This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's calendars page.

Fall 2020

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION / INSTRUCTION MODE INSTR(S)
ENVS B202-001Environment and SocietySemester / 1Lecture: 11:10 AM-12:30 PM TFRemote InstructionDhillon,C.
ENVS B203-001Environmental Humanities: Stories of Justice and InjusticeSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MTHRemote InstructionGrossman,S.
ENVS B322-001Decolonial Science, Technology and EnvironmentSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM WRemote InstructionDhillon,C.
ENVS B350-001Advanced Topics in Environmental Studies: Carbon, Climate & Sea LevelSemester / 1LEC: 11:10 AM-12:30 PM MTHPark 338
Hybrid: In-Person & Remote
Barber,D.
ENVS B397-001Senior Seminar in Environmental StudiesSemester / 1Lecture: 8:40 AM-11:00 AM THRemote InstructionGrossman,S.
ARCH B104-001Archaeology of Agricultural and Urban RevolutionsSemester / 1Lecture: 11:10 AM-12:00 PM MWOld Library 110
Hybrid: In-Person & Remote
Bradbury,J., Bradbury,J., Teaching Assistant,T., Teaching Assistant,T.
Laboratory: 11:10 AM-12:00 PM FOld Library 110
Hybrid: In-Person & Remote
CITY B345-001Advanced Topics in Environment and Society: The City and NatureSemester / 1Lecture: 9:40 AM-12:30 PM TRemote InstructionLee,M.
GEOL B203-001Biosphere Through TimeSemester / 1Lecture: 9:40 AM-11:00 AM MTHPark 300
In Person
Marenco,K., Marenco,P.
Laboratory: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM MPark 300
In Person
GEOL B206-001Energy Resources and SustainabilitySemester / 1Lecture: 8:10 AM- 9:30 AM TFRemote InstructionBarber,D.
GEOL B302-001Low-Temperature GeochemistrySemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM THPark 300
Hybrid: In-Person & Remote
Marenco,P.

Spring 2021

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION / INSTRUCTION MODE INSTR(S)
ENVS B101-001Introduction to Environmental StudiesSemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHTaylor Hall F
In Person
Barber,D.
ENVS B202-001Environment and SocietySemester / 1Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHPark 245
In Person
Dhillon,C.
ENVS B203-001Environmental Humanities: Stories of Justice and InjusticeSemester / 1Lecture: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTHTaylor Hall D
In Person
Grossman,S.
ENVS B322-001Decolonial Science, Technology and EnvironmentSemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHPark 245
In Person
Dhillon,C.
ENVS B352-001Indigenous Peoples, Environments, and JusticeSemester / 1Lecture: 9:10 AM-12:00 PM FIn PersonDhillon,C.
ENVS B397-001Senior Seminar in Environmental StudiesSemester / 1In Person
ENVS B403-001Independent StudySemester / 1Dept. staff, TBA
ENVS B403-001Independent StudySemester / 1Dept. staff, TBA
ANTH B332-001GIS: Space, Landscape, and EnvironmentSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM FCanaday Computer Lab
In Person
Norman,S.
BIOL B332-001Global Change BiologySemester / 1Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTHPark 227
In Person
Mozdzer,T.
CITY B190-001The Form of the City: Urban Form from Antiquity to the PresentSemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHIn Person
CITY B190-00AThe Form of the City: Urban Form from Antiquity to the PresentSemester / 1Discussion: 11:30 AM-12:20 PM TIn PersonLee,M.
CITY B190-00BThe Form of the City: Urban Form from Antiquity to the PresentSemester / 1Discussion: 1:10 PM- 2:00 PM TIn PersonLee,M.
CITY B190-00CThe Form of the City: Urban Form from Antiquity to the PresentSemester / 1Discussion: 10:10 AM-11:00 AM WIn PersonLee,M.
CITY B201-001Introduction to GIS for Social and Environmental AnalysisSemester / 1Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MWCanaday Computer Lab
In Person
Hurley,J.
Discussion: 2:10 AM- 2:40 AM MWIn Person
CSTS B226-001Ecology of the Roman WorldSemester / 1Lecture: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTHIn PersonDevereaux,J.
ENGL B204-001Literatures of American ExpansionSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWIn PersonSchneider,B.
GEOL B108-001Earth's Oceans: Past, Present, and FutureSemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHIn PersonMarenco,P.
GEOL B209-001Natural HazardsSemester / 1Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:00 AM MWFIn PersonMarenco,K.
SOCL B268-001Environmental SustainabilitySemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWIn PersonWright,N.

