This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's calendars page.

Spring 2021

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION / INSTRUCTION MODE INSTR(S)
ANTH B102-001Introduction to Cultural AnthropologySecond Half / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MTHRemote InstructionWeidman,A.
ANTH B202-001Africa in the WorldSecond Half / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM WRemote InstructionFioratta,S.
ANTH B207-001Becoming Human: Evolutionary Perspectives on Human AnatomySecond Half / 1Lecture: 11:10 AM-12:30 PM TFRemote InstructionEyre,J.
ANTH B209-001Human Evolution: Debates in PaleoanthropologySecond Half / 1Lecture: 9:40 AM-11:00 AM MTHRemote InstructionEyre,J.
ANTH B235-001Comparative Colonialism in Latin AmericaSecond Half / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM TFRemote InstructionNorman,S.
ANTH B241-001Archaeologies of GenderSecond Half / 1Lecture: 9:40 AM-11:00 AM TFRemote InstructionNorman,S.
ANTH B281-001Language in Social ContextSecond Half / 1Lecture: 9:40 AM-11:00 AM MTHRemote InstructionWeidman,A.
ANTH B331-001Medical Anthro Seminar: Critical Thinking for Critical TimesSecond Half / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 3:00 PM TRemote InstructionPashigian,M.
ANTH B339-001Migrants, Refugees, and Life Across BordersSecond Half / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 3:30 PM THRemote InstructionFioratta,S.
ANTH B349-001Space, Landscape, and EnvironmentSecond Half / 1Lecture: 9:40 AM-12:30 PM WRemote InstructionNorman,S.
ANTH B399-001Senior ConferenceSecond Half / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 3:00 PM MRemote InstructionDept. staff, TBA
ANTH B420-001Praxis Fieldwork SeminarSecond Half / 1In Person
ANTH B425-001Praxis III: Independent StudySecond Half / 1Dept. staff, TBA
BIOL B236-001EvolutionSecond Half / 1Lecture: 9:40 AM-11:00 AM TFPark 25
Hybrid: In-Person & Remote
Davis,G.
CITY B229-001Topics in Comparative Urbanism: Colonial & Post Colonial ReflectionsSecond Half / 1LEC: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MTHDalton Hall 300
Hybrid: In-Person & Remote
McDonogh,G.
CITY B365-001Topics: Techniques of the City: New Urbanism and Its DiscontentsSecond Half / 1LEC: 2:40 PM- 5:30 PM MDalton Hall 25
Hybrid: In-Person & Remote
Hurley,J.
INST B210-001Popular Uprisings in Global PerspectiveSecond Half / 1Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MTHPark 25
Hybrid: In-Person & Remote
Elamin,N.

Fall 2021

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION / INSTRUCTION MODE INSTR(S)
ANTH B101-001Introduction to Biological and Archaeological AnthropologySemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHDalton Hall 300
In Person
Barrier,C., Seselj,M.
ANTH B101-002Introduction to Biological and Archaeological AnthropologySemester / 1Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHDalton Hall 300
In Person
Barrier,C., Seselj,M.
ANTH B101-00AIntroduction to Biological and Archaeological AnthropologySemester / 1Laboratory: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TDalton Hall 315
In Person
Barrier,C., Seselj,M.
ANTH B101-00BIntroduction to Biological and Archaeological AnthropologySemester / 1Laboratory: 4:10 PM- 5:30 PM TDalton Hall 315
In Person
Barrier,C., Seselj,M.
ANTH B101-00CIntroduction to Biological and Archaeological AnthropologySemester / 1Laboratory: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM WDalton Hall 315
In Person
Barrier,C., Seselj,M.
ANTH B101-00DIntroduction to Biological and Archaeological AnthropologySemester / 1Laboratory: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM WDalton Hall 315
In Person
Barrier,C., Seselj,M.
ANTH B101-00ZIntroduction to Biological and Archaeological AnthropologySemester / 1In Person
ANTH B102-001Introduction to Cultural AnthropologySemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHDalton Hall 119
In Person
Carby Denning,N.
ANTH B254-001Anthropology and Social Science Research MethodsSemester / 1Lecture: 12:10 PM- 2:00 PM MDalton Hall 300
In Person
Pashigian,M.
ANTH B303-001History of Anthropological TheorySemester / 1Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:30 AM MWDalton Hall 1
In Person
Weidman,A.
ANTH B343-001Human Growth and Development and Life HistorySemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 3:30 PM WDalton Hall 212A
In Person
Seselj,M.
ANTH B354-001Political Economy, Gender, Ethnicity and Transformation in VietnamSemester / 1Lecture: 9:40 AM-12:00 PM FDalton Hall 300
In Person
Pashigian,M.
ANTH B398-001Senior ConferenceSemester / 1Lecture: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM MDalton Hall 300
In Person
Dept. staff, TBA
CITY B185-001Urban Culture and SocietySemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWOld Library 110
In Person
McDonogh,G.
CITY B185-002Urban Culture and SocietySemester / 1LEC: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWOld Library 110
In Person
Restrepo,L.
HIST B200-001The Atlantic World 1492-1800Semester / 1Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTHIn PersonGallup-Diaz,I.

