This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's calendars page.

Fall 2019

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
CITY B185-001Urban Culture and SocietySemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWTaylor Hall DRaddatz,L., Restrepo,L.
CITY B185-002Urban Culture and SocietySemester / 1LEC: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWTaylor Hall CRaddatz,L., Restrepo,L.
CITY B217-001Research Methods in the Social Sciences: Qualitative MethodsSemester / 1LEC: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTHCanaday Computer LabRestrepo,L.
CITY B226-001Introduction to Architectural DesignSemester / 1Lecture: 7:10 PM- 9:00 PM TRockefeller Drafting StudioOlshin,S., Olshin,S., Voith,D., Voith,D.
LEC: 9:10 AM-12:00 PM FRockefeller Drafting Studio
CITY B254-001History of Modern ArchitectureSemester / 1Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MWOld Library 224Mudge,T.
CITY B378-001Formative Landscapes: The Architecture and Planning of American Collegiate CampusesSemester / 1Lecture: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM TCarpenter Library 17Cohen,J.
CITY B398-001Senior SeminarSemester / 1Lecture: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM THOld Library 116Dept. staff, TBA
Breakout Session: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM THOld Library 223
Breakout Session: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM THTaylor Hall, Seminar Room
CITY B403-001Independent StudySemester / 1Dept. staff, TBA
CITY B415-001Teaching AssistantSemester / 1
CITY B415-002Teaching AssistantSemester / 1
CITY B425-001Praxis III: Independent StudySemester / 1Dept. staff, TBA
ECON B225-001Economic DevelopmentSemester / 1Lecture: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTHDalton Hall 119Rock,M.
ECON B324-001The Economics of Discrimination and InequalitySemester / 1Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MWDalton Hall 212ENutting,A.
ECON B335-001East Asian DevelopmentSemester / 1Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHDalton Hall 25Rock,M.
GNST B245-001Introduction to Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o StudiesSemester / 1LEC: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM TDalton Hall 10Song,R.
HART B355-001Topics in the History of LondonSemester / 1Lecture: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM MCarpenter Library 15Cast,D.
HIST B319-001Topics in Modern European History: Metropolis: A Cultural HistorySemester / 1LEC: 12:10 PM- 2:00 PM TTaylor Hall, Seminar RoomKurimay,A.
HIST B325-001Topics in Social History: Civil War, Race, Amer. MemorySemester / 1LEC: 1:10 PM- 3:30 PM WCarpenter Library 15Ullman,S.
SOCL B205-001Social InequalitySemester / 1Lecture: 11:40 AM- 1:00 PM MWDalton Hall 119Cox,A.
SOCL B229-001Black America in Sociological PerspectiveSemester / 1Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHDalton Hall 2Washington,R.

Spring 2020

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
CITY B190-001The Form of the City: Urban Form from Antiquity to the PresentSemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHCohen,J., Teaching Assistant,T.
CITY B201-001Introduction to GIS for Social and Environmental AnalysisSemester / 1Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTHRaddatz,L.
CITY B214-001The Philadelphia Mosaic: Immigrant Communities in the CitySemester / 1Lecture: 12:15 PM- 3:00 PM WFRaddatz,L.
CITY B228-001Problems in Architectural DesignSemester / 1Lecture: Date/Time TBAOlshin,S., Voith,D.
CITY B229-001Topics in Comparative Urbanism: Divided Cities: Race, Class, Gender & Other DebateSemester / 1LEC: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWRestrepo,L.
CITY B360-001Topics: Urban Culture and Society: Urban TheorySemester / 1LEC: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM TRestrepo,L.
CITY B403-001Independent StudySemester / 1Dept. staff, TBA
CITY B450-001Urban Internships/PraxisSemester / 1Lecture: Date/Time TBARaddatz,L.
ARCH B244-001Great Empires of the Ancient Near EastSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWRenette,S.
ARCH B252-001PompeiiSemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHTasopoulou,E.
ECON B208-001Labor EconomicsSemester / 1Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHNutting,A.
ECON B242-001Economics of Local Environmental ProgramsSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWRoss,D.
ECON B253-001Introduction to EconometricsSemester / 1Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MWRoss,D.
ECON B314-001The Economics of Social PolicySemester / 1Lecture: 11:40 AM- 1:00 PM MWVelasco,L.
EDUC B266-001Critical Issues in Urban EducationSemester / 1Lecture: Date/Time TBAZuckerman,K.
Laboratory: Date/Time TBA
Laboratory: Date/Time TBA
HIST B237-001Themes in Modern African History: Public History in AfricaSemester / 1LEC: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MWNgalamulume,K.
HIST B319-001Topics in Modern European HistorySemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM TKurimay,A.
POLS B256-001Global Politics of Climate ChangeSemester / 1Lecture: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTHHager,C.

