This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's calendars page.

Spring 2019

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
GERM B002-001Elementary GermanSemester / 1Lecture: 9:10 AM-10:00 AM MWFTaylor Hall CBurri,M., Burri,M., Burri,M., Burri,M.
Lecture: 8:55 AM- 9:45 AM TTHTaylor Hall C
TA Session: 7:30 PM- 8:30 PM TOld Library 104
TA Session: 4:00 PM- 5:00 PM WOld Library 104
GERM B102-001Intermediate GermanSemester / 1Lecture: 11:10 AM-12:00 PM MWFOld Library 102Shen,Q., Shen,Q.
TA Session: 6:30 PM- 7:30 PM THOld Library 102
GERM B262-001Topics: Film and the German Literary ImaginationSemester / 1Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTHOld Library 102Burri,M.
GERM B321-001Advanced Topics in German Cultural Studies: Representing Diversity in German CinemaSemester / 1LEC: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM WCarpenter Library 17Shen,Q., Shen,Q.
Discussion: 8:30 AM- 9:30 AM THOld Library 102
GERM B399-001Senior SeminarSemester / 1
GERM B403-001Supervised WorkSemester / 1Dept. staff, TBA

Fall 2019

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
GERM B001-001Elementary GermanSemester / 1Lecture: 9:10 AM-10:00 AM MWFBurri,M.
Lecture: 8:55 AM- 9:45 AM TTH
GERM B101-001Intermediate GermanSemester / 1Lecture: 9:10 AM-10:00 AM MWFStrair,M.
GERM B320-001Topics in German Literature and Culture: Sinn und WahnsinnSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWStrair,M.
GERM B403-001Supervised WorkSemester / 1Dept. staff, TBA

Spring 2020

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
GERM B002-001Elementary GermanSemester / 1Lecture: 9:10 AM-10:00 AM MWFBurri,M.
Lecture: 8:55 AM- 9:45 AM TTH
GERM B320-001Topics in German Literature and Culture: Canonical Works in German LitSemester / 1LEC: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTHShen,Q.
GERM B399-001Senior SeminarSemester / 1Lecture: Date/Time TBADept. staff, TBA
GERM B403-001Supervised WorkSemester / 1Dept. staff, TBA
COML B225-001Censorship: Historical Contexts, Local Practices and Global ResonanceSemester / 1Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTHShen,Q.

2019-20 Catalog Data

GERM B001 Elementary German
Fall 2019
Meets five hours a week with the individual class instructor, an additional one hour with a TA. Strong emphasis on communicative competence both in spoken and written German in a larger cultural context.
Course does not meet an Approach

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GERM B002 Elementary German
Spring 2020
Meets five hours a week with the individual class instructor, and one additional hour with a TA. Strong emphasis on communicative competence both in spoken and written German in a larger cultural context. Prerequisite: GERM 001 or its equivalent or permission of instructor
Course does not meet an Approach

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GERM B101 Intermediate German
Fall 2019
Thorough review of grammar, exercises in composition and conversation. Enforcement of correct grammatical patterns and idiomatic use of language. Study of selected literary and cultural texts and films from German-speaking countries. Class will meet for an additional hour with a TA. Prerequisite: Completion of GERM 002 or its equivalent as decided by the department and/or placement test.
Course does not meet an Approach

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GERM B102 Intermediate German
Not offered 2019-20
This course is the continuation of GERM 101 (Intermediate German). We will concentrate on all four language skills--speaking, reading, writing, and listening comprehension. We will build on the knowledge that students gained in the elementary-level courses and then honed in GERM 101. Class will meet for an additional hour with a TA. This course will also provide students with an introduction to selected aspects of German culture. Prerequisite: GERM 101 or its equivalent as decided by the department
Course does not meet an Approach

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GERM B201 Advanced Training: Language, Text, Context
Not offered 2019-20
Emphasis on the development of conversational, writing and interpretive skills through an introductory study of German political, cultural and intellectual life and history, including public debate, institutional practices, mass media, cross-cultural currents, folklore, fashion and advertising. Taught in German. Course content may vary.

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GERM B202 Introduction to German Studies
Not offered 2019-20
In this course, we will concentrate on all four language skills - speaking, reading, writing and listening comprehension. However, special emphasis will be placed on reading and writing skills. In addition, students will be introduced to different literary and non-literary texts and practice writing in different genres. Through newspaper articles, film reviews, short stories, poetry, and selected film screenings, this course also offers an introduction to some of the most compelling debates about multiculturalism in Germany and exemplary representations of cultural diversity in contemporary German life. Course taught in German.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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GERM B212 Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, and the Rhetoric of Modernity
Not offered 2019-20
This course examines selected writings by Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud as pre-texts for a critique of cultural reason and underlines their contribution to questions of language, representation, history, ethics, and art. These three visionaries of modernity have translated the abstract metaphysics of "the history of the subject" into a concrete analysis of human experience. Their work has been a major influence on the Frankfurt School of critical theory and has also led to a revolutionary shift in the understanding and writing of history and literature now associated with the work of modern French philosophers Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, Julia Kristeva, and Jacques Lacan. Our readings will, therefore, also include short selections from these philosophers in order to analyze the contested history of modernity and its intellectual and moral consequences. Special attention will be paid to the relation between rhetoric and philosophy and the narrative forms of "the philosophical discourse(s) of modernity" (e.g., sermon and myth in Marx; aphorism and oratory in Nietzsche, myth, fairy tale, case hi/story in Freud). Course is taught in English. One additional hour will be added for those students wanting German credit. Course counts toward Philosophy.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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GERM B231 Cultural Profiles in Modern Exile
Not offered 2019-20
This course investigates the anthropological, philosophical, psychological, cultural, and literary aspects of modern exile. It studies exile as experience and metaphor in the context of modernity, and examines the structure of the relationship between imagined/remembered homelands and transnational identities, and the dialectics of language loss and bi- and multi-lingualism. Particular attention is given to the psychocultural dimensions of linguistic exclusion and loss. Readings of works by Julia Alvarez, Albert Camus, Ana Castillo, Sigmund Freud, Eva Hoffman, Maxine Hong Kingston, Milan Kundera, Friedrich Nietzsche, Salman Rushdie, W. G. Sebald, Kurban Said, and others.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward International Studies