Spring 2022

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION / INSTRUCTION MODE INSTR(S)
ANTH B102-001Introduction to Cultural AnthropologySemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWDalton Hall 300
In Person
Weidman,A.
ANTH B102-002Introduction to Cultural AnthropologySemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHDalton Hall 300
In Person
Carby Denning,N.
ANTH B208-001Human BiologySemester / 1Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTHDalton Hall 119
In Person
Seselj,M.
ANTH B220-001Theory and Method in ArchaeologySemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM FDalton Hall 315
In Person
Barrier,C.
ANTH B234-001Forensic AnthropologySemester / 1Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHDalton Hall 315
In Person
Dept. staff, TBA
ANTH B399-001Senior ConferenceSemester / 1Lecture: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM MDalton Hall 300
In Person
Dept. staff, TBA
ARCH B330-001Archaeological Theory and MethodSemester / 1In Person
CITY B229-001Topics in Comparative Urbanism: Cities Beyond WallsSemester / 1LEC: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWIn PersonMcDonogh,G.
CITY B365-001Topics: Techniques of the City: Making & Remaking PhiladelphiaSemester / 1In Person
INST B210-001Popular Uprisings in Global PerspectiveSemester / 1Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHDalton Hall 212A
In Person
Elamin,N.

2021-22 Catalog Data

ANTH B101 Introduction to Biological and Archaeological Anthropology
Fall 2021
An introduction to the place of humans in nature, evolutionary theory, living primates, the fossil record for human evolution, human variation and the issue of race, and the archaeological investigation of culture change from the Old Stone Age to the rise of early agricultural societies in the Americas, Eurasia and Africa. In addition to the lecture/discussion classes, students must select and sign up for one lab section.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Scientific Investigation (SI)

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ANTH B102 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Fall 2021, Spring 2022
This course will explore the basic principles and methods of sociocultural anthropology. Through field research, direct observation, and participation in a group's daily life, sociocultural anthropologists examine the many ways that people organize their social institutions and cultural systems, ranging from the dynamics of life in small-scale societies to the transnational circulation of people, commodities, technologies and ideas. Sociocultural anthropology examines how many of the categories we assume to be "natural," such as kinship, gender, or race, are culturally and socially constructed. It examines how people's perceptions, beliefs, values, and actions are shaped by broader historical, economic, and political contexts. It is also a vital tool for understanding and critiquing imbalances of power in our contemporary world. Through a range of topically and geographically diverse course readings and films, and opportunities to practice ethnographic methodology, students will gain new analytical and methodological tools for understanding cultural difference, social organization, and social change.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward International Studies

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ANTH B202 Africa in the World
Not offered 2021-22
In this course, we will approach Africa with an emphasis on the many interconnections that link the continent with the rest of the world, through both time and space. Much popular talk about Africa in the U.S. is overwhelmingly negative--focusing on poverty, violence, and failed states--and often portrays Africa as something "other," both different from and unrelated to the United States and the rest of the world. But such preconceptions blatantly overlook what we know about historical and contemporary movements of people, ideas, materials, and money around the globe. Rather than regarding Africa as separate or apart, in this course we will examine the centrality of African engagements with these global movements. Rather than attempting a survey of particular, bounded African "peoples" or "cultures," we will explore complex issues and processes through interconnected topics including colonial and postcolonial politics, urban life, gender and sexuality, economic networks, development, and transnational migration. We will use these themes as guides for exploring larger, interlinked questions of social life in Africa and around the world. This course fulfills the BMC Anthropology major/minor ethnographic area requirement. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Africana Studies

