This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's master calendar.

Students must choose a major subject and may choose a minor subject. Students may also select from one of seven concentrations, which are offered to enhance a student's work in the major or minor and to focus work on a specific area of interest.

Concentrations are an intentional cluster of courses already offered by various academic departments or through general programs. These courses may also be cross-listed in several academic departments. Therefore, when registering for a course that counts toward a concentration, a student should register for the course listed in her major or minor department. If the concentration course is not listed in her major or minor department, the student may enroll in any listing of that course.

Fall 2018

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
ANTH B294-001Culture, Power, and PoliticsSemester / 1Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MWDalton Hall 10Fioratta,S.
ANTH B331-001Medical Anthro Seminar: Critical Thinking for Critical TimesSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 3:30 PM TDalton Hall 212EPashigian,M.
ARTD B250-001Performing the Political Body: Dance and PowerSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 3:30 PM WGoodhart Hall BJones,L.
ENGL B217-001Narratives of LatinidadSemester / 1Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:30 AM MWEnglish House IHarford Vargas,J.
ENGL B269-001Medieval BodiesSemester / 1Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:30 AM MWEnglish House IITaylor,J.
ENGL B305-001Early Modern Trans StudiesSemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHEnglish House IIGordon,C.
ENGL B320-001Black Feminist LiteratureSemester / 1Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHEnglish House ISullivan,M.
ENGL B345-001Topics in Narrative TheorySemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWEnglish House IIIHarford Vargas,J.
GERM B320-001Topics in German Literature and Culture: 1968 and Its LegaciesSemester / 1Lecture: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM THDalton Hall 212AShen,Q.
GNST B108-001Introduction to Gender and Sexuality StudiesSemester / 1Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHOld Library 251Vider,S.
GREK B201-001Plato and ThucydidesSemester / 1Lecture: 12:10 PM- 1:00 PM MWFCarpenter Library 15Edmonds,R.
HIST B102-001Introduction to African CivilizationsSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWTaylor Hall FNgalamulume,K.
HIST B156-001The Long 1960'sSemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHDalton Hall 300Ullman,S.
HIST B237-001Themes in Modern African History: Public History in AfricaSemester / 1Lecture: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTHTaylor Hall CNgalamulume,K.
HIST B292-001Women in Britain since 1750Semester / 1Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHOld Library 223Kale,M.
HIST B298-001Politics of FoodSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWCarpenter Library 21Ullman,S.
HIST B337-001Topics in African History: Hist of Global Health AfricaSemester / 1LEC: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM MCarpenter Library 15Ngalamulume,K.
ITAL B213-001Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities: Critical TheoriesSemester / 1Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MWOld Library 251Giammei,A.
PSYC B375-001Movies and Madness: Abnormal Psychology Through FilmsSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM WBettws Y Coed 239Rescorla,L.
SOCL B102-001Society, Culture, and the IndividualSemester / 1Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MWTaylor Hall FPinto-Coelho,J.
SOCL B205-001Social InequalitySemester / 1Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHOld Library 116Pinto-Coelho,J.
SOCL B322-001Thinking with Trans: Theorizing Race and GenderSemester / 1Lecture: 9:10 AM-12:00 PM TDalton Hall 10Sledge,P.
SOCL B342-001Bodies in Social LifeSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM WDalton Hall 119Sledge,P.

Spring 2019

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
ANTH B102-001Introduction to Cultural AnthropologySemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWPashigian,M.
ANTH B102-002Introduction to Cultural AnthropologySemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHFioratta,S.
ARCH B303-001Classical BodiesSemester / 1Lecture: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM TDonohue,A.
BIOL B214-001The History of Genetics and EmbryologySemester / 1LEC: 9:10 AM-10:00 AM MWFPark 227Davis,G.
EALC B264-001Human Rights in ChinaSemester / 1Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHJiang,Y.
EALC B315-001Spirits, Saints, Snakes, Swords: Women in East Asian Literature & FilmSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 3:30 PM WKwa,S.
ENGL B215-001Early Modern Crime Narratives: Vice, Villains, and LawSemester / 1Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:30 AM MWGordon,C.
ENGL B225-001Contemporary Life Writing: Form and TheorySemester / 1Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MWBryant,S.
ENGL B231-001Theorizing Affect, Watching TelevisionSemester / 1Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHBryant,S.
Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTH
ENGL B314-001Troilus and CriseydeSemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHTaylor,J.
ENGL B336-001Topics in Film: Cinematic VoiceSemester / 1LEC: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTHBryant,S.
Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTH
ENGL B339-001Latina/o Culture and the Art of MigrationSemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHHarford Vargas,J.
GERM B321-001Advanced Topics in German Cultural Studies: Representing Diversity in German CinemaSemester / 1LEC: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM WShen,Q.
GNST B290-001Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Gender and SexualitySemester / 1Lecture: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM WVider,S.
HIST B226-001Topics in 20th Century European History: Human Rights:Theory & PracticeSemester / 1LEC: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWKurimay,A.
HIST B245-001Topics in Modern US HistorySemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM MWVider,S.
HIST B284-001Movies and America: The Past Lives ForeverSemester / 1LEC: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTHUllman,S.
Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM W
HIST B337-001Topics in African History: Hist of Global Health AfricaSemester / 1LEC: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM THNgalamulume,K.
PHIL B221-001EthicsSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWInterim,R.
PHIL B225-001Global Ethical IssuesSemester / 1Lecture: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTHFugo,J.
SOCL B201-001The Study of Gender in SocietySemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHSledge,P.
SOCL B257-001Marginals and Outsiders: The Sociology of DevianceSemester / 1Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTHWashington,R.
SPAN B309-001La mujer en la literatura española del Siglo de OroSemester / 1Lecture: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM MQuintero,M.

Fall 2019

(Class schedules for this semester will be posted at a later date.)


Courses at Haverford Fall 2015

COURSE TITLE MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTRUCTOR(S)
         

 

2018-19 Catalog Data

ANTH B102 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Spring 2019
An introduction to the methods and theories of cultural anthropology in order to understand and explain cultural similarities and differences among contemporary societies.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward International Studies

Back to top

ANTH B279 Anthropology of Childhood and Youth
Not offered 2018-19
This course will challenge you to think about childhood and youth as a diverse global experience by exploring a set of fundamental questions. How do children's daily lives differ from place to place, and how are race, class and gender linked to discourses and experiences of childhood? How do children stand in as symbols for broader political and cultural concerns? The course will explore these questions by considering the ways childhood is constructed and experienced in relation to controversial topics such as education, labor, migration, human rights, violence, consumerism, and media.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

ANTH B294 Culture, Power, and Politics
Fall 2018
What do a country's national politics have to do with culture? Likewise, how are politics hidden below the surface of our everyday social lives? This course explores questions like these through anthropological approaches. Drawing on both classic and contemporary ethnographic studies from the U.S. and around the world, we will examine how social and cultural frameworks help us understand politics in new ways. We will investigate how people perceive the meanings and effects of the state; how nationalism and citizenship shape belonging on the one hand, and exclusion on the other; how understandings of gender, race, and difference converge with political action, ideology, and power; and how politics infuse everyday spaces including schools, businesses, homes, and even the dinner table. Prerequisite: ANTH B102, H103 or permission of the instructor.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward International Studies

Back to top

ANTH B312 Anthropology of Reproduction
Not offered 2018-19
An examination of social and cultural constructions of reproduction, and how power and politics in everyday life shapes reproductive behavior and its meaning in Western and non-Western cultures. The influence of competing interests within households, communities, states, and institutions on reproduction is considered. Prerequisite: ANTH B102 (or ANTH H103) or permission of instructor.
Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Health Studies

Back to top

ANTH B316 Media, Performance, and Gender in South Asia
Not offered 2018-19
Examines gender as a culturally and historically constructed category in the modern South Asian context, focusing on the ways in which everyday experiences of and practices relating to gender are informed by media, performance, and political events. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward International Studies

Back to top

ANTH B322 Anthropology of the Body
Not offered 2018-19
This course examines a diversity of meanings and interpretations of the body in anthropology. It explores anthropological theories and methods of studying the body and social difference via a series of topics including the construction of the body in medicine, identity, race, gender, sexuality and as explored through cross-cultural comparison. Prerequisite: ANTH B102, ANTH H103 or permission of instructor.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Health Studies

Back to top

ANTH B331 Medical Anthro Seminar: Critical Thinking for Critical Times
Fall 2018
Advanced Medical Anthropology: Critical Thinking for Critical Times explores theoretical and applied frameworks used in medical anthropology to tackle pressing problems in our world today. Coupled with topical subjects and ethnographic examples, this seminar will enable students to delve deeply into sub-specialization areas in the field of medical anthropology, including: global health inequalities, cross-border disease transmission, genomics, science and technology studies, ethnomedicine, cross-cultural psychiatry/psychology, cross-cultural bioethics, and ecological approaches to studying health and behavior, among others. No prior experience in medical anthropology is required. Prerequisite: ANTH B102, ANTH H103, or permission of instructor.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Health Studies

Back to top

ANTH B334 Digital Cultures
Not offered 2018-19
How do we do anthropology in, and of, the digital age? What does it mean to do ethnography of digital spaces, when we, as humans, exist simultaneously in overlapping virtual and actual worlds? Specific topics to be covered include surveillance, telecommunications infrastructures, activism, social movements, gender and sexuality, disability, space and place, and virtual ethnography. Prerequisite: Anth B102 or Anth H103 or permission of instructor.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

ANTH B348 In Search of Women in the Paleolithic
Not offered 2018-19
What was the role of women in Paleolithic times? How does female form reflect evolutionary changes to our species? Paleoanthropologists reconstruct how humans evolved based on evidence from fossilized bones, ancient DNA, and archaeological artifacts. This complex narrative is often presented as androcentric, focusing on the importance of male-bodies, while de-emphasizing or even ignoring female-bodies. In this seminar, students will read and discuss historical and modern works on paleoanthropology and its critical intersection with feminist theory. The goal will be to find out what women were doing in our evolutionary past, and identify methodological and theoretical approaches to prevent gender-biased, androcentric paleoanthropological research from occurring. Prerequisites: ANTH B101
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

ANTH B354 Political Economy, Gender, Ethnicity and Transformation in Vietnam
Not offered 2018-19
Today, Vietnam is in the midst of dramatic social, economic and political changes brought about through a shift from a central economy to a market/capitalist economy since the late 1980s. These changes have resulted in urbanization, a rise in consumption and shifts in social and economic relationships and cultural practices as the country has moved from low income to middle income status. This course examines culture and society in Vietnam focusing largely on contemporary Vietnam, but with a view to continuities and historical precedent in past centuries. In this course, we will draw on anthropological studies of Vietnam, as well as literature and historical studies. Relationships between the individual, family, gender, ethnicity, community and state will pervade the topics addressed in the course, as will the importance of political economy, nation, and globalization. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward International Studies

Back to top

CSTS B230 Food and Drink in the Ancient World
Not offered 2018-19
This course explores practices of eating and drinking in the ancient Mediterranean world both from a socio-cultural and environmental perspective. Since we are not only what we eat, but also where, when, why, with whom, and how we eat, we will examine the wider implications of patterns of food production, preparation, consumption, availability, and taboos, considering issues like gender, health, financial situation, geographical variability, and political status. Anthropological, archaeological, literary, and art historical approaches will be used to analyze the evidence and shed light on the role of food and drink in ancient culture and society. In addition, we will discuss how this affects our contemporary customs and practices and how our identity is still shaped by what we eat.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

HIST B231 Medicine, Magic & Miracles in the Middle Ages
Not offered 2018-19
A lecture and discussion course on the therapeutic systems (humoral theory, faith healing, natural magic), the medical marketplace, and the social context for understanding health and disease in the medieval period. Topics covered include Greek, Arabic, and Latin medical textual traditions, the rise of hospitals and public health, and the Black Death.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

Back to top

ARCH B254 Cleopatra
Not offered 2018-19
This course examines the life and rule of Cleopatra VII, the last queen of Ptolemaic Egypt, and the reception of her legacy in the Early Roman Empire and the western world from the Renaissance to modern times. The first part of the course explores extant literary evidence regarding the upbringing, education, and rule of Cleopatra within the contexts of Egyptian and Ptolemaic cultures, her relationships with Julius Caesar and Marc Antony, her conflict with Octavian, and her death by suicide in 30 BCE. The second part examines constructions of Cleopatra in Roman literature, her iconography in surviving art, and her contributions to and influence on both Ptolemaic and Roman art. A detailed account is also provided of the afterlife of Cleopatra in the literature, visual arts, scholarship, and film of both Europe and the United States, extending from the papal courts of Renaissance Italy and Shakespearean drama, to Thomas Jefferson's art collection at Monticello and Joseph Mankiewicz's 1963 epic film, Cleopatra.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

