This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's master calendar.

Spring 2018

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
ARCH B102-001Introduction to Classical ArchaeologySemester / 1Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:00 AM MWCollege Hall 224Lindenlauf,A., Lindenlauf,A., Lindenlauf,A., Lindenlauf,A.
Discussion: 10:10 AM-11:00 AM FCarpenter Library 17
Discussion: 10:10 AM-11:00 AM FCarpenter Library 13
Discussion: 10:10 AM-11:00 AM FCarpenter Library 25
ARCH B217-001Captive Greece, Captor Rome?Semester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWCollege Hall 102Donohue,A.
ARCH B218-001Food and Archaeology in Greece, Past and PresentSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM FCarpenter Library 25MacKay,C.
ARCH B252-001PompeiiSemester / 1Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTHCarpenter Library 25McFadden,S.
ARCH B301-001Greek Vase-PaintingSemester / 1Lecture: 11:40 AM- 1:00 PM MWCollege Hall 251Lindenlauf,A.
ARCH B359-001Topics in Classical Art and Archaeology: IllustrationSemester / 1LEC: 12:10 PM- 2:00 PM THCollege Hall 104Donohue,A.
ARCH B399-001Senior SeminarSemester / 1Lecture: 11:10 AM- 1:00 PM FDalton Hall 6Dept. staff, TBA
ARCH B403-001Supervised WorkSemester / 1Dept. staff, TBA
ARCH B403-001Supervised WorkSemester / 1Dept. staff, TBA
ARCH B501-001Greek Vase PaintingSemester / 1Lecture: 11:40 AM- 1:00 PM MWCollege Hall 251Lindenlauf,A., Lindenlauf,A.
LEC: 4:30 PM- 5:30 PM MCollege Hall 223
ARCH B634-001Problems in Classical Art: NarrativeSemester / 1LEC: 2:00 PM- 3:50 PM TCollege Hall 102Donohue,A.
ARCH B701-001Supervised WorkSemester / 1Lecture: Date/Time TBADonohue,A.
ARCH B701-002Supervised WorkSemester / 1Lecture: Date/Time TBALindenlauf,A.

Fall 2018

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
ARCH B104-001Archaeology of Agricultural and Urban RevolutionsSemester / 1Lecture: 12:10 PM- 1:00 PM MWFBradbury,J.
ARCH B135-001Focus: Archaeological Fieldwork and MethodsFirst Half / 0.5Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:00 AM MWLindenlauf,A.
ARCH B135-00AFocus: Archaeological Fieldwork and MethodsSemester / 0.5Laboratory: 10:10 AM-11:00 AM FLindenlauf,A.
ARCH B135-00BFocus: Archaeological Fieldwork and MethodsSemester / 0.5Laboratory: 11:10 AM-12:00 PM FLindenlauf,A.
ARCH B220-001Araby the Blest: The Archaeology of the Arabian Peninsula from 3000 to 300 B.C.E.Semester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHMagee,P.
ARCH B240-001Archaeology and History of Ancient MesopotamiaSemester / 1Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MWBradbury,J.
ARCH B263-001Roman Archaeology: Life in the CitySemester / 1Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTHMcFadden,S.
ARCH B322-001The Archaeology of the Roman Empire: Comparative PerspectivesSemester / 1Lecture: 12:10 PM- 2:00 PM FMcFadden,S.
ARCH B398-001Senior SeminarSemester / 1Lecture: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM TCollege Hall 102Dept. staff, TBA
ARCH B403-001Supervised WorkSemester / 1Dept. staff, TBA
ARCH B403-001Supervised WorkSemester / 1Dept. staff, TBA
ARCH B605-001The Concept of StyleSemester / 1Lecture: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM THDonohue,A.
ARCH B608-001Mediterranean Landscape ArchaeologySemester / 1Lecture: 4:10 PM- 6:00 PM MLindenlauf,A.
ARCH B691-001The Uruk Period in Western AsiaSemester / 1Lecture: Date/Time TBAMagee,P.
ARCH B701-001Supervised WorkSemester / 1
ARCH B701-002Supervised WorkSemester / 1
ARCH B701-003Supervised WorkSemester / 1
ARCH B701-004Supervised WorkSemester / 1
HART B218-001Byzantine Textiles in Life and DeathSemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHTeaching Assistant,T., Walker,A.

