This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's calendars page.

Students must choose a major subject and may choose a minor subject. Students may also select from one of seven concentrations, which are offered to enhance a student's work in the major or minor and to focus work on a specific area of interest.

Concentrations are an intentional cluster of courses already offered by various academic departments or through general programs. These courses may also be cross-listed in several academic departments. Therefore, when registering for a course that counts toward a concentration, a student should register for the course listed in her major or minor department. If the concentration course is not listed in her major or minor department, the student may enroll in any listing of that course.

Spring 2019

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
EALC B315-001Spirits, Saints, Snakes, Swords: Women in East Asian Literature & FilmSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 3:30 PM WOld Library 116Kwa,S., Kwa,S.
Film Screening: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM MCarpenter Library 21
ENGL B231-001Theorizing Affect, Watching TelevisionSemester / 1Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHDalton Hall 1Bryant,S., Bryant,S.
Film Screening: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM SUCarpenter Library 25
ENGL B336-001Topics in Film: Cinematic VoiceSemester / 1LEC: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTHCarpenter Library 25Bryant,S., Bryant,S.
Film Screening: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM SUOld Library 224
FREN B208-001Visible Minorities: Diversity in Contemporary French CinemaSemester / 1Lecture: 11:10 AM-12:00 PM MWFOld Library 116Suaudeau,J., Suaudeau,J.
Film screening: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM SUCarpenter Library 21
FREN B312-001Advanced Topics in Literature: La Rentrée littéraireSemester / 1LEC: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM TTaylor Hall, Seminar RoomMahuzier,B.
GERM B262-001Topics: Film and the German Literary ImaginationSemester / 1Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTHOld Library 102Burri,M.
HIST B284-001Movies and America: The Past Lives ForeverSemester / 1LEC: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTHOld Library 110Ullman,S., Ullman,S.
Film Screening: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM WOld Library 110
ITAL B229-001The Politics of Food in Italian Literature, Culture, and CinemaSemester / 1Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHOld Library 118Benini,S., Benini,S.
TA Discussion: 1:00 PM- 2:00 PM TOld Library 102
RUSS B227-001Russia and its Ecology: Cultural and Historical PerspectivesSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWOld Library 111Harte,T., Harte,T.
Film Screening: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM TCarpenter Library 21

Fall 2019

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
ARTD B220-001Screendance: Movement and the CameraSemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHDept. staff, TBA
ARTW B266-001ScreenwritingSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM WTorday,D.
ITAL B212-001Italy Today: Bodies, Souls, Politics, CulturesSemester / 1LEC: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHGiammei,A.
ITAL B380-001Modernity and Psychoanalysis: Crossing National Boundaries in 20th c. Italy and EuropeSemester / 1Lecture: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM WRicci,R.
Lecture: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM W
PSYC B375-001Movies and Madness: Abnormal Psychology Through FilmsSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM WRescorla,L.

Spring 2020

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
ENGL B205-001Introduction to FilmSemester / 1Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTHBryant,S.
ENGL B231-001Theorizing Affect, Watching TelevisionSemester / 1Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHBryant,S.
FREN B208-001Visible Minorities: Diversity in Contemporary French CinemaSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:00 PM MWFSuaudeau,J.
HART B110-001Critical Approaches to Visual Representation: Identification in the CinemaSemester / 1Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:00 AM MWFFeliz,M., Teaching Assistant,T.
Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:00 AM MWF
HART B334-001Topics in Film StudiesSemester / 1Lecture: 12:10 PM- 2:00 PM TKing,H.

2019-20 Catalog Data

ARTD B220 Screendance: Movement and the Camera
Fall 2019
This course is a practical introduction to Screendance for students interested in extending their experience or interest in dance and movement into a new realm. Also known as dancefilm, cinedance, videodance and/or dance for the camera, Screendance connects film (and filmmaking) with dance (and dancemaking) in an evolving hybrid performative practice. For both the maker and audience, the inquiry is the adventure of discovering what the coming together of dance and screen can be. Screendance can be described as diverse, global, emergent, alive, active, trans-media, continually evolving. Through class screenings, exercises, readings and discussion, students will learn approaches to combining dance and the moving image. Students will work alone and in small collaborative groups to create their own works integrating dance and video. Through creative projects, students will develop their own cinematic style and an increased proficiency with both filming and editing movement.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Film Studies

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ARTW B266 Screenwriting
Fall 2019
An introduction to screenwriting. Issues basic to the art of storytelling in film will be addressed and analyzed: character, dramatic structure, theme, setting, image, sound. The course focuses on the film adaptation; readings include novels, screenplays, and short stories. Films adapted from the readings will be screened. In the course of the semester, students will be expected to outline and complete the first act of an adapted screenplay of their own.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Film Studies