ARCH B303 Classical Bodies
Spring 2019
An examination of the conceptions of the human body evidenced in Greek and Roman art and literature, with emphasis on issues that have persisted in the Western tradition. Topics include the fashioning of concepts of male and female standards of beauty and their implications; conventions of visual representation; the nude; clothing and its symbolism; the athletic ideal; physiognomy; medical theory and practice; the visible expression of character and emotions; and the formulation of the "classical ideal" in antiquity and later times.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

ARTD B250 Performing the Political Body: Dance and Power
Fall 2018
Artists, activists, politicos, regents, intellectuals, and just ordinary people have, throughout history and across cultures, used dance and performance to support political goals and ideologies or to perform social or cultural interventions in the private and public spheres. From a wide range of possibilities, this course focuses on how dance is a useful medium for both embodying and analyzing ideologies and practices of power, particularly with reference to gender, class, and ethnicity. Students will also investigate bodiedness as an active agent of social change and political action. Students will read excerpts from seminal and contemporary theory of performing bodiedness, ethnicity, and gender, as well as from theoreticians, performers, and other practitioners more specifically engaged with dance and performance. In addition to literary, dance historical, anthropological and political texts, the course includes media, guest lecturers, and introductory group improvisation and performance exercises, however, no prior training or experience in dance or performance is necessary. In lieu of books, readings will be posted on Moodle. Preparation: A previous dance lecture/seminar course or a course in a relevant discipline such as anthropology, sociology, or history is recommended but not required.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

ARTD B250 Performing the Political Body: Dance and Power
Fall 2018
Artists, activists, politicos, regents, intellectuals, and just ordinary people have, throughout history and across cultures, used dance and performance to support political goals and ideologies or to perform social or cultural interventions in the private and public spheres. From a wide range of possibilities, this course focuses on how dance is a useful medium for both embodying and analyzing ideologies and practices of power, particularly with reference to gender, class, and ethnicity. Students will also investigate bodiedness as an active agent of social change and political action. Students will read excerpts from seminal and contemporary theory of performing bodiedness, ethnicity, and gender, as well as from theoreticians, performers, and other practitioners more specifically engaged with dance and performance. In addition to literary, dance historical, anthropological and political texts, the course includes media, guest lecturers, and introductory group improvisation and performance exercises, however, no prior training or experience in dance or performance is necessary. In lieu of books, readings will be posted on Moodle. Preparation: A previous dance lecture/seminar course or a course in a relevant discipline such as anthropology, sociology, or history is recommended but not required.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

BIOL B214 The History of Genetics and Embryology
Spring 2019
This course provides a general history of genetics and embryology in Germany, Britain and the United States from the late 19th to the mid-20th century. The course will include a focus on the role that women scientists and technicians played in the development of these sub-disciplines. We will look at the lives of well known and lesser-known individuals, asking how factors such as their educational experiences and mentor relationships influenced the roles these women played in the scientific enterprise. We will also examine specific scientific contributions in historical context, requiring a review of core concepts in genetics and developmental biology.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

GREK B201 Plato and Thucydides
Fall 2018
This course is designed to introduce the student to two of the greatest prose authors of ancient Greece, the philosopher, Plato, and the historian, Thucydides. These two writers set the terms in the disciplines of philosophy and history for millennia, and philosophers and historians today continue to grapple with their ideas and influence. The brilliant and controversial statesman Alcibiades provides a link between the two texts in this course (Plato's Symposium and Thucydides' History of the Peloponnesian War), and we examine the ways in which both authors handle the figure of Alcibiades as a point of entry into the comparison of the varying styles and modes of thought of these two great writers. Suggested Prerequisites: At least 2 years of college Greek or the equivalent.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

HIST B231 Medicine, Magic & Miracles in the Middle Ages
Not offered 2018-19
A lecture and discussion course on the therapeutic systems (humoral theory, faith healing, natural magic), the medical marketplace, and the social context for understanding health and disease in the medieval period. Topics covered include Greek, Arabic, and Latin medical textual traditions, the rise of hospitals and public health, and the Black Death.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

Back to top

SOCL B205 Social Inequality
Fall 2018
Introduction to the major sociological theories of gender, racial-ethnic, and class inequality with emphasis on the relationships among these forms of stratification in the contemporary United States, including the role of the upper class(es), inequality between and within families, in the work place, and in the educational system.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

HIST B237 Themes in Modern African History
Section 001 (Spring 2018): African Economic Development
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Public History in Africa
Section 001 (Fall 2017): Urban History
Fall 2018
This is a topics course. Course content varies
Current topic description:The course will explore the colonial and postcolonial practices in public history. It will address the following question: in an age of "fake news" and "history wars", how can we understand the relationship between the public and the place of the past? Topics will include exhibitions; museum practices and colonial outlooks; commemorations and identities; monuments; film, popular history and memory; heritage and regeneration; oral history and public engagement; and public policy. We will also discuss ongoing inter-sectional and interdisciplinary decolonizing approaches to breaking received hierarchies and narratives. The course will also introduce students to the multi-faceted method of public history - in theory, application, and critique.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Museum Studies

Back to top

GERM B245 Interdisciplinary Approaches to German Literature and Culture
Section 001 (Spring 2018): Crime, Justice and the Courtroom
Not offered 2018-19
This is a topics course. Taught in German. Course content varies. Previous topics include, Women's Narratives on Modern Migrancy, Exile, and Diasporas; Nation and Identity in Post-War Austria. Current topic: Crime, Justice and the Courtroom. This is a film-based course about political trials at critical junctures of German history.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

HIST B249 History of Global Health
Not offered 2018-19
This course examines the interrelated histories of public health, international health, and global health from the late 18th to the 21st centuries as part of a broader history of epidemics, empire, and global mobility. We will pay particular attention this semester to the use of architectural and spatial strategies for managing crises of contagion, disaster, and epidemic. The architectural spaces to be examined will include urban-based hospitals, public health infrastructure, and quarantine buildings as well as mobile architectural technologies such as incubators, wartime pop-up surgical tents, and floating hospitals in both Western and non-Western environments. The course will trace the role of health and medicine in mediating the relationships between metropolis and colony, state and citizen, research practice and human subject.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

Back to top

GERM B320 Topics in German Literature and Culture
Section 001 (Fall 2018): 1968 and Its Legacies
Fall 2018
This is a topics course. Course content varies. Taught in German.
Current topic description: This year marks the 50th anniversary of 1968. This course, taught in German, revisits the events of that watershed year and its enduring legacies in postwar German and European politics and history. Using literature and film, the course examines crucial topics including the student protest movement, the women's movement, Prague Spring, protests against the Vietnam War, and the terrorist campaigns of the Red Army Faction in the 1970s that culminated in what is known as the German Autumn.

Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

Back to top

ECON B324 The Economics of Discrimination and Inequality
Not offered 2018-19
Explores the causes and consequences of discrimination and inequality in economic markets. Topics include economic theories of discrimination and inequality, evidence of contemporary race- and gender-based inequality, detecting discrimination, identifying sources of racial and gender inequality, and identifying sources of overall economic inequality. Additionally, the instructor and students will jointly select supplementary topics of specific interest to the class. Possible topics include: discrimination in historical markets, disparity in legal treatments, issues of family structure, and education gaps. Writing Intensive. Prerequisites: At least one 200-level applied microeconomics elective; ECON 253 or 304; ECON 200.
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

GREK B201 Plato and Thucydides
Fall 2018
This course is designed to introduce the student to two of the greatest prose authors of ancient Greece, the philosopher, Plato, and the historian, Thucydides. These two writers set the terms in the disciplines of philosophy and history for millennia, and philosophers and historians today continue to grapple with their ideas and influence. The brilliant and controversial statesman Alcibiades provides a link between the two texts in this course (Plato's Symposium and Thucydides' History of the Peloponnesian War), and we examine the ways in which both authors handle the figure of Alcibiades as a point of entry into the comparison of the varying styles and modes of thought of these two great writers. Suggested Prerequisites: At least 2 years of college Greek or the equivalent.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

ITAL B212 Italy today: Migration Studies
Not offered 2018-19
There are numerous economic, political, and cultural elements that encumber on the existential condition of the migrant. In political and ideological parlance the term migrant has come to mean poor, needy, precarious, unhappy, primitive, and even criminal. In Italy, furthermore, the colonial past has been foreclosed, leading to a strengthening of stereotypes that continue to populate the discourse on migration. In this course we will examine issues related to migration, such as colonialism. racism, gender relations, discrimination, identity and difference and how they re-present new forms of multicultural and contaminated life and their impact on geography, security, identity, and belonging. . Is multiculturalism the answer to all the problems? Does it resolve the problem of closed communities so eloquently discussed by Bauman? With the help of Italian cinema of migration and selected critical articles we will discuss different positions and follow the migrants as they cross desert and sea to reach the European metropolis. From Libya to Lampedusa, from the Balkans to Puglia, and from there to the Roman peripheries, to the center of the city.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

ITAL B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Critical Theories
Fall 2018
What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.
Current topic description: What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.

Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

RUSS B238 Topics: The History of Cinema 1895 to 1945
Not offered 2018-19
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

Back to top

EALC B240 Topics in Chinese Film
Section 001 (Spring 2018): The Films of Wong Kar-wai
Not offered 2018-19
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

Back to top

GERM B245 Interdisciplinary Approaches to German Literature and Culture
Section 001 (Spring 2018): Crime, Justice and the Courtroom
Not offered 2018-19
This is a topics course. Taught in German. Course content varies. Previous topics include, Women's Narratives on Modern Migrancy, Exile, and Diasporas; Nation and Identity in Post-War Austria. Current topic: Crime, Justice and the Courtroom. This is a film-based course about political trials at critical junctures of German history.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

EALC B255 Understanding Comics: Introduction to Reading the Graphic No
Not offered 2018-19
The graphic narrative form has proliferated at a breathtaking rate in the last several decades. Called "comics," "graphic novels," and many other terms in between, these word-image hybrids have been embraced by both popular and critical audiences. But what is a graphic novel? How do we conceive of these texts and, more importantly, how do we read, interpret and write about them? This course is focused on approaches to reading the graphic novel, with a focus on a subgenre called the "literary comic." Our first approach is to consider different kinds of primary source texts and ask if and how they fulfill our understanding of the graphic narrative. This consideration will include various test cases, from wordless comics, to texts used as images, to the many varieties of word-image hybrids that are called comic books. Our second approach is to examine different scholarly approaches to analyzing graphic narratives, base d in different disciplines such as memoir studies, trauma studies, visual and material culture, history, semiotics, and, especially, narratology. Primary source readings include texts by Ware, Barry, Clowes, and Burns. Secondary readings include Hirsch, McCloud, Barthes, Iser, and Groensteen.Three short assignments due during the semester, and a final project due at the end of exam period (see description below). Students will also rotate responsibilities for starting discussions with small presentations aimed at discussing readings in depth. Students taking this course for their major in EALC or COML should meet with the instructor to discuss specific requirements.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

Back to top

FREN B302 Le printemps de la parole féminine: femmes écrivains des débuts
Not offered 2018-19
This study of selected women authors from Latin CE-Carolingian period through the Middle Ages, Renaissance and 17th century--among them, Perpetua, Hrotswitha, Marie de France, the trobairitz, Christine de Pisan, Louise Labé, Marguerite de Navarre, and Madame de Lafayette--examines the way in which they appropriate and transform the male writing tradition and define themselves as self-conscious artists within or outside it. Particular attention will be paid to identifying recurring concerns and structures in their works, and to assessing their importance to women's writing in general: among them, the poetics of silence, reproduction as a metaphor for artistic creation, and sociopolitical engagement. Prerequisite: two 200-level courses or permission of instructor.
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

ARCH B303 Classical Bodies
Spring 2019
An examination of the conceptions of the human body evidenced in Greek and Roman art and literature, with emphasis on issues that have persisted in the Western tradition. Topics include the fashioning of concepts of male and female standards of beauty and their implications; conventions of visual representation; the nude; clothing and its symbolism; the athletic ideal; physiognomy; medical theory and practice; the visible expression of character and emotions; and the formulation of the "classical ideal" in antiquity and later times.
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

EALC B315 Spirits, Saints, Snakes, Swords: Women in East Asian Literature & Film
Spring 2019
This interdisciplinary course focuses on a critical survey of literary and visual texts by and about Chinese women. We will begin by focusing on the cultural norms that defined women's lives beginning in early China, and consider how those tropes are reflected and rejected over time and geographical borders (in Japan, Hong Kong and the United States). No prior knowledge of Chinese culture or language necessary.
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

GERM B320 Topics in German Literature and Culture
Section 001 (Fall 2018): 1968 and Its Legacies
Fall 2018
This is a topics course. Course content varies. Taught in German.
Current topic description: This year marks the 50th anniversary of 1968. This course, taught in German, revisits the events of that watershed year and its enduring legacies in postwar German and European politics and history. Using literature and film, the course examines crucial topics including the student protest movement, the women's movement, Prague Spring, protests against the Vietnam War, and the terrorist campaigns of the Red Army Faction in the 1970s that culminated in what is known as the German Autumn.

Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

Back to top

HART B340 Topics in Baroque Art
Not offered 2018-19
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

Back to top

ENGL B345 Topics in Narrative Theory
Fall 2018
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o

Back to top

CSTS B175 Feminism in Classics
Not offered 2018-19
This course will illustrate the ways in which feminism has had an impact on classics, as well as the ways in which feminists think with classical texts. It will have four thematic divisions: feminism and the classical canon; feminism, women, and rethinking classical history; feminist readings of classical texts; and feminists and the classics - e.g. Cixous' Medusa and Butler's Antigone.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

CSTS B230 Food and Drink in the Ancient World
Not offered 2018-19
This course explores practices of eating and drinking in the ancient Mediterranean world both from a socio-cultural and environmental perspective. Since we are not only what we eat, but also where, when, why, with whom, and how we eat, we will examine the wider implications of patterns of food production, preparation, consumption, availability, and taboos, considering issues like gender, health, financial situation, geographical variability, and political status. Anthropological, archaeological, literary, and art historical approaches will be used to analyze the evidence and shed light on the role of food and drink in ancient culture and society. In addition, we will discuss how this affects our contemporary customs and practices and how our identity is still shaped by what we eat.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

HIST B231 Medicine, Magic & Miracles in the Middle Ages
Not offered 2018-19
A lecture and discussion course on the therapeutic systems (humoral theory, faith healing, natural magic), the medical marketplace, and the social context for understanding health and disease in the medieval period. Topics covered include Greek, Arabic, and Latin medical textual traditions, the rise of hospitals and public health, and the Black Death.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

Back to top

ARCH B254 Cleopatra
Not offered 2018-19
This course examines the life and rule of Cleopatra VII, the last queen of Ptolemaic Egypt, and the reception of her legacy in the Early Roman Empire and the western world from the Renaissance to modern times. The first part of the course explores extant literary evidence regarding the upbringing, education, and rule of Cleopatra within the contexts of Egyptian and Ptolemaic cultures, her relationships with Julius Caesar and Marc Antony, her conflict with Octavian, and her death by suicide in 30 BCE. The second part examines constructions of Cleopatra in Roman literature, her iconography in surviving art, and her contributions to and influence on both Ptolemaic and Roman art. A detailed account is also provided of the afterlife of Cleopatra in the literature, visual arts, scholarship, and film of both Europe and the United States, extending from the papal courts of Renaissance Italy and Shakespearean drama, to Thomas Jefferson's art collection at Monticello and Joseph Mankiewicz's 1963 epic film, Cleopatra.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

EALC B240 Topics in Chinese Film
Section 001 (Spring 2018): The Films of Wong Kar-wai
Not offered 2018-19
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Visual Studies

Back to top

EALC B255 Understanding Comics: Introduction to Reading the Graphic No
Not offered 2018-19
The graphic narrative form has proliferated at a breathtaking rate in the last several decades. Called "comics," "graphic novels," and many other terms in between, these word-image hybrids have been embraced by both popular and critical audiences. But what is a graphic novel? How do we conceive of these texts and, more importantly, how do we read, interpret and write about them? This course is focused on approaches to reading the graphic novel, with a focus on a subgenre called the "literary comic." Our first approach is to consider different kinds of primary source texts and ask if and how they fulfill our understanding of the graphic narrative. This consideration will include various test cases, from wordless comics, to texts used as images, to the many varieties of word-image hybrids that are called comic books. Our second approach is to examine different scholarly approaches to analyzing graphic narratives, base d in different disciplines such as memoir studies, trauma studies, visual and material culture, history, semiotics, and, especially, narratology. Primary source readings include texts by Ware, Barry, Clowes, and Burns. Secondary readings include Hirsch, McCloud, Barthes, Iser, and Groensteen.Three short assignments due during the semester, and a final project due at the end of exam period (see description below). Students will also rotate responsibilities for starting discussions with small presentations aimed at discussing readings in depth. Students taking this course for their major in EALC or COML should meet with the instructor to discuss specific requirements.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Visual Studies

Back to top

EALC B264 Human Rights in China
Spring 2019
This course will examine China's human rights issues from a historical perspective. The topics include diverse perspectives on human rights, historical background, civil rights, religious practice, justice system, education, as well as the problems concerning some social groups such as migrant laborers, women, ethnic minorities and peasants.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

EALC B315 Spirits, Saints, Snakes, Swords: Women in East Asian Literature & Film
Spring 2019
This interdisciplinary course focuses on a critical survey of literary and visual texts by and about Chinese women. We will begin by focusing on the cultural norms that defined women's lives beginning in early China, and consider how those tropes are reflected and rejected over time and geographical borders (in Japan, Hong Kong and the United States). No prior knowledge of Chinese culture or language necessary.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

EALC B240 Topics in Chinese Film
Section 001 (Spring 2018): The Films of Wong Kar-wai
Not offered 2018-19
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

Back to top

EALC B255 Understanding Comics: Introduction to Reading the Graphic No
Not offered 2018-19
The graphic narrative form has proliferated at a breathtaking rate in the last several decades. Called "comics," "graphic novels," and many other terms in between, these word-image hybrids have been embraced by both popular and critical audiences. But what is a graphic novel? How do we conceive of these texts and, more importantly, how do we read, interpret and write about them? This course is focused on approaches to reading the graphic novel, with a focus on a subgenre called the "literary comic." Our first approach is to consider different kinds of primary source texts and ask if and how they fulfill our understanding of the graphic narrative. This consideration will include various test cases, from wordless comics, to texts used as images, to the many varieties of word-image hybrids that are called comic books. Our second approach is to examine different scholarly approaches to analyzing graphic narratives, base d in different disciplines such as memoir studies, trauma studies, visual and material culture, history, semiotics, and, especially, narratology. Primary source readings include texts by Ware, Barry, Clowes, and Burns. Secondary readings include Hirsch, McCloud, Barthes, Iser, and Groensteen.Three short assignments due during the semester, and a final project due at the end of exam period (see description below). Students will also rotate responsibilities for starting discussions with small presentations aimed at discussing readings in depth. Students taking this course for their major in EALC or COML should meet with the instructor to discuss specific requirements.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

Back to top

EALC B264 Human Rights in China
Spring 2019
This course will examine China's human rights issues from a historical perspective. The topics include diverse perspectives on human rights, historical background, civil rights, religious practice, justice system, education, as well as the problems concerning some social groups such as migrant laborers, women, ethnic minorities and peasants.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

EALC B315 Spirits, Saints, Snakes, Swords: Women in East Asian Literature & Film
Spring 2019
This interdisciplinary course focuses on a critical survey of literary and visual texts by and about Chinese women. We will begin by focusing on the cultural norms that defined women's lives beginning in early China, and consider how those tropes are reflected and rejected over time and geographical borders (in Japan, Hong Kong and the United States). No prior knowledge of Chinese culture or language necessary.
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

ECON B324 The Economics of Discrimination and Inequality
Not offered 2018-19
Explores the causes and consequences of discrimination and inequality in economic markets. Topics include economic theories of discrimination and inequality, evidence of contemporary race- and gender-based inequality, detecting discrimination, identifying sources of racial and gender inequality, and identifying sources of overall economic inequality. Additionally, the instructor and students will jointly select supplementary topics of specific interest to the class. Possible topics include: discrimination in historical markets, disparity in legal treatments, issues of family structure, and education gaps. Writing Intensive. Prerequisites: At least one 200-level applied microeconomics elective; ECON 253 or 304; ECON 200.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

ENGL B203 Imagined Worlds: Utopia and Dystopia in Literature
Not offered 2018-19
When Thomas More coined the term "Utopia" in 1516, it meant both "good place" and "no place" - an ideal society, and an unreachable one. Since then, the term (as well as its opposite, dystopia) has been applied to representations of imagined worlds that hold a mirror up to our own. In this class, we'll read texts from the early modern period (Utopia, The Blazing World) through the present day (The Handmaid's Tale, The Hunger Games) that use invented societies to critique the 'real world.' We will pay particular attention to how descriptions of imagined places explore very real tensions around class, gender and racial identities. Do these texts offer a path to better worlds, or do such fantasies always remain out of reach?
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

ENGL B210 Renaissance Literature: Performances of Gender
Not offered 2018-19
Readings chosen to highlight the construction and performance of gender identity during the period from 1550 to 1650 and the ways in which the gender anxieties of 16th- and 17th-century men and women differ from, yet speak to, our own. Texts will include plays, poems, prose fiction, diaries, and polemical writing of the period.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

ENGL B212 Renaissance Erotic Poetry
Not offered 2018-19
Even when it was concerned with elevated topics like religion, politics, or community, Renaissance poetry was deeply embodied, working through abstract topics in frank and fleshy figures. This class will serve as an introduction to Renaissance lyric, focusing on the erotic dimensions of early modern poetics. Along the way, we'll discuss topics of interest within gender and sexuality studies and queer theory. Authors will include Wyatt, Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, Marvell, Herbert, Rochester, and Milton.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

ITAL B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Critical Theories
Fall 2018
What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.
Current topic description: What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.

Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

ENGL B215 Early Modern Crime Narratives: Vice, Villains, and Law
Spring 2019
This course taps into our continuing collective obsession with criminality, unpacking the complicated web of feelings attached to crime and punishment through early modern literary treatments of villains, scoundrels, predators, pimps, witches, king-killers, poisoners, mobs, and adulterers. By reading literary accounts of vice alongside contemporary and historical theories of criminal justice, we will chart the deep history of criminology and track competing ideas about punishment and the criminal mind. This course pays particular attention the ways that people in this historical moment mapped criminality onto dynamics of gender, race, sexuality, disability, religion, and mental illness according to cultural conventions very different from our own. Authors may include Shakespeare, Marlowe, Massinger, Middleton, Dekker, Webster, and Behn.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

ENGL B217 Narratives of Latinidad
Fall 2018
This course explores how Latina/o writers fashion bicultural and transnational identities and narrate the intertwined histories of the U.S. and Latin America. We will focus on topics of shared concern among Latino groups such as struggles for social justice, the damaging effects of machismo and racial hierarchies, the politics of Spanglish, and the affective experience of migration. By analyzing a range of cultural production, including novels, poetry, testimonial narratives, films, activist art, and essays, we will unpack the complexity of Latinidad in the Americas.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies

Back to top

ENGL B225 Contemporary Life Writing: Form and Theory
Spring 2019
In this course, we will explore contemporary forms of life writing. The term "writing" will be used flexibly to encompass self-representation in visual forms (including comics, photography, and video). We will begin by considering myth and archives in Alison Bechdel's Fun Home and Theresa Hak Kyung Cha's Dictée; our next unit will address how life writing represents the lives of others. The last half of the course focuses on the genre of autotheory, or life writing that has become a form of theorizing (about gender, sexuality, race, and biopolitics, among other topics) in its own right.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

ENGL B228 Silence: The Rhetorics of Class, Gender, Culture, Religion
Not offered 2018-19
This course will consider silence as a rhetorical art and political act, an imaginative space and expressive power that can serve many functions, including that of opening new possibilities among us. We will share our own experiences of silence, re-thinking them through the lenses of how it is explained in philosophy, enacted in classrooms and performed by various genders, cultures, and religions.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Praxis Program

Back to top

ENGL B231 Theorizing Affect, Watching Television
Spring 2019
This course examines television through the lens of affect theory. Within humanities scholarship, the turn toward affect has offered new ways to study the cultural, economic, and political functions of literature and art. In our wider cultural moment, television programming has become a source of shared fascination. The course will pair readings from affect studies (by scholars such as Lauren Berlant and Sianne Ngai) with select examples of television shows (including Black Mirror, Mad Men, and The Wire). We will also read scholarly and public writing about television and consider the interplay between cultural feelings and televisual forms such as seriality, situation comedy, and bottle episodes.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