Spring 2019

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
ARCH B102-001Introduction to Classical ArchaeologySemester / 1Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:00 AM MWFLindenlauf,A.
ARCH B206-001Hellenistic and Roman SculptureSemester / 1Lecture: 11:10 AM-12:00 PM MWFDonohue,A.
ARCH B219-001Art and Archaeology of Late AntiquitySemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWMcFadden,S.
ARCH B225-001The Art and Achaeology of Greco-Roman EgyptSemester / 1Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTHMcFadden,S.
ARCH B303-001Classical BodiesSemester / 1Lecture: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM TDonohue,A.
ARCH B305-001Topics in Ancient Athens: AcropolisSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 3:30 PM FLindenlauf,A.
ARCH B316-001Trade and Transport in the Ancient WorldSemester / 1Lecture: 9:10 AM-12:00 PM TMagee,P.
ARCH B399-001Senior SeminarSemester / 1Lecture: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM THDept. staff, TBA
ARCH B403-001Supervised WorkSemester / 1Dept. staff, TBA
ARCH B403-001Supervised WorkSemester / 1Dept. staff, TBA
ARCH B505-001Topics in Ancient AthensSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 3:30 PM FLindenlauf,A.
ARCH B613-001Interrogating the DeadSemester / 1LEC: 4:10 PM- 6:00 PM TBradbury,J.
ARCH B640-001East Mediterranean InterconnectionsSemester / 1LEC: 4:10 PM- 6:00 PM THMcFadden,S.

2018-19 Catalog Data

ARCH B102 Introduction to Classical Archaeology
Spring 2019
A historical survey of the archaeology and art of Greece, Etruria, and Rome.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Museum Studies

Back to top

ARCH B104 Archaeology of Agricultural and Urban Revolutions
Fall 2018
This course examines the archaeology of the two most fundamental changes that have occurred in human society in the last 12,000 years, agriculture and urbanism, and we explore these in Egypt and the Near East as far as India. We also explore those societies that did not experience these changes.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Geoarchaeology
Counts toward Middle Eastern Studies

Back to top

ARCH B110 The World Through Classical Eyes
Not offered 2018-19
A survey of the ways in which the ancient Greeks and Romans perceived and constructed their physical and social world. The evidence of ancient texts and monuments will form the basis for exploring such subjects as cosmology, geography, travel and commerce, ancient ethnography and anthropology, the idea of natural and artificial wonders, and the self-definition of the classical cultures in the context of the oikoumene, the "inhabited world."
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Back to top

ARCH B125 Classical Myths in Art and in the Sky
Not offered 2018-19
This course explores Greek and Roman mythology using an archaeological and art historical approach, focusing on the ways in which the traditional tales of the gods and heroes were depicted, developed and transmitted in the visual arts such as vase painting and architectural sculpture, as well as projected into the natural environment.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Museum Studies

Back to top

ARCH B135 Focus: Archaeological Fieldwork and Methods
Fall 2018
The fundamentals of the practice of archaeology through readings and case studies and participatory demonstrations. Case studies will be drawn from the archives of the Nemea Valley Archaeological Project and material in the College's collections. Each week there will be a 1-hour laboratory that will introduce students to a variety of fieldwork methods and forms of analysis. This is a half semester Focus course.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Geoarchaeology

Back to top

ARCH B137 Focus: Introduction into Principles of Preservation & Conservation
Not offered 2018-19
This half-unit introductory course provides insights into the fundamentals of the practices of archaeological preservation and conservation and enhances the understanding of their significance in the archaeological process. This half-course deals exclusively with excavated materials that are still on-site or have been moved to a storage facility or a museum. Materials considered in this course include architecture, textiles, and portable objects made of clay, stone, and metal. While most of the finds are from land sites, occasional references to marine material are made. Most of the material used in the hands-on sessions comes from the Special Collections. Suggested preparation: basic understanding of chemistry is helpful.
Course does not meet an Approach

