to the fields of sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology. We will be particularly concerned with the ways in which language is implicated in the social construction of gender, race, class, and cultural/national identity. The course will develop students' skills in the ethnographic analysis of communication through several short ethnographic projects. Prerequisite: ANTH 102 or permission of instructor. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Critical Interpretation (CI) Cross-listed as LING B281 Counts toward Child and Family Studies Counts toward Peace, Justice, and Human Rights

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ANTH B312 Anthropology of Reproduction Not offered 2014-15 An examination of social and cultural constructions of reproduction, and how power in everyday life shapes reproductive behavior and its meaning in Western and non-Western cultures. The influence of competing interests within households, communities, states, and institutions on reproduction is considered. Prerequisite: ANTH 102 or permission of instructor. Counts toward Child and Family Studies Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies Counts toward Health Studies

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EDUC B200 Critical Issues in Education Spring 2015 Designed to be the first course for students interested in pursuing one of the options offered through the Education Program, this course is also open to students exploring an interest in educational issues. The course examines major issues in education in the United States within the conceptual framework of educational transformation. Fieldwork in an area school required (eight visits, 1.5-2 hours per visit). Writing Intensive Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Counts toward Africana Studies Counts toward Child and Family Studies

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EDUC B210 Perspectives on Special Education Fall 2014 The goal of this course is to introduce students to a range of topics, challenges, dilemmas, and strategies in understanding and educating all learners--those considered typical learners as well as those considered "special" learners. Students will learn more about: how students' learning profiles affect their learning in school from a functional perspective; how and why students' educational experience is affected by special education law; major issues in the field of special education; and a-typical learners, students with disabilities, and how to meet diverse student needs in a classroom. Two hours of fieldwork per week required. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Counts toward Child and Family Studies Counts toward Praxis Program

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EDUC B250 Literacies and Education Not offered 2014-15 A critical exploration of what counts as literacy, who decides, and what the implications are for teaching and learning. Students explore both their own and others experiences of literacy through reading and writing about power, privilege, access and responsibility around issues of adult, ESL, cultural, multicultural, gendered, academic and critical literacies. Fieldwork required. Priority given first to those pursuing certification or a minor in educational studies. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Counts toward Child and Family Studies Counts toward Praxis Program

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EDUC B266 Schools in American Cities Spring 2015 This course examines issues, challenges, and possibilities of urban education in contemporary America. We use as critical lenses issues of race, class, and culture; urban learners, teachers, and school systems; and restructuring and reform. While we look at urban education nationally over several decades, we use Philadelphia as a focal "case" that students investigate through documents and school placements. This is a Praxis II course (weekly fieldwork in a school required) Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Cross-listed as SOCL B266 Cross-listed as CITY B266 Counts toward Africana Studies Counts toward Child and Family Studies Counts toward Praxis Program

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EDUC B301 Curriculum and Pedagogy Seminar Not offered 2014-15 A consideration of theoretical and applied issues related to effective curriculum design, pedagogical approaches and related issues of teaching and learning. Fieldwork is required. Enrollment is limited to 15 with priority given first to students pursuing certification and second to seniors planning to teach. Counts toward Child and Family Studies Counts toward Praxis Program

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EDUC B302 Practice Teaching Seminar Not offered 2014-15 Drawing on participants' diverse student teaching placements, this seminar invites exploration and analysis of ideas, perspectives and approaches to teaching at the middle and secondary levels. Taken concurrently with Practice Teaching. Open only to students engaged in practice teaching. Counts toward Child and Family Studies

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EDUC B311 Fieldwork Seminar Not offered 2014-15 Drawing on the diverse contexts in which participants complete their fieldwork, this seminar invites exploration and analysis of ideas, perspectives and different ways of understanding his/her ongoing fieldwork and associated issues of educational practice, reform, and innovation. Five hours of fieldwork are required per week. Counts toward Child and Family Studies Counts toward Praxis Program