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ANTH B204 North American Archaeology
Not offered 2021-22
For millennia, the North American continent has been home to a vast diversity of Native Americans. From the initial migration of big game hunters who spread throughout the continent more than 12,000 years ago, to the complex Pueblos of the Southwest and urban Cahokia in the East, there remains a rich archaeological record that reflects the ways of life of these cultures. This course will introduce the culture history of North America as well as explanations for culture change and diversification.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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ANTH B207 Becoming Human: Evolutionary Perspectives on Human Anatomy
Not offered 2021-22
Millions of years of evolution have shaped human anatomy, creating a unique bipedal ape with a very large brain. What can our bones, muscles, and physiology tell us about our evolutionary past? In this course you will learn about human biology from an evolutionary perspective by considering humans as primates with a unique evolutionary trajectory. We will consider both how humans are biologically unique and how our primate origins have shaped who we are today. Topics will include human osteology and odontology, functional anatomy, energetics, reproduction, and diversity. Furthermore, we will explore current hypotheses and evidence regarding important questions in human origins and evolution, including whether bipedalism is an efficient and effective form of locomotion, why human reproduction can be a difficult and dangerous process, and which modern day health issues are a result of a mismatch between our current lifestyles and our evolutionary adaptations.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts toward Health Studies

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ANTH B208 Human Biology
Spring 2022
This course will be a survey of modern human biological variation. We will examine the patterns of morphological and genetic variation in modern human populations and discuss the evolutionary explanations for the observed patterns. A major component of the class will be the discussion of the social implications of these patterns of biological variation, particularly in the construction and application of the concept of race. Prerequisite: ANTH 101 or permission of instructor.
Counts toward Health Studies

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ANTH B209 Human Evolution: Debates in Paleoanthropology
Not offered 2021-22
This course explores the biological and cultural evolution of humans as viewed from the fossil and archaeological record, beginning with our earliest ancestors and continuing to the dispersal of modern humans around the globe. We will use comparative, functional, and evolutionary anatomy to interpret past behaviors and relationships among fossil hominins, as well as their relationship to modern humans. Furthermore, we will use geology, archaeology, and paleoecology to reconstruct behavioral aspects of fossil hominins and their environmental influences. Throughout the course, we will focus our discussions on major debates in paleoanthropology. Prerequisite: ANTH 101 or permission of instructor.
Scientific Investigation (SI)

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ANTH B213 Anthropology of Food
Not offered 2021-22
Food is part of the universal human experience. But everyday experiences of food also reveal much about human difference. What we eat is intimately connected with who we are, where we belong, and how we see the world. In this course, we will use a socio-cultural perspective to explore how food helps us form families, national and religious communities, and other groups. We will also consider how food may become a source of inequality, a political symbol, and a subject of social discord. Examining both practical and ideological meanings of food and taste, this course will address issues of identity, social difference, and cultural experience.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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ANTH B220 Theory and Method in Archaeology
Spring 2022
An examination of techniques and theories archaeologists use to transform archaeological data into statements about patterns of prehistoric cultural behavior, adaptation and culture change. Theory development, hypothesis formulation, gathering of archaeological data and their interpretation and evaluation are discussed and illustrated by examples. Theoretical debates current in anthropological archaeology are reviewed and the place of archaeology in the general field of anthropology is discussed. Prerequisite: ANTH 101 or permission of instructor.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Geoarchaeology

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ANTH B234 Forensic Anthropology
Spring 2022
Introduces the forensic subfield of biological anthropology, which applies techniques of osteology and biomechanics to questions of forensic science, with practical applications for criminal justice. Examines the challenges of human skeletal identification and trauma analysis, as well as the broader ethical considerations and implications of the field. Topics will include: human osteology; search and recovery of human remains; taphonomy; trauma analysis; and reconstructing the biological profile of an individual. Prerequisite: ANTH 101 or permission of instructor.
Scientific Investigation (SI)