Fall 2021

(Class schedules for this semester will be posted at a later date.)

2020-21 Catalog Data

ENVS B101 Introduction to Environmental Studies
Spring 2021
The course offers a cross-disciplinary introduction to environmental studies. Tracing an arc from historical analysis to practical engagement, distinctive approaches to key categories of environmental inquiry are presented: political ecology, earth science, energy, economics, public health, ecological design, sustainability, public policy, and environmental ethics. Basic concepts, such as thermodynamics, biodiversity, cost-benefit analysis, scale, modernization, enclosure, the commons, and situational ethics, are variously defined and employed within specific explorations of environmental challenges in the modern world. No divisional credit is awarded for this course at Haverford nor does the course satisfy any of the Bryn Mawr approaches to inquiry.
Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Environmental Studies

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ENVS B200 The Edible Environment: Theory and Ethics
Not offered 2020-21
The course addresses core philosophical questions related to food production, consumption, and representation. The focus is on topics that highlight how we engage with the environment based on what we eat, how we consume it, and the way we talk about it. In the first part (food production), we examine the significance of domestication, taxonomies of edible animals, plants, and microbes, and how recent (bio)technological possibilities are changing our approach to food production. In the second part of the course, we turn to the human body to discuss how hunger, pleasure and taste guide our food consumption. In the third part, we discuss how extant practices of labeling and food criticism influence our understandings of the edible environment. The class draws upon a wide range of resources, including classical and contemporary philosophical texts, food essays, magazine and newspaper articles, videos and images. The course counts as a Social Science/Humanities elective for the Environmental Studies Minor. Suggested preparation is one course in Environmental Studies OR one course in the Cities Program or permission of the instructor.
Course does not meet an Approach

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ENVS B202 Environment and Society
Fall 2020, Spring 2021
This course explores the intersections of natural and built environments with diverse societies. Students will encounter conceptual and analytical tools of the social sciences to inform environmental responses at individual, collective, and institutional levels. Environmental issues broadly understood are not merely problems for society, but stem from cultural patterns and how societies are organized. We will survey social origins of environmental problems across local to global situations. This class draws from environmental sociology, planning, geography, political theory, and environmental health and justice. Participants interact with an array of social science methods and environmental topics. Learning to apply social concepts to environments using multiple perspectives is a core component of the course. Focused segments cover environmental justice, Indigenous peoples' environmentalisms, and social movements of the Global Souths. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC), Writing Attentive. Pre-requisite ENVS B101 or ENVS H101 or instructor's permission.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Quantitative Readiness Required (QR)
Counts toward Environmental Studies

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ENVS B203 Environmental Humanities: Stories of Justice and Injustice
Fall 2020, Spring 2021
Bringing the traditional focus of the humanities-questions of meaning, value, ethics, justice and the politics of knowledge production-into environmental domains calls for a radical reworking of a great deal of what we think we know about ourselves and our fields of inquiry. Inhabiting the difficult space of simultaneous critique and action, this course will re-imagine the proper questions and approaches of the humanities, asking how our accumulated knowledge and practice might be refashioned to meet current environmental challenges, to productively rethink 'the human' in more than human terms. In order to resituate the human within the environment, and to resituate nonhumans within cultural and ethical domains, we will draw on a range of texts and films, and engage in a range of critical and creative practices of our own. Critical Interpretation (CI); Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC). Writing in the major/ Intensive. Prerequisite: ENVS H101 or B101. (hard check prerequisite). Enrollment cap: 18. Lottery Preference(s): Senior ENVS majors, Junior ENVS majors, Sophomores, first-year students. Minors and non-majors by instructor's permission.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Environmental Studies