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ENGL B270 American Girl: Childhood in U.S. Literatures, 1690-1935 Fall 2014 This course will focus on the "American Girl" as a particularly contested model for the nascent American. Through examination of religious tracts, slave and captivity narratives, literatures for children and adult literatures about childhood, we will analyze U. S. investments in girlhood as a site for national self-fashioning. Critical Interpretation (CI) Counts toward Child and Family Studies Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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POLS B375 Gender, Work and Family Spring 2015 As the number of women participating in the paid workforce who are also mothers exceeds 50 percent, it becomes increasingly important to study the issues raised by these dual roles. This seminar will examine the experiences of working and nonworking mothers in the United States, the roles of fathers, the impact of working mothers on children, and the policy implications of women, work, and family. Cross-listed as SOCL B375 Counts toward Child and Family Studies Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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PSYC B203 Educational Psychology Fall 2014 Topics in the psychology of human cognitive, social, and affective behavior are examined and related to educational practice. Issues covered include learning theories, memory, attention, thinking, motivation, social/emotional issues in adolescence, and assessment/learning disabilities. This course provides a Praxis Level I opportunity. Classroom observation is required. Prerequisite: PSYC B105 (Introductory Psychology) Course does not meet an Approach Counts toward Child and Family Studies Counts toward Praxis Program

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PSYC B206 Developmental Psychology Spring 2015 A topical survey of psychological development from infancy through adolescence, focusing on the interaction of personal and environmental factors in the ontogeny of perception, language, cognition, and social interactions within the family and with peers. Topics include developmental theories; infant perception; attachment; language development; theory of mind; memory development; peer relations, schools and the family as contexts of development; and identity and the adolescent transition. Prerequisite: PSYC B105 or PSYC H100 Course does not meet an Approach Counts toward Child and Family Studies

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PSYC B209 Abnormal Psychology Fall 2014 This course will cover the main psychological disorders manifested by individuals as they develop across the life span. The semester will begin with an historical overview of how psychopathology has been conceptualized and treated across many centuries of Western history. The course will then review the assumptions of the major models which have been formulated to explain psychopathology: the biological, the psychodynamic, the behavioral, and the cognitive. We will begin with childhood and adolescent disorders and then cover the main disorders of adults. Among the disorders covered will be: attention deficit disorder, anorexia/bulimia, conduct disorder/antisocial personality, borderline personality disorder, anxiety disorders, psychophysiological disorders, substance abuse, depression, and schizophrenia. For each disorder, we will explore issues of classification, theories of etiology, risk and prevention factors, research on prognosis, and studies of treatment. Prerequisite: Introductory Psychology (PSYC B105 or H100). Course does not meet an Approach Counts toward Child and Family Studies Counts toward Health Studies

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PSYC B250 Autism Spectrum Disorders Fall 2014 Focuses on theory of and research on Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Topics include the history of autism; classification and diagnosis; epidemiology and etiology; major theories; investigations of sensory and motor atypicalities, early social communicative skills, affective, cognitive, symbolic and social factors; the neuropsychology of ASD; and current approaches to intervention. Prerequisite: Introductory Psychology (PSYC 105). Course does not meet an Approach Counts toward Child and Family Studies

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PSYC B322 Culture and Development Spring 2015 This course focuses on development and enculturation within nested sets of interacting contexts (e.g. family, village, classroom/work group, peer group, culture). Topics include the nature of culture, human narrativity, acquisition of multiple literacies, and the way in which developing mind, multiple contexts, cultures, narrativity, and literacies help forge identities. Prerequisites: PSYC 105 and PSYC 206, or Permission of the Instructor Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Counts toward Child and Family Studies

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PSYC B340 Women's Mental Health Not offered 2014-15 This course will provide an overview of current research and theory related to women's mental health. We will discuss psychological phenomena and disorders that are particularly salient to and prevalent among women, why these phenomena/disorders affect women disproportionately over men, and how they may impact women's psychological and physical well-being. Psychological disorders covered will include: depression, eating disorders, dissociative identity disorder, borderline personality disorder, and chronic pain disorders. Other topics discussed will include work-family conflict for working mothers, the role of sociocultural influences on women's mental health, and mental health issues particular to women of color and to lesbian women. Prerequisite: PSYC B209 or PSYC B351 (or equivalent 200-level course). Counts toward Child and Family Studies Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies Counts toward Health Studies

