This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's calendars page.

Fall 2020

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
EALC B270-001Topics in Chinese History: History of the Silk RoadSemester / 1LEC: 8:40 PM-10:00 PM MTHDalton Hall 300Mi,X.
EALC B270-002Topics in Chinese History: History of Borderland in Imperial ChinaSemester / 1LEC: 11:10 AM-12:30 PM TFGoodhart Hall Music RoomWu,T.
EALC B398-001Senior SeminarSemester / 1Lecture: 5:40 PM- 7:30 PM THDept. staff, TBA
EALC B403-001Supervised WorkSemester / 1Dept. staff, TBA
CNSE B001-001Intensive First-Year ChineseSemester / 1.5Lecture: 9:40 AM-11:00 AM MTHLiu,Y.
CNSE B001-002Intensive First-Year ChineseSemester / 1.5Lecture: 11:10 AM-12:30 PM MTHLiu,Y.

Spring 2021

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
EALC B131-001Chinese CivilizationSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWJiang,Y.
EALC B264-001Human Rights in ChinaSemester / 1Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MWJiang,Y.
EALC B310-001Advanced Readings in the Graphic NarrativeSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM TKwa,S.
EALC B322-001Topics: Considering the Dream of Red Chambers: Garden in the Dream of Red ChambersSemester / 1LEC: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM THKwa,S.
EALC B403-001Supervised WorkSemester / 1Dept. staff, TBA
CNSE B002-001Intensive First-Year ChineseSemester / 1.5Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHLiu,Y., Liu,Y.
Drill at Haverford: 8:30 AM- 9:30 AM MWF
Drill at Haverford: 9:30 AM-10:30 AM MWF
Drill at Haverford: 10:30 AM-11:30 AM MWF
CNSE B002-002Intensive First-Year ChineseSemester / 1.5Lecture: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTHLiu,Y., Liu,Y.
Drill at Haverford: 8:30 AM- 9:30 AM MWF
Drill at Haverford: 9:30 AM-10:30 AM MWF
Drill at Haverford: 10:30 AM-11:30 AM MWF
CNSE B102-001Third-Year ChineseSemester / 1Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MWZhang,C.
SOCL B268-001Environmental SustainabilitySemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWWright,N.

Fall 2021

(Class schedules for this semester will be posted at a later date.)

2020-21 Catalog Data

EALC B110 Intro to Chinese Literature (in English)
Not offered 2020-21
Students will study a wide range of texts from the beginnings through the Qing dynasty. The course focuses on the genres of poetry, prose, fiction and drama, and considers how both the forms and their content overlap and interact. Taught in English.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Visual Studies

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EALC B131 Chinese Civilization
Spring 2021
A broad chronological survey of Chinese culture and society from the Bronze Age to the 1800s, with special reference to such topics as belief, family, language, the arts and sociopolitical organization. Readings include primary sources in English translation and secondary studies.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward East Asian Languages and Cultures

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EALC B200 Major Seminar: Methods and Approaches in East Asian Studies
Not offered 2020-21
This course introduces current and prospective majors to the scope and methods of East Asian Studies. It employs readings on East Asian history and culture as a platform for exercises in critical analysis, bibliography, cartography and the formulation of research topics and approaches. It culminates in a substantial research essay. Required of East Asian Studies majors, but open to others by permission, the course should be taken before the senior year. Prerequisite: One year of Chinese or Japanese.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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EALC B212 Topics: Introduction to Chinese Literature
Section 001 (Fall 2019): Late imperial fiction and drama
Not offered 2020-21
This is a topics course. Topics may vary.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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EALC B225 Topics in Modern Chinese Literature
Not offered 2020-21
This a topics course. This course explores modern China from the early 20th century to the present through its literature, art and films, reading them as commentaries of their own time. Topics vary.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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EALC B240 Topics in Chinese Film
Not offered 2020-21
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Visual Studies