Back to top

ARCH B203 Ancient Greek Cities and Sanctuaries
Not offered 2018-19
A study of the development of the Greek city-states and sanctuaries. Archaeological evidence is surveyed in its historic context. The political formation of the city-state and the role of religion is presented, and the political, economic, and religious institutions of the city-states are explored in their urban settings. The city-state is considered as a particular political economy of the Mediterranean and in comparison to the utility of the concept of city-state in other cultures.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Back to top

ARCH B204 Animals in the Ancient Greek World
Not offered 2018-19
This course focuses on perceptions of animals in ancient Greece from the Geometric to the Classical periods. It examines representations of animals in painting, sculpture, and the minor arts, the treatment of animals as attested in the archaeological record, and how these types of evidence relate to the featuring of animals in contemporary poetry, tragedy, comedy, and medical and philosophical writings. By analyzing this rich body of evidence, the course develops a context in which participants gain insight into the ways ancient Greeks perceived, represented, and treated animals. Juxtaposing the importance of animals in modern society, as attested, for example, by their roles as pets, agents of healing, diplomatic gifts, and even as subjects of specialized studies such as animal law and animal geographies, the course also serves to expand awareness of attitudes towards animals in our own society as well as that of ancient Greece.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

Back to top

ARCH B205 Greek Sculpture
Not offered 2018-19
One of the best preserved categories of evidence for ancient Greek culture is sculpture. The Greeks devoted immense resources to producing sculpture that encompassed many materials and forms and served a variety of important social functions. This course examines sculptural production in Greece and neighboring lands from the Bronze Age through the fourth century B.C.E. with special attention to style, iconography and historical and social context.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Back to top

ARCH B206 Hellenistic and Roman Sculpture
Spring 2019
This course surveys the sculpture produced from the fourth century B.C.E. to the fourth century C.E., the period, beginning with the death of Alexander the Great, that saw the transformation of the classical world through the rise of Rome and the establishment and expansion of the Roman Empire. Style, iconography, and production will be studied in the contexts of the culture of the Hellenistic kingdoms, the Roman appropriation of Greek culture, the role of art in Roman society, and the significance of Hellenistic and Roman sculpture in the post-antique classical tradition.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Back to top

ARCH B211 The Archaeology and Anthropology of Rubbish and Recycling
Not offered 2018-19
This course serves as an introduction to a range of approaches to the study of waste and dirt as well as practices and processes of disposal and recycling in past and present societies. Particular attention will be paid to the interpretation of spatial disposal patterns, the power of dirt(y waste) to create boundaries and difference, and types of recycling.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Back to top

ARCH B215 Classical Art
Not offered 2018-19
A survey of the visual arts of ancient Greece and Rome from the Bronze Age through Late Imperial times (circa 3000 B.C.E. to 300 C.E.). Major categories of artistic production are examined in historical and social context, including interactions with neighboring areas and cultures; methodological and interpretive issues are highlighted.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Back to top

ARCH B217 Captive Greece, Captor Rome?
Not offered 2018-19
The Western classical tradition is not monolithic, but contains elements from both ancient Greek and Roman culture. This course examines the relationship between the two, from the Hellenistic era and the expansion of Roman power in the Mediterranean through the absorption of the Greek world into the Roman Empire, and its later consequences, emphasizing the primary evidence of the visual arts and contemporary texts. Suggested preparation: 100-level coursework in history of art, classics, archaeology, or comparative literature.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Back to top

ARCH B218 Food and Archaeology in Greece, Past and Present
Not offered 2018-19
This lecture and discussion course will explore food, foodways, and migration in ancient and medieval Greece through the study of archaeological approaches from the nineteenth century to the present day. We will take a comparative and multicultural approach to the exploration of practices and methods of archaeology, and consider how interest and knowledge of food has changed with the development of new techniques. We will also consider literary evidence and the modern history and ecology of Greece and how they shed light on the understanding of food and drink in the ancient and medieval world.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Back to top

ARCH B219 Art and Archaeology of Late Antiquity
Spring 2019
This class examines the art and archaeology of the late-antique Mediterranean, tracing various iterations of artistic and architectural experimentation as well as socio-political expression from the Late Roman world of the Tetrarchs (3rd century CE) to the first Islamic Dynasty, the Umayyads (7th century CE). We will explore how the vitality of classical styles and pagan beliefs mixed with the creative energies of other "indigenous" traditions - Egyptian, Arabic, Jewish, Gallic, etc., as well as those of the new church, so as to better understand the cultural plurality and vigor of this period formally considered a "Dark Age."
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Museum Studies