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PSYC B346 Pediatric Psychology Not offered 2014-15 This course uses a developmental-ecological perspective to understand the psychological challenges associated with physical health issues in children. The course explores how different environments support the development of children who sustain illness or injury and will cover topics including: prevention, coping, adherence to medical regimens, and pain management. The course will consider the ways in which cultural beliefs and values shape medical experiences. Suggested Preparations: PSYC B206 highly recommended. Counts toward Child and Family Studies Counts toward Health Studies

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PSYC B350 Developmental Cognitive Disorders Not offered 2014-15 This course uses a developmental and neuropsychological framework to study major development cognitive disorders manifested by children and adolescents, such as language delay/impairment, specific reading disability, math disability, nonverbal learning disability, intellectual disability, executive function disorder, autism, and traumatic brain injury. Cognitive disorders are viewed in the context of the normal development of language, memory, attention, reading, quantitative abilities, and executive functions. Students enrolled in the course will learn about the assessment, classification, outcome, remediation, and education of the major cognitive disorders manifested by children and adolescents. Students will participate in a course-related Praxis placement approximately 3 - 4 hours a week. Counts toward Child and Family Studies Counts toward Neuroscience Counts toward Praxis Program

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PSYC B351 Developmental Psychopathology Spring 2015 This course will examine emotional and behavioral disorders of children and adolescents, including autism, attention deficit disorder, conduct disorder, phobias, obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression, anorexia, and schizophrenia. Major topics covered will include: contrasting models of psychopathology; empirical and categorical approaches to assessment and diagnosis; outcome of childhood disorders; risk, resilience, and prevention; and therapeutic approaches and their efficacy .Prerequisite: PSYC 206 or 209. Counts toward Child and Family Studies Counts toward Health Studies Counts toward Neuroscience

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SOCL B217 The Family in Social Context Fall 2014 A consideration of the family as a social institution in the United States, looking at how societal and cultural characteristics and dynamics influence families; how the family reinforces or changes the society in which it is located; and how the family operates as a social organization. Included is an analysis of family roles and social interaction within the family. Major problems related to contemporary families are addressed, such as domestic violence and divorce. Cross-cultural and subcultural variations in the family are considered. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Counts toward Child and Family Studies Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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SOCL B225 Women in Society Not offered 2014-15 A study of the contemporary experiences of women of color in the Global South. The household, workplace, community, and the nation-state, and the positions of women in the private and public spheres are compared cross-culturally. Topics include feminism, identity and self-esteem; globalization and transnational social movements and tensions and transitions encountered as nations embark upon development. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Counts toward Africana Studies Counts toward Child and Family Studies Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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SOCL B258 Sociology of Education Not offered 2014-15 Major sociological theories of the relationships between education and society, focusing on the effects of education on inequality in the United States and the historical development of primary, secondary, and post-secondary education in the United States. Other topics include education and social selection, testing and tracking, and micro- and macro-explanations of differences in educational outcomes. This is a Praxis I course; placements are in local schools. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Counts toward Child and Family Studies Counts toward Praxis Program

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SOCL B266 Schools in American Cities Spring 2015 This course examines issues, challenges, and possibilities of urban education in contemporary America. We use as critical lenses issues of race, class, and culture; urban learners, teachers, and school systems; and restructuring and reform. While we look at urban education nationally over several decades, we use Philadelphia as a focal "case" that students investigate through documents and school placements. This is a Praxis II course (weekly fieldwork in a school required) Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Cross-listed as EDUC B266 Cross-listed as CITY B266 Counts toward Africana Studies Counts toward Child and Family Studies Counts toward Praxis Program