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CSTS B274 Greek Tragedy in Global Cinema
Not offered 2019-20
This course explores how contemporary film, a creative medium appealing to the entire demographic spectrum like Greek drama, looks back to the ancient origins. Examining both films that are directly based on Greek plays and films that make use of classical material without being explicitly classical in plot or setting, we will discuss how Greek mythology is reconstructed and appropriated for modern audiences and how the classical past continues to be culturally significant. A variety of methodological approaches such as film and gender theory, psychoanalysis, and feminist theory will be applied in addition to more straightforward literary-historical interpretation.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

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CSTS B274 Greek Tragedy in Global Cinema
Not offered 2019-20
This course explores how contemporary film, a creative medium appealing to the entire demographic spectrum like Greek drama, looks back to the ancient origins. Examining both films that are directly based on Greek plays and films that make use of classical material without being explicitly classical in plot or setting, we will discuss how Greek mythology is reconstructed and appropriated for modern audiences and how the classical past continues to be culturally significant. A variety of methodological approaches such as film and gender theory, psychoanalysis, and feminist theory will be applied in addition to more straightforward literary-historical interpretation.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

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HART B110 Critical Approaches to Visual Representation: Identification in the Cinema
Spring 2020
An introduction to the analysis of film through particular attention to the role of the spectator. Why do moving images compel our fascination? How exactly do film spectators relate to the people, objects, and places that appear on the screen? Wherein lies the power of images to move, attract, repel, persuade, or transform its viewers? In this course, students will be introduced to film theory through the rich and complex topic of identification. We will explore how points of view are framed in cinema, and how those viewing positions differ from those of still photography, advertising, video games, and other forms of media. Students will be encouraged to consider the role the cinematic medium plays in influencing our experience of a film: how it is not simply a film's content, but the very form of representation that creates interactions between the spectator and the images on the screen. Film screenings include Psycho, Being John Malkovich, and others. Course is geared to freshman and those with no prior film instruction. Fulfills History of Art major 100-level course requirement, Film Studies minor Introductory course or Theory course requirement.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

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ITAL B212 Italy Today
Section 001 (Fall 2019): Bodies, Souls, Politics, Cultures
Fall 2019
This is a topics course. Course content varies. This bridge class, taught in Italian, is designed to familiarize students with the shifting cultural panorama of present-day Italy (and its metamorphosing language) through a variety of readings by living authors, journalists, comic-book artists, intellectuals, and politicians.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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ITAL B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Critical Theories
Not offered 2019-20
What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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ITAL B214 The Myth of Venice (1800-2000)
Not offered 2019-20
In English. The Republic of Venice existed for over a millennium. This course begins in the year 1797 at the end of the Republic and the emerging of an extensive body of literature centered on Venice and its mythical facets. Readings will include the Romantic views of Venice (excerpts from Lord Byron, Fredrick Schiller, Wolfang von Goethe, Ugo Foscolo, Alessandro Manzoni) and the 20th century reshaping of the literary myth (readings from Thomas Mann, Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, Gabriele D'Annunzio, Henry James, and others). A journey into this fascinating tradition will shed light on how the literary and visual representation of Venice, rather than focusing on a nostalgic evocation of the death of the Republic, became a territory of exploration for literary modernity. The course is offered in English; all texts are provided in translation. One additional hour for students who want Italian credit. Suggested Preparation: Counts toward Comp Lit. Counts toward Film Studies.
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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ENGL B229 Movies and Mass Politics
Not offered 2019-20
Movies and mass politics emerged together, altering entertainment and government in strangely similar ways. Fascism and Communism claimed an inherent relation to the masses and hence to movies; Hollywood rejected such claims. We will examine films that allude to Communism and Fascism, seeking to understand how they join in political debates and comment upon the mass experience of movie going.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

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EALC B240 Topics in Chinese Film
Not offered 2019-20
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

Back to top

CSTS B274 Greek Tragedy in Global Cinema
Not offered 2019-20
This course explores how contemporary film, a creative medium appealing to the entire demographic spectrum like Greek drama, looks back to the ancient origins. Examining both films that are directly based on Greek plays and films that make use of classical material without being explicitly classical in plot or setting, we will discuss how Greek mythology is reconstructed and appropriated for modern audiences and how the classical past continues to be culturally significant. A variety of methodological approaches such as film and gender theory, psychoanalysis, and feminist theory will be applied in addition to more straightforward literary-historical interpretation.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

Back to top

HART B306 Film Theory
Not offered 2019-20
An introduction to major developments in film theory and criticism. Topics covered include: the specificity of film form; cinematic realism; the cinematic "author"; the politics and ideology of cinema; the relation between cinema and language; spectatorship, identification, and subjectivity; archival and historical problems in film studies; the relation between film studies and other disciplines of aesthetic and social criticism. Each week of the syllabus pairs critical writing(s) on a central principle of film analysis with a cinematic example. Class will be divided between discussion of critical texts and attempts to apply them to a primary cinematic text. Prerequisite: A course in Film Studies (HART B110, HART B299, ENGL B205, or the equivalent from another college by permission of instructor).
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