Fall 2020

(Class schedules for this semester will be posted at a later date.)

2019-20 Catalog Data

CITY B185 Urban Culture and Society
Fall 2019
Examines techniques and questions of the social sciences as tools for studying historical and contemporary cities. Topics include political-economic organization, conflict and social differentiation (class, ethnicity and gender), and cultural production and representation. Philadelphia features prominently in discussion, reading and exploration as do global metropolitan comparisons through papers involving fieldwork, critical reading and planning/problem solving using qualitative and quantitative methods.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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CITY B190 The Form of the City: Urban Form from Antiquity to the Present
Spring 2020
This course studies the city as a three-dimensional artifact. A variety of factors, geography, economic and population structure, politics, planning, and aesthetics are considered as determinants of urban form.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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CITY B201 Introduction to GIS for Social and Environmental Analysis
Spring 2020
This course is designed to introduce the foundations of GIS with emphasis on applications for social and environmental analysis. It deals with basic principles of GIS and its use in spatial analysis and information management. Ultimately, students will design and carry out research projects on topics of their own choosing. Prerequisite: At least sophomore standing and Quantitative Readiness are required (i.e.the quantitative readiness assessment or Quan B001).
Quantitative Readiness Required (QR)
Counts toward Environmental Studies

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CITY B207 Topics in Urban Studies
Not offered 2019-20
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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CITY B214 The Philadelphia Mosaic: Immigrant Communities in the City
Spring 2020
This course explores the experiences and city-making strategies of immigrant communities in the Greater Philadelphia Area from roughly the late 19th century to the present day. It sheds light on how immigrant communities have shaped the city at different points in time and how the Philadelphia metropolitan region, as an urban context, has shaped immigrants' lives. The course also familiarizes students with Philadelphia's history, transformations of the metropolitan region in recent decades and current economic, social and spatial dynamics as well as key immigration concepts and theories. This will be offered as part of the Trico-Philly program. The course will take place in Center City, Philadelphia. For additional information and the program application see the program's website https://www.brynmawr.edu/philly-program
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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CITY B217 Research Methods in the Social Sciences
Section 001 (Spring 2019): Qualitative Methods
Section 001 (Fall 2019): Qualitative Methods
Fall 2019
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: This course provides both textbook and hands-on lessons in research methods in the social and spatial sciences. Topics include research design, developing research instruments (including surveys and interview guides), data gathering, and the theory and practice of analyzing original qualitative and quantitative data. Both descriptive and inferential statistics will be surveyed, and emphasis will be placed on the ability to communicate findings to the general public. Students will also become familiar with relevant software for data analysis (SPSS and NVivo).

Quantitative Methods (QM)

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CITY B226 Introduction to Architectural Design
Fall 2019
This studio design course introduces the principles of architectural design. Suggested Preparation: drawing, some history of architecture, and permission of instructor.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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CITY B227 Topics in Modern Planning
Not offered 2019-20
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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CITY B228 Problems in Architectural Design
Spring 2020
A continuation of CITY 226 at a more advanced level. Prerequisites: CITY B226 or permission of instructor.
Course does not meet an Approach

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CITY B229 Topics in Comparative Urbanism
Section 001 (Spring 2019): Colonial and Post-Colonial Cities
Section 001 (Spring 2020): Divided Cities: Race, Class, Gender & Other Debate
Spring 2020
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description:
Current topic description: Probing the relations of power that both structure and are structured by the urban condition, this writing-intensive class employs a comparative case study approach to explore the social and spatial realities of everyday life in deeply divided cities. We will survey the planning literature on conflict and peacebuilding in urban space and examine the relationship between built forms and social processes at sites of pluralist and ethno-national contestation in Belfast, Capetown, Jerusalem, and Philadelphia.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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CITY B250 Topics: Growth & Spatial Organization of the City
Not offered 2019-20
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Environmental Studies