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SOWK B575 Global Public Health Not offered 2014-15 This course will use three overarching concepts of globalization, social justice and community to help students to define and explore the idea of public health and to decide for themselves where responsibilities for the public health lie. The first half of the course will have a global focus with an exploration of the evolution of some public health policy infrastructures in parts of Africa, India, the former Soviet Union and the United States. The second half will focus on the attempts of the United States to manage the public health through an exploration of examples of federal health legislation and the populations that they are intended to address. Major health legislation includes: soldiers' and veterans' benefits, Maternal and Child Health, Medicaid, Medicare, and laws related to the protection of the frail elderly. The subject of HIV/AIDS will be used to review all of the concepts and issues of the course. Counts toward Child and Family Studies Counts toward Praxis Program

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Courses at Haverford

ANTH H209 Anthropology of Education: State of the Debate
Education and schooling in anthropological literature. We will compare the concepts of "socialization" in British Social Anthropology with "cultural transmission" in American Cultural Anthropology to look for the different ways in which the role of education in social reproduction and transformation has been framed over time. In addition to basic works by thinkers such as Durkheim, Malinowski, Mead, Benedict and Boas, we will read a selection of ethnographies of schooling from the United States, Africa and Japan. Prerequisite: Anthro 103 and one course in Education.

ANTH H263 Anthropology of Space: Housing and Society
Space, place and architecture in anthropological theory; the contributions of anthropology to our understanding of the built and imagined environment in diverse cultures. Topics include: the body and its orientation in space; the house, kinship and cosmology; architecture as a communicative/semiotic system; space and sociopolitical segregation and integration; space and commodity culture. May be taken for Bryn Mawr Cities credit. Prerequisite: One course in ANTH or CITY.

BIOL H217 Biological Psychology
Interrelations between brain, behavior, and subjective experience. The course introduces students to physiological psychology through consideration of current knowledge about the mechanisms of mind and behavior.

COML H289 Children's Literature
This course investigates the beginnings, selected historical developments, and some of the varieties of literature for children, and asks questions about the distinctiveness of such literature, its aims and its presumed readership, and the applicability of particular theoretical approaches to children’s books. We will look at folk tale and fairy tale, early examples of literature specifically for children, some particularly influential texts, and examples from several sub-genres of children s literature; we will also spend a week each on picture books and poetry for children. Discussion will focus both on the texts themselves and on critical issues of various kinds.

EDUC H200 Critical Issues in Education
Designed to be the first course for students interested in pursuing one of the options offered through the Education Program, this course is also open to students who are not yet certain about their career aspirations but are interested in educational issues. The course examines major issues in education in the United States within the conceptual framework of educational reform. Two hours a week of fieldwork are required.

EDUC H210 Perspectives on Special Education
Perspectives on Special Education is designed as a survey course. The goal is to introduce you, the student, to a range of topics, challenges, dilemmas and strategies in understanding and educating all learners, those considered typical learners and those considered ‘special’ learners.

EDUC H250 Literacies and Education
A critical exploration of what counts as literacy, who decides, and what the implications are for teaching and learning. Students explore both their own and others experiences of literacy through reading and writing about power, privilege, access and responsibility around issues of adult, ESL, cultural, multicultural, gendered, academic and critical literacies. Fieldwork required. (Writing Intensive Praxis I). Priority given first to those pursuing certification or a minor in educational studies.

EDUC H260 Multicultural Education
A n investigation of the continually evolving theory and practice of multicultural education in the United States. This course explores and problematizes the history, politics, definitions, focuses, purposes, outcomes, and limitations of multicultural education as enacted in a range of school subjects and settings. Central topics may include: curriculum development, teacher training, language diversity, and public policy concerns. Students will also engage in researching and reinventing what is possible in education for, with, and about a diverse world. Two to three hours of fieldwork in a related setting per week required. Enrollment limited to 25. Priority given to students enrolled in the Education Program.

EDUC H302 Practice Teaching Seminar (To be taken concurrently with EDUC B303/B433 (Practice Teaching)
This class is open only to students engaged in practice teaching. The assignments build on those in EDUC 301 (Curriculum and Pedagogy), connect directly to students' practice teaching experiences, document students' progress toward meeting PA Department of Education and BMC/HC Education Program criteria for certification, and prepare students for their teaching careers. In this course, students are expected to re-visit, draw on, and put into practice the educational theory they have read in their education courses and on their own, discussed with experienced educators, high school students, and colleagues, and generated themselves. The goal of the class is to support students as they engage daily in practice teaching and as they clarify and further document the fundamental philosophies and practices that will foster reflective practice throughout their careers.

