This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's calendars page.

Students must choose a major subject and may choose a minor subject. Students may also select from one of seven concentrations, which are offered to enhance a student's work in the major or minor and to focus work on a specific area of interest.

Concentrations are an intentional cluster of courses already offered by various academic departments or through general programs. These courses may also be cross-listed in several academic departments. Therefore, when registering for a course that counts toward a concentration, a student should register for the course listed in her major or minor department. If the concentration course is not listed in her major or minor department, the student may enroll in any listing of that course.

Spring 2019

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
ANTH B202-001Africa in the WorldSemester / 1Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTHDalton Hall 212AFioratta,S.
ARTD B348-001Dance Ensemble: West AfricanSemester / 0.5LEC: 7:10 PM- 9:30 PM THPembroke StudioJones,L.
CSTS B108-001Roman AfricaSemester / 1Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MWDalton Hall 1Conybeare,C.
EDUC B200-001Community Learning Collaborative: Practicing PartnershipSemester / 1Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MWBettws Y Coed 127Zuckerman,K.
EDUC B200-00ACommunity Learning Collaborative: Practicing PartnershipSemester / 1Laboratory: 9:00 AM- 1:00 PM MDept. staff, TBA
EDUC B200-00BCommunity Learning Collaborative: Practicing PartnershipSemester / 1Laboratory: 9:00 AM- 1:00 PM TDept. staff, TBA
EDUC B200-00CCommunity Learning Collaborative: Practicing PartnershipSemester / 1Laboratory: 9:00 AM- 1:00 PM WDept. staff, TBA
EDUC B200-00DCommunity Learning Collaborative: Practicing PartnershipSemester / 1Laboratory: 9:00 AM- 1:00 PM THDept. staff, TBA
EDUC B200-00ECommunity Learning Collaborative: Practicing PartnershipSemester / 1Laboratory: 9:00 AM- 1:00 PM FDept. staff, TBA
EDUC B266-001Critical Issues in Urban EducationSemester / 1Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM MWDalton Hall 119Zuckerman,K.
EDUC B266-00ACritical Issues in Urban EducationSemester / 1Laboratory: 9:00 AM- 1:00 PM TDept. staff, TBA
EDUC B266-00BCritical Issues in Urban EducationSemester / 1Laboratory: 9:00 AM- 1:00 PM THDept. staff, TBA
EDUC B266-00CCritical Issues in Urban EducationSemester / 1Laboratory: 9:00 AM- 1:00 PM FDept. staff, TBA
ENGL B216-001Narrativity and Hip HopSemester / 1Lecture: 12:10 PM- 3:00 PM THSullivan,M.
ENGL B283-001Transnational WritingSemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHEnglish House IBeard,L.
ENGL B363-001Toni Morrison and the Art of Narrative ConjureSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM WEnglish House IBeard,L.
FREN B208-001Visible Minorities: Diversity in Contemporary French CinemaSemester / 1Lecture: 11:10 AM-12:00 PM MWFOld Library 116Suaudeau,J., Suaudeau,J.
Film screening: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM SUCarpenter Library 21
HART B279-001Exhibiting Africa: Art, Artifact and New ArticulationsSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM THOld Library 102Scott,M.
PE(D) B127-001Social Dance Forms: Salsa/Intro to Social Dance: Intro to Social Dance and SalsaSemester / 0LEC: 4:10 PM- 5:30 PM WDenbigh Dance StudioBerger,J., Butryn,R., Reinhart,D.
LEC: 4:40 PM- 6:00 PM WDenbigh Dance Studio
PHIL B207-001Africana PhilosophySemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHOld Library 102Fugo,J.
SOCL B257-001Marginals and Outsiders: The Sociology of DevianceSemester / 1Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTHDalton Hall 119Washington,R.

Fall 2019

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
ARTD B267-001Diasporic Bodies, Grounding Freedom: The Black/African Dancing Body, Restoration, and Activism.Semester / 1Lecture: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTHDept. staff, TBA
EDUC B260-001Reconceptualizing Power on Special EducationSemester / 1Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHWilson-Poe,C.
ENGL B104-001The Global Short StorySemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHBeard,L.
ENGL B222-001"Afro-Futurism"Semester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWBeard,L.
ENGL B262-001Survey in African American LiteratureSemester / 1Lecture: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTHBeard,L.
HIST B102-001Introduction to African CivilizationsSemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHNgalamulume,K.
HIST B236-001African History since 1800Semester / 1Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHNgalamulume,K.
HIST B243-001Topics: Atlantic CulturesSemester / 1Lecture: Date/Time TBAGallup-Diaz,I.
HIST B265-001Colonial Encounters in the AmericasSemester / 1Lecture: Date/Time TBAGallup-Diaz,I.
HIST B325-001Topics in Social History: Civil War, Race, Amer. MemorySemester / 1LEC: 1:10 PM- 3:30 PM WUllman,S.
HIST B337-001Topics in African History: Hist of Global Health AfricaSemester / 1LEC: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM FNgalamulume,K.
SOCL B229-001Black America in Sociological PerspectiveSemester / 1Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHWashington,R.