ENGL B232 Pirates in the Popular Imagination
Not offered 2018-19
This course will explore popular representations of pirates from the seventeenth century to the present, in memoirs, first-hand and fictional accounts (including children's literature), and films. The context will be global, with an emphasis on the transatlantic world. Topics will include slavery, gender/sexuality, captivity, class/status, race, and imperialism/colonialism.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

RUSS B238 Topics: The History of Cinema 1895 to 1945
Not offered 2018-19
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

Back to top

ENGL B239 African American Poetry
Not offered 2018-19
This course explores the work of black poets in the Americas. Focusing on a range of poetic forms from the 18th century through the present, we will consider key questions that have animated the works of black poets in North America and the Caribbean, and how they have used poetic strategy to engage these questions. How do black poets explore black political and social life in various historical and geographical contexts? How do they use particular formal strategies (for example, form poetry, free verse, narrative poetry, and experimental modes) to interrogate notions of blackness? How do political movements around gender, class, and sexuality factor in? As we approach these questions, we will consider important critical conversations on African American poetry and poetics, examining how both well-known and underexplored poets use form to complicate blackness and imagine various forms of freedom. Our work will take us through several poetic genres and forms, including print works, performance poetry, hip hop music, and digital media. Throughout our analysis, we will consider how discourses on gender, sexuality, class, national and transnational identity, and other engagements with difference shape black poetic expression, both historically and in our current moment.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies

Back to top

EALC B240 Topics in Chinese Film
Section 001 (Spring 2018): The Films of Wong Kar-wai
Not offered 2018-19
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

Back to top

EALC B255 Understanding Comics: Introduction to Reading the Graphic No
Not offered 2018-19
The graphic narrative form has proliferated at a breathtaking rate in the last several decades. Called "comics," "graphic novels," and many other terms in between, these word-image hybrids have been embraced by both popular and critical audiences. But what is a graphic novel? How do we conceive of these texts and, more importantly, how do we read, interpret and write about them? This course is focused on approaches to reading the graphic novel, with a focus on a subgenre called the "literary comic." Our first approach is to consider different kinds of primary source texts and ask if and how they fulfill our understanding of the graphic narrative. This consideration will include various test cases, from wordless comics, to texts used as images, to the many varieties of word-image hybrids that are called comic books. Our second approach is to examine different scholarly approaches to analyzing graphic narratives, base d in different disciplines such as memoir studies, trauma studies, visual and material culture, history, semiotics, and, especially, narratology. Primary source readings include texts by Ware, Barry, Clowes, and Burns. Secondary readings include Hirsch, McCloud, Barthes, Iser, and Groensteen.Three short assignments due during the semester, and a final project due at the end of exam period (see description below). Students will also rotate responsibilities for starting discussions with small presentations aimed at discussing readings in depth. Students taking this course for their major in EALC or COML should meet with the instructor to discuss specific requirements.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

Back to top

ENGL B255 Food and the Transnational City
Not offered 2018-19
Cities have been crucial sites of cultural innovation, social interaction, and identity formation, often most visibly in food and foodways. Using three cities as case studies--New York, New Orleans, and Los Angeles--"Food and the Transnational City" explores how transnational migration and urbanism have shaped and reshaped eating, shopping, and cooking patterns, and how cities and foodways together reshaped and reflected broader patterns of identity and belonging. How have food and foodways been mobilized in constructions of national, regional, ethnic, and racial heritage? How have cooking and eating patterns for various groups been transformed by migration and immigration? How have consumer spaces operated as sites of kinship, community, assimilation, and resistance? Students will draw on theory and historical scholarship to read a wide range of literary and cultural texts, including cookbooks, travel writing, print and television commercials, art and photography, documentaries, and short fiction. NOTE: This course is part of the Foodways and Migration 360, however students who do not wish to enroll in the 360 may also take this class.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

ENGL B262 Survey in African American Literature
Section 001 (Spring 2018): 19th Century African American Narrative
Not offered 2018-19
English 262 is a topics course that allows for multiple themes to be taught. Each topic will have its own description and students may enroll for credit in the course as long as the topics vary.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

ENGL B269 Medieval Bodies
Fall 2018
The Middle Ages imagined the physical body as the site of moral triumph and failure and as the canvas to expose social ills. The course examines medical tracts, saint's lives, poetry, theological texts, and representations of the Passion. Discussion topics range from plague and mercantilism to the legal and religious depiction of torture. Texts by Boccaccio, Chaucer, Dante, and Kempe will be supplemented with contemporary readings on trauma theory and embodiment.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

ENGL B270 American Girl: Childhood in U.S. Literatures, 1690-1935
Not offered 2018-19
This course will focus on the "American Girl" as a particularly contested model for the nascent American. Through examination of religious tracts, slave and captivity narratives, literatures for children and adult literatures about childhood, we will analyze U. S. investments in girlhood as a site for national self-fashioning.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

ENGL B272 Queer of Color Critique
Not offered 2018-19
Queer of color critique (QoCC) is a mode of criticism with roots in women of color feminism, post-structuralism, critical race theory, and queer studies. QoCC focuses on "intersectional" analyses. That is, QoCC seeks to integrate studies of race, sexuality, gender, class, and nationalism, and to show how these categories are co-constitutive. In so doing, QoCC contends that a focus on gay rights or reliance on academic discourse is too narrow. QoCC therefore addresses a wide set of issues from beauty standards to terrorism and questions the very idea of "normal." This course introduces students to the ideas of QoCC through key literary and film texts.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

ENGL B301 Women on Top: Gender and Power in Renaissance Drama
Not offered 2018-19
From virtuous queens to scheming adulteresses and cross-dressed "Roaring Girls," powerful female characters are at the center of a number of Renaissance plays. This class will explore how playwrights such as Shakespeare, Webster and Dekker represent both fantasies and anxieties about tough women who take charge of their destinies. We will read these plays first in the context of the historical position of women in early modern England, and then turn to gender theory (e.g. Butler, Sedgwick, Rubin) to examine constructions of gender identity and female agency.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

ENGL B305 Early Modern Trans Studies
Fall 2018
This course will consider the deep histories of transgender embodiment by exploring literary, historical, medical, and religious texts from the Renaissance. Expect to read about alchemical hermaphrodites, gender-swapping angels, Ethiopian eunuchs, female husbands, trans saints, criminal transvestites, and genderqueer monks. We will consider together how these early modern texts speak to the historical, theoretical, and political concerns that animate contemporary trans studies. We will read texts by Crashaw, Donne, Shakespeare, Lyly, and Dekker as well as Susan Stryker, Dean Spade, Mel Chen, Paul Preciado, and Kadji Amin. Prerequisite: Students must have completed at least one 200-level class.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

ENGL B310 Confessional Poetry
Not offered 2018-19
Poetry written since 1950 that deploys an autobiographical subject to engage with the psychological and political dynamics of family life and with states of psychic extremity and mental illness. Poets will include Lowell, Ginsberg, Sexton, and Plath. The impact of this`movement' on late twentieth century American poetry will also receive attention. A prior course in poetry is desirable but not required.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

ENGL B314 Troilus and Criseyde
Spring 2019
Examines Chaucer's magisterial Troilus and Criseyde, his epic romance of love, loss, and betrayal. We will supplement sustained analysis of the poem with primary readings on free will and courtly love as well as theoretical readings on gender and sexuality and translation. We will also read Boccaccio's Il Filostrato, Robert Henryson's Testament of Cresseid and Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

EALC B315 Spirits, Saints, Snakes, Swords: Women in East Asian Literature & Film
Spring 2019
This interdisciplinary course focuses on a critical survey of literary and visual texts by and about Chinese women. We will begin by focusing on the cultural norms that defined women's lives beginning in early China, and consider how those tropes are reflected and rejected over time and geographical borders (in Japan, Hong Kong and the United States). No prior knowledge of Chinese culture or language necessary.
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

ENGL B320 Black Feminist Literature
Fall 2018
This course explores contemporary black feminist literature and culture on a transnational stage. We will consider the works of prominent, emerging, and underexplored black feminist writers from various African diaspora locations, including South Africa, West Africa, Europe, North America, and the Caribbean. How do these writers engage with key currents in global black feminist politics, including understandings of gender, sexuality, class, nationality and colonialism? How do they complicate these discussions in their work? We will ground our exploration in close study of black feminist poetics--the specific formal and creative choices that black feminist poets, fiction writers, visual artists, hip hop artists, webseries producers and others use to examine gender end sexuality in their art. Paying particular attention to the work of queer and LGBTI+ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans* and Intersex) artists, we will consider the various meanings of t erms such as "black," "feminist," and "queer" in various parts of the African Diaspora. Our work will emphasize close analysis of black feminist writers' works, as well as collaborative exercises and invited in-class discussions with several contemporary black diasporic feminist artists themselves. Requirements include two short papers, regular response papers, and a final project.
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies

Back to top

ENGL B333 Lesbian Immortal
Not offered 2018-19
Lesbian literature has repeatedly figured itself in alliance with tropes of immortality and eternity. Using recent queer theory on temporality, and 19th and 20th century primary texts, we will explore topics such as: fame and noteriety; feminism and mythology; epistemes, erotics and sexual seasonality; the death drive and the uncanny; fin de siecle manias for mummies and seances.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

ENGL B336 Topics in Film
Section 001 (Spring 2018): Cinematic Voice
Section 001 (Spring 2019): Cinematic Voice
Spring 2019
This is a topics course and description varies according to the topic.
Current topic description: If film is primarily a visual medium, the integration of sound permanently changed the form. In this course, we will attend to the voice as a centrally important component of film sound. We will examine the ways voice has changed the cinema and the ways cinema has changed the voice. Topics include: the transition from silent to sound film; how voice is racialized and gendered in Hollywood film; the ways that filmmakers link voice to image, and why they matter aesthetically and politically; interiority and exteriority; and the possibility of non-human voice. The syllabus pairs a range of films with various theories relating to the concept of voice.

Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

ENGL B339 Latina/o Culture and the Art of Migration
Spring 2019
Gloria Anzaldúa has famously described the U.S.-Mexico border as an open wound and the border culture that arises from this fraught site as a third country. This course will explore how Chicana/os and Latina/os creatively represent different kinds of migrations across geo-political borders and between cultural traditions to forge transnational identities and communities. We will use cultural production as a lens for understanding how citizenship status, class, gender, race, and language shape the experiences of Latin American migrants and their Latina/o children. We will also analyze alternative metaphors and discourses of resistance that challenge anti-immigrant rhetoric and reimagine the place of undocumented migrants and Latina/os in contemporary U.S. society. Over the course of the semester, we will probe the role that literature, art, film, and music can play in the struggle for migrants' rights and minority civil rights, querying how the imagination and aesthetics can contribute to social justice. We will examine a number of different genres, as well as read and apply key theoretical texts on the borderlands and undocumented migration.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies

Back to top

ENGL B345 Topics in Narrative Theory
Fall 2018
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies

Back to top

ENGL B354 Virginia Woolf
Not offered 2018-19
Virginia Woolf has been interpreted as a feminist, a modernist, a crazy person, a resident of Bloomsbury, a victim of child abuse, a snob, a socialist, and a creation of literary and popular history. We will try out all these approaches and examine the features of our contemporary world that influence the way Woolf, her work, and her era are perceived. We will also attempt to theorize about why we favor certain interpretations over others.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

ENGL B355 Performance Studies
Not offered 2018-19
Introduces students to the field of performance studies, a multidisciplinary species of cultural studies which theorizes human actions as performances that both construct and resist cultural norms of race, gender, and sexuality. The course will explore "performativity" in everyday life as well as in the performing arts, and will include multiple viewings of dance and theater both on- and off-campus. In addition, we will consider the performative aspects of film and video productions.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

ENGL B363 Toni Morrison and the Art of Narrative Conjure
Not offered 2018-19
A comprehensive study of Morrison's narrative experiments in fiction, this course traces her entire oeuvre from "Recitatif" to God Help the Child. We read the works in publication order with three main foci: Morrison-as-epistemologist questioning what it is that constitutes knowing and being known, Morrison-as-revisionary-teacher-of-reading-strategies, and Morrison in intertextual dialogue with several oral and literary traditions. In addition to critical essays, students complete a "Pilate Project" - a creative response to the works under study.
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

