This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's master calendar.

Fall 2017

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
ENVS B101-001Introduction to Environmental StudiesSemester / 1Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MWBarber,D., Hager,C.
CITY B345-001Advanced Topics in Environment and Society: Sustainable CitiesSemester / 1LEC: 12:10 PM- 2:00 PM FRaddatz,L.
ECON B242-001Economics of Local Environmental ProgramsSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWRoss,D.
GEOL B203-001Biosphere Through TimeSemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHMarenco,K., Marenco,P.
Lab: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM M
GEOL B206-001Energy Resources and SustainabilitySemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHBarber,D.
GEOL B302-001Low-Temperature GeochemistrySemester / 1LEC: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHMarenco,P.
POLS B256-001Global Politics of Climate ChangeSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWHager,C.

Spring 2018

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
ENVS B397-001Senior Seminar in Environmental StudiesSemester / 1Lecture: 9:10 AM-12:00 PM THBarber,D.
BIOL B332-001Global Change BiologySemester / 1Lecture: 11:40 AM- 1:00 PM MWMozdzer,T.
CITY B201-001Introduction to GIS for Social and Environmental AnalysisSemester / 1Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTHRaddatz,L.
ECON B234-001Environmental EconomicsSemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHRoss,D.
GEOL B209-001Natural HazardsSemester / 1Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:00 AM MWFMarenco,K.
PHIL B240-001Environmental EthicsSemester / 1Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MWDostal,R.

Fall 2018

(Class schedules for this semester will be posted at a later date.)

2017-18 Catalog Data

ENVS B101 Introduction to Environmental Studies
Fall 2017
This interdisciplinary introduction to Environmental Studies Minor examines the ideas, themes and methodologies of humanists, social scientists, and natural scientists in order to understand what they have to offer each other in the study of the environment, and how their inquiries can be strengthened when working in concert.
Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Environmental Studies

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ENVS B397 Senior Seminar in Environmental Studies
Spring 2018
In this capstone course, senior Environmental Studies minors from across the disciplines will draw on the perspectives and skills gained from their majors and from their preparatory work in the minor to collaboratively engage high-level questions of environmental inquiry. Prerequisite: Open only to Environmental Studies minors who have completed all introductory work for the minor.
Counts toward Environmental Studies

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ENVS B403 Independent Study

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ANTH B210 Medical Anthropology
Not offered 2017-18
This course examines the relationships between culture, society, disease and illness. It considers a broad range of health-related experiences, discourses, knowledge and practice among different cultures and among individuals and groups in different positions of power. Topics covered include sorcery, herbal remedies, healing rituals, folk illnesses, modern disease, scientific medical perceptions, clinical technique, epidemiology and political economy of medicine. Prerequisite: ANTH 102, H103 or permission of instructor.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

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ANTH B237 Environmental Health
Not offered 2017-18
This course introduces principles and methods in environmental anthropology and public health used to analyze global environmental health problems globally and develop health and disease control programs. Topics covered include risk; health and environment; food production and consumption; human health and agriculture; meat and poultry production; and culture, urbanization, and disease. Prerequisite: ANTH B102, H103 or permission of instructor.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

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ANTH B244 Global Perspectives on Early Farmers and Social Change
Not offered 2017-18
Throughout most of human history our ancestors practiced lifestyles focused upon the gathering and hunting of wild plants and animals. Today, however, a globalized agricultural economy supports a population of over seven billion individuals. This course utilizes information produced by archaeologists around the globe to examine this major historical transition while asking big questions like: What impact did the adoption of agriculture have on communities in the past, and how did farming spread to different world regions? We will also consider how the current farming system influences our own society. How does farming still affect our lives today, and how will the history of agricultural change shape our collective future? Counts toward Environmental Studies minor.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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ARCH B104 Archaeology of Agricultural and Urban Revolutions
Not offered 2017-18
This course examines the archaeology of the two most fundamental changes that have occurred in human society in the last 12,000 years, agriculture and urbanism, and we explore these in Egypt and the Near East as far as India. We also explore those societies that did not experience these changes.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Geoarchaeology
Counts toward Counts toward Middle Eastern & Islamic Studies