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FREN B312 Advanced Topics in Literature
Section 001 (Spring 2019): La Rentrée littéraire
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Revolutions Numerqiues de Pascal a L'internet
Not offered 2019-20
This is a topics course. Course content varies. Prerequisites: two 200-level courses.
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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EALC B315 Spirits, Saints, Snakes, Swords: Women in East Asian Literature & Film
Not offered 2019-20
This interdisciplinary course focuses on a critical survey of literary and visual texts by and about Chinese women. We will begin by focusing on the cultural norms that defined women's lives beginning in early China, and consider how those tropes are reflected and rejected over time and geographical borders (in Japan, Hong Kong and the United States). No prior knowledge of Chinese culture or language necessary.
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

CSTS B274 Greek Tragedy in Global Cinema
Not offered 2019-20
This course explores how contemporary film, a creative medium appealing to the entire demographic spectrum like Greek drama, looks back to the ancient origins. Examining both films that are directly based on Greek plays and films that make use of classical material without being explicitly classical in plot or setting, we will discuss how Greek mythology is reconstructed and appropriated for modern audiences and how the classical past continues to be culturally significant. A variety of methodological approaches such as film and gender theory, psychoanalysis, and feminist theory will be applied in addition to more straightforward literary-historical interpretation.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Visual Studies

Back to top

EALC B240 Topics in Chinese Film
Not offered 2019-20
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Visual Studies

Back to top

EALC B315 Spirits, Saints, Snakes, Swords: Women in East Asian Literature & Film
Not offered 2019-20
This interdisciplinary course focuses on a critical survey of literary and visual texts by and about Chinese women. We will begin by focusing on the cultural norms that defined women's lives beginning in early China, and consider how those tropes are reflected and rejected over time and geographical borders (in Japan, Hong Kong and the United States). No prior knowledge of Chinese culture or language necessary.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

EALC B240 Topics in Chinese Film
Not offered 2019-20
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

Back to top

EALC B315 Spirits, Saints, Snakes, Swords: Women in East Asian Literature & Film
Not offered 2019-20
This interdisciplinary course focuses on a critical survey of literary and visual texts by and about Chinese women. We will begin by focusing on the cultural norms that defined women's lives beginning in early China, and consider how those tropes are reflected and rejected over time and geographical borders (in Japan, Hong Kong and the United States). No prior knowledge of Chinese culture or language necessary.
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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ENGL B205 Introduction to Film
Spring 2020
This course is intended to provide students with the tools of critical film analysis. Through readings of images and sounds, sections of films and entire narratives, students will cultivate the habits of critical viewing and establish a foundation for focused work in film studies. The course introduces formal and technical units of cinematic meaning and categories of genre and history that add up to the experiences and meanings we call cinema. Although much of the course material will focus on the Hollywood style of film, examples will be drawn from the history of cinema. Attendance at weekly screenings is mandatory.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Visual Studies

Back to top

ITAL B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Critical Theories
Not offered 2019-20
What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

ENGL B229 Movies and Mass Politics
Not offered 2019-20
Movies and mass politics emerged together, altering entertainment and government in strangely similar ways. Fascism and Communism claimed an inherent relation to the masses and hence to movies; Hollywood rejected such claims. We will examine films that allude to Communism and Fascism, seeking to understand how they join in political debates and comment upon the mass experience of movie going.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Visual Studies

Back to top

ENGL B231 Theorizing Affect, Watching Television
Spring 2020
This course examines television through the lens of affect theory. Within humanities scholarship, the turn toward affect has offered new ways to study the cultural, economic, and political functions of literature and art. In our wider cultural moment, television programming has become a source of shared fascination. The course will pair readings from affect studies (by scholars such as Lauren Berlant and Sianne Ngai) with select examples of television shows (including Black Mirror, Mad Men, and The Wire). We will also read scholarly and public writing about television and consider the interplay between cultural feelings and televisual forms such as seriality, situation comedy, and bottle episodes.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Film Studies

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EALC B240 Topics in Chinese Film
Not offered 2019-20
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

Back to top

GERM B262 Topics: Film and the German Literary Imagination
Not offered 2019-20
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