Spring 2020

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
ARTD B348-001Dance Ensemble: West AfricanSemester / 0.5Lecture: Date/Time TBADept. staff, TBA
EDUC B200-001Community Learning Collaborative: Practicing PartnershipSemester / 1Lecture: Date/Time TBALesnick,A.
Laboratory: Date/Time TBA
EDUC B266-001Critical Issues in Urban EducationSemester / 1Lecture: Date/Time TBAZuckerman,K.
Laboratory: Date/Time TBA
Laboratory: Date/Time TBA
ENGL B236-001Latina/o Culture and the Art of MigrationSemester / 1Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:30 AM MWHarford Vargas,J.
FREN B208-001Visible Minorities: Diversity in Contemporary French CinemaSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:00 PM MWFSuaudeau,J.
HIST B200-001The Atlantic World 1492-1800Semester / 1Lecture: Date/Time TBAGallup-Diaz,I.
HIST B237-001Themes in Modern African HistorySemester / 1Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MWNgalamulume,K.
HIST B337-001Topics in African HistorySemester / 1Lecture: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM TNgalamulume,K.
HIST B339-001The Making of the African Diaspora 1450-1800Semester / 1Lecture: Date/Time TBAGallup-Diaz,I.
HIST B349-001Topics in Comparative HistorySemester / 1Lecture: 12:10 PM- 2:00 PM WKale,M.
HLTH B115-001Introduction to Health StudiesSemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHWhite,S., Williamson,A.
SOCL B225-001Women in SocietySemester / 1Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHMontes,V.

2018-19 Catalog Data

HIST B200 The Atlantic World 1492-1800
Fall 2018
The aim of this course is to provide an understanding of the way in which peoples, goods, and ideas from Africa, Europe. and the Americas came together to form an interconnected Atlantic World system. The course is designed to chart the manner in which an integrated system was created in the Americas in the early modern period, rather than to treat the history of the Atlantic World as nothing more than an expanded version of North American, Caribbean, or Latin American history.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

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ANTH B202 Africa in the World
Spring 2019
In this course, we will approach Africa with an emphasis on the many interconnections that link the continent with the rest of the world, through both time and space. Much popular talk about Africa in the U.S. is overwhelmingly negative--focusing on poverty, violence, and failed states--and often portrays Africa as something "other," both different from and unrelated to the United States and much of the rest of the world. But such preconceptions blatantly overlook what we know about historical and contemporary movements of people, ideas, materials, and money around the globe. Rather than regarding Africa as separate or apart, in this course we will examine the centrality of African engagements with these global movements. Rather than attempting a survey of particular, bounded African "peoples" or "cultures," we will explore complex issues and processes through interconnected topics including colonial and postcolonial politics, urban life, gender and sexuality, religion, economic networks, development, and transnational migration. We will use these themes as guides for exploring larger, interlinked questions of social life in Africa and around the world. This course fulfills the BMC Anthropology major/minor ethnographic area requirement. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Africana Studies

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ARTD B267 Diasporic Bodies, Grounding Freedom: The Black/African Dancing Body, Restoration, and Activism.
Not offered 2018-19
This dance theory, writing, and practice course takes marronage--the act of escaping from slavery in the Americas to create autonomous communities--as its model. It views Black and African diasporic movement cultures and artistic practices as forms of contemporary marronage, providing spaces of embodied activism, release, restoration, and revival towards thriving. Students will engage the body as an individual, intimate maroon site and cultivate the embodied collective spaces that counter oppressive systems. By connecting theory and practice, students will build individual and collective consciousness through the resources of narrative, memoir, and nostalgia intertwined with guided movement sessions. We will also utilize creative writing, film, and visual arts as components that enhance potential for deeper embodied engagement. This course is writing attentive and has required movement assignments/presentations. A previous dance lecture/seminar course or a course in a relevant discipline such as anthropology, sociology, or history is strongly recommended but not required. No dance experience is necessary, however a willingness to move and create is essential.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Africana Studies

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ARTD B348 Dance Ensemble: West African
Spring 2019
Dance ensembles are designed to offer students significant opportunities to develop dance technique and performance skills. Students audition for entrance into individual ensembles. Original works choreographed by faculty or guest choreographers or works reconstructed / restaged from classic or contemporary repertories are rehearsed and performed in concert. Students are evaluated on their participation in rehearsals, their demonstration of full commitment and openness to the choreographic and performance processes both in terms of attitude and technical practice, and achievement of expected levels of performance. Preparation: This course is suitable for intermediate and advanced level dancers. Students must commit to the full semester and be available for rehearsal week and two performances of the Spring Dance Concert, Friday and Saturday, April 24 and 25, 2020.
Counts toward Africana Studies

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SOCL B229 Black America in Sociological Perspective
Fall 2018
This course presents sociological perspectives on various issues affecting black America as a historically unique minority group in the United States: the legacy of slavery and the Jim Crow era; the formation of urban black ghettos; the civil rights reforms; the problems of poverty and unemployment; the problems of crime and other social problems; the problems of criminal justice; the continuing significance of race; the varied covert modern forms of racial discrimination; and the role of race in American politics.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Child and Family Studies

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HIST B237 Themes in Modern African History
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Public History in Africa
Fall 2018
This is a topics course. Course content varies
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Museum Studies

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EDUC B266 Critical Issues in Urban Education
Spring 2019
This course examines issues, challenges, and possibilities of urban education in contemporary America. We use as critical lenses issues of race, class, and culture; urban learners, teachers, and school systems; and restructuring and reform. While we look at urban education nationally over several decades, we use Philadelphia as a focal "case" that students investigate through documents and school placements. Weekly fieldwork in a school required.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Praxis Program

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HIST B325 Topics in Social History
Section 001 (Fall 2019): Civil War, Race, Amer. Memory
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Queering History
Fall 2018
This a topics course that explores various themes in American social history. Course content varies. Course may be repeated.
Current topic description: This course explores how the American Civil War, fought over the issue of maintaining race based slavery, has become enshrined with a host of contested meanings about race and citizenship to generations of Americans ever since the Confederacy surrendered at Appomattox. During this semester we will explore some of those contests and address the Civil War's intense power in the American psyche.

Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies

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ITAL B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Critical Theories
Fall 2018
What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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ENGL B234 Postcolonial Literature in English
Not offered 2018-19
This course will survey a broad range of novels and poems written while countries were breaking free of British colonial rule. Readings will also include cultural theorists interested in defining literary issues that arise from the postcolonial situation.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies

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ENGL B279 Introduction to African Literature
Not offered 2018-19
Taking into account the oral, written, aural, and visual forms of African "texts" over several thousand years, this course will explore literary production, intertextuality, translation, and audience/critical reception. Representative works to be studied include oral traditions, the Sundiata and Mwindo epics, the plays of Wole Soyinka and his Burden of History, the Muse of Forgiveness; and the work of Sembène Ousmane, Bessie Head, Ayi Kwei Armah, Mariama Bâ, Naguib Mahfouz, Ngugi wa Thiong'o, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Yvonne Vera, and others.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies

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ENGL B381 Post-Apartheid Literature
Not offered 2018-19
South African texts from several language communities which anticipate a post-apartheid polity and texts by contemporary South African writers which explore the complexities of life in "the new South Africa." Several films emphasize the minefield of post-apartheid reconciliation and accountability.
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies

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CSTS B108 Roman Africa
Spring 2019
In 146 BCE, Rome conquered and destroyed the North African city of Carthage, which had been its arch-enemy for generations, and occupied many of the Carthaginian settlements in North Africa. But by the second and third centuries CE, North Africa was one of the most prosperous and cultured areas of the Roman Empire, and Carthage (near modern Tunis) was one of the busiest ports in the Mediterranean. This course will trace the relations between Rome and Carthage, looking at the history of their mutual enmity, the extraordinary rise to prosperity of Roman North Africa, and the continued importance of the region even after the Vandal invasions of the fifth century.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Africana Studies

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EDUC B200 Community Learning Collaborative: Practicing Partnership
Spring 2019
Designed to be the first course for students interested in pursuing one of the options offered through the Education Program, this course is open to students exploring an interest in educational practice, theory, research, and policy. The course asks how myriad people, groups, and fields have defined the purpose of education, and considers the implications of conflicting definitions for generating new, more just, and more inclusive modes of "doing school". In collaboration with practicing educators, students learn practical and philosophical approaches to experiential, community-engaged learning across individual relationships and organizational contexts. Fieldwork in an area school required
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Child and Family Studies

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EDUC B260 Reconceptualizing Power on Special Education
Fall 2018
The systematic critical exploration of the influence of power in education requires attention and re-conceptualization; this course investigates the following question: how can power be redistributed to ensure equitable educational outcomes? We will examine the production of transformative knowledge, arguing the necessity for including creativity and multi-disciplinary collaboration in contemporary societies. Supporting students' pursuit of a politics of resistance, subversion, and transformation will allow for the rethinking of traditional education. We will also center the intersections between race, class, gender, sexuality, language, religion, citizenship status, and geographic region, assessing their impact on teaching and learning. Weekly fieldwork required.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Praxis Program

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EDUC B266 Critical Issues in Urban Education
Spring 2019
This course examines issues, challenges, and possibilities of urban education in contemporary America. We use as critical lenses issues of race, class, and culture; urban learners, teachers, and school systems; and restructuring and reform. While we look at urban education nationally over several decades, we use Philadelphia as a focal "case" that students investigate through documents and school placements. Weekly fieldwork in a school required.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Praxis Program

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ENGL B104 The Global Short Story
Fall 2018
The majority of the most provocative and interesting English-language literary production at the current moment hails from African nations, India, Oceania and their diasporae throughout the world. A significant number of major international literary prizes have been awarded to members of these writing communities who cross borders, continents, passport identities, and traditions in their experiments with narration, place, politics, and the creolization of English. The late Nigerian novelist and memoirist Chinua Achebe said of the English language, in particular: "Do not be fooled by the fact that we may write in English because we intend to do unheard of things with it."
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Africana Studies

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ITAL B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Critical Theories
Fall 2018
What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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ENGL B216 Narrativity and Hip Hop
Spring 2019
This course explores narrative and poetic forms and themes in hip-hop culture. Through close, intensive analysis of hip-hop lyrics, as well as audiovisual performance and visual art, we will consider how rappers and hip-hop artists from the late twentieth century onward have used the form to extend, further, and complicate key concerns of literature in general, and African American and African Diaspora literature in particular. We will explore key texts in hip hop from the late 1970s to the current moment. Reading these texts alongside short fiction by writers such as Gayl Jones, Octavia Butler, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, Victor LaValle, Kiese Laymon, Ivelisse Rodriguez, Regina Bradley and others, we will consider how themes of socioeconomic mobility, gender and sexuality, queer and feminist critique, and intersectional political engagement animate artists' narrative and poetic strategies across genre and media. Written work will include regular in-class presentations, short creative assignments, three short papers, and a final project. As a part of the Philly program, the course will take place in Center City, Philadelphia. Along with course readings, we will engage directly with writers, artists, and events that help shape Philadelphia's vibrant hip-hop and literature scene. For additional information see the program's website https://www.brynmawr.edu/philly-program
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Africana Studies