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GERM B245 Interdisciplinary Approaches to German Literature and Culture
Not offered 2019-20
This is a topics course. Taught in German. Course content varies. Previous topics include, Women's Narratives on Modern Migrancy, Exile, and Diasporas; Nation and Identity in Post-War Austria. Current topic: Crime, Justice and the Courtroom. This is a film-based course about political trials at critical junctures of German history.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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GERM B262 Topics: Film and the German Literary Imagination
Not offered 2019-20
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Film Studies

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GERM B320 Topics in German Literature and Culture
Section 001 (Fall 2018): 1968 and Its Legacies
Section 001 (Spring 2020): Canonical Works in German Lit
Section 001 (Fall 2019): Sinn und Wahnsinn
Fall 2019, Spring 2020
This is a topics course. Course content varies. Taught in German.
Current topic description: Sinn und Wahnsinn: Die Literatur des 18. und 19. Jahrhunderts ,.Sapere aude!" or "dare to be wise!" declares Kant in his 1784 essay "Answer to the Question, What is Enlightenment?" as the dictum of the Age of Reason. At the center of Enlightenment thought was a mode of being and knowing in the world defined chiefly through the clarity of sight and the use of one's own rationality. Nevertheless, powerful countercurrents emerge in the literature parallel to and in the wake of Enlightenment that give primacy to feeling, madness, and unrestrainable forces of inspired creativity. Accordingly, these give rise to certain modes of perception, styles of expression, and forms of media that destabilize the Enlightened subject. In this course, we consider this dark side to the Enlightenment as it emerges in tensions between ,,Sinn" and a corresponding ,,Wahnsinn" during the various political, social, cultural, and aesthetic shifts in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. We will explore the ways in which this tension is mediated through various modes of self-expression, literary production, and cultural techniques. This course is taught in German.
Current topic description: Taught in German. Conscious of the debate around canon formation and canon revision, this course studies a selection of classical works in German literature of the twentieth and twentieth-first century. Canon is what we make it to be! Whereas traditional canon is predominated by male authors, this course reads both male and female authors including Kafka, Brecht, Mann, Borchert, Weiss, Wolf, Özdamar, Sebald, and Tawada. Students will hone their skills in discussing and analyzing original German texts and deepen their knowledge of Germany's literary history, culture and society from the Weimar Republic to the present.

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GERM B321 Advanced Topics in German Cultural Studies
Section 001 (Spring 2019): Representing Diversity in German Cinema
Not offered 2019-20
This is a topics course. Course content varies. Course is taught in English. There will an additional hour in German for those students taking the course for German credit.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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GERM B399 Senior Seminar
Senior Seminar. Students are required to write a long research paper with an annotated bibliography.

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GERM B403 Supervised Work

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GERM B421 German for Reading Knowledge
This course is designed to prepare students to read and translate challenging academic texts from German into English. It presents an intensive examination of basic German grammar and syntax, together with strategies that will enable students to read and understand German texts essential for advanced study or learning in disciplines across the arts, social sciences, and humanities. Previous experience in German is an asset, but is not a class prerequisite. This course does not fulfill the Language Requirement.

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COML B225 Censorship: Historical Contexts, Local Practices and Global Resonance
Spring 2020
The course is in English. It examines the ban on books and art in a global context through a study of the historical and sociopolitical conditions of censorship practices. The course raises such questions as how censorship is used to fortify political power, how it is practiced locally and globally, who censors, what are the categories of censorship, how censorship succeeds and fails, and how writers and artists write and create against and within censorship. The last question leads to an analysis of rhetorical strategies that writers and artists employ to translate the expression of repression, trauma, and torture into idioms of resistance. German majors/minors can get German Studies credit. Prerequisite: EMLY B001 or a 100-level intensive writing course.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o

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FREN B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Not offered 2019-20
By bringing together the study of major theoretical currents of the 20th century and the practice of analyzing literary works in the light of theory, this course aims at providing students with skills to use literary theory in their own scholarship. The selection of theoretical readings reflects the history of theory (psychoanalysis, structuralism, narratology), as well as the currents most relevant to the contemporary academic field: Post-structuralism, Post-colonialism, Gender Studies, and Ecocriticism. They are paired with a diverse range of short stories (Poe, Kafka, Camus, Borges, Calvino, Morrison, Djebar, Ngozi Adichie) that we discuss along with our study of theoretical texts. The class will be conducted in English with an additional hour in French for students wishing to take it for French credit.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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ITAL B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Critical Theories
Not offered 2019-20
What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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