NOTE: Please note that not all topics courses (B223, 209, 321, 325, 326, 340) count toward COML elective requirements. See adviser.

This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's master calendar.

Fall 2018

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
COML B398-001Theories and Methods in Comparative LiteratureSemester / 1Lecture: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM THOld Library 118Dept. staff, TBA
ARTW B261-001Writing Poetry ISemester / 1Lecture: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTHEnglish House IIMatthews,D.
EALC B345-001Topics in East Asian Culture: Food and PowerSemester / 1Lecture: 12:10 PM- 2:00 PM THCarpenter Library 13Kwa,S., Kwa,S.
Film Screening: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM MCarpenter Library 13
ENGL B345-001Topics in Narrative TheorySemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWEnglish House IIIHarford Vargas,J.
FREN B312-001Advanced Topics in Literature: Revolutions Numerqiues de Pascal a L'internetSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM TTaylor Hall, Seminar RoomSedley,D.
GERM B231-001Cultural Profiles in Modern ExileSemester / 1Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MWDalton Hall 212ASeyhan,A.
GERM B320-001Topics in German Literature and Culture: 1968 and Its LegaciesSemester / 1Lecture: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM THDalton Hall 212AShen,Q.
HART B110-001Critical Approaches to Visual Representation: Identification in the CinemaSemester / 1Lecture: 11:10 AM-12:00 PM MWFCarpenter Library 13King,H., King,H., Teaching Assistant,T.
Film Screening: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM S
ITAL B213-001Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities: Critical TheoriesSemester / 1Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MWOld Library 251Giammei,A.
RUSS B218-001The Coming-Of-Age Novel in 19th-century EuropeSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWRussian Center Conference RoomGrigoryan,B.

Spring 2019

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
COML B200-001Introduction to Comparative LiteratureSemester / 1Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHGaspar,M.
ARCH B303-001Classical BodiesSemester / 1Lecture: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM TDonohue,A.
EALC B212-001Topics: Introduction to Chinese Literature: Dream of the Red ChamberSemester / 1LEC: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHKwa,S.
EALC B315-001Spirits, Saints, Snakes, Swords: Women in East Asian Literature & FilmSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 3:30 PM WKwa,S.
ENGL B388-001Contemporary African FictionSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM WBeard,L.
FREN B312-001Advanced Topics in Literature: Wars & Conflicts in French LitSemester / 1LEC: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM TMahuzier,B.
FREN B326-001Etudes avancées: La liberté ou la mortSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM WLe Menthéour,R.
SPAN B211-001Borges y sus lectoresSemester / 1Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTHSacerio-Garí,E.

Fall 2019

(Class schedules for this semester will be posted at a later date.)

2018-19 Catalog Data

COML B200 Introduction to Comparative Literature
Spring 2019
This course explores a variety of approaches to the comparative or transnational study of literature through readings of several kinds: texts from different cultural traditions that raise questions about the nature and function of storytelling and literature; texts that comment on, respond to, and rewrite other texts from different historical periods and nations; translations; and readings in critical theory.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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COML B225 Censorship: Historical Contexts, Local Practices and Global Resonance
Not offered 2018-19
The course is in English. It examines the ban on books and art in a global context through a study of the historical and sociopolitical conditions of censorship practices. The course raises such questions as how censorship is used to fortify political power, how it is practiced locally and globally, who censors, what are the categories of censorship, how censorship succeeds and fails, and how writers and artists write and create against and within censorship. The last question leads to an analysis of rhetorical strategies that writers and artists employ to translate the expression of repression, trauma, and torture into idioms of resistance. German majors/minors can get German Studies credit. Prerequisite: EMLY B001 or a 100-level intensive writing course.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Counts toward Middle Eastern Studies

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COML B293 The Play of Interpretation
Not offered 2018-19
Designated theory course. A study of the methodologies and regimes of interpretation in the arts, humanistic sciences, and media and cultural studies, this course focuses on common problems of text, authorship, reader/spectator, and translation in their historical and formal contexts. Literary, oral, and visual texts from different cultural traditions and histories will be studied through interpretive approaches informed by modern critical theories. Readings in literature, philosophy, popular culture, and film will illustrate how theory enhances our understanding of the complexities of history, memory, identity, and the trials of modernity.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward International Studies

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COML B398 Theories and Methods in Comparative Literature
This course, required of all senior comparative literature majors in preparation for writing the senior thesis in the spring semester, has a twofold purpose: to review interpretive approaches informed by critical theories that enhance our understanding of literary and cultural texts; and to help students prepare a preliminary outline of their senior theses. Throughout the semester, students research theoretical paradigms that bear on their own comparative thesis topics in order to situate those topics in an appropriate critical context. This is a required for majors and minors.