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ENVS B204 Place, People and Praxis in Environmental Studies
Not offered 2020-21
This course offers a cross-disciplinary introduction to community-based learning. Working with local community groups, students will learn the fundamental skills of praxis work applied to environmental issues within an inquiry-based framework. Pre-requisite: ENVS B101 or ENVS H101 and (ENVS B202, H202, B203, or H203) or instructor's permission.
Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Environmental Studies
Counts toward Praxis Program

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ENVS B322 Decolonial Science, Technology and Environment
Fall 2020, Spring 2021
The course explores the application of decolonial concepts at the intersections of science, technology, and environmental studies. How can we understand uneven social dynamics bound to sciences and technologies--with corresponding opportunities to reconfigure environmental scientific approaches? We analyze case studies that foreground diverse Latina/o and Indigenous populations of the Americas and Caribbean. Four segments include: (I) bridging sociology of science and technology with decolonial theory; (II) conservation and forestry practices; (III) science contestations around pollution and pesticides; and (IV) climate change and disasters. Prerequisite: 200-level course in ENVS or LAILS or SOCL or ANTH or permission of instructor.
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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ENVS B350 Advanced Topics in Environmental Studies
Section 001 (Fall 2020): Carbon, Climate & Sea Level
Section 001 (Spring 2020): Idgns Peoples, Envrmnt & Jstce
Section 001 (Fall 2019): Sustainability Lab: Approaches
Fall 2020
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: This seminar explores recent biogeochemical literature on Earth's short-term carbon cycle with a focus on climate-system feedbacks associated with sea-level change.

Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Environmental Studies

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ENVS B352 Indigenous Peoples, Environments, and Justice
Spring 2021
This seminar draws on voices and writings by contemporary Indigenous peoples across themes in environmental studies, settler colonialism, and movements for justice. Diverse Indigenous collectives challenge ongoing attempts by settler societies to eliminate, appropriate, and stereotype their ways of life. With a regional focus primarily in Native North America, this course seeks to understand varied ecological knowledge-practices by and for contemporary Indigenous peoples. We study contested conceptualizations of sovereignty, rights, recognition, land, justice, race, gender, and tradition through an environmental lens. Selected topics include climate change, Indigenous movements, decolonized environmental futures, and an introduction to Indigenous research methodologies. Prerequisite: 200-level course in ENVS or SOCL or ANTH or HIST or permission of instructor.
Course does not meet an Approach

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ENVS B397 Senior Seminar in Environmental Studies
Fall 2020, Spring 2021
This capstone Environmental Studies course is designed to allow Environmental Studies seniors to actively engage in environmental problem solving. Students bring the perspectives and skills gained from their ENVS focus area and from their preparatory work in the major/minor to collaborate on interdisciplinary projects
Counts toward Environmental Studies

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ENVS B403 Independent Study

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ENVS B403 Independent Study

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ENVS B425 Praxis III: Independent Study
Counts toward Praxis Program

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ANTH B244 Global Perspectives on Early Farmers and Social Change
Not offered 2020-21
Throughout most of human history our ancestors practiced lifestyles focused upon the gathering and hunting of wild plants and animals. Today, however, a globalized agricultural economy supports a population of over seven billion individuals. This course utilizes information produced by archaeologists around the globe to examine this major historical transition while asking big questions like: What impact did the adoption of agriculture have on communities in the past, and how did farming spread to different world regions? We will also consider how the current farming system influences our own society. How does farming still affect our lives today, and how will the history of agricultural change shape our collective future? Counts toward Environmental Studies minor.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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ANTH B254 Anthropology and Social Science Research Methods
Not offered 2020-21
This course is designed for students interested in learning ethnographic methods, qualitative and quantitative social science methods, and how to learn from and write about quantitative and qualitative results. Students will learn and practice ethnographic field methods, for example, observation, participant observation, interviewing, generating and analyzing statistical data, and ways to productively transform qualitative and quantitative data into contextual information. An introduction to the basics of statistical methods for social scientists will also be covered. Ethics in ethnographic research will be a central theme, as well as ways to envision and design projects that protect human subjects. The purpose of this course is to provide anthropology majors and other students in the social sciences and humanities an opportunity to learn methods that can be used in their thesis research, Hanna Holborn Gray summer research, and other social science research opportunities. Anth 101 or 102, or permission of instructor.
Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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ANTH B325 Mobility, Movement, and Migration in the Past
Not offered 2020-21
The movement of human social groups across landscapes, borders, and boundaries is a dominant feature of today's world as well as of the recent historic past. Archaeological research has demonstrated that migration, movement, and mobility were also common features of human life in the more distant past. From examining cases of small-scale groups that were largely defined by constant movements across their social landscapes, to the study of the spread of complex societies and early political states, this course will consider the role of migration in the formation, reproduction, and alteration of human societies. Attention will be paid to how archaeologists recognize and study movement, as well as to how knowledge of the past contributes to a broader anthropological understanding of human migration. Prerequisite: ANTH B101, or permission of instructor