PSYCH H213 Memory and Cognition
An interdisciplinary study of ways in which memory and other cognitive processes manifest themselves in everyday life. Topics addressed include memory for faces and geographical locations; advertising; eyewitness testimony; autobiographical memory; metacognition; mood and memory; biological bases of cognition; human factors; decision-making; and cognitive diversity. Prerequisite: Psychology 100 or 104 or consent. Typically offered in alternate years

PSYCH H215 Introduction to Personality Psychology
An examination of the fundamental issues and questions addressed by personality psychology. What is personality? What are its underlying processes and mechanisms? How does personality develop and change over time? What constitutes a healthy personality? This course will explore these questions by considering evidence from several major approaches to personality (trait, psychodynamic, humanistic and social-cognitive), and it will encourage students to develop a dynamic understanding of human personality that is situated within biological, social and cultural contexts. Lottery preference to Psychology majors, minors and NBS concentrators, and then by class. Prerequisite: Psychology 100 or 105 or consent

PSYCH H217 Biological Psychology
Interrelations between brain, behavior and subjective experience. The course introduces students to physiological psychology through consideration of current knowledge about the mechanisms of mind and behavior. Prerequisite: An introductory course in Psychology or Biology, or consent..

PSYCH H238 Psychology of Language
An interdisciplinary examination of linguistic theory, language evolution and the psychological processes involved in using language. Topics include speech perception and production, processes of comprehension, language and the brain, language learning, language and thought, linguistic diversity and conversational interaction. Prerequisite: Psychology 100 or consent of instructor.

PSYCH H335 Self and Identity
Who am I? How do I feel about myself? What is the story of my life? How people answer such questions and the implications of their answers, both over time and across situations in their lives, are the issues that are at the heart of this course on self and identity. Through a combination of lecture and discussion, we will examine the literature on self and identity from multiple disciplinary perspectives (biological, developmental, personality, social, and clinical) and apply scientific concepts to the analysis of socially important issues, current events, popular culture, and our own life experiences. Specific topics to be addressed include self and identity development in childhood and adolescence, self-esteem and its consequences, gender and self, culture and ethnic identity development, stigmatized selves and prejudice, and the connection between self/identity and mental health.

SOCL H235 Class, Race & Education
An examination of the effects of class and race on educational and occupational outcomes, emphasizing the contemporary United States.


Courses at Swarthmore

EDUC 14 Introduction to Education
This course provides a survey of issues in education within an interdisciplinary framework. In addition to considering the theories of individuals such as Dewey, Skinner, and Bruner, the course explores some major economic, historical, psychological, and sociological questions in American education and discusses alternative policies and programs. Topics are examined through readings, software, writing, discussion, and hands-on activity. Fieldwork is required. This course fulfills the prerequisite for further course work in educational studies and provides an opportunity for students to explore their interests in educational policy, student learning, and teaching. This course, or the first-year seminar EDUC 014F, is required for students pursuing teacher certification.

EDUC 17 Curriculum and Methods Seminar
This seminar is taken concurrently with Ed 16. Readings and discussion focus on the applications of educational research and theory to classroom practice. Course content covers: lesson planning; classroom management; inquiry-oriented teaching strategies; questioning and discussion methods; literacy; the integration of technology and media; classroom-based and standardized assessments; instruction of special needs populations; topics in multicultural, nonracist, and nonsexist education; and legislation regarding the rights of students and teachers. As part of the seminar, students take a series of special methods workshops in their content area. Required for students pursuing teacher certification.

EDUC 21/PSYC 21 Educational Psychology
This course focuses on issues in learning and development that have particular relevance to understanding student thinking. Research and theoretical work on student learning and development provide the core readings for the course. In addition, students participate in a laboratory section that involves consideration of learning and motivation in an alternative public school classroom and provides an introduction to research methods. Required for students pursuing teacher certification.
Prerequisite: EDUC 14 or permission of the instructor.