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CITY B253 Before Modernism: Architecture and Urbanism of the 18th and 19th Centuries
Not offered 2019-20
The course frames the topic of architecture before the impact of 20th century Modernism, with a special focus on the two prior centuries - especially the 19th - in ways that treat them on their own terms rather than as precursors of more modern technologies and forms of expression. The course will integrate urbanistic and vernacular perspectives alongside more familiar landmark exemplars. Key goals and components of the course will include attaining a facility within pertinent bibliographical and digital landscapes, formal analysis and research skills exercised in writing projects, class field-trips, and a nuanced mastery of the narratives embodied in the architecture of these centuries.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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CITY B254 History of Modern Architecture
Fall 2019
A survey of the development of modern architecture since the 18th century.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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CITY B255 Survey of American Architecture
Not offered 2019-20
This survey course examines architecture within the global framework of "the modern." Through an introduction to an architectural canon of works and figures, it seeks to foster a critical consideration of modernity, modernization, and modernism. The course explores each as a category of meaning that framed the theory and practice of architecture as a cultural, political, social, and technological enterprise. It also uses these conjugates to study the modes by which architecture may be said to have framed history. We will study practical and discursive activity that formed a dynamic field within which many of the contradictions of "the modern" were made visible (and visual) through architecture. In this course, we will engage architectural concepts and designs by studying drawings and buildings closely within their historical context. We will examine spheres of reception for architecture and its theoretical, discursive, and cultural life through a variety of media: buildings of course, but also journals, books, and film. We will also investigate architecture as a site and subject for critical inquiry. In particular, we will see what it may tell us about the globalization and politics of the twentieth century, and about history, theory, and criticism as epistemological tracks.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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CITY B298 Topics: Advanced Research Methods
Not offered 2019-20
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Course does not meet an Approach

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CITY B306 Advanced Fieldwork Techniques: Places in Time
Not offered 2019-20
A workshop for research into the histories of places, intended to bring students into contact with some of the raw materials of architectural and urban history. A focus will be placed on historical images and texts, and on creating engaging informational experiences that are transparent to their evidentiary basis.

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CITY B318 Topics in Urban Social and Cultural Theory
Not offered 2019-20
This is a topics course. Course content varies.

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CITY B325 Topics in Social History
Not offered 2019-20
This a topics course that explores various themes in American social history. Course content varies.

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CITY B328 Analysis of Geospatial Data Using GIS
Not offered 2019-20
An advanced course for students with prior GIS experience involving individual projects and collaboration with faculty. Completion of GIS (City 201) or equivalent with 3.7 or above. Instructor permission required after discussion of project.
Quantitative Readiness Required (QR)

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CITY B332 Paris: Making a Modern City
Not offered 2019-20
This course explores 19th-century Paris from the French Revolution to the First World War, and studies how the city transformed into a modern capital. By engaging with history, architecture, art and literature, we will examine the social, cultural, political, and economic shifts and conflicts that shaped its built environment and influenced many other cities around the world.

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CITY B335 Topics in City and Media
Not offered 2019-20
This is a topics course. Course content varies.

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CITY B337 The Chinese City
Not offered 2019-20
This course examines Chinese urbanization as both a physical and social process. Drawing broadly on scholarship in anthropology, political science, geography, and city planning, we will construct a history of the present of Chinese cities. By taking the long view on China's urban development, this course seeks to contextualize and make sense of the sometimes dazzling, sometimes dismal, and often contested landscape of everyday life in contemporary urban China. Prior familiarity with China and the Chinese language is welcomed but not required.
Course does not meet an Approach

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CITY B345 Advanced Topics in Environment and Society
Section 001 (Spring 2019): Sustainable Cities
Not offered 2019-20
This is a topics course. Topics vary.
Counts toward Environmental Studies

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CITY B360 Topics: Urban Culture and Society
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Migration and Cities
Section 001 (Spring 2020): Urban Theory
Spring 2020
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: Urban theory is a tool with which to critique existing cities, a position from which to imagine cities yet to come, and a structure with which to generate interventions in the space between. This course will trace the intellectual lineages of contemporary critical and postmodern urban theory and put the '-isms' into practice to help make sense of the forces that differentiate and segregate individuals - and those that bring us together as urban citizens. Open to cities majors and non-majors who have taken an introductory course in social theory.

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CITY B365 Topics: Techniques of the City
Not offered 2019-20
This is a topics course. Course content varies.

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CITY B377 Topics in Modern Architecture
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Writing Architecture
Not offered 2019-20
This is a topics course on modern architecture. Topics vary.

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CITY B378 Formative Landscapes: The Architecture and Planning of American Collegiate Campuses
Fall 2019
The campus and buildings familiar to us here at the College reflect a long and rich design conversation regarding communicative form, architectural innovation, and orchestrated planning. This course will explore that conversation through varied examples, key models, and shaping conceptions over time.