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ANTH B332 GIS: Space, Landscape, and Environment
Spring 2021
In this course, students will become familiar with theories of space, place and landscape and spatial analysis of archaeological and other social science data. This course also serves as a methodological introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS), though it is not exclusively focused on GIS. Students will learn how the concept of space developed in social science, and how archaeologists and other social scientists have broadened their understandings of the past as a result of the spatial turn. Students will be responsible for submitting short practica which are necessary for keeping up with GIS methods. The final project will be a public poster presentation which demonstrates a case study and investigation of any spatial phenomena. These may be archaeology-focused or may utilize contemporary or historical data on environmental, public health, demographic, etc. case studies. There are numerous public datasets available online, or students can use their own data or some of my own in their projects.
Course does not meet an Approach

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ANTH B354 Political Economy, Gender, Ethnicity and Transformation in Vietnam
Not offered 2020-21
Today, Vietnam is in the midst of dramatic social, economic and political changes brought about through a shift from a central economy to a market/capitalist economy since the late 1980s. These changes have resulted in urbanization, a rise in consumption, changes in land use, movement of people, environmental consequences of economic development, and shifts in social and economic relationships and cultural practices as the country has moved from low income to middle income status. This course examines culture and society in Vietnam focusing largely on contemporary Vietnam, but with a view to continuities and historical precedent in past centuries. In this course, we will draw on anthropological studies of Vietnam, as well as literature and historical studies. Relationships between the individual, family, gender, ethnicity, community, land, and state will pervade the topics addressed in the course, as will the importance of political economy, nation, and globalization. In addition to class seminar discussions, students will view documentary and fictional films about Vietnamese culture. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher or first years with ANTH 102.
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

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ARCH B104 Archaeology of Agricultural and Urban Revolutions
Fall 2020
This course examines the archaeology of the two most fundamental changes that have occurred in human society in the last 12,000 years, agriculture and urbanism, and we explore these in Egypt and the Near East as far as India. We also explore those societies that did not experience these changes.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Geoarchaeology
Counts toward Counts toward Middle Eastern Studies