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ENGL B217 Narratives of Latinidad
Fall 2018
This course explores how Latina/o writers fashion bicultural and transnational identities and narrate the intertwined histories of the U.S. and Latin America. We will focus on topics of shared concern among Latino groups such as struggles for social justice, the damaging effects of machismo and racial hierarchies, the politics of Spanglish, and the affective experience of migration. By analyzing a range of cultural production, including novels, poetry, testimonial narratives, films, activist art, and essays, we will unpack the complexity of Latinidad in the Americas.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies

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ENGL B222 "Afro-Futurism"
Not offered 2018-19
The study of "Afro-Futurism" is the cultural, artistic, and political exploration of African and diasporan visions and critiques of the past, present and future. It presents worlds inflected by the ancient conjurations of African forebears, chattel slaves, and free African Americans from the 19th to the 21st century. The supranatural worlds of Afro-Futurism brings into sharp focus the laws of both nature and society. It has given birth to a revision of the science fiction and fantasy genres by writers such as Nnedi Okorafor, Octavia Butler, Nalo Hopkinson, Tomi Adeyeni, and Deji Bryce Olukotun. Prerequisites: Contemporary enrollment in or completion of the Emily Balch Seminar, its Haverford equivalent, or College permission to bypass either.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Africana Studies

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ENGL B234 Postcolonial Literature in English
Not offered 2018-19
This course will survey a broad range of novels and poems written while countries were breaking free of British colonial rule. Readings will also include cultural theorists interested in defining literary issues that arise from the postcolonial situation.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Africana Studies

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ENGL B236 Latina/o Culture and the Art of Migration
Not offered 2018-19
Gloria Anzaldúa has famously described the U.S.-Mexico border as an open wound and the border culture that arises from this fraught site as a third country. This course will explore how Chicana/os and Latina/os creatively represent different kinds of migrations across geo-political borders and between cultural traditions to forge transnational identities and communities. We will use cultural production as a lens for understanding how citizenship status, class, gender, race, and language shape the experiences of Latin American migrants and their Latina/o children. We will also analyze alternative metaphors and discourses of resistance that challenge anti-immigrant rhetoric and reimagine the place of undocumented migrants and Latina/os in contemporary U.S. society. Over the course of the semester, we will probe the role that literature, art, film, and music can play in the struggle for migrants' rights and minority civil rights, querying how the imagination and aesthetics can contribute to social justice. We will examine a number of different genres, as well as read and apply key theoretical texts on the borderlands and undocumented migration.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies

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ENGL B239 African American Poetry
Not offered 2018-19
This course explores the work of black poets in the Americas. Focusing on a range of poetic forms from the 18th century through the present, we will consider key questions that have animated the works of black poets in North America and the Caribbean, and how they have used poetic strategy to engage these questions. How do black poets explore black political and social life in various historical and geographical contexts? How do they use particular formal strategies (for example, form poetry, free verse, narrative poetry, and experimental modes) to interrogate notions of blackness? How do political movements around gender, class, and sexuality factor in? As we approach these questions, we will consider important critical conversations on African American poetry and poetics, examining how both well-known and underexplored poets use form to complicate blackness and imagine various forms of freedom. Our work will take us through several poetic genres and forms, including print works, performance poetry, hip hop music, and digital media. Throughout our analysis, we will consider how discourses on gender, sexuality, class, national and transnational identity, and other engagements with difference shape black poetic expression, both historically and in our current moment.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies

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ENGL B262 Survey in African American Literature
Not offered 2018-19
English 262 is a topics course that allows for multiple themes to be taught. Each topic will have its own description and students may enroll for credit in the course as long as the topics vary.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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ENGL B271 Transatlantic Childhoods in the 19th Century
Fall 2018
This class explores what we can see anew when we juxtapose American and British experiences of, and responses to, emergent ideas and ideals of childhood in the child-obsessed nineteenth century. After setting up key eighteenth-century concepts and contexts for what French historian Philippe Ariès called the "invention of childhood," we'll explore the ways in which children came to be defined between 1800 and 1900, in relation to such categories as law, labor, education, sex, play, and psychology, through examinations of both "literary" works and texts and artifacts from a range of other discourses and spheres. We'll move between American and British examples, aiming to track the commonalities at work in the two nations and the effects of marked structural differences. Here we'll be especially attentive to chattel slavery in the U.S., and to the relations, and non-relations, between the racialized notions of childhood produced in this country and those which arise out of Britain's sharply stratified class landscape. If race and class are produced differently, we'll also consider the degree to which British and American histories and representations of boyhood and girlhood converge and diverge across the period. We'll close with reflections on the ways in which a range of literary genres on the cusp of modernism form themselves in and through the new discourses of childhood and evolving figures of the child.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Child and Family Studies

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ENGL B279 Introduction to African Literature
Not offered 2018-19
Taking into account the oral, written, aural, and visual forms of African "texts" over several thousand years, this course will explore literary production, intertextuality, translation, and audience/critical reception. Representative works to be studied include oral traditions, the Sundiata and Mwindo epics, the plays of Wole Soyinka and his Burden of History, the Muse of Forgiveness; and the work of Sembène Ousmane, Bessie Head, Ayi Kwei Armah, Mariama Bâ, Naguib Mahfouz, Ngugi wa Thiong'o, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Yvonne Vera, and others.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Africana Studies

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ENGL B283 Transnational Writing
Spring 2019
This course is a study in direct and indirect conversations between and among writers, eras, and continents involving narrative practitioners who may never have interacted in life or letters, but whose works, nevertheless, "speak" to each other in intertextual exchanges. Almost all the works were originally written in English. The yoked works are in groupings of no more than 5 to underscore and to intensify the dialogue and to allow adequate time for discussion and written analysis. As Kenyan Ngugi wa Thiong'o observes in The Wizard of the Crow: "Stories, like food, lose their flavor if cooked in a hurry."
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Africana Studies