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CITY B398 Senior Seminar
An intensive research seminar designed to guide students in writing a senior thesis.

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CITY B403 Independent Study
Advanced Fieldwork: Places in Time - This class offers the students the opportunity to do advanced directed fieldwork/archival study in architecture, architectural history, preservation and urban history under supervision of the professor with occasional collective meetings. For advanced majors but also open to others in history or history of art by permission

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CITY B415 Teaching Assistant
An exploration of course planning, pedagogy and creative thinking as students work to help others understand pathways they have already explored in introductory and writing classes. This opportunity is available only to advanced students of highest standing by professorial invitation.

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CITY B425 Praxis III: Independent Study
Praxis III courses are Independent Study courses and are developed by individual students, in collaboration with faculty and field supervisors. A Praxis courses is distinguished by genuine collaboration with fieldsite organizations and by a dynamic process of reflection that incorporates lessons learned in the field into the classroom setting and applies theoretical understanding gained through classroom study to work done in the broader community.
Counts toward Praxis Program

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CITY B450 Urban Internships/Praxis
Individual opportunities to engage in praxis in the greater Philadelphia area; internships must be arranged prior to registration for the semester in which the internship is taken. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

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ANTH B210 Medical Anthropology
Not offered 2019-20
This course examines the relationships between culture, society, disease and illness. It considers a broad range of health-related experiences, discourses, knowledge and practice among different cultures and among individuals and groups in different positions of power. Topics covered include sorcery, herbal remedies, healing rituals, folk illnesses, modern disease, scientific medical perceptions, clinical technique, epidemiology and political economy of medicine. Prerequisite: ANTH 102, H103 or permission of instructor.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

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ARCH B104 Archaeology of Agricultural and Urban Revolutions
Not offered 2019-20
This course examines the archaeology of the two most fundamental changes that have occurred in human society in the last 12,000 years, agriculture and urbanism, and we explore these in Egypt and the Near East as far as India. We also explore those societies that did not experience these changes.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Geoarchaeology
Counts toward Counts toward Middle Eastern Studies

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ARCH B110 The World Through Classical Eyes
Not offered 2019-20
A survey of the ways in which the ancient Greeks and Romans perceived and constructed their physical and social world. The evidence of ancient texts and monuments will form the basis for exploring such subjects as cosmology, geography, travel and commerce, ancient ethnography and anthropology, the idea of natural and artificial wonders, and the self-definition of the classical cultures in the context of the oikoumene, the "inhabited world."
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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ARCH B203 Ancient Greek Cities and Sanctuaries
Not offered 2019-20
A study of the development of the Greek city-states and sanctuaries. Archaeological evidence is surveyed in its historic context. The political formation of the city-state and the role of religion is presented, and the political, economic, and religious institutions of the city-states are explored in their urban settings. The city-state is considered as a particular political economy of the Mediterranean and in comparison to the utility of the concept of city-state in other cultures.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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ARCH B215 Classical Art
Not offered 2019-20
A survey of the visual arts of ancient Greece and Rome from the Bronze Age through Late Imperial times (circa 3000 B.C.E. to 300 C.E.). Major categories of artistic production are examined in historical and social context, including interactions with neighboring areas and cultures; methodological and interpretive issues are highlighted.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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ARCH B244 Great Empires of the Ancient Near East
Spring 2020
A survey of the history, material culture, political and religious ideologies of, and interactions among, the five great empires of the ancient Near East of the second and first millennia B.C.E.: New Kingdom Egypt, the Hittite Empire in Anatolia, the Assyrian and Babylonian Empires in Mesopotamia, and the Persian Empire in Iran.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Middle Eastern Studies

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ARCH B252 Pompeii
Spring 2020
Introduces students to a nearly intact archaeological site whose destruction by the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in 79 C.E. was recorded by contemporaries. The discovery of Pompeii in the mid-1700s had an enormous impact on 18th- and 19th-century views of the Roman past as well as styles and preferences of the modern era. Informs students in classical antiquity, urban life, city structure, residential architecture, home decoration and furnishing, wall painting, minor arts and craft and mercantile activities within a Roman city.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Museum Studies

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ARCH B260 Daily Life in Ancient Greece and Rome
Not offered 2019-20
The often-praised achievements of the classical cultures arose from the realities of day-to-day life. This course surveys the rich body of material and textual evidence pertaining to how ancient Greeks and Romans -- famous and obscure alike -- lived and died. Topics include housing, food, clothing, work, leisure, and family and social life.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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ARCH B305 Topics in Ancient Athens
Section 001 (Spring 2019): Acropolis
Not offered 2019-20
This is a topics course. Course content varies.