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BIOL B323 Coastal and Marine Ecology
Not offered 2020-21
An interdisciplinary course exploring the ecological, biogeochemical, and physical aspects of coastal and marine ecosystems. We will compare intertidal habitats in both temperate and tropical environments, with a specific emphasis on global change impacts on coastal systems (e.g. sea level rise, warming, and species shifts). Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours per week. In 2020 the course will have a mandatory field trip to a tropical marine field station and an overnight field trip to a temperate field station in the mid-Atlantic. Prerequisite: BIOL B220 or BIOL B225.
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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BIOL B332 Global Change Biology
Spring 2021
Global changes to our environment present omnipresent environmental challenges. We are only beginning to understand the complex interactions between organisms and the rapidly changing environment. Students will explore the effects of global change on ecosystems by critically reading and analyzing the primary literature and the latest IPCC report. In 2021, there will be a mandatory one-day field trip to the Smithsonian Global Change Research Wetland. Prerequisites: BIOL B220, BIOL 225 or BIOL B262, or permission of instructor.
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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CITY B190 The Form of the City: Urban Form from Antiquity to the Present
Spring 2021
This course studies the city as a three-dimensional artifact. A variety of factors, geography, economic and population structure, politics, planning, and aesthetics are considered as determinants of urban form.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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CITY B201 Introduction to GIS for Social and Environmental Analysis
Spring 2021
This course is designed to introduce the foundations of GIS with emphasis on applications for social and environmental analysis. It deals with basic principles of GIS and its use in spatial analysis and information management. Ultimately, students will design and carry out research projects on topics of their own choosing. Prerequisite: At least sophomore standing and Quantitative Readiness are required (i.e.the quantitative readiness assessment or Quan B001).
Quantitative Readiness Required (QR)
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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CITY B345 Advanced Topics in Environment and Society
Section 001 (Fall 2020): The City and Nature
Fall 2020
This is a topics course. Topics vary.
Current topic description: The City and Nature: The Environmental Transformation of Modern Cities: The class examines the emergence of the modern city in Europe and the Americas in relation to their natural environments in order to understand how "country" and "city" were and continue to be mutually constitutive spaces and concepts. Focusing on the era of the Industrial Revolution and the rise of capitalism, the class studies how the planning, building, and regulating of urban built environments were embedded in practices to control, manage, and consume natural resources, and ultimately define nature. An integral part of this subject also concerns the people who both affected and were affected by the decisions to construct and manipulate the terrain, as well as the institutions that were built to manage and define new social relations and public responsibilities of the modern city. This course looks at history of the relationship between the city and the countryside and how it has informed contemporary responses, policies and ideas around global climate change. The readings and materials are diverse, drawing from environmental studies and urban history, as well as art and architecture. This is a reading and discussion heavy upper-level course. Each student will be asked to facilitate/host a discussion session. There are two options for the final assignment: an exhibition developed by a team and a more traditional research paper. The course fulfills major requirements in Environmental Studies, History and Cities.

Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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CSTS B226 Ecology of the Roman World
Spring 2021
In this course, we will study Roman attitudes toward the natural world, reconstructing the environment in which Roman urban centers flourished. While investigating the attitudes towards the environment that the Romans expressed through their myths, poetry, philosophy, and material culture, students will gain exposure to perspectives and methods from a variety of disciplines including literary studies, archaeology and art history, anthropology, social psychology, and 4E cognition. Through readings by authors such as Cato, Varro, Columella, Lucretius, Virgil, Ovid, Horace, Cicero, Pliny and Seneca, we will discuss agriculture and pre-industrial economies, social (re)evolution, disease and famine, resource exploitation, and human interaction with the landscape through engineering. In addition to gaining a broad understanding of how the Romans interacted with and explained the world around them (and how they used that world to explain themselves), students will a) become familiar with the major periods and events of Roman history and be able to contextualize attitudes towards nature and the environment within those periods; b) become familiar with the styles of literature and material arts during major periods of Roman history, and c) develop skills necessary for reading primary texts (literary, philosophical, and historical) as documents representing the intellectual history of the Roman world. No previous knowledge of the ancient world is required.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

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EALC B261 Chinese Environmental Culture
Not offered 2020-21
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward East Asian Languages and Cultures

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EALC B353 The Environment on China's Frontiers
Not offered 2020-21
This seminar explores environmental issues on China's frontiers from a historical perspective. It focuses on the particular relationship between the environment and the frontier, examining how these two variables have interacted. The course will deal with the issues such as the relationship between the environment and human ethnic and cultural traditions, social movements, economic growth, political and legal institutions and practices, and changing perceptions. The frontier regions under discussion include Tibet, Xinjiang, Inner Mongolia, and the southwestern ethnic areas, which are all important in defining what China is and who the Chinese are.

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ECON B234 Environmental Economics
Not offered 2020-21
Introduction to the use of economic analysis to explain the underlying behavioral causes of environmental and natural resource problems and to evaluate policy responses to them. Topics may include air and water pollution; the economic theory of externalities, public goods and the depletion of resources; cost-benefit analysis; valuing non-market benefits and costs; economic justice; and sustainable development. Prerequisites: ECON B105.
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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ECON B242 Economics of Local Environmental Programs
Not offered 2020-21
Considers the determinants of human impact on the environment at the neighborhood or community level and policy responses available to local government. How can economics help solve and learn from the problems facing rural and suburban communities? The instructor was a local township supervisor who will share the day-to-day challenges of coping with land use planning, waste disposal, dispute resolution, and the provision of basic services. Prerequisite: ECON B105.
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Praxis Program