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EALC B255 Understanding Comics: Introduction to Reading the Graphic No
Not offered 2020-21
The graphic narrative form has proliferated at a breathtaking rate in the last several decades. Called "comics," "graphic novels," and many other terms in between, these word-image hybrids have been embraced by both popular and critical audiences. But what is a graphic novel? How do we conceive of these texts and, more importantly, how do we read, interpret and write about them? This course is focused on approaches to reading the graphic novel, with a focus on a subgenre called the "literary comic." Our first approach is to consider different kinds of primary source texts and ask if and how they fulfill our understanding of the graphic narrative. This consideration will include various test cases, from wordless comics, to texts used as images, to the many varieties of word-image hybrids that are called comic books. Our second approach is to examine different scholarly approaches to analyzing graphic narratives, base d in different disciplines such as memoir studies, trauma studies, visual and material culture, history, semiotics, and, especially, narratology. Primary source readings include texts by Ware, Barry, Clowes, and Burns. Secondary readings include Hirsch, McCloud, Barthes, Iser, and Groensteen.Three short assignments due during the semester, and a final project due at the end of exam period (see description below). Students will also rotate responsibilities for starting discussions with small presentations aimed at discussing readings in depth. Students taking this course for their major in EALC or COML should meet with the instructor to discuss specific requirements.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Visual Studies

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EALC B261 Chinese Environmental Culture
Not offered 2020-21
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward East Asian Languages and Cultures

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EALC B264 Human Rights in China
Spring 2021
This course will examine China's human rights issues from a historical perspective. The topics include diverse perspectives on human rights, historical background, civil rights, religious practice, justice system, education, as well as the problems concerning some social groups such as migrant laborers, women, ethnic minorities and peasants.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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EALC B265 Chinese Empires: Yuan, Ming, and Qing
Not offered 2020-21
The Yuan, Ming, and Qing dynasties (1271-1912) witnessed fundamental transformations in imperial China. The Mongols made China part of its vast land empire in the Yuan; Han Chinese restored the ethnic Han dominance in the Ming; and the Manchus established China's largest conquest empire during the Qing. These imperial experiences not only enriched Chinese cultural traditions but also left profound and ever-lasting legacies for contemporary China. From a historical perspective, this course examines the Chinese empires by focusing on such topics as the formation and growth of imperial government; the changing relationship between the central bureaucracy and local society; the interaction of diverse ethnic groups; the tension between agrarian economy and commercialization; the roles of women in family and society; the dynamics of elite and popular cultures; the interplay between Chinese empires and foreign forces; and China's search for m odernity. This course will meet the College requirements for "Approaches to Inquiry" in "Cross-cultural Analysis" and "Inquiry into the Past." Class time: 70% lecture, and 30% discussion.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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EALC B270 Topics in Chinese History
Section 001 (Fall 2020): History of the Silk Road
Section 002 (Fall 2020): History of Borderland in Imperial China
Fall 2020
This is a topics course, course content varies.
Current topic description: This course will examine the borderlands around late imperial China during the tenth to nineteenth centuries. We will combine different borderland spaces with specific themes. Tibet, Mongol, Xinjiang and Southeast Asian highland will be examined in detail; and topics such as environment, gender, ethnicity will be covered.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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EALC B310 Advanced Readings in the Graphic Narrative
Spring 2021
This advanced seminar focuses on critical and theoretical approaches to the graphic novel. In the past several decades, a genre of "auteur comics" has emerged from the medium that are highly literary with a deep engagement between form and meaning. This seminar focuses on weekly close readings of such graphic novels with rigorous analysis of form and content. Primary text readings are supplemented with readings from literary theory, visual studies, and philosophy. Participants are expected to be comfortable with the application of literary critical theory and visual studies theory to texts. There are no prerequisites for the course, but due to the quantity and complexity of the reading material, some background in literary study is necessary. Students interested in taking this course in fulfillment of a major requirement in Comparative Literature or East Asian Languages and Cultures will need to discuss with me prior to enrollment. Preference given to students who have taken EALC B255. This semester (Spring 2021) we will explore theories of narrative in the context of the graphic narrative. Students will read and view primary texts, supplemented by theoretical readings, that engage questions of how subjects develop through unconventional notions of "travel" in time, space, or both. THIS COURSE IS OFFERED AS PART OF A 360
Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward East Asian Languages and Cultures
Counts toward Visual Studies

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EALC B315 Spirits, Saints, Snakes, Swords: Women in East Asian Literature & Film
Not offered 2020-21
This interdisciplinary course focuses on a critical survey of literary and visual texts by and about Chinese women. We will begin by focusing on the cultural norms that defined women's lives beginning in early China, and consider how those tropes are reflected and rejected over time and geographical borders (in Japan, Hong Kong and the United States). No prior knowledge of Chinese culture or language necessary.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Film Studies