ENGL B367 Asian American Film Video and New Media
Not offered 2018-19
The course explores the role of pleasure in the production, reception, and performance of Asian American identities in film, video, and the internet, taking as its focus the sexual representation of Asian Americans in works produced by Asian American artists from 1915 to present. In several units of the course, we will study graphic sexual representations, including pornographic images and sex acts some may find objectionable. Students should be prepared to engage analytically with all class material. To maintain an atmosphere of mutual respect and solidarity among the participants in the class, no auditors will be allowed.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

ENGL B375 Sex on Screens
Not offered 2018-19
This course will provide a historical and theoretical overview of the ways moving image sex acts have been represented on screen, from early cinema's silent film loops to today's celebrity sex tapes. We will examine the ideological operations of sex in the cinema and aim to comprehend the multifarious ways viewers, filmmakers, critics, and scholars respond to dominant conceptions of sex-sexuality through alternative cinematic production and critical scholarship. Units include: stag movies, the Production Code and ratings system, European art cinema, sex ed, underground and the avant-garde, cult / sexploitation / blaxploitation, sexual revolution, hard core, women's cinema, home video, queer cinema, HIV/AIDS, the digital revolution, feminist porn, and the Internet. Prerequisites: HART / COML B110: Identification in the Cinema; or ENGL / HART 205: Introduction to Film; or ENGL B299 History of Narrative Cinema, 1945 to the Present.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

ENGL B379 The African Griot(te)
Section 001 (Spring 2018): Women Writing Southern Africa
Not offered 2018-19
English 379 is a capstone topics course in the study of two or more distinguished African writers who have made significant contributions to African literary production. The focus changes from one semester to the next so that students may re-enroll in the course for credit. The specific focus of each semester's offering of the course is outlined separately.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

EALC B240 Topics in Chinese Film
Section 001 (Spring 2018): The Films of Wong Kar-wai
Not offered 2018-19
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

Back to top

HIST B284 Movies and America: The Past Lives Forever
Spring 2019
Movies are one of the most important means by which Americans come to know - or think they know--their own history. We look to old movies to tell us about a world we never knew but think we can access through film. And Hollywood often reaches into the past to tell a good story. How can we understand the impact of our love affair with movies on our understanding of what happened in this country? In this course we will examine the complex cultural relationship between film and American historical self-fashioning.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

Back to top

GERM B320 Topics in German Literature and Culture
Section 001 (Fall 2018): 1968 and Its Legacies
Fall 2018
This is a topics course. Course content varies. Taught in German.
Current topic description: This year marks the 50th anniversary of 1968. This course, taught in German, revisits the events of that watershed year and its enduring legacies in postwar German and European politics and history. Using literature and film, the course examines crucial topics including the student protest movement, the women's movement, Prague Spring, protests against the Vietnam War, and the terrorist campaigns of the Red Army Faction in the 1970s that culminated in what is known as the German Autumn.

Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

Back to top

GERM B321 Advanced Topics in German Cultural Studies
Section 001 (Fall 2017): German Encounters/East Asia
Section 001 (Spring 2019): Representing Diversity in German Cinema
Spring 2019
This is a topics course. Course content varies. Course is taught in English. There will an additional hour in German for those students taking the course for German credit.
Current topic description:This course examines a wide-ranging repertoire of transnational films produced in contemporary Germany. It presents an introduction to modern German cinema through a close analysis of visual material and identity construction in the worlds of the real and the reel. It uses film as the primary medium to discuss the experiences of diverse minority groups in Germany, including Turkish Germans, Afro-Germans, ethnic Germans from former Eastern European territories, German Jews, and Asian Germans.

Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward East Asian Languages and Cultures
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

ENGL B336 Topics in Film
Section 001 (Spring 2018): Cinematic Voice
Section 001 (Spring 2019): Cinematic Voice
Spring 2019
This is a topics course and description varies according to the topic.
Current topic description: If film is primarily a visual medium, the integration of sound permanently changed the form. In this course, we will attend to the voice as a centrally important component of film sound. We will examine the ways voice has changed the cinema and the ways cinema has changed the voice. Topics include: the transition from silent to sound film; how voice is racialized and gendered in Hollywood film; the ways that filmmakers link voice to image, and why they matter aesthetically and politically; interiority and exteriority; and the possibility of non-human voice. The syllabus pairs a range of films with various theories relating to the concept of voice.

Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

FREN B201 Le Chevalier, la dame et le prêtre: littérature et publics du Moyen Age
Not offered 2018-19
Using literary texts, historical documents and letters as a mirror of the social classes that they address, this interdisciplinary course studies the principal preoccupations of secular and religious female and male authors in France and Norman England from the eleventh century through the fifteenth. Selected works from epic, lais, roman courtois, fabliaux, theater, letters, and contemporary biography are read in modern French translation. Prerequisite: FREN 102 or 105.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

ITAL B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Critical Theories
Fall 2018
What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.
Current topic description: What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.

Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

FREN B302 Le printemps de la parole féminine: femmes écrivains des débuts
Not offered 2018-19
This study of selected women authors from Latin CE-Carolingian period through the Middle Ages, Renaissance and 17th century--among them, Perpetua, Hrotswitha, Marie de France, the trobairitz, Christine de Pisan, Louise Labé, Marguerite de Navarre, and Madame de Lafayette--examines the way in which they appropriate and transform the male writing tradition and define themselves as self-conscious artists within or outside it. Particular attention will be paid to identifying recurring concerns and structures in their works, and to assessing their importance to women's writing in general: among them, the poetics of silence, reproduction as a metaphor for artistic creation, and sociopolitical engagement. Prerequisite: two 200-level courses or permission of instructor.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

ITAL B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Critical Theories
Fall 2018
What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.
Current topic description: What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.

Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

GERM B245 Interdisciplinary Approaches to German Literature and Culture
Section 001 (Spring 2018): Crime, Justice and the Courtroom
Not offered 2018-19
This is a topics course. Taught in German. Course content varies. Previous topics include, Women's Narratives on Modern Migrancy, Exile, and Diasporas; Nation and Identity in Post-War Austria. Current topic: Crime, Justice and the Courtroom. This is a film-based course about political trials at critical junctures of German history.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

GERM B320 Topics in German Literature and Culture
Section 001 (Fall 2018): 1968 and Its Legacies
Fall 2018
This is a topics course. Course content varies. Taught in German.
Current topic description: This year marks the 50th anniversary of 1968. This course, taught in German, revisits the events of that watershed year and its enduring legacies in postwar German and European politics and history. Using literature and film, the course examines crucial topics including the student protest movement, the women's movement, Prague Spring, protests against the Vietnam War, and the terrorist campaigns of the Red Army Faction in the 1970s that culminated in what is known as the German Autumn.

Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Visual Studies

Back to top

GERM B321 Advanced Topics in German Cultural Studies
Section 001 (Fall 2017): German Encounters/East Asia
Section 001 (Spring 2019): Representing Diversity in German Cinema
Spring 2019
This is a topics course. Course content varies. Course is taught in English. There will an additional hour in German for those students taking the course for German credit.
Current topic description:This course examines a wide-ranging repertoire of transnational films produced in contemporary Germany. It presents an introduction to modern German cinema through a close analysis of visual material and identity construction in the worlds of the real and the reel. It uses film as the primary medium to discuss the experiences of diverse minority groups in Germany, including Turkish Germans, Afro-Germans, ethnic Germans from former Eastern European territories, German Jews, and Asian Germans.

Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward East Asian Languages and Cultures
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

GNST B108 Introduction to Gender and Sexuality Studies
Fall 2018
This course will introduce students to major approaches, theories, and topics in gender and sexuality studies, as a framework for understanding the past and present--not only how societies conceive differences in bodily sex, gender expression, and sexual behavior, but how those conceptions shape broader social, cultural, political, and economic patterns.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

GNST B290 Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality
Spring 2019
This course offers a rigorous grounding for students interested in questions of gender and sexuality. Bringing together intellectual resources from multiple disciplines, it also explores what it means to think across and between disciplinary boundaries. Team-taught by Bryn Mawr and Haverford professors from different disciplines, this course is offered yearly on alternate campuses.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

GREK B201 Plato and Thucydides
Fall 2018
This course is designed to introduce the student to two of the greatest prose authors of ancient Greece, the philosopher, Plato, and the historian, Thucydides. These two writers set the terms in the disciplines of philosophy and history for millennia, and philosophers and historians today continue to grapple with their ideas and influence. The brilliant and controversial statesman Alcibiades provides a link between the two texts in this course (Plato's Symposium and Thucydides' History of the Peloponnesian War), and we examine the ways in which both authors handle the figure of Alcibiades as a point of entry into the comparison of the varying styles and modes of thought of these two great writers. Suggested Prerequisites: At least 2 years of college Greek or the equivalent.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

CSTS B230 Food and Drink in the Ancient World
Not offered 2018-19
This course explores practices of eating and drinking in the ancient Mediterranean world both from a socio-cultural and environmental perspective. Since we are not only what we eat, but also where, when, why, with whom, and how we eat, we will examine the wider implications of patterns of food production, preparation, consumption, availability, and taboos, considering issues like gender, health, financial situation, geographical variability, and political status. Anthropological, archaeological, literary, and art historical approaches will be used to analyze the evidence and shed light on the role of food and drink in ancient culture and society. In addition, we will discuss how this affects our contemporary customs and practices and how our identity is still shaped by what we eat.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

HART B108 Critical Approaches to Visual Representation: Women, Feminism, and History of Art
Not offered 2018-19
An investigation of the history of art since the Renaissance organized around the practice of women artists, the representation of women in art, and the visual economy of the gaze.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

ITAL B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Critical Theories
Fall 2018
What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.
Current topic description: What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.

Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

RUSS B238 Topics: The History of Cinema 1895 to 1945
Not offered 2018-19
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

Back to top

ARCH B254 Cleopatra
Not offered 2018-19
This course examines the life and rule of Cleopatra VII, the last queen of Ptolemaic Egypt, and the reception of her legacy in the Early Roman Empire and the western world from the Renaissance to modern times. The first part of the course explores extant literary evidence regarding the upbringing, education, and rule of Cleopatra within the contexts of Egyptian and Ptolemaic cultures, her relationships with Julius Caesar and Marc Antony, her conflict with Octavian, and her death by suicide in 30 BCE. The second part examines constructions of Cleopatra in Roman literature, her iconography in surviving art, and her contributions to and influence on both Ptolemaic and Roman art. A detailed account is also provided of the afterlife of Cleopatra in the literature, visual arts, scholarship, and film of both Europe and the United States, extending from the papal courts of Renaissance Italy and Shakespearean drama, to Thomas Jefferson's art collection at Monticello and Joseph Mankiewicz's 1963 epic film, Cleopatra.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

ARCH B303 Classical Bodies
Spring 2019
An examination of the conceptions of the human body evidenced in Greek and Roman art and literature, with emphasis on issues that have persisted in the Western tradition. Topics include the fashioning of concepts of male and female standards of beauty and their implications; conventions of visual representation; the nude; clothing and its symbolism; the athletic ideal; physiognomy; medical theory and practice; the visible expression of character and emotions; and the formulation of the "classical ideal" in antiquity and later times.
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

ENGL B336 Topics in Film
Section 001 (Spring 2018): Cinematic Voice
Section 001 (Spring 2019): Cinematic Voice
Spring 2019
This is a topics course and description varies according to the topic.
Current topic description: If film is primarily a visual medium, the integration of sound permanently changed the form. In this course, we will attend to the voice as a centrally important component of film sound. We will examine the ways voice has changed the cinema and the ways cinema has changed the voice. Topics include: the transition from silent to sound film; how voice is racialized and gendered in Hollywood film; the ways that filmmakers link voice to image, and why they matter aesthetically and politically; interiority and exteriority; and the possibility of non-human voice. The syllabus pairs a range of films with various theories relating to the concept of voice.

Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

HART B340 Topics in Baroque Art
Not offered 2018-19
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Visual Studies

Back to top

ENGL B367 Asian American Film Video and New Media
Not offered 2018-19
The course explores the role of pleasure in the production, reception, and performance of Asian American identities in film, video, and the internet, taking as its focus the sexual representation of Asian Americans in works produced by Asian American artists from 1915 to present. In several units of the course, we will study graphic sexual representations, including pornographic images and sex acts some may find objectionable. Students should be prepared to engage analytically with all class material. To maintain an atmosphere of mutual respect and solidarity among the participants in the class, no auditors will be allowed.
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

HIST B102 Introduction to African Civilizations
Fall 2018
The course is designed to introduce students to the history of African and African Diaspora societies, cultures, and political economies. We will discuss the origins, state formation, external contacts, and the structural transformations and continuities of African societies and cultures in the context of the slave trade, colonial rule, capitalist exploitation, urbanization, and westernization, as well as contemporary struggles over authority, autonomy, identity and access to resources. Case studies will be drawn from across the continent.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward International Studies

Back to top

HIST B156 The Long 1960's
Fall 2018
The 1960s has had a powerful effect on recent US History. But what was it exactly? How long did it last? And what do we really mean when we say "The Sixties?" This term has become so potent and loaded for so many people from all sides of the political spectrum that it's almost impossible to separate fact from fiction; myth from memory. We are all the inheritors of this intense period in American history but our inheritance is neither simple nor entirely clear. Our task this semester is to try to pull apart the meaning as well as the legend and attempt to figure out what "The Sixties" is (and what it isn't) and try to assess its long term impact on American society.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

HIST B209 Introduction to the History of Medicine
Not offered 2018-19
This course provides an introduction to the history of medicine, from Hippocrates to the Black Plague to contemporary struggles to combat HIV/AIDS. It examines topics including epidemic disease, the processes of medical knowledge production, the hospital and the rise of clinical medicine, and issues of hygiene and public health. We will focus on the intersecting social, political, and cultural histories of medicine, addressing themes of race, gender, and constructions of biological difference; the history of the body; professionalization; and medical ethics. Disrupting straightforward narratives of medical progress, this course will focus on the contingencies involved in medical knowledge production and situate elements of historical medical practice, for example humoral theory or polypharmacy, within their appropriate historical context.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Health Studies

Back to top

BIOL B214 The History of Genetics and Embryology
Spring 2019
This course provides a general history of genetics and embryology in Germany, Britain and the United States from the late 19th to the mid-20th century. The course will include a focus on the role that women scientists and technicians played in the development of these sub-disciplines. We will look at the lives of well known and lesser-known individuals, asking how factors such as their educational experiences and mentor relationships influenced the roles these women played in the scientific enterprise. We will also examine specific scientific contributions in historical context, requiring a review of core concepts in genetics and developmental biology.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

HIST B215 Europe and the Other 1492-1800
Not offered 2018-19
This course will introduce students to process through which Europeans created systems and categories of difference into which they placed Indigenous, African, and Asian peoples between the years 1492 and 1815. Topics of study include Indigenous leaders, slave and free communities, and cultural mediators on colonial frontiers.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies

Back to top

HIST B226 Topics in 20th Century European History
Section 001 (Fall 2017): Gender- Modern European State
Section 001 (Spring 2018): Holocaust: History and Politics of Commemoration
Section 001 (Spring 2019): Human Rights:Theory & Practice
Spring 2019
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: What are the origins of human rights? Are human rights universal? This course examines the history of human rights, as a set of ideas and as a motivation for social action from the French Revolution to the present. Concentrating on the role of human rights in European history, the course considers how ideas about rights motivated political and social change and looks at how different groups defined and fought for rights, either for themselves or others. From the birth of the first NGO to the establishment of the United Nations we will discuss such issues as humanitarianism, genocide, internationalism, abolition, torture, colonialism, activism and lgtbq rights. Throughout the class we will consider the differences between ideas about human rights and how those ideas have been implemented at different times, different places, and by different actors. In doing so, the course will trace the historical evolution of international human rights

Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

CSTS B230 Food and Drink in the Ancient World
Not offered 2018-19
This course explores practices of eating and drinking in the ancient Mediterranean world both from a socio-cultural and environmental perspective. Since we are not only what we eat, but also where, when, why, with whom, and how we eat, we will examine the wider implications of patterns of food production, preparation, consumption, availability, and taboos, considering issues like gender, health, financial situation, geographical variability, and political status. Anthropological, archaeological, literary, and art historical approaches will be used to analyze the evidence and shed light on the role of food and drink in ancient culture and society. In addition, we will discuss how this affects our contemporary customs and practices and how our identity is still shaped by what we eat.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

HIST B231 Medicine, Magic & Miracles in the Middle Ages
Not offered 2018-19
A lecture and discussion course on the therapeutic systems (humoral theory, faith healing, natural magic), the medical marketplace, and the social context for understanding health and disease in the medieval period. Topics covered include Greek, Arabic, and Latin medical textual traditions, the rise of hospitals and public health, and the Black Death.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Health Studies

Back to top

HIST B233 Health and Disability in the U.S.
Not offered 2018-19
This course examines how scientific, medical, and cultural discourses have shaped the construction of health and disability in U.S. history. Paying attention to the ways in which health and disability are constructed in relationship to other social categories such as race, class, gender, sexuality, and nationality, we will examine the processes through which certain bodies are defined as healthy, useful and productive while others are marked as diseased, defective, and socially undesirable. Topics will include eugenics, public health, immigration policies, birth control and sterilization, the women's health movement, AIDS activism, disability rights, mental health, obesity, biological citizenship, and health consumerism.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Health Studies

Back to top

HIST B237 Themes in Modern African History
Section 001 (Spring 2018): African Economic Development
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Public History in Africa
Section 001 (Fall 2017): Urban History
Fall 2018
This is a topics course. Course content varies
Current topic description:The course will explore the colonial and postcolonial practices in public history. It will address the following question: in an age of "fake news" and "history wars", how can we understand the relationship between the public and the place of the past? Topics will include exhibitions; museum practices and colonial outlooks; commemorations and identities; monuments; film, popular history and memory; heritage and regeneration; oral history and public engagement; and public policy. We will also discuss ongoing inter-sectional and interdisciplinary decolonizing approaches to breaking received hierarchies and narratives. The course will also introduce students to the multi-faceted method of public history - in theory, application, and critique.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Museum Studies

Back to top

HIST B243 Topics: Atlantic Cultures
Section 001 (Spring 2018): Maroon Societies
Not offered 2018-19
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

HIST B245 Topics in Modern US History
Section 001 (Fall 2017): Making Public Queer History
Spring 2019
This is a topics course in 20th century America social history.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Museum Studies
Counts toward Praxis Program

Back to top

HIST B249 History of Global Health
Not offered 2018-19
This course examines the interrelated histories of public health, international health, and global health from the late 18th to the 21st centuries as part of a broader history of epidemics, empire, and global mobility. We will pay particular attention this semester to the use of architectural and spatial strategies for managing crises of contagion, disaster, and epidemic. The architectural spaces to be examined will include urban-based hospitals, public health infrastructure, and quarantine buildings as well as mobile architectural technologies such as incubators, wartime pop-up surgical tents, and floating hospitals in both Western and non-Western environments. The course will trace the role of health and medicine in mediating the relationships between metropolis and colony, state and citizen, research practice and human subject.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Health Studies

Back to top

HIST B252 American Popular Culture and Politics: 1900-present
Not offered 2018-19
From dance halls and silent film to comic books and music videos, popular culture has been central to struggles over the meaning of national belonging, "freedom," and democracy. Rather than drawing a distinction between pop culture as a matter of private consumption and the more "serious" and public arena of politics, this course will consider the role of popular culture in shaping the nation's political history, and in providing a lens to critically evaluate and rethink that history today. Exploring a wide range of popular cultural forms including amusement parks, vaudeville, fashion, music, film, photography, newspapers, and television, we will examine how popular culture has not only reflected but actively shaped the American political landscape from the early twentieth century to the present.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

EALC B264 Human Rights in China
Spring 2019
This course will examine China's human rights issues from a historical perspective. The topics include diverse perspectives on human rights, historical background, civil rights, religious practice, justice system, education, as well as the problems concerning some social groups such as migrant laborers, women, ethnic minorities and peasants.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

HIST B274 Focus: Topics in Modern US History
Not offered 2018-19
This is a topics course in 20th century America social history. Topics vary by half semester
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Museum Studies
Counts toward Praxis Program

Back to top

HIST B284 Movies and America: The Past Lives Forever
Spring 2019
Movies are one of the most important means by which Americans come to know - or think they know--their own history. We look to old movies to tell us about a world we never knew but think we can access through film. And Hollywood often reaches into the past to tell a good story. How can we understand the impact of our love affair with movies on our understanding of what happened in this country? In this course we will examine the complex cultural relationship between film and American historical self-fashioning.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Visual Studies

Back to top

HIST B292 Women in Britain since 1750
Fall 2018
Focusing on contemporary and historical narratives, this course explores the ongoing production, circulation and refraction of discourses on gender and nation as well as race, empire and modernity since the mid-18th century. Texts will incorporate visual material as well as literary evidence and culture and consider the crystallization of the discipline of history itself.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

HIST B298 Politics of Food
Fall 2018
Politics shapes what appears on our plates as well as where we set our table. It all has a history. In America with its confounding combination of engorging bounty and tragic poverty, food represents a special nexus of the political and the personal. This course looks at the history and politics of eating, producing, and consuming food in the United States. Course topics include how food shaped both external and internal migrations to the United States; how American foreign policy from the Cold War to today helps us understand global food and refugee crises; the history and politics of food aid, and the transformation of food consumption in modern America.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

HIST B337 Topics in African History
Section 001 (Fall 2017): Hist of Global Health Africa
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Hist of Global Health Africa
Section 001 (Spring 2019): Hist of Global Health Africa
Fall 2018, Spring 2019
This is a topics course. Topics vary.
Current topic description: The course will focus on the issues of public health history, social and cultural history of disease as well as the issues of the history of medicine. We will examine the histories of global initiatives to control disease in Africa from an interdisciplinary perspective (history, and social and biomedical sciences), using case studies from across the continent. These initiatives involve the relationship between states, NGOs, universities, pharmaceutical companies, and other nonstate actors. We will explore various themes, such as the indigenous theories of disease and therapies; disease, imperialism and medicine; the emerging diseases, medical education, women in medicine, and differential access to health care. We will also explore the questions regarding the sources of African history and their quality.
Current topic description: The course examines the history of global health initiatives to deal with the burden of disease in Africa. It offers historical (and anthroplogical) perspectives on the ways in which medicine and public health in Africa have been transformed under the pressures of broad forces and factors, including colonial exploitation and rule, post-Second World War initiatives, the postcolonial economic and political liberalization and globalization, and rise of 'para-states' in Africa.

Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Health Studies

Back to top

HIST B339 The Making of the African Diaspora 1450-1800
Not offered 2018-19
This course explores the emergence, development, and challenges to the ideologies of whiteness and blackness, that have been in place from the colonial period to the present. Through the reading of primary and secondary sources, we will explore various ways through which enslaved people imagined freedom, personal rights, community membership, and some of the paths they created in order to improve their experiences and change the social order. In an attempt to have a comparative approach, we will look at particular events and circumstances that took place in few provinces in the Americas, with an emphasis on Latin America and the Caribbean. The course will also look at the methodological challenges of studying and writing history of people who in principle, were not allowed to produce written texts. Throughout, we will identify and underscore the contribution that people of African descent have made to the ideas of rights, freedom, equality, and democracy.
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies

Back to top

HIST B373 Topics: History of the Middle East
Section 001 (Spring 2018): Gender & Sexuality
Not offered 2018-19
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Middle Eastern Studies

Back to top

HIST B249 History of Global Health
Not offered 2018-19
This course examines the interrelated histories of public health, international health, and global health from the late 18th to the 21st centuries as part of a broader history of epidemics, empire, and global mobility. We will pay particular attention this semester to the use of architectural and spatial strategies for managing crises of contagion, disaster, and epidemic. The architectural spaces to be examined will include urban-based hospitals, public health infrastructure, and quarantine buildings as well as mobile architectural technologies such as incubators, wartime pop-up surgical tents, and floating hospitals in both Western and non-Western environments. The course will trace the role of health and medicine in mediating the relationships between metropolis and colony, state and citizen, research practice and human subject.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

Back to top

PSYC B375 Movies and Madness: Abnormal Psychology Through Films
Fall 2018
This writing-intensive seminar (maximum enrollment = 16 students) deals with critical analysis of how various forms of psychopathology are depicted in films. The primary focus of the seminar will be evaluating the degree of correspondence between the cinematic presentation and current research knowledge about the disorder, taking into account the historical period in which the film was made. For example, we will discuss how accurately the symptoms of the disorder are presented and how representative the protagonist is of people who typically manifest this disorder based on current research. We will also address the theory of etiology of the disorder depicted in the film, including discussion of the relevant intellectual history in the period when the film was made and the prevailing accounts of psychopathology in that period. Another focus will be how the film portrays the course of the disorder and how it depicts treatment for the disorder. This cinematic presentation will be evaluated with respect to current research on treatment for the disorder as well as the historical context of prevailing treatment for the disorder at the time the film was made. Prerequisite: PSYC B209.
Counts toward Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