ARTW B266 Screenwriting
Fall 2019
An introduction to screenwriting. Issues basic to the art of storytelling in film will be addressed and analyzed: character, dramatic structure, theme, setting, image, sound. The course focuses on the film adaptation; readings include novels, screenplays, and short stories. Films adapted from the readings will be screened. In the course of the semester, students will be expected to outline and complete the first act of an adapted screenplay of their own.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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HART B299 History of Narrative Cinema, 1945 to the present
Not offered 2019-20
This course surveys the history of narrative film from 1945 through contemporary cinema. We will analyze a chronological series of styles and national cinemas, including Classical Hollywood, Italian Neorealism, the French New Wave, and other post-war movements and genres. Viewings of canonical films will be supplemented by more recent examples of global cinema. While historical in approach, this course emphasizes the theory and criticism of the sound film, and we will consider various methodological approaches to the aesthetic, socio-political, and psychological dimensions of cinema. Readings will provide historical context, and will introduce students to key concepts in film studies such as realism, formalism, spectatorship, the auteur theory, and genre studies. Fulfills the history requirement or the introductory course requirement for the Film Studies minor.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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HART B306 Film Theory
Not offered 2019-20
An introduction to major developments in film theory and criticism. Topics covered include: the specificity of film form; cinematic realism; the cinematic "author"; the politics and ideology of cinema; the relation between cinema and language; spectatorship, identification, and subjectivity; archival and historical problems in film studies; the relation between film studies and other disciplines of aesthetic and social criticism. Each week of the syllabus pairs critical writing(s) on a central principle of film analysis with a cinematic example. Class will be divided between discussion of critical texts and attempts to apply them to a primary cinematic text. Prerequisite: A course in Film Studies (HART B110, HART B299, ENGL B205, or the equivalent from another college by permission of instructor).
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

Back to top

EALC B315 Spirits, Saints, Snakes, Swords: Women in East Asian Literature & Film
Not offered 2019-20
This interdisciplinary course focuses on a critical survey of literary and visual texts by and about Chinese women. We will begin by focusing on the cultural norms that defined women's lives beginning in early China, and consider how those tropes are reflected and rejected over time and geographical borders (in Japan, Hong Kong and the United States). No prior knowledge of Chinese culture or language necessary.
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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ENGL B324 Topics in Shakespeare:
Not offered 2019-20
Films and play texts vary from year to year. The course assumes significant prior experience of Shakespearean drama and/or Renaissance drama.
Counts toward Film Studies

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HART B334 Topics in Film Studies
Spring 2020
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: Digital imagery in relation to cinema, photography, and other media, questions of whether the digital marks a significant break from the analog. Enrollment priority will be given to History of Art majors and Film Studies minors in the senior year, and graduate students, who may take the course for 600-level credit.

Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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ENGL B336 Topics in Film
Section 001 (Spring 2019): Cinematic Voice
Not offered 2019-20
This is a topics course and description varies according to the topic.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Film Studies

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RUSS B227 Russia and its Ecology: Cultural and Historical Perspectives
Not offered 2019-20
This course will explore the historical, social, and cultural significance of the environment in Russian literature and the visual arts. As the largest country on the planet and as a sprawling nation that covers almost a sixth of the world's land mass, Russia has both cherished and exploited its vast forests and ample natural resources. Exploring Russian culture from an ecological perspective, we will delve into the fiction, poetry, cinema, and photography that has raised environmental issues or, in the opposite vein, has promoted rapid industrial development and a swift taming of Russia's natural landscape for the sake of progress. To this day, Russian artists continue to grapple with the ecological state of the country and its fragile well-being.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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ITAL B229 The Politics of Food in Italian Literature, Culture, and Cinema
Not offered 2019-20
In English. A profile of Italian literature/culture/cinema obtained through an analysis of gastronomic documents, films, literary texts, and magazines. We will also include a discussion of the Slow Food Revolution, a movement initiated in Italy in 1980 and now with a world-wide following, and its social, economic, ecological, aesthetic, and cultural impact to counteract fast food and to promote local food traditions. Course taught in English. One additional hour for students who want Italian credit.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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EALC B240 Topics in Chinese Film
Not offered 2019-20
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

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GNST B255 Video Production
Not offered 2019-20
This course will explore aesthetic strategies utilized by low-budget film and video makers as each student works throughout the semester to complete a 7-15 minute film or video project. Course requirements include weekly screenings, reading assignments, and class screenings of rushes and roughcuts of student projects. Prerequisites: Some prior film course experience necessary, instructor discretion.
Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

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RUSS B258 Soviet and Eastern European Cinema of the 1960s
Not offered 2019-20
This course examines 1960s Soviet and Eastern European "New Wave" cinema, which won worldwide acclaim through its treatment of war, gender, and aesthetics. Films from Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Poland, Russia, and Yugoslavia will be viewed and analyzed, accompanied by readings on film history and theory. All films shown with subtitles; no knowledge of Russian or previous study of film required.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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HIST B284 Movies and America: The Past Lives Forever
Not offered 2019-20
Movies are one of the most important means by which Americans come to know - or think they know--their own history. We look to old movies to tell us about a world we never knew but think we can access through film. And Hollywood often reaches into the past to tell a good story. How can we understand the impact of our love affair with movies on our understanding of what happened in this country? In this course we will examine the complex cultural relationship between film and American historical self-fashioning.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