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ENGL B307 Philadelphia Freedom: Slavery, Liberty, Literature 1682-1899
Fall 2018
Philadelphia, the City of Brotherly Love, a space of religious diversity, the hotbed of the American Revolution, the first large "free" city north of the slave states, a major center of free Black culture. In this course we will examine literature written in and about Philadelphia before the Civil War, exploring how and why Philadelphians engaged questions of freedom and non-freedom. Beginning with William Penn and the colonial city, moving through the literatures of Revolution and the Civil War, we will conclude with W. E. B. DuBois' The Philadelphia Negro. We will take two field trips to the city and students will be expected to pursue city-based research projects.
Counts toward Africana Studies

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ENGL B320 Black Feminist Literature
Fall 2018
This course explores contemporary black feminist literature and culture on a transnational stage. We will consider the works of prominent, emerging, and underexplored black feminist writers from various African diaspora locations, including South Africa, West Africa, Europe, North America, and the Caribbean. How do these writers engage with key currents in global black feminist politics, including understandings of gender, sexuality, class, nationality and colonialism? How do they complicate these discussions in their work? We will ground our exploration in close study of black feminist poetics--the specific formal and creative choices that black feminist poets, fiction writers, visual artists, hip hop artists, webseries producers and others use to examine gender end sexuality in their art. Paying particular attention to the work of queer and LGBTI+ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans* and Intersex) artists, we will consider the various meanings of t erms such as "black," "feminist," and "queer" in various parts of the African Diaspora. Our work will emphasize close analysis of black feminist writers' works, as well as collaborative exercises and invited in-class discussions with several contemporary black diasporic feminist artists themselves. Requirements include two short papers, regular response papers, and a final project.
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies

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ENGL B362 African American Literature: Hypercanonical Codes
Not offered 2018-19
Intensive study of six 18th-21st century hypercanonical African American written and visual texts (and critical responses) with specific attention to the tradition's long use of speaking in code and in multiple registers simultaneously. Focus on language as a tool of opacity as well as transparency, translation, transliteration, invention and resistance. Previous reading required.
Counts toward Africana Studies

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ENGL B363 Toni Morrison and the Art of Narrative Conjure
Spring 2019
A comprehensive study of Morrison's narrative experiments in fiction, this course traces her entire oeuvre from "Recitatif" to God Help the Child. We read the works in publication order with three main foci: Morrison-as-epistemologist questioning what it is that constitutes knowing and being known, Morrison-as-revisionary-teacher-of-reading-strategies, and Morrison in intertextual dialogue with several oral and literary traditions. In addition to critical essays, students complete a "Pilate Project" - a creative response to the works under study.
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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ENGL B379 The African Griot(te)
Not offered 2018-19
English 379 is a capstone topics course in the study of two or more distinguished African writers who have made significant contributions to African literary production. The focus changes from one semester to the next so that students may re-enroll in the course for credit. The specific focus of each semester's offering of the course is outlined separately.
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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ENGL B381 Post-Apartheid Literature
Not offered 2018-19
South African texts from several language communities which anticipate a post-apartheid polity and texts by contemporary South African writers which explore the complexities of life in "the new South Africa." Several films emphasize the minefield of post-apartheid reconciliation and accountability.
Counts toward Africana Studies

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FREN B208 Visible Minorities: Diversity in Contemporary French Cinema
Spring 2019
Until the closing years of the 20th century, ethnic diversity was virtually absent from French cinema. While Francophone directors from Northern and Sub-Saharan Africa debunked colonialism and neocolonialism in their films, minorities hardly appeared on French screens. Movies were made by white filmmakers for a white audience. Since the 1980's and the 1990's, minorities have become more visible in French films. Are French Blacks and Arabs portrayed in French cinema beyond stereotypes, or are they still objects of a euro-centric gaze? Have minorities gained agency in storytelling, not just as actors, but as directors? What is the national narrative at play in the recent French films that focus on diversity? Is it still "us against them", or has the new generation of French filmmakers found a way to include the different components of French identity into a collective subject? From Bouchareb to Gomis, from Kechiche to Benyamina and Jean-Baptiste, this course will map out the visual fault lines of the French self and examine the prospects for a post-republican sense of community. Open to non-majors. There will be a weekly screening on Sunday, 7:00pm-9:00pm.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Film Studies

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ITAL B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Critical Theories
Fall 2018
What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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ITAL B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Critical Theories
Fall 2018
What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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GNST B103 Introduction to Swahili Language and Culture I
Not offered 2018-19
The primary goal of this course is to develop an elementary level ability to speak, read, and write Swahili. The emphasis is on communicative competence in Swahili based on the National Standards for Foreign Language Learning. In the process of acquiring the language, students will also be introduced to East Africa and its cultures. No prior knowledge of Swahili or East Africa is required. Note: GNST B103/B105 do not fulfill the Bryn Mawr College language requirement.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Africana Studies

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GNST B105 Introduction to Swahili Language and Culture II
Not offered 2018-19
The primary goal of this course is to continue working on an elementary level ability to speak, read, and write Swahili. The emphasis is on communicative competence in Swahili based on the National Standards for Foreign Language Learning. Students will also continue learning about East Africa and its cultures. Prerequisite: GNST B103 (Introduction to Swahili Language and Culture I) or permission of the instructor is required. Note: GNST B103/B105 does not fulfill the Bryn Mawr College language requirement.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Africana Studies

