This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's calendars page.

Fall 2018

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
GERM B001-001Elementary GermanSemester / 1Lecture: 9:10 AM-10:00 AM MWFTaylor Hall FBurri,M., Burri,M., Burri,M., Burri,M.
Lecture: 8:55 AM- 9:45 AM TTHTaylor Hall F
TA Session: 7:30 PM- 8:30 PM TOld Library 102
TA Session: 4:00 PM- 5:00 PM WOld Library 116
GERM B101-001Intermediate GermanSemester / 1Lecture: 11:10 AM-12:00 PM MWFDalton Hall 212EShen,Q., Shen,Q.
TA Session: 7:00 PM- 8:00 PM THDalton Hall 212E
GERM B201-001Advanced Training: Language, Text, ContextSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWDalton Hall 10Shen,Q.
GERM B212-001Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, and the Rhetoric of ModernitySemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWDalton Hall 20Seyhan,A.
GERM B231-001Cultural Profiles in Modern ExileSemester / 1Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MWDalton Hall 212ASeyhan,A.
GERM B320-001Topics in German Literature and Culture: 1968 and Its LegaciesSemester / 1Lecture: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM THDalton Hall 212AShen,Q.
GERM B403-001Supervised WorkSemester / 1Dept. staff, TBA
GERM B403-001Supervised WorkSemester / 1Dept. staff, TBA
GERM B421-001German for Reading KnowledgeSemester / 1LEC: 10:00 AM-12:30 PM WTaylor Hall CBurri,M.
ITAL B213-001Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities: Critical TheoriesSemester / 1Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MWOld Library 251Giammei,A.

Spring 2019

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
GERM B002-001Elementary GermanSemester / 1Lecture: 9:10 AM-10:00 AM MWFTaylor Hall CBurri,M., Burri,M.
Lecture: 8:55 AM- 9:45 AM TTHTaylor Hall C
GERM B102-001Intermediate GermanSemester / 1Lecture: 11:10 AM-12:00 PM MWFOld Library 102Shen,Q.
GERM B262-001Topics: Film and the German Literary ImaginationSemester / 1Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTHOld Library 102Burri,M.
GERM B321-001Advanced Topics in German Cultural Studies: Representing Diversity in German CinemaSemester / 1LEC: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM WCarpenter Library 17Shen,Q.
GERM B399-001Senior SeminarSemester / 1
GERM B403-001Supervised WorkSemester / 1Dept. staff, TBA
GERM B403-001Supervised WorkSemester / 1Dept. staff, TBA

Fall 2019

(Class schedules for this semester will be posted at a later date.)

2018-19 Catalog Data

GERM B000 German TA Sessions
Not offered 2018-19

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GERM B001 Elementary German
Fall 2018
Meets five hours a week with the individual class instructor, an additional one hour with a TA. Strong emphasis on communicative competence both in spoken and written German in a larger cultural context.
Course does not meet an Approach

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GERM B002 Elementary German
Spring 2019
Meets five hours a week with the individual class instructor, and one additional hour with a TA. Strong emphasis on communicative competence both in spoken and written German in a larger cultural context. Prerequisite: GERM 001 or its equivalent or permission of instructor
Course does not meet an Approach

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GERM B101 Intermediate German
Fall 2018
Thorough review of grammar, exercises in composition and conversation. Enforcement of correct grammatical patterns and idiomatic use of language. Study of selected literary and cultural texts and films from German-speaking countries. Class will meet for an additional hour with a TA. Prerequisite: Completion of GERM 002 or its equivalent as decided by the department and/or placement test.
Course does not meet an Approach

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GERM B102 Intermediate German
Spring 2019
This course is the continuation of GERM 101 (Intermediate German). We will concentrate on all four language skills--speaking, reading, writing, and listening comprehension. We will build on the knowledge that students gained in the elementary-level courses and then honed in GERM 101. Class will meet for an additional hour with a TA. This course will also provide students with an introduction to selected aspects of German culture. Prerequisite: GERM 101 or its equivalent as decided by the department
Course does not meet an Approach

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GERM B201 Advanced Training: Language, Text, Context
Fall 2018
Emphasis on the development of conversational, writing and interpretive skills through an introductory study of German political, cultural and intellectual life and history, including public debate, institutional practices, mass media, cross-cultural currents, folklore, fashion and advertising. Taught in German. Course content may vary.