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ARCH B316 Trade and Transport in the Ancient World
Not offered 2019-20
Issues of trade, commerce and production of export goods are addressed with regard to the Bronze Age and Iron Age cultures of Mesopotamia, Arabia, Iran and south Asia. Crucial to these systems is the development of means of transport via maritime routes and on land. Archaeological evidence for traded goods and shipwrecks is used to map the emergence of sea-faring across the Indian Ocean and Gulf while bio-archaeological data is employed to examine the transformative role that Bactrian and Dromedary camels played in ancient trade and transport.

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ARCH B359 Topics in Classical Art and Archaeology
Not offered 2019-20
This is a topics course. Topics vary. A research-oriented course taught in seminar format, treating issues of current interest in Greek and Roman art and archaeology. 200-level coursework in some aspect of classical or related cultures, archeology, art history, or Cities, or related fields is strongly recommended.

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ARCH B505 Topics in Ancient Athens
Not offered 2019-20
This is a topics course. Topics vary.

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CSTS B324 Roman Architecture
Not offered 2019-20
The course gives special attention to the architecture and topography of ancient Rome from the origins of the city to the later Roman Empire. At the same time, general issues in architecture and planning with particular reference to Italy and the provinces from republic to empire are also addressed. These include public and domestic spaces,structures, settings and uses, urban infrastructure, the relationship of towns and territories, "suburban" and working villas, and frontier settlements. Prerequisite: ARCH 102.

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ECON B208 Labor Economics
Spring 2020
Analysis of labor markets. Focuses on the economic forces and public policies that determine wage rates and unemployment. Specific topics include: human capital, family decision marking, discrimination, immigration, technological change, compensating differentials, and signaling. Prerequisite: ECON B105.

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ECON B213 Taming the Modern Corporation
Not offered 2019-20
Introduction to the economics of industrial organization and regulation, focusing on policy options for ensuring that corporations enhance economic welfare and the quality of life. Topics include firm behavior in imperfectly competitive markets; theoretical bases of antitrust laws; regulation of product and occupational safety, environmental pollution, and truth in advertising. Prerequisite: ECON B105.

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ECON B214 Public Finance
Not offered 2019-20
Analysis of government's role in resource allocation, emphasizing effects of tax and expenditure programs on income distribution and economic efficiency. Topics include sources of inefficiency in markets and possible government responses; federal budget composition; social insurance and antipoverty programs; U.S. tax structure and incidence. Prerequisites: ECON B105.
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

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ECON B225 Economic Development
Fall 2019
Examination of the issues related to and the policies designed to promote economic development in the developing economies of Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East. Focus is on why some developing economies grow faster than others and why some growth paths are more equitable, poverty reducing, and environmentally sustainable than others. Includes consideration of the impact of international trade and investment policy, macroeconomic policies (exchange rate, monetary and fiscal policy) and sector policies (industry, agriculture, education, population, and environment) on development outcomes in a wide range of political and institutional contexts. Prerequisite: ECON B105.
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

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ECON B234 Environmental Economics
Not offered 2019-20
Introduction to the use of economic analysis to explain the underlying behavioral causes of environmental and natural resource problems and to evaluate policy responses to them. Topics may include air and water pollution; the economic theory of externalities, public goods and the depletion of resources; cost-benefit analysis; valuing non-market benefits and costs; economic justice; and sustainable development. Prerequisites: ECON B105.
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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ECON B236 The Economics of Globalization
Not offered 2019-20
An introduction to international economics through theory, policy issues, and problems. The course surveys international trade and finance, as well as topics in international economics. It investigates why and what a nation trades, the consequences of such trade, the role of trade policy, the behavior and effects of exchange rates, and the macroeconomic implications of trade and capital flows. Topics may include the economics of free trade areas, world financial crises, outsourcing, immigration, and foreign investment. Prerequisites: ECON B105. The course is not open to students who have taken ECON B316 or B348.
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

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ECON B242 Economics of Local Environmental Programs
Spring 2020
Considers the determinants of human impact on the environment at the neighborhood or community level and policy responses available to local government. How can economics help solve and learn from the problems facing rural and suburban communities? The instructor was a local township supervisor who will share the day-to-day challenges of coping with land use planning, waste disposal, dispute resolution, and the provision of basic services. Prerequisite: ECON B105.
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Praxis Program