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ITAL B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Critical Theories
Fall 2018
What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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HART B279 Exhibiting Africa: Art, Artifact and New Articulations
Spring 2019
At the turn of the 20th century, the Victorian natural history museum played an important role in constructing and disseminating images of Africa to the Western public. The history of museum representations of Africa and Africans reveals that exhibitions--both museum exhibitions and "living" World's Fair exhibitions-- has long been deeply embedded in politics, including the persistent "othering" of African people as savages or primitives. While paying attention to stereotypical exhibition tropes about Africa, we will also consider how art museums are creating new constructions of Africa and how contemporary curators and conceptual artists are creating complex, challenging new ways of understanding African identities.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Museum Studies
Counts toward Visual Studies

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HIST B102 Introduction to African Civilizations
Fall 2018
The course is designed to introduce students to the history of African and African Diaspora societies, cultures, and political economies. We will discuss the origins, state formation, external contacts, and the structural transformations and continuities of African societies and cultures in the context of the slave trade, colonial rule, capitalist exploitation, urbanization, and westernization, as well as contemporary struggles over authority, autonomy, identity and access to resources. Case studies will be drawn from across the continent.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward International Studies

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CSTS B108 Roman Africa
Spring 2019
In 146 BCE, Rome conquered and destroyed the North African city of Carthage, which had been its arch-enemy for generations, and occupied many of the Carthaginian settlements in North Africa. But by the second and third centuries CE, North Africa was one of the most prosperous and cultured areas of the Roman Empire, and Carthage (near modern Tunis) was one of the busiest ports in the Mediterranean. This course will trace the relations between Rome and Carthage, looking at the history of their mutual enmity, the extraordinary rise to prosperity of Roman North Africa, and the continued importance of the region even after the Vandal invasions of the fifth century.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies

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HIST B156 The Long 1960's
Fall 2018
The 1960s has had a powerful effect on recent US History. But what was it exactly? How long did it last? And what do we really mean when we say "The Sixties?" This term has become so potent and loaded for so many people from all sides of the political spectrum that it's almost impossible to separate fact from fiction; myth from memory. We are all the inheritors of this intense period in American history but our inheritance is neither simple nor entirely clear. Our task this semester is to try to pull apart the meaning as well as the legend and attempt to figure out what "The Sixties" is (and what it isn't) and try to assess its long term impact on American society.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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HIST B200 The Atlantic World 1492-1800
Fall 2018
The aim of this course is to provide an understanding of the way in which peoples, goods, and ideas from Africa, Europe. and the Americas came together to form an interconnected Atlantic World system. The course is designed to chart the manner in which an integrated system was created in the Americas in the early modern period, rather than to treat the history of the Atlantic World as nothing more than an expanded version of North American, Caribbean, or Latin American history.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Counts toward International Studies

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HIST B212 Pirates, Travelers, and Natural Historians: 1492-1750
Not offered 2018-19
In the early modern period, conquistadors, missionaries, travelers, pirates, and natural historians wrote interesting texts in which they tried to integrate the New World into their existing frameworks of knowledge. This intellectual endeavor was an adjunct to the physical conquest of American space, and provides a framework though which we will explore the processes of imperial competition, state formation, and indigenous and African resistance to colonialism.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Environmental Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies

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HIST B215 Europe and the Other 1492-1800
Not offered 2018-19
This course will introduce students to process through which Europeans created systems and categories of difference into which they placed Indigenous, African, and Asian peoples between the years 1492 and 1815. Topics of study include Indigenous leaders, slave and free communities, and cultural mediators on colonial frontiers.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies

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HIST B236 African History since 1800
Not offered 2018-19
The course analyzes the history of Africa in the last two hundred years in the context of global political economy. We will examine the major themes in modern African history, including the 19th-century state formation, expansion, or restructuration; partition and resistance; colonial rule; economic, social, political, religious, and cultural developments; nationalism; post-independence politics, economics, and society, as well as conflicts and the burden of disease. The course will also introduce students to the sources and methods of African history.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward International Studies

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HIST B237 Themes in Modern African History
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Public History in Africa
Fall 2018
This is a topics course. Course content varies
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Museum Studies

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HIST B243 Topics: Atlantic Cultures
Not offered 2018-19
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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HIST B265 Colonial Encounters in the Americas
Not offered 2018-19
The course explores the confrontations, conquests and accommodations that formed the "ground-level" experience of day-to-day colonialism throughout the Americas. The course is comparative in scope, examining events and structures in North, South and Central America, with particular attention paid to indigenous peoples and the nature of indigenous leadership in the colonial world of the 18th century.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies

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HIST B325 Topics in Social History
Section 001 (Fall 2019): Civil War, Race, Amer. Memory
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Queering History
Fall 2018
This a topics course that explores various themes in American social history. Course content varies. Course may be repeated.
Current topic description: This course explores how the American Civil War, fought over the issue of maintaining race based slavery, has become enshrined with a host of contested meanings about race and citizenship to generations of Americans ever since the Confederacy surrendered at Appomattox. During this semester we will explore some of those contests and address the Civil War's intense power in the American psyche.