Back to top

ARCH B220 Araby the Blest: The Archaeology of the Arabian Peninsula from 3000 to 300 B.C.E.
Fall 2018
A survey of the archaeology and history of the Arabian peninsula focusing on urban forms, transport, and cultures in the Arabian peninsula and Gulf and their interactions with the world from the rise of states in Mesopotamia down to the time of Alexander the Great.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Back to top

ARCH B225 The Art and Achaeology of Greco-Roman Egypt
Spring 2019
This course examines the art and archaeology of Greco-Roman Egypt from the conquests of Alexander the Great in the 4th century BCE to the Late Roman Era, ca. 4th century CE.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Middle Eastern Studies

Back to top

ARCH B226 Archaeology of Anatolia
Not offered 2018-19
One of the cradles of civilization, Anatolia witnessed the rise and fall of many cultures and states throughout its ancient history. This course approaches the ancient material remains of pre-classical Anatolia from the perspective of Near Eastern archaeology, examining the art, artifacts, architecture, cities, and settlements of this land from the Neolithic through the Lydian periods. Some emphasis will be on the Late Bronze Age and the Iron Age, especially phases of Hittite and Assyrian imperialism, Late Hittite states, Phrygia, and the Urartu.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Back to top

ARCH B238 Land of Buddha: The Archaeology of South Asia, First Millenium B.C.E.
Not offered 2018-19
This course uses archaeological evidence to reconstruct social and economic life in South Asia from ca. 1200 to 0 B.C.E. We examine the roles of religion, economy and foreign trade in the establishment of powerful kingdoms and empires that characterized this region during this period.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Back to top

ARCH B240 Archaeology and History of Ancient Mesopotamia
Fall 2018
A survey of the material culture of ancient Mesopotamia, modern Iraq, from the earliest phases of state formation (circa 3500 B.C.E.) through the Achaemenid Persian occupation of the Near East (circa 331 B.C.E.). Emphasis will be on art, artifacts, monuments, religion, kingship, and the cuneiform tradition. The survival of the cultural legacy of Mesopotamia into later ancient and Islamic traditions will also be addressed.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Middle Eastern Studies

Back to top

ARCH B244 Great Empires of the Ancient Near East
Not offered 2018-19
A survey of the history, material culture, political and religious ideologies of, and interactions among, the five great empires of the ancient Near East of the second and first millennia B.C.E.: New Kingdom Egypt, the Hittite Empire in Anatolia, the Assyrian and Babylonian Empires in Mesopotamia, and the Persian Empire in Iran.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Middle Eastern Studies

Back to top

ARCH B252 Pompeii
Not offered 2018-19
Introduces students to a nearly intact archaeological site whose destruction by the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in 79 C.E. was recorded by contemporaries. The discovery of Pompeii in the mid-1700s had an enormous impact on 18th- and 19th-century views of the Roman past as well as styles and preferences of the modern era. Informs students in classical antiquity, urban life, city structure, residential architecture, home decoration and furnishing, wall painting, minor arts and craft and mercantile activities within a Roman city.
Course does not meet an Approach

Back to top

ARCH B254 Cleopatra
Not offered 2018-19
This course examines the life and rule of Cleopatra VII, the last queen of Ptolemaic Egypt, and the reception of her legacy in the Early Roman Empire and the western world from the Renaissance to modern times. The first part of the course explores extant literary evidence regarding the upbringing, education, and rule of Cleopatra within the contexts of Egyptian and Ptolemaic cultures, her relationships with Julius Caesar and Marc Antony, her conflict with Octavian, and her death by suicide in 30 BCE. The second part examines constructions of Cleopatra in Roman literature, her iconography in surviving art, and her contributions to and influence on both Ptolemaic and Roman art. A detailed account is also provided of the afterlife of Cleopatra in the literature, visual arts, scholarship, and film of both Europe and the United States, extending from the papal courts of Renaissance Italy and Shakespearean drama, to Thomas Jefferson's art collection at Monticello and Joseph Mankiewicz's 1963 epic film, Cleopatra.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