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COML B399 Senior Seminar in Comparative Literature
Thesis writing seminar. Research methods. This course will be offered at Haverford College in 2017-18.

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COML B403 Supervised Work

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COML B403 Supervised Work

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 B260 Ariel/Calibán y el discurso americano
Not offered 2018-19
A study of the transformations of Ariel/Calibán as images of Latin American culture. Prerequisite: B120 or another SPAN 200-level course.

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 B317 Poéticas del deseo y el poder en la lírica del Siglo de Oro
Not offered 2018-19
A study of the evolution of the lyric in Spain during the Renaissance and Baroque periods beginning with the oral tradition and the imitation of Petrarch. Topics include: the representation of women as objects of desire and pre-texts for writing, the political and national subtexts for lyric production, the self-fashioning and subjectivity of the lyric voice, theories of parody and imitation, and the feminine appropriation of the Petrarchan tradition. Although concentrating on the poetry of Spain, reading will include texts from Italy, France, England and Mexico. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisites: at least one 200-level course.

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 B370 Literatura y delincuencia
Not offered 2018-19
A study of the origins, development and transformation of the picaresque genre from its origins in 16th- and 17th-century Spain through the 21st century. Using texts, literature, painting, and film from Spain and Latin America, we will explore topics such as the construction of the fictive self, the poetics and politics of criminality, transgression in gender and class. Among the topics to be discussed: criminalization of poverty, prostitution, and the feminine picaresque. Prerequiste: At least one SPAN 200-level course. Course fulfills pre-1700 requirement and HC's pre-1898 requirement.

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ARCH B217 Captive Greece, Captor Rome?
Not offered 2018-19
The Western classical tradition is not monolithic, but contains elements from both ancient Greek and Roman culture. This course examines the relationship between the two, from the Hellenistic era and the expansion of Roman power in the Mediterranean through the absorption of the Greek world into the Roman Empire, and its later consequences, emphasizing the primary evidence of the visual arts and contemporary texts. Suggested preparation: 100-level coursework in history of art, classics, archaeology, or comparative literature.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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ARCH B303 Classical Bodies
Spring 2019
An examination of the conceptions of the human body evidenced in Greek and Roman art and literature, with emphasis on issues that have persisted in the Western tradition. Topics include the fashioning of concepts of male and female standards of beauty and their implications; conventions of visual representation; the nude; clothing and its symbolism; the athletic ideal; physiognomy; medical theory and practice; the visible expression of character and emotions; and the formulation of the "classical ideal" in antiquity and later times.
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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ARTW B261 Writing Poetry I
Fall 2018
In this course students will learn to "read like a writer," while grappling with the work of accomplished poets, and providing substantive commentary on peers' work. Through diverse readings, students will examine craft strategies at work in both formal and free verse poems, such as diction, metaphor, imagery, lineation, metrical patterns, irony, and syntax. The course will cover shaping forms (such as elegy and pastoral) as well as given forms, such as the sonnet, ghazal, villanelle, etc. Students will discuss strategies for conveying the literal meaning of a poem (e.g., through sensory description and clear, compelling language) and the concealed meaning of a text (e.g., through metaphor, imagery, meter, irony, and shifts in diction and syntax). By the end of the course, students will have generated new material, shaped and revised draft poems, and significantly grown as writers by experimenting with various aspects of craft.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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CSTS B274 Greek Tragedy in Global Cinema
Not offered 2018-19
This course explores how contemporary film, a creative medium appealing to the entire demographic spectrum like Greek drama, looks back to the ancient origins. Examining both films that are directly based on Greek plays and films that make use of classical material without being explicitly classical in plot or setting, we will discuss how Greek mythology is reconstructed and appropriated for modern audiences and how the classical past continues to be culturally significant. A variety of methodological approaches such as film and gender theory, psychoanalysis, and feminist theory will be applied in addition to more straightforward literary-historical interpretation.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