EDUC 23 Adolescents and Special Education
In this course, students examine adolescent development from psychological, sociological, and life-span perspectives, reading both traditional theory and challenges to that theory that consider issues of race, class, gender, ethnicity, and sexual orientation. During the first part of the term, students explore various aspects of individual development (e.g., cognitive, affective, physiological, etc.). The second part of the semester focuses on the adolescent’s experience in a range of social contexts (e.g., family, peer group, school, etc.). Required for students pursuing teacher certification.
Prerequisite: EDUC 14 or permission of the instructor.

EDUC 26/PSYC 26 Special Education
This course is designed to provide students with a critical overview of special education, including its history, the classification and description of exceptionalities, and its legal regulation. Major issues related to identification, assessment, educational and therapeutic interventions, psychosocial aspects, and inclusion are examined. Course includes a field placement. Required for students pursuing teacher certification. Prerequisite: EDUC 14

EDUC 41 Educational Policy
This course explores issues in the design, implementation, and evaluation of educational policy at the federal, state, and local levels in light of the ongoing historical and cultural debates over educational policy. It will examine a range of current policy topics, including school finance, issues of adequacy and equity, the standards movement, systemic reform, testing and accountability, varieties of school choice, early childhood education, immigrant and bilingual education, and special education from the perspectives of several social science disciplines and political perspectives. Prerequisite: EDUC 14

EDUC 42 Teaching Diverse Young Learners
This course explores the ways children learn in classrooms and construct meaning in their personal, community, and academic lives. The course is framed by theories of learning as transmissionist, constructivist, and participatory. Students will draw on ethnographies, research, their own learning histories, classroom observations, and positioning as novice learners to create optimal learning environments for diverse learners including but not limited to English-language learners, socioeconomically disadvantaged populations, culturally non-mainstream students, students with learning differences and disabilities, and students with socioemotional classifications. Fieldwork is required. Required for elementary certification. Prerequisite: EDUC 14

EDUC 45 Literacies and Social Identities
This course explores the intersections of literacy practices and identities of gender, race, class, religion, ethnicity, and sexual orientation within communities of practice. It includes but is not limited to school settings. Students will work with diverse theory and analytical tools that draw on educational, anthropological, historical, sociological, linguistic, fictional, visual, popular readings and “scenes of literacy” from everyday practice. Fieldwork includes a Learning for Life partnership, tutoring, or community service in a literacy program. Prerequisite: EDUC 14 or permission of the instructor

EDUC 53 Language Minority Education
This course examines the multifaceted issues facing English learners in U.S. schools. Course topics include theories of second language acquisition and bilingualism, the history of bilingual education in the United States, educational language policies and the impact of the English-only movement, and practical approaches to teaching linguistic minority students. Course readings draw from relevant literature in sociolinguistics, language policy, language acquisition, educational anthropology, and language pedagogy. Through fieldwork and small group projects, students have the opportunity to explore issues particular to a language minority population of their choice. Required for students pursuing teacher certification. Prerequisite: EDUC 14 or permission of the instructor

EDUC 61 Gender and Education
This course uses historical, psychological, and social frameworks to explore the role of gender in the education process. It examines how gender influences the experiences of teaching and learning and how schools both contribute to and challenge social constructions of gender. Prerequisite: EDUC 14 or permission of the instructor

EDUC 64 Comparative Education
This course examines key issues and themes in education as they play out in schools and nations around the world. We will explore the roles of local, national, and international actors and organizations in the construction of educational goals and practice, using case studies and country studies to look for the interplay between local context and globalized movements in education. Topics will include immigration and schooling, equity, literacy, curriculum goals and constructs, teachers and teaching, and education in areas of conflict. Prerequisite: EDUC 14