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ENGL B336 Topics in Film
Section 001 (Spring 2019): Cinematic Voice
Not offered 2019-20
This is a topics course and description varies according to the topic.
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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FREN B208 Visible Minorities: Diversity in Contemporary French Cinema
Spring 2020
Until the closing years of the 20th century, ethnic diversity was virtually absent from French cinema. While Francophone directors from Northern and Sub-Saharan Africa debunked colonialism and neocolonialism in their films, minorities hardly appeared on French screens. Movies were made by white filmmakers for a white audience. Since the 1980's and the 1990's, minorities have become more visible in French films. Are French Blacks and Arabs portrayed in French cinema beyond stereotypes, or are they still objects of a euro-centric gaze? Have minorities gained agency in storytelling, not just as actors, but as directors? What is the national narrative at play in the recent French films that focus on diversity? Is it still "us against them", or has the new generation of French filmmakers found a way to include the different components of French identity into a collective subject? From Bouchareb to Gomis, from Kechiche to Benyamina and Jean-Baptiste, this course will map out the visual fault lines of the French self and examine the prospects for a post-republican sense of community. Open to non-majors. There will be a weekly screening on Sunday, 7:00pm-9:00pm.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Film Studies

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ITAL B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Critical Theories
Not offered 2019-20
What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

FREN B312 Advanced Topics in Literature
Section 001 (Spring 2019): La Rentrée littéraire
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Revolutions Numerqiues de Pascal a L'internet
Not offered 2019-20
This is a topics course. Course content varies. Prerequisites: two 200-level courses.
Counts toward Film Studies

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GEOL B125 Focus: Geology in Film
Not offered 2019-20
This is a half semester Focus course. Geologic processes make for great film storylines, but filmmakers take great liberty with how they depict scientific "facts" and scientists. We will explore how and why filmmakers choose to deviate from science reality. We will study and view one film per week and discuss its issues from a geologist's perspective.
Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Film Studies

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ITAL B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Critical Theories
Not offered 2019-20
What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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GERM B262 Topics: Film and the German Literary Imagination
Not offered 2019-20
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Film Studies

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GNST B255 Video Production
Not offered 2019-20
This course will explore aesthetic strategies utilized by low-budget film and video makers as each student works throughout the semester to complete a 7-15 minute film or video project. Course requirements include weekly screenings, reading assignments, and class screenings of rushes and roughcuts of student projects. Prerequisites: Some prior film course experience necessary, instructor discretion.
Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Visual Studies

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CSTS B274 Greek Tragedy in Global Cinema
Not offered 2019-20
This course explores how contemporary film, a creative medium appealing to the entire demographic spectrum like Greek drama, looks back to the ancient origins. Examining both films that are directly based on Greek plays and films that make use of classical material without being explicitly classical in plot or setting, we will discuss how Greek mythology is reconstructed and appropriated for modern audiences and how the classical past continues to be culturally significant. A variety of methodological approaches such as film and gender theory, psychoanalysis, and feminist theory will be applied in addition to more straightforward literary-historical interpretation.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

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HART B110 Critical Approaches to Visual Representation: Identification in the Cinema
Spring 2020
An introduction to the analysis of film through particular attention to the role of the spectator. Why do moving images compel our fascination? How exactly do film spectators relate to the people, objects, and places that appear on the screen? Wherein lies the power of images to move, attract, repel, persuade, or transform its viewers? In this course, students will be introduced to film theory through the rich and complex topic of identification. We will explore how points of view are framed in cinema, and how those viewing positions differ from those of still photography, advertising, video games, and other forms of media. Students will be encouraged to consider the role the cinematic medium plays in influencing our experience of a film: how it is not simply a film's content, but the very form of representation that creates interactions between the spectator and the images on the screen. Film screenings include Psycho, Being John Malkovich, and others. Course is geared to freshman and those with no prior film instruction. Fulfills History of Art major 100-level course requirement, Film Studies minor Introductory course or Theory course requirement.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Visual Studies

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ENGL B205 Introduction to Film
Spring 2020
This course is intended to provide students with the tools of critical film analysis. Through readings of images and sounds, sections of films and entire narratives, students will cultivate the habits of critical viewing and establish a foundation for focused work in film studies. The course introduces formal and technical units of cinematic meaning and categories of genre and history that add up to the experiences and meanings we call cinema. Although much of the course material will focus on the Hollywood style of film, examples will be drawn from the history of cinema. Attendance at weekly screenings is mandatory.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