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ANTH B235 Comparative Colonialism in Latin America
Not offered 2021-22
This course takes a comparative perspective to consider state development in Central and South America through the early Spanish Colonial era. The course is divided into three sections: in the first third, students learn about the development of the Maya and the Wari, consider the cultural distinctions between the two states, and compare how each state set the stage for the upcoming major imperial empires. The second section studies how Aztec and Inka civilizations built upon (or not) existing infrastructures and religious traditions to become major powers. The third section investigates how Spanish colonial processes were shaped by cultural traditions in Mexico and Peru. Specifically, this third section explores how cultural structures and shifting alliances led to Spanish forces adapting and exacerbating these factors in their ultimately successful conquests of each region. Readings are based mostly on current literature and some book sections. Assignments include a comparative essay based on some aspect of empire (economic strategy, religious practices, hegemonic vs. militaristic conquests), various hands-on small projects and activities, and a final exam.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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ANTH B239 Anthropology of Media
Not offered 2021-22
Life throughout much of the world today is saturated by forms of media and media technologies: films, television, radio, cell phones, the internet and social media. This course examines media from an anthropological perspective, focusing on the impact of these various non-print media on social and political life. We will also explore the distinctive properties of two media phenomena specific to our time: reality TV and social media. Throughout, we will be concerned with the constitutive power of media at two levels: first, in the construction of subjectivity, senses of self, and the production of affect; and second, in collective social and political projects, such as building national identity, consolidating or resisting state power, giving voice to indigenous claims, or creating alliances.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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ANTH B241 Archaeologies of Gender
Not offered 2021-22
This course foregrounds gender as a structuring part of past lives and explores the construction of gender in archaeological interpretations across time and space. We begin with an overview of how gender has been theorized in archaeology as a discipline, including more recent theoretical approaches which incorporate feminist and queer theory. Drawing on case studies from diverse geographic locations and time periods, we will consider how studies of gender can be practically applied to archaeological investigations of labor, mortuary analysis, space and landscape, and feasting and religious practices. This engendered perspective, which includes women, men, and nonbinary genders, promotes more nuanced understandings of social complexity and diversity of past communities. Potential topics to be considered include: theories of gender, non-binary genders and masculinities, mortuary analysis, labor and technology, space and landscape, feasting and ritual, gender and hierarchies, and colonialism and transformation of gendered identities. A running theme throughout this course will consider who is responsible for the production of knowledge, if the concept of positivism is inherently male, and how we can build feminist and community ideals into scientific investigations.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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ANTH B244 Global Perspectives on Early Farmers and Social Change
Not offered 2021-22
Throughout most of human history our ancestors practiced lifestyles focused upon the gathering and hunting of wild plants and animals. Today, however, a globalized agricultural economy supports a population of over seven billion individuals. This course utilizes information produced by archaeologists around the globe to examine this major historical transition while asking big questions like: What impact did the adoption of agriculture have on communities in the past, and how did farming spread to different world regions? We will also consider how the current farming system influences our own society. How does farming still affect our lives today, and how will the history of agricultural change shape our collective future? Counts toward Environmental Studies minor.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Environmental Studies

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ANTH B246 The Everyday Life of Language: Field Research in Linguistic Anthropology
Not offered 2021-22
The goal of this course is to develop an awareness of how language operates in various interactional and other (eg. ritual, performance, political) contexts that we commonly experience. The focus will be on gaining hands-on experience in doing linguistic anthropological data collection and analysis, and putting the results of individual student projects together as part of initiating an ongoing, multi-year project. Topics that students explore ethnographically may include: language and gender; language, race and social indexicality; sociolinguistic variation; codeswitching; register and social stance; language and social media. Student research will involve ethnographic observation, audio-recording of spoken discourse, conducting interviews, and learning how to create a transcript to use as the basis for ethnographic analysis. Students will work in parallel on individual projects cohering around a particular topic, and class time will be used to discuss the results and synthesize insights that develop from bringing different ethnographic contexts together. For the praxis component of the course, students will use the experience they have gained to generate ideas for components of a middle school/high school language arts curriculum that incorporates linguistic anthropology concepts and student-driven research on language.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Praxis Program

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ANTH B250 Global Economies: Work, Money, and Value in Everyday Life
Not offered 2021-22
This course explores economic life from an anthropological perspective. We will explore the social structures shaping economies, labor, and consumption in diverse human cultures. Throughout we will examine the relation between global systems and local everyday life, between gender constructions and work structures, between what we produce and what we consume. We will explore emerging 21st century economies and how new technologies are changing the ways we think about labor. In addition, we will examine how traditional cultural values are still shaping today's global economies. The central focus of this course is the question of value: What are the power dynamics shaping our perception of the value of human labor, capital, and the things we consume everyday? Prereq: ANTH B102 or permission of instructor.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward International Studies

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ANTH B254 Anthropology and Social Science Research Methods
Fall 2021
This course is designed for students interested in learning ethnographic and qualitative social science methods, and how to analyze qualitative results. Through hands on fieldwork, students will learn and practice ethnographic field methods, for example, observation, participant observation, interviewing, use of visual media and drawing, life stories, generating and analyzing data, and ways to productively transform qualitative data into contextual information. Ethics in ethnographic research will be a central theme, as will envisioning and designing projects that protect human subjects. The purpose of this course is to provide anthropology majors and students in social sciences, humanities, as well as STEM majors with interests in multi-method research, an opportunity to learn methods in advance of their thesis proposal and research, Hanna Holborn Gray summer research, and other social science independent research opportunities during their undergraduate experience, and post-graduation.
Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Environmental Studies