ANTH B102 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Spring 2019
An introduction to the methods and theories of cultural anthropology in order to understand and explain cultural similarities and differences among contemporary societies.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

Back to top

SOCL B102 Society, Culture, and the Individual
Fall 2018
Analysis of the basic sociological methods, perspectives, and concepts used in the study of society, with emphasis on social structure, education, culture, the self, and power. Theoretical perspectives that focus on sources of stability, conflict, and change are emphasized throughout.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

Back to top

ITAL B212 Italy today: Migration Studies
Not offered 2018-19
There are numerous economic, political, and cultural elements that encumber on the existential condition of the migrant. In political and ideological parlance the term migrant has come to mean poor, needy, precarious, unhappy, primitive, and even criminal. In Italy, furthermore, the colonial past has been foreclosed, leading to a strengthening of stereotypes that continue to populate the discourse on migration. In this course we will examine issues related to migration, such as colonialism. racism, gender relations, discrimination, identity and difference and how they re-present new forms of multicultural and contaminated life and their impact on geography, security, identity, and belonging. . Is multiculturalism the answer to all the problems? Does it resolve the problem of closed communities so eloquently discussed by Bauman? With the help of Italian cinema of migration and selected critical articles we will discuss different positions and follow the migrants as they cross desert and sea to reach the European metropolis. From Libya to Lampedusa, from the Balkans to Puglia, and from there to the Roman peripheries, to the center of the city.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

PHIL B221 Ethics
Spring 2019
An introduction to ethics by way of an examination of moral theories and a discussion of important ancient, modern, and contemporary texts which established theories such as virtue ethics, deontology, utilitarianism, relativism, emotivism, care ethics. This course considers questions concerning freedom, responsibility, and obligation. How should we live our lives and interact with others? How should we think about ethics in a global context? Is ethics independent of culture? A variety of practical issues such as reproductive rights, euthanasia, animal rights and the environment will be considered.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

Back to top

PHIL B225 Global Ethical Issues
Spring 2019
The need for a critical analysis of what justice is and requires has become urgent in a context of increasing globalization, the emergence of new forms of conflict and war, high rates of poverty within and across borders and the prospect of environmental devastation. This course examines prevailing theories and issues of justice as well as approaches and challenges by non-western, post-colonial, feminist, race, class, and disability theorists.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

Back to top

HIST B237 Themes in Modern African History
Section 001 (Spring 2018): African Economic Development
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Public History in Africa
Section 001 (Fall 2017): Urban History
Fall 2018
This is a topics course. Course content varies
Current topic description:The course will explore the colonial and postcolonial practices in public history. It will address the following question: in an age of "fake news" and "history wars", how can we understand the relationship between the public and the place of the past? Topics will include exhibitions; museum practices and colonial outlooks; commemorations and identities; monuments; film, popular history and memory; heritage and regeneration; oral history and public engagement; and public policy. We will also discuss ongoing inter-sectional and interdisciplinary decolonizing approaches to breaking received hierarchies and narratives. The course will also introduce students to the multi-faceted method of public history - in theory, application, and critique.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Museum Studies

Back to top

ANTH B294 Culture, Power, and Politics
Fall 2018
What do a country's national politics have to do with culture? Likewise, how are politics hidden below the surface of our everyday social lives? This course explores questions like these through anthropological approaches. Drawing on both classic and contemporary ethnographic studies from the U.S. and around the world, we will examine how social and cultural frameworks help us understand politics in new ways. We will investigate how people perceive the meanings and effects of the state; how nationalism and citizenship shape belonging on the one hand, and exclusion on the other; how understandings of gender, race, and difference converge with political action, ideology, and power; and how politics infuse everyday spaces including schools, businesses, homes, and even the dinner table. Prerequisite: ANTH B102, H103 or permission of the instructor.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

Back to top

ANTH B334 Digital Cultures
Not offered 2018-19
How do we do anthropology in, and of, the digital age? What does it mean to do ethnography of digital spaces, when we, as humans, exist simultaneously in overlapping virtual and actual worlds? Specific topics to be covered include surveillance, telecommunications infrastructures, activism, social movements, gender and sexuality, disability, space and place, and virtual ethnography. Prerequisite: Anth B102 or Anth H103 or permission of instructor.
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

ANTH B354 Political Economy, Gender, Ethnicity and Transformation in Vietnam
Not offered 2018-19
Today, Vietnam is in the midst of dramatic social, economic and political changes brought about through a shift from a central economy to a market/capitalist economy since the late 1980s. These changes have resulted in urbanization, a rise in consumption and shifts in social and economic relationships and cultural practices as the country has moved from low income to middle income status. This course examines culture and society in Vietnam focusing largely on contemporary Vietnam, but with a view to continuities and historical precedent in past centuries. In this course, we will draw on anthropological studies of Vietnam, as well as literature and historical studies. Relationships between the individual, family, gender, ethnicity, community and state will pervade the topics addressed in the course, as will the importance of political economy, nation, and globalization. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher.
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

Back to top

ITAL B212 Italy today: Migration Studies
Not offered 2018-19
There are numerous economic, political, and cultural elements that encumber on the existential condition of the migrant. In political and ideological parlance the term migrant has come to mean poor, needy, precarious, unhappy, primitive, and even criminal. In Italy, furthermore, the colonial past has been foreclosed, leading to a strengthening of stereotypes that continue to populate the discourse on migration. In this course we will examine issues related to migration, such as colonialism. racism, gender relations, discrimination, identity and difference and how they re-present new forms of multicultural and contaminated life and their impact on geography, security, identity, and belonging. . Is multiculturalism the answer to all the problems? Does it resolve the problem of closed communities so eloquently discussed by Bauman? With the help of Italian cinema of migration and selected critical articles we will discuss different positions and follow the migrants as they cross desert and sea to reach the European metropolis. From Libya to Lampedusa, from the Balkans to Puglia, and from there to the Roman peripheries, to the center of the city.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

ITAL B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Critical Theories
Fall 2018
What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.
Current topic description: What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.

Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

ITAL B235 Scrittrici e registe italiane: Heroines In and Out of the Canon
Not offered 2018-19
Emphasis will be put on Italian women writers and film directors, who are often left out of syllabi adhering to traditional canons. Particular attention will be paid to: a) women writers who have found their voices (through writing) as a means of psychological survival in a patriarchal world; b) women engaged in the women's movement of the 70's and who continue to look at, and rewrite, women's stories of empowerment and solidarity; c) "divaism", fame, via beauty and sex with a particular emphasis on the '60s (i.e. Gina Lollobrigida, Sofia Loren, Claudia Cardinale). Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies; Counts toward Film Studies.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

ITAL B255 Uomini d'onore in Sicilia: Italian Mafia in Literature and Cinema
Not offered 2018-19
This course aims to explore representations of Mafia figures in Italian literature and cinema, starting from the 'classical' example of Sicily. From Sicily, the "octopus" (piovra), as the Mafia is called in Italy, has spread throughout Italy, and has pervaded almost every facet of Italian life, including cultural life. The course will introduce students to both Italian Studies from an interdisciplinary prospective and also to narrative, using fiction and non-fiction texts written by 19th, 20th, and 21st century writers. Novels, films, testimonies and TV series will offer different representations of the Mafia: its ethics, its relation with politics, religion and business, its ideas of friendship, family, masculinity and femininity. Internships in Italy will be available connected with this course. Course is taught in Italian. Prerequisite: ITAL B102 or permission of the instructor.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

ITAL B306 Youth in 20th Century Italian Literature and Cinema
Not offered 2018-19
This interdisciplinary course focuses on literary texts and visual material dealing with youth and youth culture in post-fascist Italy. How is youth described in Italian culture after WWII? What does youth represent in the Italian imagination of 20th century Italy? Which language is used by the youth? While the focus in analyzing the challenges faced by youth is primarily on literature and film studies, throughout the semester the course will also touch upon sociological, cultural, and anthropological perspectives concerning the role of the family, peer relationships, prostitution, drugs, criminality and violence, diversity, gender identity, and sexuality. Students will be required to attend film screenings or view films on their own devices. Prerequisite: One literature course at the 200 level. or permission by the instructor.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

CSTS B230 Food and Drink in the Ancient World
Not offered 2018-19
This course explores practices of eating and drinking in the ancient Mediterranean world both from a socio-cultural and environmental perspective. Since we are not only what we eat, but also where, when, why, with whom, and how we eat, we will examine the wider implications of patterns of food production, preparation, consumption, availability, and taboos, considering issues like gender, health, financial situation, geographical variability, and political status. Anthropological, archaeological, literary, and art historical approaches will be used to analyze the evidence and shed light on the role of food and drink in ancient culture and society. In addition, we will discuss how this affects our contemporary customs and practices and how our identity is still shaped by what we eat.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

ITAL B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Critical Theories
Fall 2018
What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.
Current topic description: What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.

Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

PHIL B221 Ethics
Spring 2019
An introduction to ethics by way of an examination of moral theories and a discussion of important ancient, modern, and contemporary texts which established theories such as virtue ethics, deontology, utilitarianism, relativism, emotivism, care ethics. This course considers questions concerning freedom, responsibility, and obligation. How should we live our lives and interact with others? How should we think about ethics in a global context? Is ethics independent of culture? A variety of practical issues such as reproductive rights, euthanasia, animal rights and the environment will be considered.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward International Studies

Back to top

PHIL B225 Global Ethical Issues
Spring 2019
The need for a critical analysis of what justice is and requires has become urgent in a context of increasing globalization, the emergence of new forms of conflict and war, high rates of poverty within and across borders and the prospect of environmental devastation. This course examines prevailing theories and issues of justice as well as approaches and challenges by non-western, post-colonial, feminist, race, class, and disability theorists.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward International Studies

Back to top

PHIL B252 Feminist Theory
Not offered 2018-19
Beliefs that gender discrimination has been eliminated and women have achieved equality have become commonplace. We challenge these assumptions examining the concepts of patriarchy, sexism, and oppression. Exploring concepts central to feminist theory, we attend to the history of feminist theory and contemporary accounts of women's place and status in different societies, varied experiences, and the impact of the phenomenon of globalization. We then explore the relevance of gender to philosophical questions about identity and agency with respect to moral, social and political theory. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy or permission of instructor.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

POLS B290 Power and Resistance
Not offered 2018-19
What more is there to politics than power? What is the force of the "political" for specifying power as a practice or institutional form? What distinguishes power from authority, violence, coercion, and domination? How is power embedded in and generated by cultural practices, institutional arrangements, and processes of normalization? This course seeks to address questions of power and politics in the context of domination, oppression, and the arts of resistance. Our general topics will include authority, the moralization of politics, the dimensions of power, the politics of violence (and the violence of politics), language, sovereignty, emancipation, revolution, domination, normalization, governmentality, genealogy, and democratic power. Writing projects will seek to integrate analytical and reflective analyses as we pursue these questions in common. Writing Intensive.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

PHIL B225 Global Ethical Issues
Spring 2019
The need for a critical analysis of what justice is and requires has become urgent in a context of increasing globalization, the emergence of new forms of conflict and war, high rates of poverty within and across borders and the prospect of environmental devastation. This course examines prevailing theories and issues of justice as well as approaches and challenges by non-western, post-colonial, feminist, race, class, and disability theorists.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

Back to top

PHIL B252 Feminist Theory
Not offered 2018-19
Beliefs that gender discrimination has been eliminated and women have achieved equality have become commonplace. We challenge these assumptions examining the concepts of patriarchy, sexism, and oppression. Exploring concepts central to feminist theory, we attend to the history of feminist theory and contemporary accounts of women's place and status in different societies, varied experiences, and the impact of the phenomenon of globalization. We then explore the relevance of gender to philosophical questions about identity and agency with respect to moral, social and political theory. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy or permission of instructor.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

SOCL B262 Public Opinion
Not offered 2018-19
This course explores public opinion: what it is, how it is measured, how it is shaped, and how it changes over time. Specific attention is given to the role of elites, the mass media, and religion in shaping public opinion. Examples include racial/ethnic civil rights, abortion, gay/lesbian/transgendered sexuality, and inequalities.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