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ITAL B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Critical Theories
Not offered 2019-20
What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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HART B299 History of Narrative Cinema, 1945 to the present
Not offered 2019-20
This course surveys the history of narrative film from 1945 through contemporary cinema. We will analyze a chronological series of styles and national cinemas, including Classical Hollywood, Italian Neorealism, the French New Wave, and other post-war movements and genres. Viewings of canonical films will be supplemented by more recent examples of global cinema. While historical in approach, this course emphasizes the theory and criticism of the sound film, and we will consider various methodological approaches to the aesthetic, socio-political, and psychological dimensions of cinema. Readings will provide historical context, and will introduce students to key concepts in film studies such as realism, formalism, spectatorship, the auteur theory, and genre studies. Fulfills the history requirement or the introductory course requirement for the Film Studies minor.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Film Studies

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HART B306 Film Theory
Not offered 2019-20
An introduction to major developments in film theory and criticism. Topics covered include: the specificity of film form; cinematic realism; the cinematic "author"; the politics and ideology of cinema; the relation between cinema and language; spectatorship, identification, and subjectivity; archival and historical problems in film studies; the relation between film studies and other disciplines of aesthetic and social criticism. Each week of the syllabus pairs critical writing(s) on a central principle of film analysis with a cinematic example. Class will be divided between discussion of critical texts and attempts to apply them to a primary cinematic text. Prerequisite: A course in Film Studies (HART B110, HART B299, ENGL B205, or the equivalent from another college by permission of instructor).
Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Visual Studies

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HART B334 Topics in Film Studies
Spring 2020
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: Digital imagery in relation to cinema, photography, and other media, questions of whether the digital marks a significant break from the analog. Enrollment priority will be given to History of Art majors and Film Studies minors in the senior year, and graduate students, who may take the course for 600-level credit.

Counts toward Film Studies

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ENGL B336 Topics in Film
Section 001 (Spring 2019): Cinematic Voice
Not offered 2019-20
This is a topics course and description varies according to the topic.
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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HART B420 Praxis Fieldwork Seminar
In this Praxis course, students will learn to critically evaluate augmented and virtual reality (AR/VR) applications by developing their own AR/VR museum installation. The classroom component will include readings, guest lectures, and discussion topics in public history, conceptual art, and museum studies, and critical exploration of AR/VR and location-based technologies currently used in these fields. The majority of this course consists of a fieldwork component, in which students will develop an augmented- or virtual-reality installation of their own. Students will learn project management, design thinking, Unity development, and other digital competencies needed to successfully develop their museum installation. Prior experience with programming and/or Unity is advantageous but not required. If you are unsure about whether this course would work for you, please contact us or attend an info session. Pre-registered students should attend an info session on November 27 at 4PM in Canaday 315 to complete their Praxis learning plan.
Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Praxis Program

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HIST B284 Movies and America: The Past Lives Forever
Not offered 2019-20
Movies are one of the most important means by which Americans come to know - or think they know--their own history. We look to old movies to tell us about a world we never knew but think we can access through film. And Hollywood often reaches into the past to tell a good story. How can we understand the impact of our love affair with movies on our understanding of what happened in this country? In this course we will examine the complex cultural relationship between film and American historical self-fashioning.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Visual Studies

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PSYC B375 Movies and Madness: Abnormal Psychology Through Films
Fall 2019
This writing-intensive seminar (maximum enrollment = 16 students) deals with critical analysis of how various forms of psychopathology are depicted in films. The primary focus of the seminar will be evaluating the degree of correspondence between the cinematic presentation and current research knowledge about the disorder, taking into account the historical period in which the film was made. For example, we will discuss how accurately the symptoms of the disorder are presented and how representative the protagonist is of people who typically manifest this disorder based on current research. We will also address the theory of etiology of the disorder depicted in the film, including discussion of the relevant intellectual history in the period when the film was made and the prevailing accounts of psychopathology in that period. Another focus will be how the film portrays the course of the disorder and how it depicts treatment for the disorder. This cinematic presentation will be evaluated with respect to current research on treatment for the disorder as well as the historical context of prevailing treatment for the disorder at the time the film was made. Prerequisite: PSYC B209.
Counts toward Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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ITAL B212 Italy Today
Section 001 (Fall 2019): Bodies, Souls, Politics, Cultures
Fall 2019
This is a topics course. Course content varies. This bridge class, taught in Italian, is designed to familiarize students with the shifting cultural panorama of present-day Italy (and its metamorphosing language) through a variety of readings by living authors, journalists, comic-book artists, intellectuals, and politicians.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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ITAL B212 Italy Today
Section 001 (Fall 2019): Bodies, Souls, Politics, Cultures
Fall 2019
This is a topics course. Course content varies. This bridge class, taught in Italian, is designed to familiarize students with the shifting cultural panorama of present-day Italy (and its metamorphosing language) through a variety of readings by living authors, journalists, comic-book artists, intellectuals, and politicians.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Film Studies