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ANTH B259 The Creation of Early Complex Societies
Not offered 2021-22
In the last 10,000 years, humans around the world have transitioned from organizing themselves through small, egalitarian social networks to living within large and socially complex societies. This archaeology course takes an anthropological perspective to seek to understand the ways that human groups created these complex societies. We will explore the archaeological evidence for the development of complexity in the past, including the development of villages and early cities, the institutionalization of social and political-economic inequalities, and the rise of states and empires. Alongside discussion of current theoretical ideas about complexity, the course will compare and contrast the evolutionary trajectories of complex societies in different world regions. Case studies will emphasize the pre-Columbian histories of complex societies in the Americas as well as some of the early complex societies of the Old World. Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latino Studies minor. Approach: Inquiry into the Past (IP) and Cross-Cultural (CC).
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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ANTH B281 Language in Social Context
Not offered 2021-22
This course provides an introduction to the concepts and methods of linguistic anthropology, which can help us understand the role language plays in constructing identities, creating social and political hierarchies, and shaping understandings and experiences of the world. The course considers topics relevant to the everyday life of language in the U.S. context, including the relationship between language and gender, race, and socioeconomic inequality, and uses ethnographic materials from a variety of cultural contexts to explore three perspectives that are central to linguistic anthropology. These are: language, power, and the linguistic market: how different languages and the ways of speaking get associated with particular social groups and become valued or devalued; linguistic ideologies and semiotic processes: how language as a system of signs becomes meaningful, to whom, and in what ways; poetics and performance: how people "do things with words" and how the non-referential (sonic, poetic) aspects of language matter.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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ANTH B283 The Living Primates: Biology, Bones, and Behavior
Not offered 2021-22
This course provides a comprehensive review of the order Primates, focusing on morphology, biological adaptations, and behavioral diversity characterizing non-human primates. First, we will investigate the morphological traits that characterize major primate groups, and their evolutionary history. As many primate taxa are endangered or vulnerable to extinction, we will explore the approaches and challenges to primate conservation. In the second half of the course, we will focus on primate socioecology, examining how different environments influence primate distribution and social relationships. We will then delve further into primate behavior and cognition, examining interpersonal relationships, social dynamics, communication strategies, and learning modes. In doing this, we will address the questions concerning the recognition and definition of culture, self-awareness, and personhood among non-human primates using a comparative perspective. Prerequisites: ANTH B101 or permission of the instructor
Course does not meet an Approach

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ANTH B294 Culture, Power, and Politics
Not offered 2021-22
What do a country's national politics have to do with culture? Likewise, how are politics hidden below the surface of our everyday social lives? This course explores questions like these through anthropological approaches. Drawing on both classic and contemporary ethnographic studies from the U.S. and around the world, we will examine how social and cultural frameworks help us understand politics in new ways. We will investigate how people perceive the meanings and effects of the state; how nationalism and citizenship shape belonging on the one hand, and exclusion on the other; how understandings of gender, race, and difference converge with political action, ideology, and power; and how politics infuse everyday spaces including schools, businesses, homes, and even the dinner table. Prerequisite: ANTH B102, H103 or permission of the instructor.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward International Studies

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ANTH B301 Anthropology of Globalization
Not offered 2021-22
This class explores globalization from an anthropological perspective. With a focus on the social, cultural, and historical aspects of global connections, we seek to understand how the growing integration of different places and systems around the world shapes everyday life experience. Conversely, we also explore how individuals actively engage with, and sometimes help shape, dynamic global processes. Questioning assumptions that link globalization with worldwide cultural and economic homogeneity, we will examine how gender, race, class, and other structures of difference and inequality become meaningful within a global systems of power. Working through a series of ethnographic analyses and conducting our own research, we will gain a better understanding of how people around the world experience and actively make "the global." Prerequisite: ANTH B102, ANTH H103 or permission of the instructor.
Counts toward International Studies

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ANTH B303 History of Anthropological Theory
Fall 2021
A consideration of the history of anthropological theories and the discipline of anthropology as an academic discipline that seeks to understand and explain society and culture as its subjects of study. Several vantage points on the history of anthropological theory are engaged to enact an historically charged anthropology of a disciplinary history. Anthropological theories are considered not only as a series of models, paradigms, or orientations, but as configurations of thought, technique, knowledge, and power that reflect the ever-changing relationships among the societies and cultures of the world. This course qualifies as completion of the writing requirement. Prerequisite: ANTH B102/ANTH H103 and at least one additional anthropology course at the 200 or 300 level.