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ENGL B204 Literatures of American Expansion
Spring 2021
This course will explore the relationship between U.S. narratives that understand national expansion as "manifest destiny" and narratives that understand the same phenomenon as imperial conquest. We will ask why the ingredients of such fictions--dangerous savages, empty landscapes, easy money, and lawless violence--often combine to make the master narrative of "America," and we will explore how and where that master narrative breaks down. Critical readings will engage discourses of nation, empire, violence, race, and sexuality. Texts will include novels, travel narratives, autobiographies, legal documents, and cultural ephemera.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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ENGL B293 Animal, Vegetable, Mineral: Medieval Ecologies
Not offered 2020-21
This course explores relationships between natural, non-human, and human agents in the Middle Ages. Reading natural philosophy, vernacular literature, and theological treatises, we examine how the Middle Ages understood supposedly "modern" environmental concepts like climate change, sustainability, animal rights, and protected land.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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GEOL B108 Earth's Oceans: Past, Present, and Future
Spring 2021
This course is designed to expose students to the fundamentals of oceanography with an emphasis on how Earth's oceans are tied to life and climate and how we study these links in the present and in the fossil record. We will spend much time understanding how the modern ocean works and how biogeochemical cycles interact with it. A major focus will be how we can use the ocean's past and present to make predictions about its future.
Scientific Investigation (SI)

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GEOL B203 Biosphere Through Time
Fall 2020
We will explore how the Earth-life system has evolved through time by studying the interactions between life, climate, and tectonic processes. During the lab component of the course, we will study important fossil groups to better understand their paleoecology and roles in the Earth-life system. Prerequisite: GEOL B101
Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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GEOL B206 Energy Resources and Sustainability
Fall 2020
An examination of issues concerning the supply of energy required by humanity. This includes an investigation of the geological framework that determines resource availability, aspects of energy production and resource development and the science of global climate change. Two 90-minute lectures a week. Suggested preparation: one year of college science.
Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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GEOL B209 Natural Hazards
Spring 2021
A quantitative approach to understanding the earth processes that impact human societies. We consider the past, current, and future hazards presented by geologic processes, including earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, floods, and hurricanes. The course includes discussion of the social, economic, and policy contexts within which natural geologic processes become hazards. Case studies are drawn from contemporary and ancient societies. Lecture three hours a week.
Quantitative Methods (QM)
Quantitative Readiness Required (QR)
Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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GEOL B302 Low-Temperature Geochemistry
Fall 2020
Stable isotope geochemistry is one of the most important subfields of the Earth sciences for understanding environmental and climatic change. In this course, we will explore stable isotopic fundamentals and applications including a number of important case studies from the recent and deep time dealing with important biotic events in the fossil record and major climate changes. Prerequisites: GEOL 101 or GEOL 102, and at least one semester of chemistry or physics, or professor approval.
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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MATH B151 Introduction to Math and Sustainability
Not offered 2020-21
The world faces many sustainability challenges: climate change, energy, over-population, natural resource depletion. Using techniques of mathematical modeling including dynamical systems and bifurcation theory (tipping points), we will study quantitative aspects of these problems. No advanced mathematics beyond high school mathematics (pre-calculus) is required.
Quantitative Methods (QM)
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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PHIL B240 Environmental Ethics
Not offered 2020-21
This course surveys rights- and justice-based justifications for ethical positions on the environment. It examines approaches such as stewardship, intrinsic value, land ethic, deep ecology, ecofeminism, Asian and aboriginal. It explores issues such as obligations to future generations, to nonhumans and to the biosphere.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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POLS B222 Environmental Issues: Movements and Policy Making in Comparative Perspective
Not offered 2020-21
An exploration of the ways in which different cultural, economic, and political settings have shaped issue emergence and policy making. We examine the politics of particular environmental issues in selected countries and regions, paying special attention to the impact of environmental movements. We also assess the prospects for international cooperation in addressing global environmental problems such as climate change.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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POLS B256 Global Politics of Climate Change
Not offered 2020-21
This course will introduce students to important political issues raised by climate change locally, nationally, and internationally, paying particular attention to the global implications of actions at the national and subnational levels. It will focus not only on specific problems, but also on solutions; students will learn about some of the technological and policy innovations that are being developed worldwide in response to the challenges of climate change. Only open to students in 360 program.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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POLS B310 Comparative Public Policy
Not offered 2020-21
A comparison of policy processes and outcomes across space and time. Focusing on particular issues such as health care, domestic security, water and land use, we identify institutional, historical, and cultural factors that shape policies. We also examine the growing importance of international-level policy making and the interplay between international and domestic pressures on policy makers. Writing attentive. Prerequisite: One course in Political Science or public policy.
Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

