This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's master calendar.

Fall 2017

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
ANTH B101-001Introduction to Biological and Archaeological AnthropologySemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHDalton Hall 300Seselj,M., VanSickle,C.
ANTH B101-00AIntroduction to Biological and Archaeological AnthropologySemester / 1Lab: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TDalton Hall 315VanSickle,C.
ANTH B101-00BIntroduction to Biological and Archaeological AnthropologySemester / 1Lab: 4:10 PM- 5:30 PM TDalton Hall 315VanSickle,C.
ANTH B101-00CIntroduction to Biological and Archaeological AnthropologySemester / 1Lab: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM WDalton Hall 315VanSickle,C.
ANTH B101-00DIntroduction to Biological and Archaeological AnthropologySemester / 1Lab: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM WDalton Hall 315VanSickle,C.
ANTH B274-001BioarchaeologySemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 3:30 PM FDalton Hall 315VanSickle,C.
ANTH B279-001Anthropology of Childhood and YouthSemester / 1LEC: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTHTaylor Hall FCampoamor,L.
ANTH B283-001The Living Primates: Biology, Bones, and BehaviorSemester / 1Lecture: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTHDalton Hall 2Seselj,M.
ANTH B285-001Anthropology of Development, Aid, and ActivismSemester / 1LEC: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHDalton Hall 2Campoamor,L.
ANTH B303-001History of Anthropological TheorySemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 3:30 PM WPark 10Campoamor,L.
ANTH B354-001Political Economy, Gender, Ethnicity and Transformation in VietnamSemester / 1Lecture: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM MDalton Hall 212APashigian,M.
ANTH B398-001Senior ConferenceSemester / 1Lecture: 12:10 PM- 2:00 PM MDalton Hall 1Dept. staff, TBA
CITY B185-001Urban Culture and SocietySemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWTaylor Hall FMcDonogh,G., Raddatz,L.
CITY B185-002Urban Culture and SocietySemester / 1LEC: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWTaylor Hall GMcDonogh,G., Raddatz,L.

Spring 2018

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
ANTH B102-001Introduction to Cultural AnthropologySemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWDalton Hall 300Pashigian,M.
ANTH B102-002Introduction to Cultural AnthropologySemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHDalton Hall 300Campoamor,L.
ANTH B209-001Human EvolutionSemester / 1Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTHDalton Hall 25VanSickle,C.
ANTH B278-001Paleoanthropology MethodsSemester / 1Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHDalton Hall 2VanSickle,C.
ANTH B288-001Global Latin AmericaSemester / 1LEC: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTHDalton Hall 2Campoamor,L.
ANTH B317-001Disease and Human EvolutionSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 3:30 PM WDalton Hall 315Seselj,M.
ANTH B334-001Digital CulturesSemester / 1LEC: 12:10 PM- 2:00 PM MCollege Hall 102Campoamor,L.
ANTH B399-001Senior ConferenceSemester / 1Lecture: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM MDalton Hall 10Dept. staff, TBA
B348-001In Search of Women in the PaleolithicSemester / Lecture: 1:10 PM- 3:30 PM FDalton Hall 10VanSickle,C.
BIOL B236-001EvolutionSemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHDavis,G., Marenco,K.
CITY B229-001Topics in Comparative Urbanism: Global SuburbiaSemester / 1LEC: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWCollege Hall 116McDonogh,G.
CITY B365-001Topics: Techniques of the City: Global EnclavesSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM TMcDonogh,G.

Fall 2018

(Class schedules for this semester will be posted at a later date.)