ARCH B260 Daily Life in Ancient Greece and Rome
Not offered 2018-19
The often-praised achievements of the classical cultures arose from the realities of day-to-day life. This course surveys the rich body of material and textual evidence pertaining to how ancient Greeks and Romans -- famous and obscure alike -- lived and died. Topics include housing, food, clothing, work, leisure, and family and social life.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Back to top

ARCH B263 Roman Archaeology: Life in the City
Fall 2018
The art and architecture of Rome from the Republic through the Empire.

Back to top

ARCH B301 Greek Vase-Painting
Not offered 2018-19
This course is an introduction to the world of painted pottery of the Greek world, from the 10th to the 4th centuries B.C.E. We will interpret these images from an art-historical and socio-economic viewpoint. We will also explore how these images relate to other forms of representation. Prerequisite: one course in classical archaeology or permission of instructor.

Back to top

ARCH B303 Classical Bodies
Spring 2019
An examination of the conceptions of the human body evidenced in Greek and Roman art and literature, with emphasis on issues that have persisted in the Western tradition. Topics include the fashioning of concepts of male and female standards of beauty and their implications; conventions of visual representation; the nude; clothing and its symbolism; the athletic ideal; physiognomy; medical theory and practice; the visible expression of character and emotions; and the formulation of the "classical ideal" in antiquity and later times.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

ARCH B304 Archaeology of Greek Religion
Not offered 2018-19
This course approaches the topic of ancient Greek religion by focusing on surviving archaeological, architectural, epigraphical, artistic and literary evidence that dates from the Archaic and Classical periods. By examining a wealth of diverse evidence that ranges, for example, from temple architecture, and feasting and banqueting equipment to inscriptions, statues, vase paintings, and descriptive texts, the course enables the participants to analyze the value and complexity of the archaeology of Greek religion and to recognize its significance for the reconstruction of daily life in ancient Greece. Special emphasis is placed on subjects such as the duties of priests and priestesses, the violence of animal sacrifice, the function of cult statues and votive offerings and also the important position of festivals and hero and mystery cults in ancient Greek religious thought and experience.

Back to top

ARCH B305 Topics in Ancient Athens
Section 001 (Spring 2019): Acropolis
Spring 2019
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: This course is an introduction to the Acropolis of Athens, perhaps the best-known acropolis in the world. We will explore its history, understand and interpret specific monuments and their sculptural decoration and engage in more recent discussions, for instance, on the role of the Acropolis played in shaping the Hellenic Identity.

Back to top

ARCH B306 Monumental Painting
Not offered 2018-19
The Mediterranean tradition of large-scale painting begins in prehistoric times and continues through Late Antiquity and beyond. Important examples survive on the walls of houses, tombs and other structures at sites in the Bronze Age Aegean, in Archaic, Classical and Hellenistic Anatolia, Macedonia, Magna Graecia, and Etruria, Rome and the famous sites of Pompeii and Hercul- aneum preserved by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius. Technical, artistic, cultural and interpretive issues will be considered.
Counts toward Museum Studies

Back to top

ARCH B308 Ceramic Analysis
Not offered 2018-19
Pottery is a fundamental means of establishing the relative chronology of archaeological sites and of understanding past human behavior. Included are theories, methods and techniques of pottery description, analysis and interpretation. Topics include typology, seriation, ceramic characterization, production, function, exchange and the use of computers in pottery analysis. Laboratory work on pottery in the department collections. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
Counts toward Geoarchaeology

Back to top

ARCH B312 Bronze Age Internationalism
Not offered 2018-19
This course explores the rise and fall of the first international age in the eastern mediterranean. We will focus on the cultural and diplomatic connections between Egypt, Syria, Anatolia and the Aegean during the Bronze Age, c. 2000-1200BCE.. Prerequisites: ARCH B101 or B216 or B226 or B230 or B240 or B244.