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POLS B326 Comparative Environmental Politics in East and Southeast Asia
Not offered 2020-21
East Asia (referring to both Northeast and Southeast Asia) is often discussed as one unit vis-à-vis other economic blocs yet this region is a home to the largest population in the world with various divergent cultures, colonial histories, religions, political system and state-society relations, as well as the level of economic development. With increasing focus on 3Es-- Economic growth, Environment protection, and Energy security-- as shared priorities at the regional level, such diversities serve not only as opportunities but challenges for East Asian states to cope with environmental issues. Geographic proximity makes countries in the region environmentally interdependent, and heavy dependence on imported fossil fuels make energy security as a matter of survival. Increasing public outcry over pollution and resultant health problems has also challenged political legitimacy and sustainable economic development. his course explores contemporary environmental issues in East Asia from comparative political economy perspective and sheds light on how environmental problems - and solutions - are often shaped by political context and interweaved into varying actors' perceived interest. Main questions in the course include: What kind of environmental problems East Asia face and how diverse historical, political and economic conditions of each country shape the context in which countries deal with the problem either individually or collectively? What are the roles of various social, political and market actors in environmental politics? What sorts of approaches seem most likely to solve local, national and regional environmental issues such as air pollution, natural resource depletion, and climate change? What are the impacts of globalization and technological innovation in dealing with environmental issues? Prerequisite: Junior standing or higher, previous courses in social science, humanities, area studies or relevant experiences are required. This course meets writing intensive requirement.
Counts toward Counts toward East Asian Languages and Cultures

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POLS B354 Comparative Social Movements: Power and Mobilization
Not offered 2020-21
A consideration of the conceptualizations of power and "legitimate" and "illegitimate" participation, the political opportunity structure facing potential activists, the mobilizing resources available to them, and the cultural framing within which these processes occur. Specific attention is paid to recent movements within and across countries, such as feminist, environmental, and anti-globalization movements, and to emerging forms of citizen mobilization, including transnational and global networks, electronic mobilization via social media, and collaborative policymaking institutions. Writing Attentive. Prerequisite: one course in POLS or SOCL or permission of instructor.
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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RUSS B227 Russia and its Ecology: Cultural and Historical Perspectives
Not offered 2020-21
This course will explore the historical, social, and cultural significance of the environment in Russian literature and the visual arts. As the largest country on the planet and as a sprawling nation that covers almost a sixth of the world's land mass, Russia has both cherished and exploited its vast forests and ample natural resources. Exploring Russian culture from an ecological perspective, we will delve into the fiction, poetry, cinema, and photography that has raised environmental issues or, in the opposite vein, has promoted rapid industrial development and a swift taming of Russia's natural landscape for the sake of progress. To this day, Russian artists continue to grapple with the ecological state of the country and its fragile well-being.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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SOCL B268 Environmental Sustainability
Spring 2021
This course relates a broadly construed understanding of environmental sustainability to the historical development of the major concepts and developments in sociology. It situates the development of sociology as responding to major social problems in the natural and built environment, and demonstrates how the key theoretical developments and empirical findings of sociology are crucial in understanding how these problems develop, persist, and are addressed or fail to be addressed. Conceptually, it begins with the radical environmental changes at the dawn of modernity that gave rise to European sociology and the massive urban social problems experienced in rapidly changing urban areas that gave rise to American sociology. Empirically, it moves through a series of more contemporary case studies of environmental problems (including both single-event "disasters" and ongoing slowly developing ever-present realities) that demonstrate both the context for sociology's development and the promise sociology offers in understanding environmental problems. The course will have a global focus drawing on case studies from North America, South America, Europe, Africa, with special attention given to East Asia.
Course does not meet an Approach

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