2017-18 Catalog Data

ANTH B101 Introduction to Biological and Archaeological Anthropology
Fall 2017
An introduction to the place of humans in nature, evolutionary theory, living primates, the fossil record for human evolution, human variation and the issue of race, and the archaeological investigation of culture change from the Old Stone Age to the rise of early civilizations in the Americas, Eurasia and Africa. In addition to the lecture/discussion classes, students must select and sign up for one lab section.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Scientific Investigation (SI)

Back to top

ANTH B102 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Spring 2018
An introduction to the methods and theories of cultural anthropology in order to understand and explain cultural similarities and differences among contemporary societies.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward International Studies

Back to top

ANTH B202 Africa in the World
Not offered 2017-18
In this course, we will approach Africa with an emphasis on the many interconnections that link the continent with the rest of the world, through both time and space. Much popular talk about Africa in the U.S. is overwhelmingly negative--focusing on poverty, violence, and failed states--and often portrays Africa as something "other," both different from and unrelated to the United States and much of the rest of the world. But such preconceptions blatantly overlook what we know about historical and contemporary movements of people, ideas, materials, and money around the globe. Rather than regarding Africa as separate or apart, in this course we will examine the centrality of African engagements with these global movements. Rather than attempting a survey of particular, bounded African "peoples" or "cultures," we will explore complex issues and processes through interconnected topics including colonial and postcolonial politics, urban life, gender and sexuality, religion, economic networks, development, and transnational migration. We will use these themes as guides for exploring larger, interlinked questions of social life in Africa and around the world. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Africana Studies

Back to top

ANTH B204 North American Archaeology
Not offered 2017-18
For millennia, the North American continent has been home to a vast diversity of Native Americans. From the initial migration of big game hunters who spread throughout the continent more than 12,000 years ago, to the complex Pueblos of the Southwest and urban Cahokia in the East, there remains a rich archaeological record that reflects the ways of life of these cultures. This course will introduce the culture history of North America as well as explanations for culture change and diversification.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Back to top

ANTH B208 Human Biology
Not offered 2017-18
This course will be a survey of modern human biological variation. We will examine the patterns of morphological and genetic variation in modern human populations and discuss the evolutionary explanations for the observed patterns. A major component of the class will be the discussion of the social implications of these patterns of biological variation, particularly in the construction and application of the concept of race. Prerequisite: ANTH 101 or permission of instructor.
Counts toward Health Studies

Back to top

ANTH B209 Human Evolution
Spring 2018
This course explores the biological and cultural evolution of humans as viewed from the fossil and archaeological record, beginning with our earliest ancestors and continuing to the dispersal of modern humans around the globe. We will use comparative, functional, and evolutionary anatomy to interpret past behaviors and relationships among fossil hominins, as well as their relationship to modern humans. Furthermore, we will use geology, archaeology, and paleoecology to reconstruct behavioral aspects of fossil hominins and their environmental influences. Throughout the course, we will focus our discussions on major debates in paleoanthropology. Prerequisite: ANTH 101 or permission of instructor.
Scientific Investigation (SI)

Back to top

ANTH B210 Medical Anthropology
Not offered 2017-18
This course examines the relationships between culture, society, disease and illness. It considers a broad range of health-related experiences, discourses, knowledge and practice among different cultures and among individuals and groups in different positions of power. Topics covered include sorcery, herbal remedies, healing rituals, folk illnesses, modern disease, scientific medical perceptions, clinical technique, epidemiology and political economy of medicine. Prerequisite: ANTH 102, H103 or permission of instructor.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Environmental Studies
Counts toward Health Studies

Back to top

ANTH B220 Methods and Theory in Archaeology
Not offered 2017-18
An examination of techniques and theories archaeologists use to transform archaeological data into statements about patterns of prehistoric cultural behavior, adaptation and culture change. Theory development, hypothesis formulation, gathering of archaeological data and their interpretation and evaluation are discussed and illustrated by examples. Theoretical debates current in anthropological archaeology are reviewed and the place of archaeology in the general field of anthropology is discussed. Prerequisite: ANTH 101 or permission of instructor.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Geoarchaeology

Back to top

ANTH B232 Human Diets Past and Present: Nutritional Anthropology
Not offered 2017-18
This course will explore the complex nature of human experiences in satisfying needs for food and nourishment. The approach is biocultural, exploring both the biological basis of human food choices and the cultural context that influences food acquisition and choice. Material covered will primarily be from an evolutionary and cross-cultural perspective. Also included will be a discussion of popular culture in the U.S. and our current obsession with food, such as dietary fads. Prerequisite: ANTH 101 or instructor permission.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Back to top