Back to top

ARCH B314 Ancient Greek Seafaring and Shipwrecks
Not offered 2018-19
This course examines the diverse evidence for ancient Greek seafaring and shipwrecks in the Mediterranean Sea from prehistory to the beginning of the Roman Empire. By focusing on archaeological, literary, iconographic, and epigraphic evidence, the course explores ancient Greek, Phoenician, Etruscan, and Roman interconnections in the Mediterranean Sea, through special attention to trade routes, commerce, colonization, economy, naval and maritime technology, cultural interactions, sea exploration, and piracy.

Back to top

ARCH B316 Trade and Transport in the Ancient World
Spring 2019
Issues of trade, commerce and production of export goods are addressed with regard to the Bronze Age and Iron Age cultures of Mesopotamia, Arabia, Iran and south Asia. Crucial to these systems is the development of means of transport via maritime routes and on land. Archaeological evidence for traded goods and shipwrecks is used to map the emergence of sea-faring across the Indian Ocean and Gulf while bio-archaeological data is employed to examine the transformative role that Bactrian and Dromedary camels played in ancient trade and transport.

Back to top

ARCH B322 The Archaeology of the Roman Empire: Comparative Perspectives
Fall 2018
An examination of the growth of the Roman Republic into the Roman Empire at its height, from its acquisitions of the Hellenistic kingdoms (second and first centuries, B.C.E.) to its domination of Europe, North Africa and the Near East.

Back to top

ARCH B352 Ancient Egyptian Architecture: The New Kingdom
Not offered 2018-19
A proseminar that concentrates on the principles of ancient Egyptian monumental architecture with an emphasis on the New Kingdom. The primary focus of the course is temple design, but palaces, representative settlements, and examples of Graeco-Roman temples of the Nile Valley will also be dealt with. Prerequisites: ARCH B101 or B230 or B244.

Back to top

ARCH B359 Topics in Classical Art and Archaeology
Section 001 (Spring 2018): Illustration
Not offered 2018-19
This is a topics course. Topics vary. A research-oriented course taught in seminar format, treating issues of current interest in Greek and Roman art and archaeology. 200-level coursework in some aspect of classical or related cultures, archeology, art history, or Cities, or related fields is strongly recommended.

Back to top

ARCH B398 Senior Seminar
A weekly seminar on topics to be determined with assigned readings and oral and written reports.

Back to top

ARCH B399 Senior Seminar
A weekly seminar on common topics with assigned readings and oral and written reports.

Back to top

ARCH B403 Supervised Work
Supervised Work

Back to top

ARCH B403 Supervised Work
Supervised Work

Back to top

ARCH B501 Greek Vase Painting
Not offered 2018-19
This course is an introduction to the world of painted pottery of the Greek world, from the 10th to the 4th centuries B.C.E. We will interpret these images from an art-historical and socio-economic viewpoint. We will also explore how these images relate to other forms of representation. Prerequisite: one course in classical archaeology or permission of instructor.

Back to top

ARCH B504 Archaeology of Greek Religion
Not offered 2018-19
This course approaches the topic of ancient Greek religion by focusing on surviving archaeological, architectural, epigraphical, artistic and literary evidence that dates from the Archaic and Classical periods. By examining a wealth of diverse evidence that ranges, for example, from temple architecture, and feasting and banqueting equipment to inscriptions, statues, vase paintings, and descriptive texts, the course enables the participants to analyze the value and complexity of the archaeology of Greek religion and to recognize its significance for the reconstruction of daily life in ancient Greece. Special emphasis is placed on subjects such as the duties of priests and priestesses, the violence of animal sacrifice, the function of cult statues and votive offerings and also the important position of festivals and hero and mystery cults in ancient Greek religious thought and experience.

Back to top

ARCH B505 Topics in Ancient Athens
Spring 2019
This is a topics course. Topics vary.
Current topic description: This course is an introduction to the Acropolis of Athens, perhaps the best-known acropolis in the world. We will explore its history, understand and interpret specific monuments and their sculptural decoration and engage in more recent discussions, for instance, on the role of the Acropolis played in shaping the Hellenic Identity.