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ITAL B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Critical Theories
Not offered 2019-20
What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Film Studies

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ITAL B214 The Myth of Venice (1800-2000)
Not offered 2019-20
In English. The Republic of Venice existed for over a millennium. This course begins in the year 1797 at the end of the Republic and the emerging of an extensive body of literature centered on Venice and its mythical facets. Readings will include the Romantic views of Venice (excerpts from Lord Byron, Fredrick Schiller, Wolfang von Goethe, Ugo Foscolo, Alessandro Manzoni) and the 20th century reshaping of the literary myth (readings from Thomas Mann, Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, Gabriele D'Annunzio, Henry James, and others). A journey into this fascinating tradition will shed light on how the literary and visual representation of Venice, rather than focusing on a nostalgic evocation of the death of the Republic, became a territory of exploration for literary modernity. The course is offered in English; all texts are provided in translation. One additional hour for students who want Italian credit. Suggested Preparation: Counts toward Comp Lit. Counts toward Film Studies.
Counts toward Film Studies

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ITAL B229 The Politics of Food in Italian Literature, Culture, and Cinema
Not offered 2019-20
In English. A profile of Italian literature/culture/cinema obtained through an analysis of gastronomic documents, films, literary texts, and magazines. We will also include a discussion of the Slow Food Revolution, a movement initiated in Italy in 1980 and now with a world-wide following, and its social, economic, ecological, aesthetic, and cultural impact to counteract fast food and to promote local food traditions. Course taught in English. One additional hour for students who want Italian credit.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Film Studies

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ITAL B255 Uomini d'onore in Sicilia: Italian Mafia in Literature and Cinema
Not offered 2019-20
This course aims to explore representations of Mafia figures in Italian literature and cinema, starting from the 'classical' example of Sicily. From Sicily, the "octopus" (piovra), as the Mafia is called in Italy, has spread throughout Italy, and has pervaded almost every facet of Italian life, including cultural life. The course will introduce students to both Italian Studies from an interdisciplinary prospective and also to narrative, using fiction and non-fiction texts written by 19th, 20th, and 21st century writers. Novels, films, testimonies and TV series will offer different representations of the Mafia: its ethics, its relation with politics, religion and business, its ideas of friendship, family, masculinity and femininity. Internships in Italy will be available connected with this course. Course is taught in Italian. Prerequisite: ITAL B102 or permission of the instructor.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Film Studies

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ITAL B306 Youth in 20th Century Italian Literature and Cinema
Not offered 2019-20
This interdisciplinary course focuses on literary texts and visual material dealing with youth and youth culture in post-fascist Italy. How is youth described in Italian culture after WWII? What does youth represent in the Italian imagination of 20th century Italy? Which language is used by the youth? While the focus in analyzing the challenges faced by youth is primarily on literature and film studies, throughout the semester the course will also touch upon sociological, cultural, and anthropological perspectives concerning the role of the family, peer relationships, prostitution, drugs, criminality and violence, diversity, gender identity, and sexuality. Students will be required to attend film screenings or view films on their own devices. Prerequisite: One literature course at the 200 level. or permission by the instructor.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Film Studies

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ITAL B307 Insiders and Outsiders: Otherness in Italian Literature
Not offered 2019-20
This course will introduce students to the most representative works in Italian literature of all genres --poetry, novels, scientific prose, theater, diaries, narrative, epistolary--throughout the centuries, with emphasis on marginalization, exile, political persecution, national identity, violence, and otherness. We will bring works of literature to the attention of students who are interested in the key role played by Italian culture in the development of a European civilization, including the international debate on modernity and post-modernity. Readings and lectures will move from 14th century writers (Dante, Boccaccio) to Humanistic Thought (Florentine political revolution) and the Renaissance (Machiavelli); from the Enlightenment (Foscolo, Leopardi, Manzoni) to modernity (Pirandello, Svevo) and post-modernism (Calvino). Prerequisite: One literature course at the 200 level. or permission by the instructor.
Counts toward Film Studies

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ITAL B380 Modernity and Psychoanalysis: Crossing National Boundaries in 20th c. Italy and Europe
Fall 2019
Designed as an in-depth interdisciplinary exploration of Italy's 20th century cultural life, the course is organized around major artistic and intellectual trends, viewed in their historical and global perspective in connection with Avant-garde literary movements and philosophical ideas: i.e. surrealism, metaphysics, Dadaism, psychoanalysis, futurism, decadence, modernism. While thinking and writing in Italian, we will examine films, novels, and poetry to gain insight on Modernity with attention also to gender perspectives. Elements of metrics and rhetoric will be used to analyze poetry in its own essence. Prerequisite: One 200-Level course in Italian.
Counts toward Film Studies