ANTH B234 Forensic Anthropology
Not offered 2017-18
Introduces the forensic subfield of biological anthropology, which applies techniques of osteology and biomechanics to questions of forensic science, with practical applications for criminal justice. Examines the challenges of human skeletal identification and trauma analysis, as well as the broader ethical considerations and implications of the field. Topics will include: human osteology; search and recovery of human remains; taphonomy; trauma analysis; and the development and application of innovative and specialized techniques. Prerequisite: ANTH 101 or permission of instructor.
Scientific Investigation (SI)

Back to top

ANTH B237 Environmental Health
Not offered 2017-18
This course introduces principles and methods in environmental anthropology and public health used to analyze global environmental health problems globally and develop health and disease control programs. Topics covered include risk; health and environment; food production and consumption; human health and agriculture; meat and poultry production; and culture, urbanization, and disease. Prerequisite: ANTH B102, H103 or permission of instructor.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Environmental Studies
Counts toward Health Studies

Back to top

ANTH B238 Chinese Culture and Society
Not offered 2017-18
This course encourages students to think critically about major developments in Chinese culture and society that have occurred during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, with an emphasis on understanding both cultural change and continuity in China. Drawing on ethnographic material and case studies from rural and urban China over the traditional, revolutionary, and reform periods, this course examines a variety of topics including family and kinship; marriage, reproduction, and death; popular religion; women and gender; the Cultural Revolution; social and economic reforms and development; gift exchange and guanxi networks; changing perceptions of space and place; as well as globalization and modernity. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward International Studies

Back to top

ANTH B244 Global Perspectives on Early Farmers and Social Change
Not offered 2017-18
Throughout most of human history our ancestors practiced lifestyles focused upon the gathering and hunting of wild plants and animals. Today, however, a globalized agricultural economy supports a population of over seven billion individuals. This course utilizes information produced by archaeologists around the globe to examine this major historical transition while asking big questions like: What impact did the adoption of agriculture have on communities in the past, and how did farming spread to different world regions? We will also consider how the current farming system influences our own society. How does farming still affect our lives today, and how will the history of agricultural change shape our collective future? Counts toward Environmental Studies minor.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Environmental Studies

Back to top

ANTH B259 The Creation of Early Complex Societies
Not offered 2017-18
In the last 10,000 years, humans around the world have transitioned from organizing themselves through small, egalitarian social networks to living within large and socially complex societies. This archaeology course takes an anthropological perspective to seek to understand the ways that human groups created these complex societies. We will explore the archaeological evidence for the development of complexity in the past, including the development of villages and early cities, the institutionalization of social and political-economic inequalities, and the rise of states and empires. Alongside discussion of current theoretical ideas about complexity, the course will compare and contrast the evolutionary trajectories of complex societies in different world regions. Case studies will emphasize the pre-Columbian histories of complex societies in the Americas as well as some of the early complex societies of the Old World. Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latino Studies minor. Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP) and Cross-Cultural (CC)
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Back to top

ANTH B266 Waves of Power: Sound in Culture, Politics, and Society
Not offered 2017-18
From the chants of protesters to the hum of engines, from the ring of church bells to the background tracks of our favorite songs, sound matters. It is not just a background to what we see, but a crucial and powerful part of social life. This course builds an understanding of sound through anthropological investigation, as a product of human creativity, human conflict, and human interaction with the material world. We will explore the ways that sound is conceptualized and endowed with meaning; how sound becomes linked to identity; and how sound can become a call to action in different cultural and historical contexts. The kinds of sounds we will encounter in this course include, but are not limited to, music and spoken language; we will also be studying environmental, industrial, and religious sounds. You will also be learning about different ways to record, document, and write about sound by engaging in your own sound-based ethnographic research. Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing or higher.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Back to top

ANTH B268 Cultural Perspectives on Marriage and Family
Not offered 2017-18
This course explores the family and marriage as basic social institutions in cultures around the world. We will consider various topics including: kinship systems in social organization; dating and courtship; parenting and childhood; cohabitation and changing family formations; family planning and reproductive technologies; and gender and the division of household labor. In addition to thinking about individuals in families, we will consider the relationship between society, the state, and marriage and family. Prerequisite: ANTH B102 or permission of instructor.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