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BIOL B262 Urban Ecosystems
Not offered 2017-18
Cities can be considered ecosystems whose functions are highly influenced by human activity. This course will address many of the living and non-living components of urban ecosystems, as well as their unique processes. Using an approach focused on case studies, the course will explore the ecological and environmental problems that arise from urbanization, and also examine solutions that have been attempted. Prerequisite: BIOL B110 or B111 or ENVS B101.
Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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BIOL B323 Coastal and Marine Ecology
Not offered 2017-18
An interdisciplinary course exploring the ecological, biogeochemical, and physical aspects of coastal and marine ecosystems. We will compare intertidal habitats in both temperate and tropical environments, with a specific emphasis on global change impacts on coastal systems (e.g. sea level rise, warming, and species shifts). In 2015 the course will have a mandatory field trip to a tropical marine field station and an overnight field trip to a temperate field station in the mid-Atlantic. Prerequisite: BIOL B220 (Ecology)
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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BIOL B332 Global Change Biology
Spring 2018
Global changes to our environment present omnipresent environmental challenges. We are only beginning to understand the complex interactions between organisms and the rapidly changing environment. Students will explore the effects of global change on ecosystems by analyzing the primary literature and the latest IPCC report. In 2017, there will be a mandatory one-day field trip to the Smithsonian Global Change Research Wetland. Prerequisites: BIOL B220, BIOL 225 or BIOL B262, or permission of instructor.
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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CITY B201 Introduction to GIS for Social and Environmental Analysis
Spring 2018
This course is designed to introduce the foundations of GIS with emphasis on applications for social and environmental analysis. It deals with basic principles of GIS and its use in spatial analysis and information management. Ultimately, students will design and carry out research projects on topics of their own choosing. Prerequisite: At least sophomore standing and Quantitative Readiness are required (i.e.the quantitative readiness assessment or Quan B001).
Quantitative Readiness Required (QR)
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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CITY B278 American Environmental History
Not offered 2017-18
This course explores major themes of American environmental history, examining changes in the American landscape, the history of ideas about nature and the interaction between the two. Students will study definitions of nature, environment, and environmental history while investigating interactions between Americans and their physical worlds.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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CITY B345 Advanced Topics in Environment and Society
Section 001 (Spring 2017): Sustainable Cities
Section 001 (Fall 2017): Sustainable Cities
Fall 2017
This is a topics course. Topics vary.
Current topic description: How can cities help address today's most pressing environmental problems? Are sustainable urban environments possible, and if so, what would they look like? This course explores these and other questions by examining theories, politics and practices of sustainability in urban contexts from a global perspective.

Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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EALC B352 China's Environment
Not offered 2017-18
This seminar explores China's environmental issues from a historical perspective. It begins by considering a range of analytical approaches , and then explores three general periods in China's environmental changes, imperial times, Mao's socialist experiments during the first thirty years of the People's Republic, and the post-Mao reforms. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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EALC B353 The Environment on China's Frontiers
Not offered 2017-18
This seminar explores environmental issues on China's frontiers from a historical perspective. It focuses on the particular relationship between the environment and the frontier, examining how these two variables have interacted. The course will deal with the issues such as the relationship between the environment and human ethnic and cultural traditions, social movements, economic growth, political and legal institutions and practices, and changing perceptions. The frontier regions under discussion include Tibet, Xinjiang, Inner Mongolia, and the southwestern ethnic areas, which are all important in defining what China is and who the Chinese are.

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EALC B362 Environment in Contemporary East Asia: China and Japan
Not offered 2017-18
This seminar explores environmental issues in contemporary East Asia from a historical perspective. It will explore the common and different environmental problems in Japan and China, and explain and interpret their causal factors and solving measures in cultural traditions, social movements, economic growth, political and legal institutions and practices, international cooperation and changing perceptions. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above.
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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ECON B234 Environmental Economics
Spring 2018
Introduction to the use of economic analysis to explain the underlying behavioral causes of environmental and natural resource problems and to evaluate policy responses to them. Topics may include air and water pollution; the economic theory of externalities, public goods and the depletion of resources; cost-benefit analysis; valuing non-market benefits and costs; economic justice; and sustainable development. Prerequisites: ECON B105.
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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ECON B242 Economics of Local Environmental Programs
Fall 2017
Considers the determinants of human impact on the environment at the neighborhood or community level and policy responses available to local government. How can economics help solve and learn from the problems facing rural and suburban communities? The instructor was a local township supervisor who will share the day-to-day challenges of coping with land use planning, waste disposal, dispute resolution, and the provision of basic services. Prerequisite: ECON B105.
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Praxis Program