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ANTH B312 Anthropology of Reproduction
Not offered 2021-22
This course will examine how power in everyday life shapes reproductive behavior and how reproduction is culturally constructed. Through an examination of materials from different cultures, this course will look at how often competing interests within households, communities, states and institutions (at both the local and global levels) influence reproduction in society. We will explore the political economy of reproduction cross-culturally, how power and politics shape gendered reproductive behavior and how it is interpreted and used differently by persons, communities and institutions. Topics covered include but are not limited to the politics of family planning, mothering/parenting, abortion, pregnancy, pregnancy loss, fetal testing and biology and social policy in cross-cultural comparison. Prerequisite: ANTH 8102 (or ANTH H103) or permission of instructor. Haverford: Social Science (SO), Enrollment Cap: 15; Post Bacc Spaces: 2; If the course exceeds the enrollment cap the following criteria will be used for the lottery: Major/Minor/Concentration; Senior; Junior; Permission of Instructor.
Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Health Studies

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ANTH B316 Beyond Bollywood: Gender, Performance and Popular Culture in South Asia
Not offered 2021-22
The countries of South Asia (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Sri Lanka) have produced vibrant and varied forms of popular culture, including cinema, theatrical and other forms of performance, and sonic and visual culture. Using cinema and other audio-visual materials, this course will examine media and performance as crucial sites for the construction and negotiation of gender ideologies and hierarchies in these different national contexts. The issues we will explore include: questions of agency, constraint, and identity in performance; the role of mass mediation in creating new masculinities and femininities; and the relationship between popular culture and larger sociopolitical identities.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward International Studies

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ANTH B325 Mobility, Movement, and Migration in the Past
Not offered 2021-22
The movement of human social groups across landscapes, borders, and boundaries is a dominant feature of today's world as well as of the recent historic past. Archaeological research has demonstrated that migration, movement, and mobility were also common features of human life in the more distant past. From examining cases of small-scale groups that were largely defined by constant movements across their social landscapes, to the study of the spread of complex societies and early political states, this course will consider the role of migration in the formation, reproduction, and alteration of human societies. Attention will be paid to how archaeologists recognize and study movement, as well as to how knowledge of the past contributes to a broader anthropological understanding of human migration. Prerequisite: ANTH B101, or permission of instructor

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ANTH B329 The politics of belonging and exclusion in India
Not offered 2021-22
Since India's economic liberalization in the early 1990s, the globalizing dynamics of cultural and economic liberalization have been accompanied by renewed articulations of who belongs in the "New India" and who doesn't. In this context, caste, class, religious community, language, and gender have become crucial sites for claiming citizenship, articulating distinctions among people, and constructing senses of what and who can inhabit the public sphere. Using materials from different regions of India, our focus will be on how fine-grained ethnographic study can be a tool to examine the broader dynamics of belonging and exclusion and its political and social effects. This course fulfills the BMC Anthropology major/minor ethnographic area requirement.
Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward International Studies

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ANTH B331 Medical Anthro Seminar: Critical Thinking for Critical Times
Not offered 2021-22
Advanced Medical Anthropology: Critical Thinking for Critical Times explores theoretical and applied frameworks used in medical anthropology to tackle pressing problems in our world today. Coupled with topical subjects and ethnographic examples, this seminar will enable students to delve deeply into sub-specialization areas in the field of medical anthropology, including: global health inequalities, cross-border disease transmission, genomics, science and technology studies, ethnomedicine, cross-cultural psychiatry/psychology, cross-cultural bioethics, and ecological approaches to studying health and behavior, among others. No prior experience in medical anthropology is required. Prerequisite: ANTH B102 or ANTH H103, or permission of instructor. Sophomore standing and higher. First year students who have taken Anth B102 or H103 can also register for this class.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Health Studies