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CSTS B375 Interpreting Mythology
Not offered 2018-19
The myths of the Greeks have provoked outrage and fascination, interpretation and retelling, censorship and elaboration, beginning with the Greeks themselves. We will see how some of these stories have been read and understood, recounted and revised, in various cultures and eras, from ancient tellings to modern movies. We will also explore some of the interpretive theories by which these tales have been understood, from ancient allegory to modern structural and semiotic theories. The student should gain a more profound understanding of the meaning of these myths to the Greeks themselves, of the cultural context in which they were formulated. At the same time, this course should provide the student with some familiarity with the range of interpretations and strategies of understanding that people of various cultures and times have applied to the Greek myths during the more than two millennia in which they have been preserved. Preference to upperclassmen, previous coursework in myth required.

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EALC B212 Topics: Introduction to Chinese Literature
Section 001 (Spring 2019): Dream of the Red Chamber
Spring 2019
This is a topics course. Topics may vary.
Current topic description: The Dream of Red Chambers (Hongloumeng) is the most important novel in Chinese

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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EALC B240 Topics in Chinese Film
Section 001 (Spring 2018): The Films of Wong Kar-wai
Not offered 2018-19
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

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EALC B255 Understanding Comics: Introduction to Reading the Graphic No
Not offered 2018-19
The graphic narrative form has proliferated at a breathtaking rate in the last several decades. Called "comics," "graphic novels," and many other terms in between, these word-image hybrids have been embraced by both popular and critical audiences. But what is a graphic novel? How do we conceive of these texts and, more importantly, how do we read, interpret and write about them? This course is focused on approaches to reading the graphic novel, with a focus on a subgenre called the "literary comic." Our first approach is to consider different kinds of primary source texts and ask if and how they fulfill our understanding of the graphic narrative. This consideration will include various test cases, from wordless comics, to texts used as images, to the many varieties of word-image hybrids that are called comic books. Our second approach is to examine different scholarly approaches to analyzing graphic narratives, base d in different disciplines such as memoir studies, trauma studies, visual and material culture, history, semiotics, and, especially, narratology. Primary source readings include texts by Ware, Barry, Clowes, and Burns. Secondary readings include Hirsch, McCloud, Barthes, Iser, and Groensteen.Three short assignments due during the semester, and a final project due at the end of exam period (see description below). Students will also rotate responsibilities for starting discussions with small presentations aimed at discussing readings in depth. Students taking this course for their major in EALC or COML should meet with the instructor to discuss specific requirements.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

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EALC B281 Food in Translation: Theory and Practice
Not offered 2018-19
This semester we will explore the connections between what we eat and how we define ourselves in the context of global culture. We will proceed from the assumption that food is an object of culture, and that our contemplation of its transformations and translations in production, preparation, consumption, and distribution will inform our notions of personal and group identity. This course takes Chinese food as a case study, and examines the way that Chinese food moves from its host country to diasporic communities all over the world, using theories of translation as our theoretical and empirical foundation. From analyzing menu and ingredient translations to producing a short film based on interviews, we will consider the relationship between food and communication in a multilingual and multicultural world. Readings include theoretical texts on translation (Apter), recipe books and menus, Chinese and Chinese-American literature (Classic of Poetry, Mo Yan, Hong Kingston). Films include Ian Cheney's "Searching for General Tso," Wayne Wang's "Soul of a Banquet" and "Eat a Bowl of Tea," Ang Li's "Eat Drink Man Woman," and Wong Karwai's "In the Mood for Love."
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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EALC B315 Spirits, Saints, Snakes, Swords: Women in East Asian Literature & Film
Spring 2019
This interdisciplinary course focuses on a critical survey of literary and visual texts by and about Chinese women. We will begin by focusing on the cultural norms that defined women's lives beginning in early China, and consider how those tropes are reflected and rejected over time and geographical borders (in Japan, Hong Kong and the United States). No prior knowledge of Chinese culture or language necessary.
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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EALC B345 Topics in East Asian Culture
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Food and Power
Fall 2018
This is a topics course. Course contents vary.
Current topic description: This semester we will explore the connections between what we eat and how we define ourselves in the context of global culture. This interdisciplinary course draws from materials and methods in literature, film, visual and cultural studies, history, semiotics, anthropology, and translation studies. Students engage in critical and creative assignments throughout the semester will make use of our accessibility to Chinatown for some assignments.