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GERM B202 Introduction to German Studies
Not offered 2018-19
In this course, we will concentrate on all four language skills - speaking, reading, writing and listening comprehension. However, special emphasis will be placed on reading and writing skills. In addition, students will be introduced to different literary and non-literary texts and practice writing in different genres. Through newspaper articles, film reviews, short stories, poetry, and selected film screenings, this course also offers an introduction to some of the most compelling debates about multiculturalism in Germany and exemplary representations of cultural diversity in contemporary German life. Course taught in German.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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GERM B212 Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, and the Rhetoric of Modernity
Fall 2018
This course examines selected writings by Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud as pre-texts for a critique of cultural reason and underlines their contribution to questions of language, representation, history, ethics, and art. These three visionaries of modernity have translated the abstract metaphysics of "the history of the subject" into a concrete analysis of human experience. Their work has been a major influence on the Frankfurt School of critical theory and has also led to a revolutionary shift in the understanding and writing of history and literature now associated with the work of modern French philosophers Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, Julia Kristeva, and Jacques Lacan. Our readings will, therefore, also include short selections from these philosophers in order to analyze the contested history of modernity and its intellectual and moral consequences. Special attention will be paid to the relation between rhetoric and philosophy and the narrative forms of "the philosophical discourse(s) of modernity" (e.g., sermon and myth in Marx; aphorism and oratory in Nietzsche, myth, fairy tale, case hi/story in Freud). Course is taught in English. One additional hour will be added for those students wanting German credit. Course counts toward Philosophy.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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GERM B223 Topics in German Cultural Studies
Not offered 2018-19
This is a topics course. Course content varies. Recent topics include Remembered Violence, Global Masculinities, and Crime and Detection in German.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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GERM B231 Cultural Profiles in Modern Exile
Fall 2018
This course investigates the anthropological, philosophical, psychological, cultural, and literary aspects of modern exile. It studies exile as experience and metaphor in the context of modernity, and examines the structure of the relationship between imagined/remembered homelands and transnational identities, and the dialectics of language loss and bi- and multi-lingualism. Particular attention is given to the psychocultural dimensions of linguistic exclusion and loss. Readings of works by Julia Alvarez, Albert Camus, Ana Castillo, Sigmund Freud, Eva Hoffman, Maxine Hong Kingston, Milan Kundera, Friedrich Nietzsche, Salman Rushdie, W. G. Sebald, Kurban Said, and others.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward International Studies

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GERM B245 Interdisciplinary Approaches to German Literature and Culture
Section 001 (Spring 2018): Crime, Justice and the Courtroom
Not offered 2018-19
This is a topics course. Taught in German. Course content varies. Previous topics include, Women's Narratives on Modern Migrancy, Exile, and Diasporas; Nation and Identity in Post-War Austria. Current topic: Crime, Justice and the Courtroom. This is a film-based course about political trials at critical junctures of German history.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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GERM B262 Topics: Film and the German Literary Imagination
Spring 2019
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: Taught in German, this course explores two cinematic Viennas: the mythmaking fantasy of the Habsburg empire, with its "fin-de-siècle Vienna," and the city of today, a place marked by competing visions of national identity, gender, culture and politics. We will study the "Wien-Film" and "Jewish Vienna" as well as recent attempts by Barbara Albert, Michael Haneke, Jessica Hausner, and others to redefine Vienna's significance within contemporary Europe.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Film Studies

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GERM B320 Topics in German Literature and Culture
Section 001 (Fall 2018): 1968 and Its Legacies
Fall 2018
This is a topics course. Course content varies. Taught in German.
Current topic description: This year marks the 50th anniversary of 1968. This course, taught in German, revisits the events of that watershed year and its enduring legacies in postwar German and European politics and history. Using literature and film, the course examines crucial topics including the student protest movement, the women's movement, Prague Spring, protests against the Vietnam War, and the terrorist campaigns of the Red Army Faction in the 1970s that culminated in what is known as the German Autumn.

Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Visual Studies

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GERM B321 Advanced Topics in German Cultural Studies
Section 001 (Fall 2017): German Encounters/East Asia
Section 001 (Spring 2019): Representing Diversity in German Cinema
Spring 2019
This is a topics course. Course content varies. Course is taught in English. There will an additional hour in German for those students taking the course for German credit.
Current topic description:This course examines a wide-ranging repertoire of transnational films produced in contemporary Germany. It presents an introduction to modern German cinema through a close analysis of visual material and identity construction in the worlds of the real and the reel. It uses film as the primary medium to discuss the experiences of diverse minority groups in Germany, including Turkish Germans, Afro-Germans, ethnic Germans from former Eastern European territories, German Jews, and Asian Germans.

Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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GERM B399 Senior Seminar
Senior Seminar. Students are required to write a long research paper with an annotated bibliography.

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GERM B403 Supervised Work

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GERM B403 Supervised Work

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GERM B421 German for Reading Knowledge
This course is designed to prepare students to read and translate challenging academic texts from German into English. It presents an intensive examination of basic German grammar and syntax, together with strategies that will enable students to read and understand German texts essential for advanced study or learning in disciplines across the arts, social sciences, and humanities. Previous experience in German is an asset, but is not a class prerequisite. This course does not fulfill the Language Requirement.

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COML B225 Censorship: Historical Contexts, Local Practices and Global Resonance
Not offered 2018-19
The course is in English. It examines the ban on books and art in a global context through a study of the historical and sociopolitical conditions of censorship practices. The course raises such questions as how censorship is used to fortify political power, how it is practiced locally and globally, who censors, what are the categories of censorship, how censorship succeeds and fails, and how writers and artists write and create against and within censorship. The last question leads to an analysis of rhetorical strategies that writers and artists employ to translate the expression of repression, trauma, and torture into idioms of resistance. German majors/minors can get German Studies credit. Prerequisite: EMLY B001 or a 100-level intensive writing course.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o
Counts toward Counts toward Middle Eastern Studies

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FREN B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Not offered 2018-19
By bringing together the study of major theoretical currents of the 20th century and the practice of analyzing literary works in the light of theory, this course aims at providing students with skills to use literary theory in their own scholarship. The selection of theoretical readings reflects the history of theory (psychoanalysis, structuralism, narratology), as well as the currents most relevant to the contemporary academic field: Post-structuralism, Post-colonialism, Gender Studies, and Ecocriticism. They are paired with a diverse range of short stories (Poe, Kafka, Camus, Borges, Calvino, Morrison, Djebar, Ngozi Adichie) that we discuss along with our study of theoretical texts. The class will be conducted in English with an additional hour in French for students wishing to take it for French credit.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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ITAL B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Critical Theories
Fall 2018
What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.
Current topic description: What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.

Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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