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ECON B253 Introduction to Econometrics
Spring 2020
An introduction to econometric terminology and reasoning. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, and statistical inference. Particular emphasis is placed on regression analysis and on the use of data to address economic issues. The required computational techniques are developed as part of the course. Class cannot be taken if you have taken H203 or H204. Prerequisites: ECON B105 and a 200-level elective.
Quantitative Methods (QM)

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ECON B314 The Economics of Social Policy
Spring 2020
Introduces students to the economic rationale behind government programs and the evaluation of government programs. Topics include health insurance, social security, unemployment and disability insurance, and education. Additionally, the instructor and students will jointly select topics of special interest to the class. Emphasis will be placed on the use of statistics to evaluate social policy. Prerequisites: ECON 200; ECON 253 or 304.

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ECON B324 The Economics of Discrimination and Inequality
Fall 2019
Explores the causes and consequences of discrimination and inequality in economic markets. Topics include economic theories of discrimination and inequality, evidence of contemporary race- and gender-based inequality, detecting discrimination, identifying sources of racial and gender inequality, and identifying sources of overall economic inequality. Additionally, the instructor and students will jointly select supplementary topics of specific interest to the class. Possible topics include: discrimination in historical markets, disparity in legal treatments, issues of family structure, and education gaps. Writing Intensive. Prerequisites: At least one 200-level applied microeconomics elective; ECON 253 or 304; ECON 200.
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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ECON B335 East Asian Development
Fall 2019
Identifies the core economic and political elements of an East Asian newly industrializing economies (NIEs) development model. Assesses the performance of this development model in Northeast (China, South Korea and Taiwan) and Southeast Asia (Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam) in a comparative perspective. Considers the debate over the impact of interventionist and selective development policies associated with this model on the development successes and failures of the East Asian NIEs. Evaluates the impact of democratization in several of these polities on both the core development model identified as well as on development performance. Prerequisite:ECON 225; ECON 200 or 202; and ECON 253 or 304; or permission of instructor.

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EDUC B266 Critical Issues in Urban Education
Spring 2020
This course examines issues, challenges, and possibilities of urban education in contemporary America. We use as critical lenses issues of race, class, and culture; urban learners, teachers, and school systems; and restructuring and reform. While we look at urban education nationally over several decades, we use Philadelphia as a focal "case" that students investigate through documents and school placements. Weekly fieldwork in a school required.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Praxis Program

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ENVS B200 The Edible Environment: Theory and Ethics
Not offered 2019-20
The course addresses core philosophical questions related to food production, consumption, and representation. The focus is on topics that highlight how we engage with the environment based on what we eat, how we consume it, and the way we talk about it. In the first part (food production), we examine the significance of domestication, taxonomies of edible animals, plants, and microbes, and how recent (bio)technological possibilities are changing our approach to food production. In the second part of the course, we turn to the human body to discuss how hunger, pleasure and taste guide our food consumption. In the third part, we discuss how extant practices of labeling and food criticism influence our understandings of the edible environment. The class draws upon a wide range of resources, including classical and contemporary philosophical texts, food essays, magazine and newspaper articles, videos and images. The course counts as a Social Science/Humanities elective for the Environmental Studies Minor. Suggested preparation is one course in Environmental Studies OR one course in the Cities Program or permission of the instructor.
Course does not meet an Approach

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GEOL B209 Natural Hazards
Not offered 2019-20
A quantitative approach to understanding the earth processes that impact human societies. We consider the past, current, and future hazards presented by geologic processes, including earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, floods, and hurricanes. The course includes discussion of the social, economic, and policy contexts within which natural geologic processes become hazards. Case studies are drawn from contemporary and ancient societies. Lecture three hours a week. Prerequisite: one semester of college science or permission of instructor.
Quantitative Methods (QM)
Quantitative Readiness Required (QR)
Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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GERM B245 Interdisciplinary Approaches to German Literature and Culture
Not offered 2019-20
This is a topics course. Taught in German. Course content varies. Previous topics include, Women's Narratives on Modern Migrancy, Exile, and Diasporas; Nation and Identity in Post-War Austria. Current topic: Crime, Justice and the Courtroom. This is a film-based course about political trials at critical junctures of German history.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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GERM B321 Advanced Topics in German Cultural Studies
Section 001 (Spring 2019): Representing Diversity in German Cinema
Not offered 2019-20
This is a topics course. Course content varies. Course is taught in English. There will an additional hour in German for those students taking the course for German credit.
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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GNST B245 Introduction to Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Fall 2019
A broad, interdisciplinary survey of themes uniting and dividing societies from the Iberian Peninsula to the Americas. The class introduces the methods and interests of all departments in the concentration, posing problems of cultural continuity and change, globalization and struggles within dynamic histories, political economies, and creative expressions. Course is taught in English.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