ANTH B271 Museum Anthropology: History, Politics, Practices
Not offered 2017-18
This course provides an in-depth exploration of museum anthropology: the critical study of museum practices from an anthropological perspective. The course will fundamentally consider the role of museums in exhibiting culture--the politics of placing cultures on display, from living humans and human remains to cultural objects and artifacts. The course will also consider changing practices in museum anthropology, including repatriation efforts, shifting notions of heritage and identity and the emergence of community-curated exhibitions. This course complements the theoretical explorations of the museum with visits to area museums and hands-on work in Special Collections.
Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Museum Studies

Back to top

ANTH B274 Bioarchaeology
Fall 2017
Since the earliest days of excavations, people have been fascinated by human skeletons recovered from ancient sites. However, skeletal remains are more than a physical bridge between the present and a romanticized past - they also encode valuable information about demography, gender differences, social identities and the daily lives of past peoples. Bioarchaeology is the study of human skeletal material from archaeological sites to address questions about these topics. In this course, students will learn about the methods used to analyze skeletal remains (e.g., how to estimate age and sex) and the hypotheses those methods are used to test (e.g., what health differences existed between social classes in the past?).. Prerequisite: ANTH B101 or permission of the instructor.
Scientific Investigation (SI)

Back to top

ANTH B278 Paleoanthropology Methods
Spring 2018
Paleoanthropology is the study of how human ancestors evolved. Part biological anthropology and part archaeology, this sub-discipline uses a variety of methods to test hypotheses about the human past. This class provides an overview of some of the most useful and commonly employed methods. We will also practice using many of these techniques first-hand. Methods will come from geology (e.g., how to date a fossil site), chemistry (e.g., how to reconstruct an ancient environment), demography (e.g., how to identify gene flow between populations in the past), genetics (e.g., what ancient DNA from fossils tells us about evolution), and more. The techniques that we will explore include modeling the past using primatology, ethnology, and archaeology; assessing evidence of ancient disease through paleopathology; reconstructing diets and developmental stages of fossils based on microscopic tooth anatomy, and using virtual reconstructions to compare hominin morp hologies. Prerequisites: ANTH B101 or instructor permission.
Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts toward Geoarchaeology

Back to top

ANTH B279 Anthropology of Childhood and Youth
Fall 2017
This course will challenge you to think about childhood and youth as a diverse global experience by exploring a set of fundamental questions. How do children's daily lives differ from place to place, and how are race, class and gender linked to discourses and experiences of childhood? How do children stand in as symbols for broader political and cultural concerns? The course will explore these questions by considering the ways childhood is constructed and experienced in relation to controversial topics such as education, labor, migration, human rights, violence, consumerism, and media.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

ANTH B281 Language in Social Context
Not offered 2017-18
Studies of language in society have moved from the idea that language reflects social position/identity to the idea that language plays an active role in shaping and negotiating social position, identity, and experience. This course will explore the implications of this shift by providing an introduction to the fields of sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology. We will be particularly concerned with the ways in which language is implicated in the social construction of gender, race, class, and cultural/national identity. The course will develop students' skills in the ethnographic analysis of communication through several short ethnographic projects. Prerequisite: ANTH B102, ANTH H103 or permission of instructor.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)

Back to top

ANTH B283 The Living Primates: Biology, Bones, and Behavior
Fall 2017
This course provides a comprehensive review of the order Primates, focusing on morphology, biological adaptations, and behavioral diversity characterizing non-human primates. First, we will investigate the morphological traits that characterize major primate groups, and their evolutionary history. As many primate taxa are endangered or vulnerable to extinction, we will explore the approaches and challenges to primate conservation. In the second half of the course, we will focus on primate socioecology, examining how different environments influence primate distribution and social relationships. We will then delve further into primate behavior and cognition, examining interpersonal relationships, social dynamics, communication strategies, and learning modes. In doing this, we will address the questions concerning the recognition and definition of culture, self-awareness, and personhood among non-human primates using a comparative perspective. Prerequisites: ANTH B101 or permission of the instructor
Course does not meet an Approach