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ANTH B339 Migrants, Refugees, and Life Across Borders
Not offered 2021-22
Borders are often taken for granted as natural divisions in the world, but they are actually the products of political, historical, and social processes. Border crossing is often framed as an aberration or even a crisis, but people have moved for as long as humans have existed. This course approaches borders from an anthropological perspective by foregrounding the experiences of the people who move across them. We explore the interconnected categories of migrants and refugees to understand how people cross borders under different kinds of circumstances: some voluntary, others fleeing conflict or persecution, and still others that seem to fall between these ideal types. We will critically examine how migrants and refugees are qualitatively described and quantitatively defined, as these discursive constructions often determine legal status and reception in host countries, and also inform governmental and humanitarian responses. We will read a selection of ethnographies examining different kinds of migrant and refugee movements in Africa, Europe, the Americas, and Asia, culminating in an extended case study of Africans in China.
Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward International Studies

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ANTH B343 Human Growth and Development and Life History
Fall 2021
In this seminar we will examine various aspects of the human life history pattern, highly unusual among mammals, from a comparative evolutionary perspective. First, we will survey the fundamentals of life history theory, with an emphasis on primate life histories and socioecological pressures that influence them. Secondly, we will focus on unique aspects of human life history, including secondary altriciality of human infants, the inclusion of childhood and pubertal life stages in our pattern of growth and development, and the presence of a post-reproductive life span. Finally, we will examine fossil evidence from the hominin lineage used in reconstructing the evolution of the modern human life history pattern. Prerequisite: ANTH B101 or permission of instructor.
Counts toward Child and Family Studies

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ANTH B349 Space, Landscape, and Environment
Not offered 2021-22
In this discussion-based seminar, students will become familiar with theories of space, place, and landscape, as well as interpretation and implementation of spatial analyses of social science data. Students will learn how the concept of space developed in social science, and how anthropologists and other social scientists have broadened their understandings of the past as a result of the spatial turn. Assignments will include spatial analysis practica such as mobile survey and aerial survey via Google Earth and other GIS platforms. Students will be given the option of a creative Unessay or an Essay on a topic of their choosing as the final project. This project can use numerous public datasets available online, or students can use their own data or some of my own in their projects. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and higher; or Anth 101 for first year students; or permission of instructor.
Course does not meet an Approach

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ANTH B354 Political Economy, Gender, Ethnicity and Transformation in Vietnam
Fall 2021
Today, Vietnam is in the midst of dramatic social, economic and political changes brought about through a shift from a central economy to a market/capitalist economy since the late 1980s. These changes have resulted in urbanization, a rise in consumption, changes in land use, movement of people, environmental consequences of economic development, and shifts in social and economic relationships and cultural practices as the country has moved from low income to middle income status. This course examines culture and society in Vietnam focusing largely on contemporary Vietnam, but with a view to continuities and historical precedent in past centuries. In this course, we will draw on anthropological studies of Vietnam, as well as literature and historical studies. Relationships between the individual, family, gender, ethnicity, community, land, and state will pervade the topics addressed in the course, as will the importance of political economy, nation, and globalization. In addition to class seminar discussions, students will view documentary and fictional films about Vietnamese culture. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher or first years with ANTH 102.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward International Studies

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ANTH B398 Senior Conference
Research design, proposal writing, research ethics, empirical research techniques and analysis of original material. Class discussions of work in progress and oral and written presentations of the analysis and results of research are important. A senior thesis proposal is the most significant writing experience in the seminar. Prerequisite: Senior Anthropology majors only.

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ANTH B399 Senior Conference
Coding research notes, discussion of ongoing field work and research. A senior's thesis is the most significant writing experience in the seminar. Senior requirement.

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ANTH B403 Supervised Work
Independent work is usually open to junior and senior majors who wish to work in a special area under the supervision of a member of the faculty and is subject to faculty time and interest.

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ANTH B415 Teaching Assistant

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ANTH B420 Praxis Fieldwork Seminar
This Praxis Fieldwork Seminar will provide an opportunity for hands-on work with the archaeological material and skeletal remains from the 18th-19th century cemetery on Arch Street in Old City Philadelphia, excavated and salvaged during the summer of 2017. The materials are currently housed at several institutions in Philadelphia and the surrounding area, including the Mutter Museum, University of Pennsylvania, University of Rutgers-Camden, and The College of New Jersey. Approximately 1-2 students will be able to work with material culture remains, and 4-5 will be able to work with skeletal remains. For students pursuing a geoarchaeology concentration, there may be possibilities for conducting soil sample and stable isotope analyses.
Counts toward Praxis Program