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HART B212 Medieval Art & Architecture
Not offered 2019-20
This course takes a broad geographic and chronological scope, allowing for full exposure to the rich variety of objects and monuments that fall under the rubric of "medieval" art and architecture. We focus on the Latin and Byzantine Christian traditions, but also consider works of art and architecture from the Islamic and Jewish spheres. Topics to be discussed include: the role of religion in artistic development and expression; secular traditions of medieval art and culture; facture and materiality in the art of the middle ages; the use of objects and monuments to convey political power and social prestige; gender dynamics in medieval visual culture; and the contribution of medieval art and architecture to later artistic traditions.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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HART B253 Survey of Western Architecture
Not offered 2019-20
The major traditions in Western architecture are illustrated through detailed analysis of selected examples from classical antiquity to the present. The evolution of architectural design and building technology, and the larger intellectual, aesthetic, and social context in which this evolution occurred, are considered.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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HART B311 Topics in Medieval Art
Not offered 2019-20
This is a topics course. Course content varies.

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HART B323 Topics in Renaissance and Baroque Art
Section 001 (Spring 2019): Palladio
Not offered 2019-20
This is a topics course. Course content varies.

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HART B355 Topics in the History of London
Fall 2019
Selected topics of social, literary, and architectural concern in the history of London, emphasizing London since the 18th century.

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HIST B237 Themes in Modern African History
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Public History in Africa
Section 001 (Spring 2020): Public History in Africa
Spring 2020
This is a topics course. Course content varies
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Museum Studies

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HIST B257 British Empire I: Capitalism and Slavery
Not offered 2019-20
Focusing on the Atlantic slave trade and the slave plantation mode of production, this course explores English colonization, and the emergence and the decline of British Empire in the Americas and Caribbean from the 17th through the late 20th centuries. It tracks some of the intersecting and overlapping routes--and roots--connecting histories and politics within and between these "new" world locations. It also tracks the further and proliferating links between developments in these regions and the histories and politics of regions in the "old" world, from the north Atlantic to the South China sea.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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HIST B319 Topics in Modern European History
Section 001 (Spring 2019): Growing Up in Communism
Section 001 (Fall 2019): Metropolis: A Cultural History
Fall 2019, Spring 2020
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: A Cultural History of the Central European City and its People from the quaint bustling cafes of Vienna to the boulevards and bathhouses of Budapest this seminar will explore the social, cultural, and structural history of Central European cities from the late nineteenth century to the present. In cultural capitals like Vienna, Prague, Budapest, and Berlin we will examine how architecture, class formation, popular and high art, leisure, youth culture, (im)migration, gender, and sexuality created and built the urban (and suburban) landscape of Modern Europe.
Current topic description: We are the historical roots of far right ideologies and organizations and what can a historical perspective tell us about the reasons for their continuous attraction? The seminar will examine the histories of radical right movements in Europe from World War I to the present. The course will focus on the historical origins and evolution of key theories, organizations and receptivity of far right movements in both Western and Eastern Europe. As part of the seminar we will also interrogate the relationship between extreme right movements and gender, sexuality, and youth in both the pre and post-World War II era. how did these movements (from Italian fascism and Nazism to contemporary European far right movements) conceptualize their preferred gender and sexual order? What role did women play in these movements? And what made and continues to make these movements appeal to young people?

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HIST B325 Topics in Social History
Section 001 (Fall 2019): Civil War, Race, Amer. Memory
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Queering History
Fall 2019
This a topics course that explores various themes in American social history. Course content varies. Course may be repeated.
Current topic description: This course explores how the American Civil War, fought over the issue of maintaining race based slavery, has become enshrined with a host of contested meanings about race and citizenship to generations of Americans ever since the Confederacy surrendered at Appomattox. During this semester we will explore some of those contests and address the Civil War's intense power in the American psyche.

Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies

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HIST B368 Topics in Medieval History
Not offered 2019-20
This is a topics course. Topics vary.