Back to top

ANTH B285 Anthropology of Development, Aid, and Activism
Fall 2017
This course will provide tools to reflect critically on the meanings and effects of aid, or "doing good" for others in a world characterized by historically-rooted social, political, and economic inequalities. What goes into defining specific people or geographic regions as "in need"? What complex dynamics are at play when an outside actor - whether in the form of a government aid agency, an NGO, or an individual volunteer - enters a community in order to aid its members? How do those categorized as beneficiaries assert their own identities and offer their own perspectives on social change?
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward International Studies
Counts toward Peace, Justice and Human Rights

Back to top

ANTH B288 Global Latin America
Spring 2018
This course will explore how the region has been constituted and shaped by global forces and how Latin America and its people also influence the world on a global scale. We will focus on three historical moments - the colonial encounter, the Cold War, and the neoliberal era - and their legacies. Guiding questions will include: how has the patriarchal system instituted under Spanish colonialism influenced ideas about gender, race, and religion? How does the legacy of U.S. Cold War intervention in Latin America subtly play out in within contemporary discussions about democracy, human rights, and development? How have neoliberal policies produced a discourse of economic growth that ignores increasing economic polarization in the region? How do these broad structures of power influence the everyday lives of Latin Americans? The course will focus primarily, although not exclusively, on South America.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Counts toward International Studies

Back to top

ANTH B294 Culture, Power, and Politics
Not offered 2017-18
What do a country's national politics have to do with culture? Likewise, how are politics hidden below the surface of our everyday social lives? This course explores questions like these through anthropological approaches. Drawing on both classic and contemporary ethnographic studies from the U.S. and around the world, we will examine how social and cultural frameworks help us understand politics in new ways. Topics will include states and political systems, nationalism and citizenship, gender, violence, rumor and conspiracy theory, and non-state forms of governance. Prerequisite: ANTH 102, B103 or permission of the instructor.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward International Studies

Back to top

ANTH B301 Anthropology of Globalization: Wealth, Mobility, Insecurity
Not offered 2017-18
This course explores economic globalization from an anthropological perspective. With a focus on the social, cultural, and historical aspects of global connections, we seek to understand not only large-scale change in the world, but also how the growing integration of different countries and economic systems shapes everyday life experience. Conversely, we will also explore how individuals actively engage with, and sometimes help shape, changing global processes. We will examine the meanings and motivations that guide some people to accumulate capital, and we will consider the structural inequalities and barriers that prevent others from doing so. We will study the paths of mobile individuals around the world--those who cross borders "legally" as well as those whose movements are deemed "illegal"--and think critically about what exclusion and forced immobility means for people socially as well as economically. Finally, we will investigate patterns of economic, political, and social insecurity that often accompany processes of globalization. Working through a series of ethnographic analyses and conducting our own research, we will gain a better understanding of how people around the world experience and actively make "the global." Prerequisite: ANTH B102, ANTH H103 or permission of the instructor.

Back to top

ANTH B303 History of Anthropological Theory
Fall 2017
A consideration of the history of anthropological theories and the discipline of anthropology as an academic discipline that seeks to understand and explain society and culture as its subjects of study. Several vantage points on the history of anthropological theory are engaged to enact an historically charged anthropology of a disciplinary history. Anthropological theories are considered not only as a series of models, paradigms, or orientations, but as configurations of thought, technique, knowledge, and power that reflect the ever-changing relationships among the societies and cultures of the world. This course qualifies as completion of the writing requirement. Prerequisite: ANTH B102/ANTH H103 and at least one additional anthropology course at the 200 or 300 level.

Back to top

ANTH B305 Archaeology of the Precolumbian Southeastern United States
Not offered 2017-18
The history of Native American occupation of the southeastern United States is one that is long, rich, and varied. This rich history stretches back to the earliest colonization of the region during the late Pleistocene period more than 12,000 years ago, and continues on today. The course will serve two main purposes. First, students will gain knowledge of the culture history and archaeology of the pre-Columbian Southeast. Second, students will be exposed to problem-oriented research in anthropological archaeology. Each semester the course will examine recent archaeological studies from the region that are situated within the broad scope of current anthropological inquiry. Potential topics might include the archaeology of hunter-gatherer social complexity, the development of towns and proto-urban settlements, gender and identity, ideology and religion, culture-contact, and early Native-European relations. Prerequisite: ANTH B101, or permission of the instructor.