EDUC 68 Urban Education
This course examines issues of practice and policy, including financing, integration, compensatory education, curricular innovation, parent involvement, bilingual education, high-stakes testing, comprehensive school reform, governance, and multiculturalism. The special challenges faced by urban schools in meeting the needs of individuals and groups in a pluralistic society will be examined using the approaches of education, psychology, sociology, anthropology, political science, and economics. Current issues will also be viewed in historical perspective. Prerequisite: EDUC 14

EDUC 69 Savage Inaccuracies: The Facts and Economics of Education in America
This course investigates the relationship between issues of resource allocation and educational attainment. It examines the facts about student achievement, educational expenditure in the United States, and the relationship between them. It studies such questions as: Does reducing class size improve student achievement? Does paying teachers more improve teacher quality and student outcomes? The course also investigates the relationship between educational attainment and wages in the labor market. Finally, it analyzes the effects of various market-oriented education reforms such as vouchers and charter schools. Prerequisite: Any statistics course (or the consent of the instructor). EDUC 14 is required to receive Educational Studies Department credit for this course

EDUC 70 Outreach Practicum
This course is offered in conjunction with the Lang Center for Civic and Social Responsibility. It is designed to support students involved in educational and community-based outreach in urban settings. Students’ volunteer experiences will provide text and case material for course work. Historical grounding in the construction of cities in general, and Chester, PA, in particular, will be provided. Criteria for effective practices will be identified for the range of volunteer roles in community service projects Prerequisite: EDUC 14 is recommended

EDUC 121 Psychology and Practice Honors
This seminar focuses on general developmental principles revealed in and applicable to contexts of practice as well as practical applications of research and theory in developmental psychology. Seminar foci include: (1) use of the literatures in developmental, educational, and social psychology and learning and cognitive science to identify key indicators for assessing changed understanding and motivation; (2) preparation of literature reviews on a topic of each student’s choice; and (3) collaborative work on an evaluation research project addressing a “live” issue or problem identified by a local teacher, school, or community organization. Prerequisite: EDUC 14 and EDUC 21

EDUC 131 Social and Cultural Perspectives Honors Seminar
In this seminar, students examine schools as institutions that both reflect and challenge existing social and cultural patterns of thought, behavior, and knowledge production. Seminar participants study and use qualitative methods of research and examine topics including the aims of schooling, parent/school/community interaction, schooling and identity development, and classroom and school restructuring. Prerequisite: EDUC 14 and an additional course in the 60s

EDUC 151 Literacies Research Honors Seminar
This seminar explores theories and methods in the design and implementation of qualitative studies of literacy, evaluation of literacy programs and pedagogy, and study of literacy policies. Students review relevant literature and participate in a field-based collaborative research project or program evaluation.
Prerequisite: EDUC 14 and an additional course in the 40s-60s. Either EDUC 42 or EDUC 45 is highly recommended.

EDUC 162 Sociology of Education
This seminar explores the countless connections between schooling and society. The seminar will look at educational policy and practice, applying prominent sociological perspectives to a broad array of educational and social problems. The seminar will examine schools as socializing institutions, the ways in which schooling influences social stratification, social mobility, and adult socioeconomic success. Topics will include unequal access to education, what makes schools effective, dropping out and persisting in school at various levels, ability grouping and tracking, and school restructuring. Fieldwork is required. Theory course for SOAN majors. Prerequisite: EDUC 14 and an additional course in the 60s, or permission of the instructor.

EDUC 167 Identities and Education Honors Seminar
This course explores intersections between identities of race, class, gender, sexual orientation and public education in the United States. Readings will draw on the fields of anthropology, legal studies, and cultural studies. Two central frameworks, Cultural Production and Critical Race Theory will guide consideration of how social structures inform the realities of schooling and how racial, class-based, gendered and sexual identities are formed with in the context of schools. Prerequisite: EDUC 14 and EDUC 68

HIST 79 Women, Family and the State in China
The history of women and families in Chinese society from the late imperial period to the present. Eligible for ASIA or GSST credit.