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ITAL B308 Rome as Palimpsests: from Ruins to Virtual Reality
Not offered 2019-20
From the urban dream that Raphael confessed to pope Leo X in the middle of the Renaissance to the parkour on the top of the Colosseum in the Assassin's Creed videogames, Rome has always been both a memory and a vision: a place of nostalgia and endless potential. In this course we will investigate some crucial places, moments, and ideas in the modern history of this ancient capital of Western culture: XVI century Mannerist painting and the Pop Art of Piazza del Popolo, the early modern re-uses of the Colosseum and its cubic clone designed under fascism, the narrations of Romantic grand-tours and the ones of contemporary postcolonial authors. We will adopt a trans-historical and inter-disciplinary perspective, focusing on the main attempts to revive the glory of the ancient empire. We will try to understand weather Italy's capital is a museum to be preserved, an old laboratory of urban innovations, a cemetery, a sanctuary, or simply an amalgam of past and future, glory and misery, beauty and horror. For Italian majors you will have an additional hour for credit. Prerequisite: One two-hundred level course for students interested in taking the course towards Italian credits.
Counts toward Counts toward Museum Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Praxis Program

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ITAL B319 Multiculturalism and Diversity in Medieval Italy
Not offered 2019-20
This interdisciplinary course will reflect upon history, religion, literature, politics, and built environment of Italy from ca. 1000 to 1400. Italy was famous for its diverse cultural landscape of urban towers and fortified castles, its Mediterranean trade, and its ethnically and religiously differentiated voices. The course examines cross-cultural interactions played out through the patronage, production, and reception of works of art, literature, and architecture. Sites of patronage and production include the cities of Venice, Palermo, and Pisa. It counts towards Art History and City.

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MEST B210 The Art and Architecture of Islamic Spirituality
Not offered 2019-20
This course examines how Muslim societies across time and space have used art and architecture in different ways to express and understand inner dimensions of spirituality and mysticism. Topics to be studied include: the calligraphical remnants of the early Islamic period; inscriptions found on buildings and gravestones; the majestic architecture of mosques, shrines, seminaries, and Sufi lodges; the brilliant arts of the book; the commemorative iconography and passion plays of Ashura devotion; the souvenir culture of modern shrine visitation; and the modern art of twenty-first century Sufism. Readings include works from history, religious studies, anthropology, sociology, and the history of art and architecture.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Middle Eastern Studies

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POLS B222 Environmental Issues: Movements and Policy Making in Comparative Perspective
Section 001 (Spring 2019): Movements, Controversies and Policy Making
Not offered 2019-20
An exploration of the ways in which different cultural, economic, and political settings have shaped issue emergence and policy making. We examine the politics of particular environmental issues in selected countries and regions, paying special attention to the impact of environmental movements. We also assess the prospects for international cooperation in addressing global environmental problems such as climate change.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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POLS B256 Global Politics of Climate Change
Spring 2020
This course will introduce students to important political issues raised by climate change locally, nationally, and internationally, paying particular attention to the global implications of actions at the national and subnational levels. It will focus not only on specific problems, but also on solutions; students will learn about some of the technological and policy innovations that are being developed worldwide in response to the challenges of climate change. Only open to students in 360 program.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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POLS B321 Technology and Politics
Not offered 2019-20
A multi-media analysis of the complex role of technology in political and social life. We focus on the relationship between technological change and democratic governance. We begin with historical and contemporary Luddism as well as pro-technology movements around the world. Substantive issue areas include security and surveillance, electoral politics, economic development and women's empowerment, warfare, social media, net neutrality, GMO foods and industrial agriculture, climate change and energy politics.
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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SOCL B205 Social Inequality
Fall 2019
Introduction to the major sociological theories of gender, racial-ethnic, and class inequality with emphasis on the relationships among these forms of stratification in the contemporary United States, including the role of the upper class(es), inequality between and within families, in the work place, and in the educational system.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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SOCL B229 Black America in Sociological Perspective
Fall 2019
This course presents sociological perspectives on various issues affecting black America as a historically unique minority group in the United States: the legacy of slavery and the Jim Crow era; the formation of urban black ghettos; the civil rights reforms; the problems of poverty and unemployment; the problems of crime and other social problems; the problems of criminal justice; the continuing significance of race; the varied covert modern forms of racial discrimination; and the role of race in American politics. Prerequisite: at least one additional sociology course or permission of instructor. Course is not available to freshmen.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Child and Family Studies

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