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EALC B355 Animals, Vegetables, Minerals in East Asian Literature and F
Not offered 2018-19
This semester, we will explore how artists question, explore, celebrate, and critique the relationships between humans and the environment. Through a topics-focused course, students will examine the ways that narratives about environment have shaped the way that humans have defined themselves. We will be reading novels and short stories and viewing films that contest conventional binaries of man and animal, civilization and nature, tradition and technology, and even truth and fiction. "Animals, Vegetables, Minerals" does not follow chronological or geographical frameworks, but chooses texts that engage the three categories enumerated as the major themes of our course. We will read and discuss animal theory, theories of place and landscape, and theories of modernization or mechanization; and there will be frequent (and intentional) overlap between these categories. We will also be watching films that extend our theoretical questions of thes e themes beyond national, linguistic, and generic borders. You are expected to view this course as a collaborative process in which you share responsibility for leading discussion. There are no prerequisites or language expectations, but students should have some basic knowledge of East Asian, especially Sinophone, history and culture, or be willing to do some additional reading (suggested by the instructor) to achieve an adequate contextual background for exploring these texts.
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

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ENGL B229 Movies and Mass Politics
Not offered 2018-19
Movies and mass politics emerged together, altering entertainment and government in strangely similar ways. Fascism and Communism claimed an inherent relation to the masses and hence to movies; Hollywood rejected such claims. We will examine films that allude to Communism and Fascism, seeking to understand how they join in political debates and comment upon the mass experience of movie going.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

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ENGL B234 Postcolonial Literature in English
Not offered 2018-19
This course will survey a broad range of novels and poems written while countries were breaking free of British colonial rule. Readings will also include cultural theorists interested in defining literary issues that arise from the postcolonial situation.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies

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ENGL B279 Introduction to African Literature
Not offered 2018-19
Taking into account the oral, written, aural, and visual forms of African "texts" over several thousand years, this course will explore literary production, intertextuality, translation, and audience/critical reception. Representative works to be studied include oral traditions, the Sundiata and Mwindo epics, the plays of Wole Soyinka and his Burden of History, the Muse of Forgiveness; and the work of Sembène Ousmane, Bessie Head, Ayi Kwei Armah, Mariama Bâ, Naguib Mahfouz, Ngugi wa Thiong'o, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Yvonne Vera, and others.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies

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ENGL B345 Topics in Narrative Theory
Fall 2018
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o

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ENGL B381 Post-Apartheid Literature
Not offered 2018-19
South African texts from several language communities which anticipate a post-apartheid polity and texts by contemporary South African writers which explore the complexities of life in "the new South Africa." Several films emphasize the minefield of post-apartheid reconciliation and accountability.
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies

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ENGL B388 Contemporary African Fiction
Spring 2019
Noting that the official colonial independence of most African countries dates back only half a century, this course focuses on the fictive experiments of the most recent decade. A few highly controversial works from the 90's serve as an introduction to very recent work. Most works are in English. To experience depth as well as breadth, there is a small cluster of works from South Africa. With novels and tales from elsewhere on the huge African continent, we will get a glimpse of "living in the present" in history and letters.
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies

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FREN B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Not offered 2018-19
By bringing together the study of major theoretical currents of the 20th century and the practice of analyzing literary works in the light of theory, this course aims at providing students with skills to use literary theory in their own scholarship. The selection of theoretical readings reflects the history of theory (psychoanalysis, structuralism, narratology), as well as the currents most relevant to the contemporary academic field: Post-structuralism, Post-colonialism, Gender Studies, and Ecocriticism. They are paired with a diverse range of short stories (Poe, Kafka, Camus, Borges, Calvino, Morrison, Djebar, Ngozi Adichie) that we discuss along with our study of theoretical texts. The class will be conducted in English with an additional hour in French for students wishing to take it for French credit.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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FREN B302 Le printemps de la parole féminine: femmes écrivains des débuts
Not offered 2018-19
This study of selected women authors from Latin CE-Carolingian period through the Middle Ages, Renaissance and 17th century--among them, Perpetua, Hrotswitha, Marie de France, the trobairitz, Christine de Pisan, Louise Labé, Marguerite de Navarre, and Madame de Lafayette--examines the way in which they appropriate and transform the male writing tradition and define themselves as self-conscious artists within or outside it. Particular attention will be paid to identifying recurring concerns and structures in their works, and to assessing their importance to women's writing in general: among them, the poetics of silence, reproduction as a metaphor for artistic creation, and sociopolitical engagement. Prerequisite: two 200-level courses or permission of instructor.
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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FREN B312 Advanced Topics in Literature
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Revolutions Numerqiues de Pascal a L'internet
Section 001 (Spring 2019): Wars & Conflicts in French Lit
Fall 2018, Spring 2019
This is a topics course. Course content varies. Prerequisites: two 200-level courses.
Current topic description: This course puts into perspective the digital revolution that has swept the 21st century. We will explore it as the latest in a series of revolutions that import numbers, algorithms, and machines into fields where letters and other media are previously the norm. The mathematical, technological, and literary works of Blaise Pascal will provide a focus for our discussions of the history of digitization, from Gutenberg to Google.
Current topic description: This course will explore key events in French war history from the Napoleonic era to the First World War as they appear in war narratives. Three interrelated problematics will be addressed: the poetic and ethical question of representation; the relation between story telling and historiography; and the fiction of memory vs. forgetting in the writing of national history.

Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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FREN B325 Topics: Etudes avancées
Section 001 (Fall 2017): Les femmes au Maghreb
Section 001 (Spring 2018): Les Monstres
Not offered 2018-19
An in-depth study of a particular topic, event or historical figure in French civilization. This is a topics course. Course content varies. The seminar topic rotates among many subjects: La Révolution française: Histoire, littérature et culture; L'environnement naturel dans la culture française; Mal et valeurs éthiques; Le Cinéma et la politique, 1940-1968; Le Nationalisme en France et dans les pays francophones; Étude socio-culturelle des arts du manger en France du Moyen Age à nos jours; Crimes et criminalité; Ecrire la Grande Guerre: 1914-10; Le "Rentrée Littéraire"; Proust/Baudelaire; L'Humain et l'environnement.
Current topic description: This environmental humanities course will take an ecocritical approach to analyze French literature and culture in the era of globalization. The goal of this course is to reveal how new ideologies embedded in a wide array of media advocate for a shift away from the dominant paradigm of anthropocentrism. By the analysis of literary texts and social science texts that range from seemingly non-partisan to openly activist, students will gain familiarity with current critical trends such as Animal Studies, Critical Plant Studies and the Post-human. Course will be taught in French.

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FREN B326 Etudes avancées
Section 001 (Spring 2019): La liberté ou la mort
Spring 2019
An in-depth study of a particular topic, event or historical figure in French civilization. This is a topics course. Course content varies. Comment les valeurs des Lumières ont-elles inspiré la Révolution Française dans ses réformes les plus éclatantes, mais aussi dans ses développements les plus sombres? Comment en est-on venu à emprisonner au nom de la liberté et à guillotiner au nom de la sûreté ? Nous lirons des textes politiques de la période révolutionnaire (Robespierre, Saint-Just, etc.), mais aussi des œuvres ultérieures proposant une interprétation rétrospective de la Révolution Française (Michelet, Hugo, France). Le but sera de comprendre comment au nom d'idéaux républicains, on a pu en venir à mettre la terreur à l'ordre du jour.
Current topic description: Comment les valeurs des Lumières ont-elles inspiré la Révolution Française dans ses réformes les plus éclatantes, mais aussi dans ses développements les plus sombres? Comment en est-on venu à emprisonner au nom de la liberté et à guillotiner au nom de la sûreté ? Nous lirons des textes politiques de la période révolutionnaire (Robespierre, Saint-Just, etc.), mais aussi des œuvres ultérieures proposant une interprétation rétrospective de la Révolution Française (Michelet, Hugo, France). Le but sera de comprendre comment au nom d'idéaux républicains, on a pu en venir à mettre la terreur à l'ordre du jour.

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FREN B350 Voix médiévales et échos modernes
Not offered 2018-19
A study of selected 19th- and 20th-century works inspired by medieval subjects, such as the Grail and Arthurian legends and the Tristan and Yseut stories, and by medieval genres, such as the roman, saints' lives, or the miracle play. Among the texts and films studied are works by Bonnefoy, Cocteau, Flaubert, Genevoix, Giono, and Gracq.