Back to top

ARCH B506 The Archaeology of Greece and Asia Minor during the Archaic and Classical Periods
Not offered 2018-19
This course discusses the material culture discovered in Archaic and Classical sanctuaries, cemeteries, and settlements in Greece and Asia Minor, taking into consideration past and present archaeological theory and interpretive trends. Key topics include human interaction with material culture, social change, and the use of space, landscape, and religion.

Back to top

ARCH B508 Ceramic Analysis
Not offered 2018-19
Pottery is fundamental for establishing the relative chronology of archaeological sites and past human behavior. Included are theories, methods and techniques of pottery description, analysis, and interpretation. Topics are typology, seriation, ceramic characterization, production, function, exchange and the use of computers in pottery analysis. Laboratory in the collections.

Back to top

ARCH B512 Bronze Age Internationalism
Not offered 2018-19
This course explores the rise and fall of the first international age in the eastern Mediterranean. We will focus on the cultural and diplomatic connections between Egypt, Syria, Anatolia and the Aegean during the Bronze Age, c. 2000-1200BCE.

Back to top

ARCH B514 Ancient Greek Seafaring and Shipwrecks
Not offered 2018-19
This course examines the diverse evidence for ancient Greek seafaring and shipwrecks in the Mediterranean Sea from prehistory to the beginning of the Roman Empire. By focusing on archaeological, literary, iconographic, and epigraphic evidence, the course explores ancient Greek, Phoenician, Etruscan, and Roman interconnections in the Mediterranean Sea, through special attention to trade routes, commerce, colonization, economy, naval and maritime technology, cultural interactions, sea exploration, and piracy.

Back to top

ARCH B552 Egyptian Architecture: New Kingdom
Not offered 2018-19
A proseminar that concentrates on the principles of ancient Egyptian monumental architecture with an emphasis on the New Kingdom. The primary focus of the course is temple design, but palaces, representative settlements, and examples of Graeco-Roman temples of the Nile Valley will also be dealt with.

Back to top

ARCH B605 The Concept of Style
Fall 2018
This seminar examines the development and uses of concepts of "style" in the criticism, analysis, and historiography of textual and material culture. Particular attention is paid to the recognition and description of style, explanations of stylistic change, and the meanings attached to style, particularly but not exclusively in classical and related traditions.

Back to top

ARCH B608 Mediterranean Landscape Archaeology
Fall 2018
This course explores a range of approaches to the study of landscapes that relates to core principles of the field of archaeology. It also discusses the construction of specific landscapes in the Mediterranean (e.g., gardens, sacred landscapes, and memoryscapes).

Back to top

ARCH B613 Interrogating the Dead
Spring 2019

Back to top

ARCH B615 Mystery Cults
Not offered 2018-19
An investigation of the phenomenon of mystery cults, their foundation and dispersal from the Classical through Hellensistic and early Roman periods. A study of the topography and monuments of specific cults and of representation of mysteries in sculpture and painting.

Back to top

ARCH B617 Herculaneum: Villa dei Papiri
Not offered 2018-19
The Villa of the Papyri is a 'villa suburbana' that housed a large collection of sculptures. Its reconstruction became famous as the Getty Villa. This Villa will serve as an 'exemplum' of a Roman villa to explore topics including early excavation techniques, libraries and the Epicurean philosophy, the concepts and meanings of villae, as well as the placement of statues and copy criticism

Back to top

ARCH B634 Problems in Classical Art
Section 001 (Spring 2018): Narrative
Not offered 2018-19
This is a topics course. Topics vary. A seminar dealing with current issues in the art of ancient Greece and related traditions.

Back to top

ARCH B640 East Mediterranean Interconnections
Spring 2019

Back to top

ARCH B643 Mortuary Practices
Not offered 2018-19
This seminar focuses on the mortuary practices of the ancient Greek and Macedonian worlds from the Iron Age to the end of the Hellenistic period. Special emphasis is placed on the examination of skeletal remains, funerary offerings, the art, and architecture of specific archaeological sites and on the study of various issues in the archaeology of death.

Back to top

ARCH B654 The Archaeology of Prehistoric Arabia
Not offered 2018-19
In this course we examine the archaeology of prehistoric Arabia from c. 8000 to 500 BC. Particular emphasis is placed upon how the archaeological evidence illuminates social and economic structures.