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EALC B322 Topics: Considering the Dream of Red Chambers
Section 001 (Spring 2021): Garden in the Dream of Red Chambers
Spring 2021
The Dream of Red Chambers (Hongloumeng) is arguably the most important novel in Chinese literary history. The novel tells the story of the waxing and waning of fortunes of the Jia family and their networks of family and social relations, and in its finely articulated details also serves as a chronicle of the Qing dynasty, an examination of visual culture, environment, kinship, sociology, economics, religious and cultural beliefs, and the structures of domestic life. In addition to addressing these aspects that we might categorize as external, the novel also turns inwards and examines the human heart and mind. How can we know another? How do we define ourselves? These questions, and many others, have occupied scholars for the last two centuries. We will spend the semester reading all five volumes of the David Hawkes translation, with secondary readings assigned to guide the discussion based on the semester's theme. Course topics varies.
Current topic description: This semester we will read "The Dream of Red Chambers" in its entirety alongside other works of Chinese literature set in gardens. Supplementary readings from literary an critical theory. This is a seminar with student-led discussions.

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EALC B325 Topics in Chinese History and Culture
Not offered 2020-21
This is a topics course. Course content varies.

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EALC B345 Topics in East Asian Culture
Not offered 2020-21
This is a topics course. Course contents vary.

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EALC B353 The Environment on China's Frontiers
Not offered 2020-21
This seminar explores environmental issues on China's frontiers from a historical perspective. It focuses on the particular relationship between the environment and the frontier, examining how these two variables have interacted. The course will deal with the issues such as the relationship between the environment and human ethnic and cultural traditions, social movements, economic growth, political and legal institutions and practices, and changing perceptions. The frontier regions under discussion include Tibet, Xinjiang, Inner Mongolia, and the southwestern ethnic areas, which are all important in defining what China is and who the Chinese are.

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EALC B355 Animals, Vegetables, Minerals in East Asian Literature & Fiction
Not offered 2020-21
This semester, we will explore how artists question, explore, celebrate, and critique the relationships between humans and the environment. Through a topics-focused course, students will examine the ways that narratives about environment have shaped the way that humans have defined themselves. We will be reading novels and short stories and viewing films that contest conventional binaries of man and animal, civilization and nature, tradition and technology, and even truth and fiction. "Animals, Vegetables, Minerals" does not follow chronological or geographical frameworks, but chooses texts that engage the three categories enumerated as the major themes of our course. We will read and discuss animal theory, theories of place and landscape, and theories of modernization or mechanization; and there will be frequent (and intentional) overlap between these categories. We will also be watching films that extend our theoretical questions of thes e themes beyond national, linguistic, and generic borders. You are expected to view this course as a collaborative process in which you share responsibility for leading discussion. There are no prerequisites or language expectations, but students should have some basic knowledge of East Asian, especially Sinophone, history and culture, or be willing to do some additional reading (suggested by the instructor) to achieve an adequate contextual background for exploring these texts.
Counts toward Environmental Studies
Counts toward Visual Studies

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EALC B398 Senior Seminar
A research workshop culminating in the writing and presentation of a senior thesis. Required of all majors; open to concentrators and others by permission.

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EALC B403 Supervised Work

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CNSE B001 Intensive First-Year Chinese
Fall 2020
An intensive introductory course in modern spoken and written Chinese. The development of oral-aural skills is integrated through grammar explanations and drill sessions designed to reinforce new material through active practice. Six hours a week of lecture and oral practice plus one-on-one sessions with the instructor. This is a year-long course; both semesters are required for credit. Requires attendance at class and drills.
Course does not meet an Approach

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CNSE B002 Intensive First-Year Chinese
Spring 2021
An intensive introductory course in modern spoken and written Chinese. The development of oral-aural skills is integrated through grammar explanations and drill sessions designed to reinforce new material through active practice. Six hours a week of lecture and oral practice plus one-on-one sessions with the instructor. This is a year-long course; both semesters are required for credit. Attendance required at class and drills
Course does not meet an Approach