Back to top

ANTH B310 Performing the City: Theorizing Bodies in Space
Not offered 2017-18
Building on the premise that space is a concern in performance, choreography, architecture and urban planning, this course will interrogate relationships between (performing) bodies and (city) spaces. Using perspectives from dance and performance studies, urban studies and cultural geography, it will introduce space, spatiality and the city as material and theoretical concepts and investigate how moving and performing bodies and city spaces intersect in political, social and cultural contexts. Lectures, discussion of assigned readings, attendance at live performance and 2-3 field trips are included. Prerequisites: One Dance lecture/seminar course or one course in relevant discipline e.g. cities, anthropology, sociology or permission of the instructor.

Back to top

ANTH B312 Anthropology of Reproduction
Not offered 2017-18
An examination of social and cultural constructions of reproduction, and how power and politics in everyday life shapes reproductive behavior and its meaning in Western and non-Western cultures. The influence of competing interests within households, communities, states, and institutions on reproduction is considered. Prerequisite: ANTH B102 (or ANTH H103) or permission of instructor.
Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Health Studies

Back to top

ANTH B316 Media, Performance, and Gender in South Asia
Not offered 2017-18
Examines gender as a culturally and historically constructed category in the modern South Asian context, focusing on the ways in which everyday experiences of and practices relating to gender are informed by media, performance, and political events. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward International Studies

Back to top

ANTH B317 Disease and Human Evolution
Spring 2018
Pathogens and humans have been having an "evolutionary arms race" since the beginning of our species. In this course, we will look at methods for tracing diseases in our distant past through skeletal and genetic analyses as well as tracing the paths and impacts of epidemics that occurred during the historic past. We will also address how concepts of Darwinian medicine impact our understanding of how people might be treated most effectively. There will be a midterm, a final, and an essay and short presentation on a topic developed by the student relating to the class. Prerequisite: ANTH B101 or permission of the instructor. Counts towards: Health Studies, Biology
Counts toward Health Studies

Back to top

ANTH B322 Anthropology of the Body
Not offered 2017-18
This course examines a diversity of meanings and interpretations of the body in anthropology. It explores anthropological theories and methods of studying the body and social difference via a series of topics including the construction of the body in medicine, identity, race, gender, sexuality and as explored through cross-cultural comparison. Prerequisite: ANTH B102, ANTH H103 or permission of instructor.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Health Studies

Back to top

ANTH B325 Mobility, Movement, and Migration in the Past
Not offered 2017-18
The movement of human social groups across landscapes, borders, and boundaries is a dominant feature of today's world as well as of the recent historic past. Archaeological research has demonstrated that migration, movement, and mobility were also common features of human life in the more distant past. From examining cases of small-scale groups that were largely defined by constant movements across their social landscapes, to the study of the spread of complex societies and early political states, this course will consider the role of migration in the formation, reproduction, and alteration of human societies. Attention will be paid to how archaeologists recognize and study movement, as well as to how knowledge of the past contributes to a broader anthropological understanding of human migration. Prerequisite: ANTH B101, or permission of instructor

Back to top

ANTH B328 Race, Inequality and Human Variation
Not offered 2017-18
In this seminar, students will examine the relationship between science and social policies that impact "race" historically and in the present day. The course will focus on the role that anthropology has played in the study of race and how anthropological work has been used and abused in socio-political arenas, both with and without the complicity of the scientists themselves. We will discuss the history of the study of evolution and how race concepts have affect its study, how the worlds of science, politics and society are interrelated and how their relationship has been used to undermine, and sometimes promote, different racial and ethnic groups. Prerequisite: ANTH 101 or instructor permission.