Counts toward Africana Studies

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HIST B337 Topics in African History
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Hist of Global Health Africa
Section 001 (Fall 2019): Hist of Global Health Africa
Fall 2018
This is a topics course. Topics vary.
Current topic description: The course will focus on the issues of public health history, social and cultural history of disease as well as the issues of the history of medicine. We will examine the histories of global initiatives to control disease in Africa from an interdisciplinary perspective (history, and social and biomedical sciences), using case studies from across the continent. These initiatives involve the relationship between states, NGOs, universities, pharmaceutical companies, and other non-state actors. We will explore various themes such as the indigenous theories of disease and therapies; disease, imperialism and medicine; the emerging diseases, medical education, women in medicine, and differential access to health care. We will also explore the questions regarding the sources of African history and their quality.

Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Health Studies

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HIST B339 The Making of the African Diaspora 1450-1800
Not offered 2018-19
This course explores the emergence, development, and challenges to the ideologies of whiteness and blackness, that have been in place from the colonial period to the present. Through the reading of primary and secondary sources, we will explore various ways through which enslaved people imagined freedom, personal rights, community membership, and some of the paths they created in order to improve their experiences and change the social order. In an attempt to have a comparative approach, we will look at particular events and circumstances that took place in few provinces in the Americas, with an emphasis on Latin America and the Caribbean. The course will also look at the methodological challenges of studying and writing history of people who in principle, were not allowed to produce written texts. Throughout, we will identify and underscore the contribution that people of African descent have made to the ideas of rights, freedom, equality, and democracy.
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies

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HIST B349 Topics in Comparative History
Not offered 2018-19
This is a topics course. Topics vary.
Current topic description: Individual research projects in archival and other sources pursued collaboratively in both digital and conventional formats.

Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Museum Studies

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HLTH B115 Introduction to Health Studies
Fall 2018
The multidisciplinary foundation for the health studies minor. Students will be introduced to theories and methods from the life sciences, social sciences, and humanities and will learn to apply them to problems of health and illness. Topics include epidemiological, public health, and biomedical perspectives on health and disease; social, behavioral, and environmental determinants of health; globalization of health issues; cultural representations of illness; health inequalities, social justice, and the ethics of health as a human right.
Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Health Studies

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HIST B200 The Atlantic World 1492-1800
Fall 2018
The aim of this course is to provide an understanding of the way in which peoples, goods, and ideas from Africa, Europe. and the Americas came together to form an interconnected Atlantic World system. The course is designed to chart the manner in which an integrated system was created in the Americas in the early modern period, rather than to treat the history of the Atlantic World as nothing more than an expanded version of North American, Caribbean, or Latin American history.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

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HIST B237 Themes in Modern African History
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Public History in Africa
Fall 2018
This is a topics course. Course content varies
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Museum Studies

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ITAL B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Critical Theories
Fall 2018
What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Film Studies

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PE(D) B111 Hip-hop Technique
Fall 2018
Students learn basic movements from Hip-hop, funk, house, breakin' and other contemporary urban styles. The course aims to expand students' dance skills while increasing their knowledge of the history of Hip-hop and providing a more sophisticated understanding of the potential of Hip-hop as an art and social form. This course is open to all levels of experience. (Full Semester, 2 PE Credits)
Counts toward Africana Studies

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PE(D) B127 Social Dance Forms: Salsa/Intro to Social Dance
Section 001 (Spring 2019): Intro to Social Dance and Salsa
Spring 2019
This course teaches the steps, moves and rhythms of social or ballroom dance. The first half introduces basic social dances such as cha-cha, swing dance, waltz, etc.; the second half focuses on Salsa. This course is open to all levels of experience. (Semester Course, 2 PE credits)
Counts toward Africana Studies

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PHIL B207 Africana Philosophy
Spring 2019
Africana philosophy is also called African diasporic philosophy. It is a modern form of philosophy addressing problems of what could be called the "underside of Western philosophy," problems often avoided in Western philosophy, and thus paradoxically become more central in significance than many Western philosophers may realize. Students will examine these problems across African American philosophy, Afro-Caribbean philosophy, and African philosophy, through resources from Africana analytical, dialectical, existential, feminist, phenomenological, and pragmatist thought. While examining these problems, students will learn about the major scholars and schools of Africana philosophical thought.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Africana Studies

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ITAL B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Critical Theories
Fall 2018
What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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POLS B350 Equalities and Inequalities in Politics and Society
Fall 2018
The modern state rests on a claim of equality (of a certain sort) between citizens. At the same time, modern societies are marked by significant and increasing inequalities (of various sorts). How should we regard the co-existence of the claim of equality and the existence of inequalities? For some, the existence of large-scale inequalities may be seen not only as wholly consistent with the equality of citizens, but an expected, natural, and proper outcome of that equality. For others, the existence of significant inequalities marks a failure of the promise of equality among citizens. Beyond these disagreements, people disagree about the significance of the distinction between citizens and non-citizens. What kinds of equalities, if any, that are not acceptable between citizens are acceptable between citizens and non-citizens? In this course, we shall explore such questions concerning the relationship between claims of equality and the existence of inequalities in modern societies. We will examine these various questions at both an abstract level (reading essays of political theory and philosophy) and in the context of particular problems of social policy. While the instructor will be largely responsible for assigning readings of the first sort, students will share the responsibility for finding readings of the second. They will do this as part of their own semester-long research projects. This course is open to all students who have the prerequisites. It also serves as a thesis prep course for political science senior majors. Suggested Preparation: At least one course in political theory OR Political Science Senior OR consent of instructor.
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies

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POLS B243 African and Caribbean Perspectives in World Politics
Not offered 2018-19
This course makes African and Caribbean voices audible as they create or adopt visions of the world that explain their positions and challenges in world politics. Students learn analytical tools useful in understanding other parts of the world. Prerequisite: POLS 141 or 1 course in African or Latin American history.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Africana Studies