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CNSE B007 First-Year Chinese Non-Intensive
Not offered 2020-21
This course is designed for students who have some facility in listening, speaking, reading and writing Chinese but have not yet achieved sufficient proficiency to take Second Year Chinese. It is a year-long course that covers the same lessons as the intensive First Year Chinese, but the class meets only three hours a week. Students must place into Chinese B007 through the Chinese Language Placement exam.
Course does not meet an Approach

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CNSE B102 Third-Year Chinese
Spring 2021
A focus on overall language skills through reading and discussion of modern short essays, as well as on students' facility in written and oral expression. Audio- and videotapes of drama and films are used as study aids. Prerequisite(s): CNSE 101
Counts toward Counts toward East Asian Languages and Cultures

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COML B225 Censorship: Historical Contexts, Local Practices and Global Resonance
Not offered 2020-21
The course is in English. It examines the ban on books, films, and art in a global context through a study of the historical and sociopolitical conditions of censorship practices. This semester our focus will be on Germany and China. The course raises such questions as how censorship is used to fortify political power, how it is practiced locally and globally, who censors, what are the categories of censorship, how censorship succeeds and fails, and how writers and artists write and create against and within censorship. The last question leads to an analysis of rhetorical strategies that writers and artists employ to translate the expression of repression, trauma, and torture into idioms of resistance. Current focus: Censorship in Germany and China. German majors/minors can get German Studies credit. Prerequisite: EMLY B001 or a 100-level intensive writing course.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward East Asian Languages and Cultures

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HART B274 History of Chinese Art
Not offered 2020-21
This course is a survey of the arts of China from Neolithic to the contemporary period, focusing on bronze vessels of the Shang and Zhou dynasties, the Chinese appropriation of Buddhist art, and the evolution of landscape and figure painting traditions.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Museum Studies

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HART B370 Topics in Chinese Art
Section 001 (Fall 2019): Visual and Material Perspectives on the Silk Road
Not offered 2020-21
This is a topics course. Course content varies.

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POLS B227 Field Seminar in Comparative Politics
Not offered 2020-21
This seminar introduces the intellectual history of comparative politics, and explore the primary approaches and concepts scholars employ in order to systematically analyze the political world. In doing so, we will also examine the political structures, institutions, and behaviors of a number of countries around the world. Key questions we will discuss include: What is power and how is it exercised? What are the differences between democratic and authoritarian regimes? How do different countries develop their economies? What factors affect the way that countries behave in the international arena? By the end of this course, students will be equipped to answer these questions, and prepared for further study in political science. Freshman may not take this course and can take POLS B131. If you took POLS 131 in 2014 or 2015, you may not take this course.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

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POLS B334 Three Faces of Chinese Power: Money, Might, and Minds
Not offered 2020-21
China's extraordinary growth for the past 30 years has confirmed the power of free markets, while simultaneously challenging our thoughts on the foundations and limits of the market economy. Moreover, China's ever-increasing economic freedom and prosperity have been accompanied by only limited steps toward greater political freedom and political liberalization, running counter to one of the most consistent patterns of political economic development in recent history. This course examines China's unique economic and political development path, and the opportunities and challenges it accompanies. This course has three aims: 1) to facilitate an in-depth understanding of the political and economic development with Chinese characteristics, 2) to conduct a comprehensive analysis of three dimensions of Chinese economic, political and cultural power, and 3) to construct a thorough understanding of challenges and opportunities for China from its extraordinary developmental path. This is a senior seminar. Prerequisite: two courses either in Political Science or East Asian Languages and Culture. Junior or Senior Standing required.

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SOCL B268 Environmental Sustainability
Spring 2021
This course relates a broadly construed understanding of environmental sustainability to the historical development of the major concepts and developments in sociology. It situates the development of sociology as responding to major social problems in the natural and built environment, and demonstrates how the key theoretical developments and empirical findings of sociology are crucial in understanding how these problems develop, persist, and are addressed or fail to be addressed. Conceptually, it begins with the radical environmental changes at the dawn of modernity that gave rise to European sociology and the massive urban social problems experienced in rapidly changing urban areas that gave rise to American sociology. Empirically, it moves through a series of more contemporary case studies of environmental problems (including both single-event "disasters" and ongoing slowly developing ever-present realities) that demonstrate both the context for sociology's development and the promise sociology offers in understanding environmental problems. The course will have a global focus drawing on case studies from North America, South America, Europe, Africa, with special attention given to East Asia.
Course does not meet an Approach

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