Back to top

ANTH B331 Advanced Topics in Medical Anthropology
Not offered 2017-18
The purpose of the course is to provide a survey of theoretical frameworks used in medical anthropology, coupled with topical subjects and ethnographic examples. The course will highlight a number of sub-specializations in the field of Medical Anthropology including genomics, science and technology studies, ethnomedicine, cross-cultural psychiatry/psychology, cross-cultural bioethics, ecological approaches to studying health and behavior, and more. Prerequisite: ANTH B102, ANTH H103, or permission of instructor.
Counts toward Health Studies

Back to top

ANTH B334 Digital Cultures
Spring 2018
How do we do anthropology in, and of, the digital age? What does it mean to do ethnography of digital spaces, when we, as humans, exist simultaneously in overlapping virtual and actual worlds? Specific topics to be covered include surveillance, telecommunications infrastructures, activism, social movements, gender and sexuality, disability, space and place, and virtual ethnography. Prerequisite: Anth B102 or Anth H103 or permission of instructor.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

ANTH B354 Political Economy, Gender, Ethnicity and Transformation in Vietnam
Fall 2017
Today, Vietnam is in the midst of dramatic social, economic and political changes brought about through a shift from a central economy to a market/capitalist economy since the late 1980s. These changes have resulted in urbanization, a rise in consumption and shifts in social and economic relationships and cultural practices as the country has moved from low income to middle income status. This course examines culture and society in Vietnam focusing largely on contemporary Vietnam, but with a view to continuities and historical precedent in past centuries. In this course, we will draw on anthropological studies of Vietnam, as well as literature and historical studies. Relationships between the individual, family, gender, ethnicity, community and state will pervade the topics addressed in the course, as will the importance of political economy, nation, and globalization. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward International Studies

Back to top

ANTH B398 Senior Conference
Research design, proposal writing, research ethics, empirical research techniques and analysis of original material. Class discussions of work in progress and oral and written presentations of the analysis and results of research are important. A senior thesis proposal is the most significant writing experience in the seminar. Prerequisite: Senior Anthropology majors only.

Back to top

ANTH B399 Senior Conference
Coding research notes, discussion of ongoing field work and research. A senior's thesis is the most significant writing experience in the seminar.

Back to top

ANTH B403 Supervised Work
Independent work is usually open to junior and senior majors who wish to work in a special area under the supervision of a member of the faculty and is subject to faculty time and interest.

Back to top

ANTH B425 Praxis III: Independent Study
Praxis III courses are Independent Study courses and are developed by individual students, in collaboration with faculty and field supervisors. A Praxis courses is distinguished by genuine collaboration with fieldsite organizations and by a dynamic process of reflection that incorporates lessons learned in the field into the classroom setting and applies theoretical understanding gained through classroom study to work done in the broader community.
Counts toward Praxis Program

Back to top

 B348 In Search of Women in the Paleolithic
Course URL
Spring 2018
What was the role of women in Paleolithic times? How does female form reflect evolutionary changes to our species? Paleoanthropologists reconstruct how humans evolved based on evidence from fossilized bones, ancient DNA, and archaeological artifacts. This complex narrative is often presented as androcentric, focusing on the importance of male-bodies, while de-emphasizing or even ignoring female-bodies. In this seminar, students will read and discuss historical and modern works on paleoanthropology and its critical intersection with feminist theory. The goal will be to find out what women were doing in our evolutionary past, and identify methodological and theoretical approaches to prevent gender-biased, androcentric paleoanthropological research from occurring. Prerequisites:
Counts toward FGSTC

Back to top

ARCH B260 Daily Life in Ancient Greece and Rome
Not offered 2017-18
The often-praised achievements of the classical cultures arose from the realities of day-to-day life. This course surveys the rich body of material and textual evidence pertaining to how ancient Greeks and Romans -- famous and obscure alike -- lived and died. Topics include housing, food, clothing, work, leisure, and family and social life.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Back to top

ARTD B223 Anthropology of Dance
Not offered 2017-18
This course surveys ethnographic approaches to the study of global dance in a variety of contemporary and historical contexts, including contact improvisation, Argentinian tango, Kathak dance in Indian modernity, a range of traditional dances from Japan and China, capoeira in today's Brazil, and social dances in North America and Europe. Recognizing dance as a kind of shared cultural knowledge and drawing on theories and literature in anthropology, dance and related fields such as history, and ethnomusicology, we will examine dance's relationship to social structure, ethnicity, gender, spirituality and politics. Lectures, discussion, media, and fieldwork are included. Preparation: a course in anthropology or related discipline, or a dance lecture/seminar course, or permission of the instructor.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)