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POLS B350 Equalities and Inequalities in Politics and Society
Fall 2018
The modern state rests on a claim of equality (of a certain sort) between citizens. At the same time, modern societies are marked by significant and increasing inequalities (of various sorts). How should we regard the co-existence of the claim of equality and the existence of inequalities? For some, the existence of large-scale inequalities may be seen not only as wholly consistent with the equality of citizens, but an expected, natural, and proper outcome of that equality. For others, the existence of significant inequalities marks a failure of the promise of equality among citizens. Beyond these disagreements, people disagree about the significance of the distinction between citizens and non-citizens. What kinds of equalities, if any, that are not acceptable between citizens are acceptable between citizens and non-citizens? In this course, we shall explore such questions concerning the relationship between claims of equality and the existence of inequalities in modern societies. We will examine these various questions at both an abstract level (reading essays of political theory and philosophy) and in the context of particular problems of social policy. While the instructor will be largely responsible for assigning readings of the first sort, students will share the responsibility for finding readings of the second. They will do this as part of their own semester-long research projects. This course is open to all students who have the prerequisites. It also serves as a thesis prep course for political science senior majors. Suggested Preparation: At least one course in political theory OR Political Science Senior OR consent of instructor.
Counts toward Africana Studies

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ITAL B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Critical Theories
Fall 2018
What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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SOCL B225 Women in Society
Not offered 2018-19
A study of the contemporary experiences of women of color in the Global South. The household, workplace, community, and the nation-state, and the positions of women in the private and public spheres are compared cross-culturally. Topics include feminism, identity and self-esteem; globalization and transnational social movements and tensions and transitions encountered as nations embark upon development.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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SOCL B229 Black America in Sociological Perspective
Fall 2018
This course presents sociological perspectives on various issues affecting black America as a historically unique minority group in the United States: the legacy of slavery and the Jim Crow era; the formation of urban black ghettos; the civil rights reforms; the problems of poverty and unemployment; the problems of crime and other social problems; the problems of criminal justice; the continuing significance of race; the varied covert modern forms of racial discrimination; and the role of race in American politics.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Child and Family Studies

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SOCL B257 Marginals and Outsiders: The Sociology of Deviance
Spring 2019
An examination of non-normative and criminal behavior viewed from the standpoint of different theoretical perspectives on deviance (e.g., social strain, anomie, functionalism, social disorganization, symbolic interaction, and Marxism) with particular emphasis on social construction and labeling perspectives; and the role of subcultures, social movements and social conflicts in changing the normative boundaries of society. Topics include robbery, homicide, Black inner city violence, sexual deviance, prostitution, white collar crime, drug addiction and mental disorders.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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EDUC B266 Critical Issues in Urban Education
Spring 2019
This course examines issues, challenges, and possibilities of urban education in contemporary America. We use as critical lenses issues of race, class, and culture; urban learners, teachers, and school systems; and restructuring and reform. While we look at urban education nationally over several decades, we use Philadelphia as a focal "case" that students investigate through documents and school placements. Weekly fieldwork in a school required.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Praxis Program

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SOCL B322 Thinking with Trans: Theorizing Race and Gender
Fall 2018
In 2017, philosopher Rebecca Tuvel published an article in the journal Hypatia outlining an argument for the existence of transracialism. This article came on the tail end of a great deal of controversy about the outing of NAACP leader, Rachel Dolezal; a woman born to white parents who identifies as black. In this course we will examine the social construction of race and gender as well as critique the biological assumptions that underpin both social structures. We will explore the theoretical power and pitfalls of the terms "transgender" and "transracial"- the similarities, differences, and tensions inherent in questioning taken for granted social structures that are fundamental to social organization and personal identity. We will explore the theoretical context of the terms "transracial" and "transgender," the various arguments for and against identity categories, and the lived experiences of individuals and groups who regularly transgress the boundaries of race and gender.
Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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ITAL B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Critical Theories
Fall 2018
What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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ENGL B217 Narratives of Latinidad
Fall 2018
This course explores how Latina/o writers fashion bicultural and transnational identities and narrate the intertwined histories of the U.S. and Latin America. We will focus on topics of shared concern among Latino groups such as struggles for social justice, the damaging effects of machismo and racial hierarchies, the politics of Spanglish, and the affective experience of migration. By analyzing a range of cultural production, including novels, poetry, testimonial narratives, films, activist art, and essays, we will unpack the complexity of Latinidad in the Americas.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o

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ENGL B236 Latina/o Culture and the Art of Migration
Not offered 2018-19
Gloria Anzaldúa has famously described the U.S.-Mexico border as an open wound and the border culture that arises from this fraught site as a third country. This course will explore how Chicana/os and Latina/os creatively represent different kinds of migrations across geo-political borders and between cultural traditions to forge transnational identities and communities. We will use cultural production as a lens for understanding how citizenship status, class, gender, race, and language shape the experiences of Latin American migrants and their Latina/o children. We will also analyze alternative metaphors and discourses of resistance that challenge anti-immigrant rhetoric and reimagine the place of undocumented migrants and Latina/os in contemporary U.S. society. Over the course of the semester, we will probe the role that literature, art, film, and music can play in the struggle for migrants' rights and minority civil rights, querying how the imagination and aesthetics can contribute to social justice. We will examine a number of different genres, as well as read and apply key theoretical texts on the borderlands and undocumented migration.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o

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