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ENGL B218 Ecological Imaginings
Not offered 2017-18
Re-thinking the evolving nature of representation, with a focus on language as a link between natural and cultural ecosystems. We will observe the world; read classical and cutting edge ecolinguistic, ecoliterary, ecofeminist, and ecocritical theory, along with a wide range of exploratory, speculative, and imaginative essays and stories; and seek a variety of ways of expressing our own ecological interests.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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GEOL B103 Earth Systems and the Environment
Not offered 2017-18
This integrated approach to studying the Earth focuses on interactions among geology, oceanography, and biology. Also discussed are the consequences of human energy consumption, industrial development, and land use. Two lectures and one afternoon of laboratory or fieldwork per week. A required field trip is taken in April.
Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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GEOL B203 Biosphere Through Time
Fall 2017
We will explore how the Earth-life system has evolved through time by studying the interactions between life, climate, and tectonic processes. During the lab component of the course, we will study important fossil groups to better understand their paleoecology and roles in the Earth-life system.
Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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GEOL B206 Energy Resources and Sustainability
Fall 2017
An examination of issues concerning the supply of energy required by humanity. This includes an investigation of the geological framework that determines resource availability, aspects of energy production and resource development and the science of global climate change. Two 90-minute lectures a week. Suggested preparation: one year of college science.
Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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GEOL B209 Natural Hazards
Spring 2018
A quantitative approach to understanding the earth processes that impact human societies. We consider the past, current, and future hazards presented by geologic processes, including earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, floods, and hurricanes. The course includes discussion of the social, economic, and policy contexts within which natural geologic processes become hazards. Case studies are drawn from contemporary and ancient societies. Lecture three hours a week. Prerequisite: one semester of college science or permission of instructor.
Quantitative Methods (QM)
Quantitative Readiness Required (QR)
Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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GEOL B302 Low-Temperature Geochemistry
Fall 2017
Stable isotope geochemistry is one of the most important subfields of the Earth sciences for understanding environmental and climatic change. In this course, we will explore stable isotopic fundamentals and applications including a number of important case studies from the recent and deep time dealing with important biotic events in the fossil record and major climate changes. Prerequisites: GEOL 101 or GEOL 102, and at least one semester of chemistry or physics, or professor approval.
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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PHIL B240 Environmental Ethics
Spring 2018
This course surveys rights- and justice-based justifications for ethical positions on the environment. It examines approaches such as stewardship, intrinsic value, land ethic, deep ecology, ecofeminism, Asian and aboriginal. It explores issues such as obligations to future generations, to nonhumans and to the biosphere.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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POLS B256 Global Politics of Climate Change
Fall 2017
This course will introduce students to important political issues raised by climate change locally, nationally, and internationally, paying particular attention to the global implications of actions at the national and subnational levels. It will focus not only on specific problems, but also on solutions; students will learn about some of the technological and policy innovations that are being developed worldwide in response to the challenges of climate change.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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POLS B310 Comparative Public Policy
Not offered 2017-18
A comparison of policy processes and outcomes across space and time. Focusing on particular issues such as health care, domestic security, water and land use, we identify institutional, historical, and cultural factors that shape policies. We also examine the growing importance of international-level policy making and the interplay between international and domestic pressures on policy makers. Prerequisite: One course in Political Science or public policy.
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

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POLS B321 Technology and Politics
Not offered 2017-18
A multi-media analysis of the complex role of technology in political and social life. We focus on the relationship between technological change and democratic governance. We begin with historical and contemporary Luddism as well as pro-technology movements around the world. Substantive issue areas include security and surveillance, electoral politics, economic development and women's empowerment, warfare, social media, net neutrality, GMO foods and industrial agriculture, climate change and energy politics.
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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POLS B354 Comparative Social Movements: Power and Mobilization
Not offered 2017-18
A consideration of the conceptualizations of power and "legitimate" and "illegitimate" participation, the political opportunity structure facing potential activists, the mobilizing resources available to them, and the cultural framing within which these processes occur. Specific attention is paid to recent movements within and across countries, such as feminist, environmental, and anti-globalization movements, and to emerging forms of citizen mobilization, including transnational and global networks, electronic mobilization, and collaborative policymaking institutions. Prerequisite: one course in POLS or SOCL or permission of instructor.
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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SOCL B165 Problems in the Natural and Built Environment
Not offered 2017-18
This course situates the development of sociology as responding to major social problems in the natural and built environment. It demonstrates why the key theoretical developments and empirical findings of sociology are crucial in understanding how these problems develop, persist and are addressed or fail to be addressed.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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