Back to top

ARTD B310 Performing the City: Theorizing Bodies in Space
Not offered 2017-18
Building on the premise that space is a concern in performance, choreography, architecture and urban planning, this course will interrogate relationships between (performing) bodies and (city) spaces. Using perspectives from dance and performance studies, urban studies and cultural geography, it will introduce space, spatiality and the city as material and theoretical concepts and investigate how moving and performing bodies and city spaces intersect in political, social and cultural contexts. Lectures, discussion of assigned readings, attendance at a live performance, and 2-3 field trips are included. Prerequisites: One dance lecture/seminar course or one course in relevant discipline e.g. cities, anthropology, sociology, or permission of the instructor.

Back to top

BIOL B236 Evolution
Spring 2018
A lecture/discussion course on the development of evolutionary biology. This course will cover the history of evolutionary theory, population genetics, molecular and developmental evolution, paleontology, and phylogenetic analysis. Lecture three hours a week.
Scientific Investigation (SI)

Back to top

CITY B185 Urban Culture and Society
Fall 2017
Examines techniques and questions of the social sciences as tools for studying historical and contemporary cities. Topics include political-economic organization, conflict and social differentiation (class, ethnicity and gender), and cultural production and representation. Philadelphia features prominently in discussion, reading and exploration as do global metropolitan comparisons through papers involving fieldwork, critical reading and planning/problem solving using qualitative and quantitative methods.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Back to top

CITY B229 Topics in Comparative Urbanism
Section 001 (Spring 2017): Colonial and Post-Colonial Cities
Section 001 (Spring 2018): Global Suburbia
Spring 2018
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: City, Nature and Culture - Creativity, sprawl, alienation, mobility, nature and artifice --what do developments beyond the metropolis tell us about urban life. Probing suburban places, experiences, imagery and reforms around Paris, Hong Kong, Buenos Aires and Philadelphia, this required major writing seminar examines suburbs for both problems from the past and ideas for the future.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o

Back to top

CITY B335 Topics in City and Media
Section 001 (Spring 2017): Public/Private/Control/Freedom
Not offered 2017-18
This is a topics course. Course content varies.

Back to top

CITY B365 Topics: Techniques of the City
Section 001 (Spring 2018): Global Enclaves
Spring 2018
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: Fragmentation, Enclaves, and the Future of Global Cities - Ghettos. Gated Communities. Chinatowns. Cities have been and continue to be fragmented in multiple ways in space, meaning and experience, based on political economics, social formations and culture. From the Jewish ghetto of Venice to contemporary Chinatowns, the divided Philadelphia of W.E.B. DuBois to the gilded ghettos of contemporary gated communities, we will explore divided cities as historical process and future challenge.

Back to top

GERM B231 Cultural Profiles in Modern Exile
Not offered 2017-18
This course investigates the anthropological, philosophical, psychological, cultural, and literary aspects of modern exile. It studies exile as experience and metaphor in the context of modernity, and examines the structure of the relationship between imagined/remembered homelands and transnational identities, and the dialectics of language loss and bi- and multi-lingualism. Particular attention is given to the psychocultural dimensions of linguistic exclusion and loss. Readings of works by Julia Alvarez, Albert Camus, Ana Castillo, Sigmund Freud, Eva Hoffman, Maxine Hong Kingston, Milan Kundera, Friedrich Nietzsche, Salman Rushdie, W. G. Sebald, Kurban Said, and others.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

Back to top

HIST B200 The Atlantic World 1492-1800
Not offered 2017-18
The aim of this course is to provide an understanding of the way in which peoples, goods, and ideas from Africa, Europe. and the Americas came together to form an interconnected Atlantic World system. The course is designed to chart the manner in which an integrated system was created in the Americas in the early modern period, rather than to treat the history of the Atlantic World as nothing more than an expanded version of North American, Caribbean, or Latin American history.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

Back to top