PSYC 27 Language Acquisition and Development
This course covers central issues in language development. Is the human mind specially designed to acquire language? Are these constraints specific to language or general features of human cognition? Is there a critical period for language acquisition? How much does language ability depend on the input given to the child? The course explores these and other issues in typically developing children and special populations. Topics include speech perception, word learning, syntax, pragmatics and bilingualism. Prerequisite: PSYC 001 or  LING 001 Introduction to Language and Linguistics.

PSYC 30 Psysiological Psychology
A survey of the neural and biochemical bases of behavior with special emphasis on sensory processing, motivation, emotion, learning, and memory. Both experimental analyses and clinical implications are considered. Prerequisite: PSYC 001

PSYC 34 Psychology of Language
The capacity for language sets the human mind apart from all other minds, both natural and artificial, and so contributes critically to making us who we are. In this course, we ask several fundamental questions about the psychology of language: How do children acquire it so quickly and accurately? How do we understand and produce it, seemingly without effort? What are its biological underpinnings? What is the relationship between language and thought? How did language evolve? And to what extent is the capacity for language “built in” (genetically) versus “built up” (by experience)? Prerequisite: PSYC 001 or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 35 Social Psychology
Social psychology argues that social context is central to human experience and behavior. This course provides a review of the field with special attention to relevant theory and research. The dynamics of cooperation and conflict, the self, group identity, conformity, social influence, prosocial behavior, aggression, prejudice, attribution, and attitudes are discussed. Prerequisite: PSYC 001

PSYC 36 Thinking, Judgment, and Decision Making
People in the modern world are flooded with major and minor decisions on a daily basis. The available information is overwhelming, and there is little certainty about the outcomes of any of the decisions people face. This course explores how people should go about making decisions in a complex, uncertain world; how people do go about making decisions in a complex, uncertain world; and how the gap between the two can be closed. Prerequisite: PSYC 001

PSYC 39 Developmental Psychology
Do infants have concepts? How do children learn language? These questions and others are addressed in this survey course of cognitive, social, and emotional development from infancy to adolescence. The course examines theoretical perspectives on the nature of developmental change in addition to empirical and applied issues in the study of children. Topics include the formation of social attachments; the foundations and growth of perceptual, cognitive, and social skills; language acquisition; and the impact of family and peers on the development of the child. Prerequisite: PSYC 001

PSYC 41 Children at Risk
Violence, educational inequality, war, homelessness, and chronic poverty form the backdrop of many children’s lives. We consider children’s responses to such occurrences from clinical, developmental and ecosystem perspectives. Prerequisite: PSYC 001 and either PSYC 38 or PSYC 39 or permission of instructor

PSYC 43 Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
People in the modern world are flooded with major and minor decisions on a daily basis. The available information is overwhelming, and there is little certainty about the outcomes of any of the decisions people face. This course explores how people should go about making decisions in a complex, uncertain world; how people do go about making decisions in a complex, uncertain world; and how the gap between the two can be closed. Prerequisite: PSYC 001. PSYC 31 recommended

PSYC 50 Developmental Psychopathology
This course covers several psychological disorders that often first appear in childhood and adolescence, including autism and other developmental disorders, attention-deficit disorder, conduct disorder, eating disorders, and emotional disorders. Theories about the causes and treatment are discussed. A heavy emphasis is on current research questions and empirical findings related to each disorder. Prerequisite: PSYC 001 and either PSYC 38 or PSYC 39 or permission of instructor

PSYC 55 Family Systems Theory and Psychological Change
Systems theory is important in clinical, educational, medical and organizational contexts. This course explores family systems perspectives on illness and change. Research and theory are supplemented with popular film, documentaries, and therapeutic case histories to understand how psychologists work with individuals and organizations to address developmental, communication, and emotional impasses. Prerequisite: PSYC 001 or permission of instructor

PSYC 135 Advanced Topics in Social and Cultural Psychology
The seminar aims at a critical exploration of substantive topics in social psychology, including findings from cross-cultural research and social neuroscience research. Various perspectives and methods in investigating how human mind and social behavior interact with situational and environmental factors are considered. Real world implications and applications are emphasized.
Prerequisite: PSYC 001 and PSYC 35; PSYC 25 strongly preferred.