POLS B290 Power and Resistance
Not offered 2018-19
What more is there to politics than power? What is the force of the "political" for specifying power as a practice or institutional form? What distinguishes power from authority, violence, coercion, and domination? How is power embedded in and generated by cultural practices, institutional arrangements, and processes of normalization? This course seeks to address questions of power and politics in the context of domination, oppression, and the arts of resistance. Our general topics will include authority, the moralization of politics, the dimensions of power, the politics of violence (and the violence of politics), language, sovereignty, emancipation, revolution, domination, normalization, governmentality, genealogy, and democratic power. Writing projects will seek to integrate analytical and reflective analyses as we pursue these questions in common. Writing Intensive.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

PSYC B303 Portraits of Maladjustment in Classic Children's Novels
Not offered 2018-19
This writing-intensive seminar (maximum enrollment = 16 students) .5 unit course deals with critical analysis of how various forms of psychological maladjustment and health are depicted in selected classic novels for children. Many such novels were written in the Victorian period. Long before developmental psychopathology was a scientific discipline, its main questions were insightfully probed by 19th and early 20th century novelists in books such as "The Secret Garden." In this course, each book will be analyzed for the literary devices used to portray healthy adjustment and maladjustment, the implicit theories of psychological causation captured in the narratives, and the ways the novelist depicts life experiences that bring about mental health and personal growth. Each book will be discussed in its historical/literary contexts, and compared with current views drawn from psychological research. The course integrates literary analysis of classic children's novels with important concepts derived from the field of developmental psychopathology.
Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Health Studies

Back to top

PSYC B375 Movies and Madness: Abnormal Psychology Through Films
Fall 2018
This writing-intensive seminar (maximum enrollment = 16 students) deals with critical analysis of how various forms of psychopathology are depicted in films. The primary focus of the seminar will be evaluating the degree of correspondence between the cinematic presentation and current research knowledge about the disorder, taking into account the historical period in which the film was made. For example, we will discuss how accurately the symptoms of the disorder are presented and how representative the protagonist is of people who typically manifest this disorder based on current research. We will also address the theory of etiology of the disorder depicted in the film, including discussion of the relevant intellectual history in the period when the film was made and the prevailing accounts of psychopathology in that period. Another focus will be how the film portrays the course of the disorder and how it depicts treatment for the disorder. This cinematic presentation will be evaluated with respect to current research on treatment for the disorder as well as the historical context of prevailing treatment for the disorder at the time the film was made. Prerequisite: PSYC B209.
Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

ITAL B255 Uomini d'onore in Sicilia: Italian Mafia in Literature and Cinema
Not offered 2018-19
This course aims to explore representations of Mafia figures in Italian literature and cinema, starting from the 'classical' example of Sicily. From Sicily, the "octopus" (piovra), as the Mafia is called in Italy, has spread throughout Italy, and has pervaded almost every facet of Italian life, including cultural life. The course will introduce students to both Italian Studies from an interdisciplinary prospective and also to narrative, using fiction and non-fiction texts written by 19th, 20th, and 21st century writers. Novels, films, testimonies and TV series will offer different representations of the Mafia: its ethics, its relation with politics, religion and business, its ideas of friendship, family, masculinity and femininity. Internships in Italy will be available connected with this course. Course is taught in Italian. Prerequisite: ITAL B102 or permission of the instructor.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

ITAL B306 Youth in 20th Century Italian Literature and Cinema
Not offered 2018-19
This interdisciplinary course focuses on literary texts and visual material dealing with youth and youth culture in post-fascist Italy. How is youth described in Italian culture after WWII? What does youth represent in the Italian imagination of 20th century Italy? Which language is used by the youth? While the focus in analyzing the challenges faced by youth is primarily on literature and film studies, throughout the semester the course will also touch upon sociological, cultural, and anthropological perspectives concerning the role of the family, peer relationships, prostitution, drugs, criminality and violence, diversity, gender identity, and sexuality. Students will be required to attend film screenings or view films on their own devices. Prerequisite: One literature course at the 200 level. or permission by the instructor.
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

ITAL B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Critical Theories
Fall 2018
What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.
Current topic description: What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.

Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

RUSS B238 Topics: The History of Cinema 1895 to 1945
Not offered 2018-19
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Visual Studies

Back to top

SOCL B102 Society, Culture, and the Individual
Fall 2018
Analysis of the basic sociological methods, perspectives, and concepts used in the study of society, with emphasis on social structure, education, culture, the self, and power. Theoretical perspectives that focus on sources of stability, conflict, and change are emphasized throughout.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward International Studies

Back to top

SOCL B130 Sociology of Harry Potter
Not offered 2018-19
J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter series is a worldwide phenomenon that has sold hundreds of millions of books and been translated into dozens of languages. Over the last decade, academic studies of Harry Potter have taken root in English and Theology departments, but very few sociologists have taken a scholarly look at the rich society Rowling has created. This course will introduce students to the fundamental concepts of sociology using the lens of the Harry Potter series. We will explore questions of hierarchy, inequality, terrorism, consumption, race, class, and gender, and we will discuss the ways in which stratification in the wizarding world compares and contrasts to similar issues in the Muggle world. Class discussions and exercises will assume that students have read all seven Harry Potter books.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

SOCL B201 The Study of Gender in Society
Spring 2019
The definition of male and female social roles and sociological approaches to the study of gender in the United States, with attention to gender in the economy and work place, the division of labor in families and households, and analysis of class and ethnic differences in gender roles. Of particular interest in this course is the comparative exploration of the experiences of women of color in the United States.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

SOCL B205 Social Inequality
Fall 2018
Introduction to the major sociological theories of gender, racial-ethnic, and class inequality with emphasis on the relationships among these forms of stratification in the contemporary United States, including the role of the upper class(es), inequality between and within families, in the work place, and in the educational system.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

SOCL B217 The Family in Social Context
Not offered 2018-19
The family represents a fundamental and ubiquitous institution in the social world, providing norms and conveying values. This course focuses on current sociological research, seeking to understand how modern American families have transformed due to complex structural and cultural forces. We will examine family change from historical, social, and demographic perspectives. After examining the images, ideals, and myths concerning families, we will address the central theme of diversity and change. In what ways can sociology explain and document these shifts? What influences do law, technology, and medicine have on the family? What are the results of evolving views of work, gender, and parenting on family structure and stability? Prerequisite of one Social Science Course
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

SOCL B225 Women in Society
Not offered 2018-19
A study of the contemporary experiences of women of color in the Global South. The household, workplace, community, and the nation-state, and the positions of women in the private and public spheres are compared cross-culturally. Topics include feminism, identity and self-esteem; globalization and transnational social movements and tensions and transitions encountered as nations embark upon development.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

SOCL B235 Mexican-American Communities
Not offered 2018-19
For its unique history, the number of migrants, and the two countries' proximity, Mexican migration to the United States represents an exceptional case in world migration. There is no other example of migration with more than 100 years of history. The copious presence of migrants concentrated in a host country, such as we have in the case of the 11.7 million Mexican migrants residing in the United States, along with another 15 million Mexican descendants, is unparalleled. The 1,933-mile-long border shared by the two countries makes it one of the longest boundary lines in the world and, unfortunately, also one of the most dangerous frontiers in the world today. We will examine the different economic, political, social and cultural forces that have shaped this centenarian migration influx and undertake a macro-, meso-, and micro-levels of analysis. At the macro-level of political economy, we will investigate the economic interdependency that has developed between Mexico and the U.S. over different economic development periods of these countries, particularly, the role the Mexican labor force has played to boosting and sustaining both the Mexican and the American economies. At the meso-level, we will examine different institutions both in Mexico and the U.S. that have determined the ways in which millions of Mexican migrate to this country. Last, but certainly not least, we will explore the impacts that both the macro-and meso-processes have had on the micro-level by considering the imperatives, aspirations, and dreams that have prompted millions of people to leave their homes and communities behind in search of better opportunities. This major life decision of migration brings with it a series of social transformations in family and community networks, this will look into the cultural impacts in both the sending and receiving migrant communities. In sum, we will come to understand how these three levels of analysis work together.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Counts toward Praxis Program

Back to top

SOCL B257 Marginals and Outsiders: The Sociology of Deviance
Spring 2019
An examination of non-normative and criminal behavior viewed from the standpoint of different theoretical perspectives on deviance (e.g., social strain, anomie, functionalism, social disorganization, symbolic interaction, and Marxism) with particular emphasis on social construction and labeling perspectives; and the role of subcultures, social movements and social conflicts in changing the normative boundaries of society. Topics include robbery, homicide, Black inner city violence, sexual deviance, prostitution, white collar crime, drug addiction and mental disorders.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

SOCL B262 Public Opinion
Not offered 2018-19
This course explores public opinion: what it is, how it is measured, how it is shaped, and how it changes over time. Specific attention is given to the role of elites, the mass media, and religion in shaping public opinion. Examples include racial/ethnic civil rights, abortion, gay/lesbian/transgendered sexuality, and inequalities.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

SOCL B322 Thinking with Trans: Theorizing Race and Gender
Fall 2018
In 2017, philosopher Rebecca Tuvel published an article in the journal Hypatia outlining an argument for the existence of transracialism. This article came on the tail end of a great deal of controversy about the outing of NAACP leader, Rachel Dolezal; a woman born to white parents who identifies as black. In this course we will examine the social construction of race and gender as well as critique the biological assumptions that underpin both social structures. We will explore the theoretical power and pitfalls of the terms "transgender" and "transracial"- the similarities, differences, and tensions inherent in questioning taken for granted social structures that are fundamental to social organization and personal identity. We will explore the theoretical context of the terms "transracial" and "transgender," the various arguments for and against identity categories, and the lived experiences of individuals and groups who regularly transgress the boundaries of race and gender.
Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

SOCL B326 Feminist Perspectives on Hlth
Not offered 2018-19
Increasingly, an individual's sense of self and worth as a citizen turn on their health identity. In this course we will draw on theories of gender, sexuality, medicalization, and biocitizenship to unravel the ways in which gender structures and medical institutions are mutually constitutive and to explore how this relationship, in turn, impacts individual identity. The course will take a global approach to feminist engagement with health issues with an emphasis on human rights and bodily autonomy.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Health Studies

Back to top

SOCL B342 Bodies in Social Life
Fall 2018
Can social life exist without bodies? How can attention to the body influence our understanding of social processes of subjectivity, interaction, and practice? While the body has long been an "absent presence" in sociology, multiple approaches to theorizing and researching the body have emerged in recent decades. A sociological approach to the body and embodiment provides an opportunity to bridge the gap between everyday experience and analyses of broad social structures which can seem disconnected from daily life. In this course, we will examine the processes by which individual bodies are shaped by and, in turn, shape social life. Key questions to be explored include: how are bodies regulated by social forces; how do individuals perform the body and how does interactional context influence this performance; what is the meaning of the body in social life; and is there a "right" body? Suggested preparation: At least one course in the social sciences.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Health Studies

Back to top

SOCL B350 Movements for Social Justice in the US
Not offered 2018-19
Throughout human history, powerless groups of people have organized social movements to improve their lives and their societies. Powerful groups and institutions have resisted these efforts in order to maintain their own privilege. Some periods of history have been more likely than others to spawn protest movements. What factors seem most likely to lead to social movements? What determines their success/failure? We will examine 20th-century social movements in the United States to answer these questions. Includes a film series. Prerequisite: At least one prior social science course or permission of the instructor.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Peace, Justice and Human Rights

Back to top

ITAL B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Critical Theories
Fall 2018
What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.
Current topic description: What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.

Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

ENGL B217 Narratives of Latinidad
Fall 2018
This course explores how Latina/o writers fashion bicultural and transnational identities and narrate the intertwined histories of the U.S. and Latin America. We will focus on topics of shared concern among Latino groups such as struggles for social justice, the damaging effects of machismo and racial hierarchies, the politics of Spanglish, and the affective experience of migration. By analyzing a range of cultural production, including novels, poetry, testimonial narratives, films, activist art, and essays, we will unpack the complexity of Latinidad in the Americas.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o

Back to top

SPAN B309 La mujer en la literatura española del Siglo de Oro
Spring 2019
A study of the depiction of women in the fiction, drama, and poetry of 16th- and 17th-century Spain. Topics include the construction of gender; the idealization and codification of women's bodies; the politics of feminine enclosure (convent, home, brothel, palace); and the performance of honor. The first half of the course will deal with representations of women by male authors (Calderón, Cervantes, Lope, Quevedo) and the second will be dedicated to women writers such as Teresa de Ávila, Ana Caro, Juana Inés de la Cruz, and María de Zayas. Prerequisite: at least one SPAN 200-level course. Course fulfills pre-1700 requirement and HC's pre-1898 requirement. Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies. Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies

Back to top