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ANTH B425 Praxis III: Independent Study
Praxis III courses are Independent Study courses and are developed by individual students, in collaboration with faculty and field supervisors. A Praxis courses is distinguished by genuine collaboration with fieldsite organizations and by a dynamic process of reflection that incorporates lessons learned in the field into the classroom setting and applies theoretical understanding gained through classroom study to work done in the broader community.
Counts toward Praxis Program

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ARCH B330 Archaeological Theory and Method
Spring 2022
A history of archaeology from the Renaissance to the present with attention to the formation of theory and method.
Counts toward Counts toward Geoarchaeology

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BIOL B236 Evolution
Not offered 2021-22
A lecture/discussion course on the development of evolutionary biology. This course will cover the history of evolutionary theory, population genetics, molecular and developmental evolution, paleontology, and phylogenetic analysis. Lecture three hours a week.
Scientific Investigation (SI)

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CITY B185 Urban Culture and Society
Fall 2021
Examines techniques and questions of the social sciences as tools for studying historical and contemporary cities. Topics include political-economic organization, conflict and social differentiation (class, ethnicity and gender), and cultural production and representation. Philadelphia features prominently in discussion, reading and exploration as do global metropolitan comparisons through papers involving fieldwork, critical reading and planning/problem solving using qualitative and quantitative methods.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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CITY B229 Topics in Comparative Urbanism
Section 001 (Spring 2022): Cities Beyond Walls
Section 001 (Spring 2021): Colonial & Post Colonial Reflections
Spring 2022
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: What happens after the city "ends?" Beyond physical or structural walls of governance, finance and culture, what forms of peri-urban life do people create - suburbs, squatter settlements, new or old enclaves? And what do these formations teach us about cities and regions? This writing-intensive course uses a comparative case study method to develop research and writing skills, drawing on materials from Hong Kong, Greater Buenos Aires, Greater Philadelphia and Paris and its region.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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CITY B365 Topics: Techniques of the City
Section 001 (Spring 2022): Making & Remaking Philadelphia
Section 001 (Spring 2021): New Urbanism and Its Discontents
Spring 2022
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: This course explores how governance, politics, economics, planning, and community and social action have shaped and continue to shape modern American cities, with a special focus on Philadelphia. Course content will include; historical, academic, and popular texts. Students will have the opportunity to interact with guest speakers active in various aspects of Philadelphia's urban landscape. Students will also conduct independent research on topics of their choosing. For advanced majors but also open to others by permission.

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GERM B231 Cultural Profiles in Modern Exile
Not offered 2021-22
This course investigates the anthropological, philosophical, psychological, cultural, and literary aspects of modern exile. It studies exile as experience and metaphor in the context of modernity, and examines the structure of the relationship between imagined/remembered homelands and transnational identities, and the dialectics of language loss and bi- and multi-lingualism. Particular attention is given to the psychocultural dimensions of linguistic exclusion and loss. Readings of works by Julia Alvarez, Albert Camus, Ana Castillo, Sigmund Freud, Eva Hoffman, Maxine Hong Kingston, Milan Kundera, Friedrich Nietzsche, Salman Rushdie, W. G. Sebald, Kurban Said, and others.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

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HIST B200 The Atlantic World 1492-1800
Fall 2021
The aim of this course is to provide an understanding of the way in which peoples, goods, and ideas from Africa, Europe. and the Americas came together to form an interconnected Atlantic World system. The course is designed to chart the manner in which an integrated system was created in the Americas in the early modern period, rather than to treat the history of the Atlantic World as nothing more than an expanded version of North American, Caribbean, or Latin American history.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Peace, Justice and Human Rights

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INST B210 Popular Uprisings in Global Perspective
Spring 2022
In recent years, popular uprisings and protest movements have mobilized hundreds and thousands of people in different parts of the world to demand a radical overhauling of existing systems and changes in political leadership. These uprisings have raised a series of questions that will be the focus of this class. What are the catalysts, underlying causes and demands of these protest movements? What can we learn from the grassroots organizing that allowed these movements to gain momentum? All too often popular uprisings in the Global South in particular, are seen as representing the failures and limits of revolutionary action and politics rather than their potential and promise. What then, do recent popular uprisings reveal about the limitations and relevance of various theoretical approaches to explaining revolutionary phenomena and action? How might local scholars and activists analyzing the popular uprisings taking place in their countries, allow us to develop new vocabularies and frameworks for understanding popular protests and revolutionary action elsewhere? Students will explore these questions through a series of case studies including Sudan, Hong Kong, Chile, Lebanon, France, Ethiopia and India.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx
Counts toward Counts toward Middle Eastern Studies

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