Back to top

ARCH B669 Ancient Greece and the Near East
Not offered 2018-19
Approaches to the study of interconnections between Ancient Greece and the Near East, mainly in the Iron Age, with emphasis on art, architecture, and intellectual perspective.

Back to top

ARCH B691 The Uruk Period in Western Asia
Fall 2018

Back to top

ARCH B692 Archaeology of Achaemenid Era
Not offered 2018-19
The course explores the archaeology of the Achaemenid Empire. It will be offered in conjunction with Professor Lauren Ristvet (UPENN) and will cover the archaeology of the regions from Libya to India fro 538 to 332 BC. Students will be expected to provide presentations as well as written work.

Back to top

ARCH B701 Supervised Work
Fall 2018
Unit of supervised work

Back to top

CSTS B213 Persia and The Greeks
Not offered 2018-19
This Course explores interactions between Greeks and Persians in the Mediterranean and Near East from the Archaic Period to the Hellenistic Age. Through a variety of sources (from Greek histories, tragedies, and ethnography, to Persian royal inscriptions and administrative documents and the Hebrew Bible), we shall work to illuminate the interface between these two distinct yet complementary cultures. Our aim will be to gain familiarity not only with a general narrative of Greco-Persian history, from the foundation of the Achaemenid Empire in the middle of the sixth century BCE to the Macedonian conquest of Persia some 250 years later, but also with the materials (archaeological, numismatic, epigraphical, artistic, and literary) from which we build such a narrative. At the same time, we shall work to understand how contact between Persia and the Greeks in antiquity has influenced discourse about the opposition between East and West in the modern world.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Back to top

CSTS B230 Food and Drink in the Ancient World
Not offered 2018-19
This course explores practices of eating and drinking in the ancient Mediterranean world both from a socio-cultural and environmental perspective. Since we are not only what we eat, but also where, when, why, with whom, and how we eat, we will examine the wider implications of patterns of food production, preparation, consumption, availability, and taboos, considering issues like gender, health, financial situation, geographical variability, and political status. Anthropological, archaeological, literary, and art historical approaches will be used to analyze the evidence and shed light on the role of food and drink in ancient culture and society. In addition, we will discuss how this affects our contemporary customs and practices and how our identity is still shaped by what we eat.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

GSEM B623 Figures of Resistance: Classical and Modern
Not offered 2018-19
The GSem will explore classical figures of resistance such as Prometheus, Antigone, Electra, Medea, and Lysistrata and their reception in modern art and cinema. The focus will be on films and other works of art that re-appropriate and transform the ancient characters and their stories. We will discuss in particular how modern filmmakers re-contextualize the classical figures to shed light on contemporary historical, political, and social issues. Films will include Tony Harrison, Prometheus (Great Britain, 1998), Liliana Cavani, The Year of the Cannibals (Italy, 1970), Amy Greenfield, Antigone/Rites of Passion (USA, 1991), Ingmar Bergman, Persona (Sweden, 1966), Miklós Jancsó, Electra, My Love (Hungary, 1974), Arthur Ripstein, Asi Es La Vida (Mexico, 2000), and Spike Lee, Chi-raq (USA, 2015). Readings will be drawn from texts on reception studies, film and gender theory, psychoanalysis, and political theory.

Back to top

HART B218 Byzantine Textiles in Life and Death
Fall 2018
This course explores the manifold uses and meanings of textiles in early Byzantine visual and material culture as well as their afterlife as objects of collection and display in the modern era. Students will undertake original research on early Byzantine textiles from the collection of Philadelphia University. Assignments will develop skills in museological writing, including documentation for collection databases and object exhibitions. Prerequisites: Previous coursework in History of Art, Archaeology, Museum Studies, or History is recommended, but not required.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Middle Eastern Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Museum Studies

Back to top

HIST B231 Medicine, Magic & Miracles in the Middle Ages
Not offered 2018-19
A lecture and discussion course on the therapeutic systems (humoral theory, faith healing, natural magic), the medical marketplace, and the social context for understanding health and disease in the medieval period. Topics covered include Greek, Arabic, and Latin medical textual traditions, the rise of hospitals and public health, and the Black Death.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

Back to top