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GERM B223 Topics in German Cultural Studies
Not offered 2018-19
This is a topics course. Course content varies. Recent topics include Remembered Violence, Global Masculinities, and Crime and Detection in German.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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GERM B231 Cultural Profiles in Modern Exile
Fall 2018
This course investigates the anthropological, philosophical, psychological, cultural, and literary aspects of modern exile. It studies exile as experience and metaphor in the context of modernity, and examines the structure of the relationship between imagined/remembered homelands and transnational identities, and the dialectics of language loss and bi- and multi-lingualism. Particular attention is given to the psychocultural dimensions of linguistic exclusion and loss. Readings of works by Julia Alvarez, Albert Camus, Ana Castillo, Sigmund Freud, Eva Hoffman, Maxine Hong Kingston, Milan Kundera, Friedrich Nietzsche, Salman Rushdie, W. G. Sebald, Kurban Said, and others.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

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GERM B245 Interdisciplinary Approaches to German Literature and Culture
Section 001 (Spring 2018): Crime, Justice and the Courtroom
Not offered 2018-19
This is a topics course. Taught in German. Course content varies. Previous topics include, Women's Narratives on Modern Migrancy, Exile, and Diasporas; Nation and Identity in Post-War Austria. Current topic: Crime, Justice and the Courtroom. This is a film-based course about political trials at critical junctures of German history.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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GERM B320 Topics in German Literature and Culture
Section 001 (Fall 2018): 1968 and Its Legacies
Fall 2018
This is a topics course. Course content varies. Taught in German.
Current topic description: This year marks the 50th anniversary of 1968. This course, taught in German, revisits the events of that watershed year and its enduring legacies in postwar German and European politics and history. Using literature and film, the course examines crucial topics including the student protest movement, the women's movement, Prague Spring, protests against the Vietnam War, and the terrorist campaigns of the Red Army Faction in the 1970s that culminated in what is known as the German Autumn.

Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

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HART B110 Critical Approaches to Visual Representation: Identification in the Cinema
Fall 2018
An introduction to the analysis of film through particular attention to the role of the spectator. Why do moving images compel our fascination? How exactly do film spectators relate to the people, objects, and places that appear on the screen? Wherein lies the power of images to move, attract, repel, persuade, or transform its viewers? In this course, students will be introduced to film theory through the rich and complex topic of identification. We will explore how points of view are framed in cinema, and how those viewing positions differ from those of still photography, advertising, video games, and other forms of media. Students will be encouraged to consider the role the cinematic medium plays in influencing our experience of a film: how it is not simply a film's content, but the very form of representation that creates interactions between the spectator and the images on the screen. Film screenings include Psycho, Being John Malkovich, and others. Course is geared to freshman and those with no prior film instruction. Fulfills History of Art major 100-level course requirement, Film Studies minor Introductory course or Theory course requirement.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

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HART B306 Film Theory
Not offered 2018-19
An introduction to major developments in film theory and criticism. Topics covered include: the specificity of film form; cinematic realism; the cinematic "author"; the politics and ideology of cinema; the relation between cinema and language; spectatorship, identification, and subjectivity; archival and historical problems in film studies; the relation between film studies and other disciplines of aesthetic and social criticism. Each week of the syllabus pairs critical writing(s) on a central principle of film analysis with a cinematic example. Class will be divided between discussion of critical texts and attempts to apply them to a primary cinematic text. Prerequisite: A course in Film Studies (HART B110, HART B299, ENGL B205, or the equivalent from another college by permission of instructor).
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

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HART B340 Topics in Baroque Art
Not offered 2018-19
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

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ITAL B211 Primo Levi, the Holocaust, and Its Aftermath
Not offered 2018-19
A consideration, through analysis and appreciation of his major works, of how the horrific experience of the Holocaust awakened in Primo Levi a growing awareness of his Jewish heritage and led him to become one of the dominant voices of that tragic historical event, as well as one of the most original new literary figures of post-World War II Italy. Always in relation to Levi and his works, attention will also be given to Italian women writers whose works are also connected with the Holocaust. Course is taught in English. An extra hour will be scheduled for those students taking the course for Italian or Romance Languages credit.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

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ITAL B212 Italy today: Migration Studies
Not offered 2018-19
There are numerous economic, political, and cultural elements that encumber on the existential condition of the migrant. In political and ideological parlance the term migrant has come to mean poor, needy, precarious, unhappy, primitive, and even criminal. In Italy, furthermore, the colonial past has been foreclosed, leading to a strengthening of stereotypes that continue to populate the discourse on migration. In this course we will examine issues related to migration, such as colonialism. racism, gender relations, discrimination, identity and difference and how they re-present new forms of multicultural and contaminated life and their impact on geography, security, identity, and belonging. . Is multiculturalism the answer to all the problems? Does it resolve the problem of closed communities so eloquently discussed by Bauman? With the help of Italian cinema of migration and selected critical articles we will discuss different positions and follow the migrants as they cross desert and sea to reach the European metropolis. From Libya to Lampedusa, from the Balkans to Puglia, and from there to the Roman peripheries, to the center of the city.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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ITAL B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Critical Theories
Fall 2018
What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.
Current topic description: What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.

Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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ITAL B214 The Myth of Venice (1800-2000)
Not offered 2018-19
In English. The Republic of Venice existed for over a millennium. This course begins in the year 1797 at the end of the Republic and the emerging of an extensive body of literature centered on Venice and its mythical facets. Readings will include the Romantic views of Venice (excerpts from Lord Byron, Fredrick Schiller, Wolfang von Goethe, Ugo Foscolo, Alessandro Manzoni) and the 20th century reshaping of the literary myth (readings from Thomas Mann, Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, Gabriele D'Annunzio, Henry James, and others). A journey into this fascinating tradition will shed light on how the literary and visual representation of Venice, rather than focusing on a nostalgic evocation of the death of the Republic, became a territory of exploration for literary modernity. The course is offered in English; all texts are provided in translation. One additional hour for students who want Italian credit. Suggested Preparation: Counts toward Comp Lit. Counts toward Film Studies.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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RUSS B214 Anna Karenina and the Tasks of Literature
Not offered 2018-19
This course takes Lev Tolstoy's Anna Karenina as its centerpiece and most sustained point of interest. We will begin with a few of Tolstoy's important early works (notably, his Childhood. Boyhood. Youth.), then read Anna Karenina slowly and in detail, identifying its chief formal and thematic characteristics and thinking about the novel's aesthetics in relation to the ethical questions it raises. These questions traverse a broad range of topics from marital infidelity and legally recognized forms of kinship to a critique of Russian imperial geopolitics and military interventions from a standpoint that prefigures Tolstoy's late-in-life radical pacifism. Next, we will read three novels (Gustave Flaubert's Madame Bovary, Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter, Alexander Pushkin's Eugene Onegin) that, much as they predate Tolstoy's masterpiece, help us bring the central preoccupations of Anna Karenina into sharper focus. We will conclude the course with Tolstoy's late short works, a short story by Anton Chekhov, and Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway, which we will contemplate as a reply to and a potential re-writing of Anna Karenina, since the English modernist famously declared that she had "nearly every scene of Anna Karenina branded in [her.]" All readings in English.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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RUSS B218 The Coming-Of-Age Novel in 19th-century Europe
Fall 2018
We will study a selection of nineteenth-century French, English, and Russian novels that are concerned with the education, development, and maturing of a young protagonist. These are novels that imagine the often difficult compromise between individual aspirations and the drive towards social integration. We will think about why the Bildungsroman - or, coming-of-age novel - turned out to be one of the most productive and popular literary forms of nineteenth-century Europe. We will study works by such authors as Pushkin, Balzac, Stendhal, Charlotte Brontë, Dickens, Dostoevsky, Goncharov, Tolstoy, Flaubert and others. (Content will vary somewhat each time the course is offered.) We will think about the depiction of childhood and early adulthood; families; national and imperial polities and politics; the relationship between geographic, social, and economic mobility; domestic and professional selves and spaces; gender and sexuality.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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RUSS B238 Topics: The History of Cinema 1895 to 1945
Not offered 2018-19
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

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SPAN B211 Borges y sus lectores
Spring 2019
Primary emphasis on Borges and his poetics of reading; other writers are considered to illustrate the semiotics of texts, society, and traditions. Prerequisite: SPAN B120; or another SPAN 200-level course. Critical Interpretation (CI). Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o

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SPAN B311 Crimen y detectives en la narrativa hispánica contemporánea
Not offered 2018-19
An analysis of the rise of the hard-boiled genre in contemporary Hispanic narrative and its contrast to classic detective fiction, as a context for understanding contemporary Spanish and Latin American culture. Discussion of pertinent theoretical implications and the social and political factors that contributed to the genre's evolution and popularity. Prerequisite: at least one SPAN 200-level course.

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