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CSTS B274 Greek Tragedy in Global Cinema
Not offered 2019-20
This course explores how contemporary film, a creative medium appealing to the entire demographic spectrum like Greek drama, looks back to the ancient origins. Examining both films that are directly based on Greek plays and films that make use of classical material without being explicitly classical in plot or setting, we will discuss how Greek mythology is reconstructed and appropriated for modern audiences and how the classical past continues to be culturally significant. A variety of methodological approaches such as film and gender theory, psychoanalysis, and feminist theory will be applied in addition to more straightforward literary-historical interpretation.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

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ITAL B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Critical Theories
Not offered 2019-20
What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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PSYC B375 Movies and Madness: Abnormal Psychology Through Films
Fall 2019
This writing-intensive seminar (maximum enrollment = 16 students) deals with critical analysis of how various forms of psychopathology are depicted in films. The primary focus of the seminar will be evaluating the degree of correspondence between the cinematic presentation and current research knowledge about the disorder, taking into account the historical period in which the film was made. For example, we will discuss how accurately the symptoms of the disorder are presented and how representative the protagonist is of people who typically manifest this disorder based on current research. We will also address the theory of etiology of the disorder depicted in the film, including discussion of the relevant intellectual history in the period when the film was made and the prevailing accounts of psychopathology in that period. Another focus will be how the film portrays the course of the disorder and how it depicts treatment for the disorder. This cinematic presentation will be evaluated with respect to current research on treatment for the disorder as well as the historical context of prevailing treatment for the disorder at the time the film was made. Prerequisite: PSYC B209.
Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Film Studies

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ITAL B255 Uomini d'onore in Sicilia: Italian Mafia in Literature and Cinema
Not offered 2019-20
This course aims to explore representations of Mafia figures in Italian literature and cinema, starting from the 'classical' example of Sicily. From Sicily, the "octopus" (piovra), as the Mafia is called in Italy, has spread throughout Italy, and has pervaded almost every facet of Italian life, including cultural life. The course will introduce students to both Italian Studies from an interdisciplinary prospective and also to narrative, using fiction and non-fiction texts written by 19th, 20th, and 21st century writers. Novels, films, testimonies and TV series will offer different representations of the Mafia: its ethics, its relation with politics, religion and business, its ideas of friendship, family, masculinity and femininity. Internships in Italy will be available connected with this course. Course is taught in Italian. Prerequisite: ITAL B102 or permission of the instructor.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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ITAL B306 Youth in 20th Century Italian Literature and Cinema
Not offered 2019-20
This interdisciplinary course focuses on literary texts and visual material dealing with youth and youth culture in post-fascist Italy. How is youth described in Italian culture after WWII? What does youth represent in the Italian imagination of 20th century Italy? Which language is used by the youth? While the focus in analyzing the challenges faced by youth is primarily on literature and film studies, throughout the semester the course will also touch upon sociological, cultural, and anthropological perspectives concerning the role of the family, peer relationships, prostitution, drugs, criminality and violence, diversity, gender identity, and sexuality. Students will be required to attend film screenings or view films on their own devices. Prerequisite: One literature course at the 200 level. or permission by the instructor.
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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ITAL B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Critical Theories
Not offered 2019-20
What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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RUSS B217 The Cinema of Andrei Tarkovsky
Not offered 2019-20
This course will probe the cinematic oeuvre of the great Soviet filmmaker Andrei Tarkovsky, who produced some of the most compelling, significant film work of the 20th century. Looking at not only Tarkovsky's films but also those films that influenced his work, we will explore the aesthetics, philosophy, and ideological pressure underlying Tarkovsky's unique brand of cinema.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Film Studies

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RUSS B227 Russia and its Ecology: Cultural and Historical Perspectives
Not offered 2019-20
This course will explore the historical, social, and cultural significance of the environment in Russian literature and the visual arts. As the largest country on the planet and as a sprawling nation that covers almost a sixth of the world's land mass, Russia has both cherished and exploited its vast forests and ample natural resources. Exploring Russian culture from an ecological perspective, we will delve into the fiction, poetry, cinema, and photography that has raised environmental issues or, in the opposite vein, has promoted rapid industrial development and a swift taming of Russia's natural landscape for the sake of progress. To this day, Russian artists continue to grapple with the ecological state of the country and its fragile well-being.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Film Studies

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RUSS B258 Soviet and Eastern European Cinema of the 1960s
Not offered 2019-20
This course examines 1960s Soviet and Eastern European "New Wave" cinema, which won worldwide acclaim through its treatment of war, gender, and aesthetics. Films from Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Poland, Russia, and Yugoslavia will be viewed and analyzed, accompanied by readings on film history and theory. All films shown with subtitles; no knowledge of Russian or previous study of film required.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Film Studies

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ITAL B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Critical Theories
Not offered 2019-20
What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top