This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's calendars page.

Students must choose a major subject and may choose a minor subject. Students may also select from one of seven concentrations, which are offered to enhance a student's work in the major or minor and to focus work on a specific area of interest.

Concentrations are an intentional cluster of courses already offered by various academic departments or through general programs. These courses may also be cross-listed in several academic departments. Therefore, when registering for a course that counts toward a concentration, a student should register for the course listed in her major or minor department. If the concentration course is not listed in her major or minor department, the student may enroll in any listing of that course.

Fall 2018

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
HLTH B115-001Introduction to Health StudiesSemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHTaylor Hall GWhite,S.
ANTH B331-001Medical Anthro Seminar: Critical Thinking for Critical TimesSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 3:30 PM TDalton Hall 212APashigian,M.
BIOL B201-001GeneticsSemester / 1Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTHPark 229Davis,T.
BIOL B216-001GenomicsSemester / 1Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:30 AM MWPark 100Shapiro,J.
BIOL B271-001Developmental BiologySemester / 1Lecture: 9:10 AM-10:00 AM MWFPark 229Department staff,T., Yin,M.
Laboratory: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM TPark 126
CHEM B242-001Biological ChemistrySemester / 1Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:30 AM MWPark 278Kung,Y.
HIST B337-001Topics in African History: Hist of Global Health AfricaSemester / 1LEC: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM MDalton Hall 1Ngalamulume,K.
PSYC B231-001Health PsychologySemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHOld Library 224Peterson,L.
SOCL B317-001Comparative Social Policy: Cuba, China, US, ScandinaviaSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM MDalton Hall 1Karen,D.
SOCL B342-001Bodies in Social LifeSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM WDalton Hall 119Sledge,P.

Spring 2019

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
HLTH B398-001Senior Seminar Health StudiesSemester / 1Lecture: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM TDept. staff, TBA
BIOL B210-001Biology and Public PolicySemester / 1LEC: 8:25 AM- 9:45 AM TTHPark 229Greif,K.
BIOL B215-001Experimental Design and StatisticsSemester / 1Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:00 AM MWFPark 349Shapiro,J., Shapiro,J.
Laboratory: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM THPark 10
BIOL B255-001MicrobiologySemester / 1LEC: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHPark 126Chander,M.
LEC: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM WPark 126
BIOL B303-001Human PhysiologySemester / 1Lecture: 8:25 AM- 9:45 AM TTHBrodfuehrer,P., Brodfuehrer,P.
Laboratory: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM THPark 127
ECON B214-001Public FinanceSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWVelasco,L.
HIST B337-001Topics in African History: Hist of Global Health AfricaSemester / 1LEC: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM THNgalamulume,K.
PSYC B209-001Abnormal PsychologySemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHNeeren,A.
PSYC B331-001Health Behavior and ContextSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM TPeterson,L.

Fall 2019

(Class schedules for this semester will be posted at a later date.)

Haverford Courses Fall 2017

COURSE TITLE INSTRUCTOR MISC MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION
ANTHH213A001 Bioethics & Social Justice Roebuck, Christopher Class Nbr: 1343 Lim: 25 SO TTh 01:00pm-02:30pm   
BIOLH301D001 Advanced Genetic Analysis Meneely, Phil Class Nbr: 1661 NA MW 09:00am-10:30am   
CHEMH357E001 Topics in Bioorganic Chemistry Hilfiker, Mark Class Nbr: 2159 Lim: 30 NA M 07:30pm-10:00pm   
HLTHH213A001 Bioethics & Social Justice Roebuck, Christopher Class Nbr: 2157 Lim: 25 SO TTh 01:00pm-02:30pm   
HLTHH213A001 Bioethics & Social Justice Roebuck, Christopher Class Nbr: 2157 Lim: 25 SO TTh 01:00pm-02:30pm   
HLTHH228A001 Social Epidemiology Montgomery, Anne M. Class Nbr: 1680 Lim: 30 SO MW 11:15am-12:45pm   
HLTHH245A001 Health Psychology Wadden, Thomas Class Nbr: 1334 Lim: 35 SO T 07:30pm-10:00pm   
HLTHH245A001 Health Psychology Wadden, Thomas Class Nbr: 1334 Lim: 35 SO T 07:30pm-10:00pm   
HLTHH301D001 Advanced Genetic Analysis Meneely, Phil Class Nbr: 1684 NA MW 09:00am-10:30am   
HLTHH301D001 Advanced Genetic Analysis Meneely, Phil Class Nbr: 1684 NA MW 09:00am-10:30am   
HLTHH302A001 Bodies of Injustice:Health, Illness and Healing in Contexts of Inequality Schilling, Carol Class Nbr: 1185 Lim: 15 SO T 07:30pm-10:00pm   
HLTHH302A001 Bodies of Injustice:Health, Illness and Healing in Contexts of Inequality Schilling, Carol Class Nbr: 1185 Lim: 15 SO T 07:30pm-10:00pm   
HLTHH305A001 The Logic and Politics of Global Health West, Anna M Class Nbr: 2346 Lim: 25 SO MW 09:00am-10:30am   
HLTHH305A001 The Logic and Politics of Global Health West, Anna M Class Nbr: 2346 Lim: 25 SO MW 09:00am-10:30am   
HLTHH337A001 Stress and Coping Wang, Shu-wen Class Nbr: 1683 Lim: 15 SO TTh 01:00pm-02:30pm   
HLTHH337A001 Stress and Coping Wang, Shu-wen Class Nbr: 1683 Lim: 15 SO TTh 01:00pm-02:30pm   
HLTHH398A001 Senior Seminar Health Studies Roebuck, Christopher Class Nbr: 2229 Lim: 10 T 07:30pm-10:00pm   
ICPRH302A001 Bodies of Injustice: Health, Illness and Healing in Contexts of Inequality Schilling, Carol Class Nbr: 1162 Lim: 15 SO T 07:30pm-10:00pm   
PSYCH242A001 Cultural Psychology Wang, Shu-wen Class Nbr: 2235 Lim: 35 SO TTh 10:00am-11:30am   
PSYCH245A001 Health Psychology Wadden, Thomas Class Nbr: 1368 Lim: 35 SO T 07:30pm-10:00pm   
PSYCH337A001 Stress and Coping Wang, Shu-wen Class Nbr: 1620 Lim: 15 SO TTh 01:00pm-02:30pm   
PSYCH349A001 Anxiety Disorders and their Treatment Gordon, Elizabeth Class Nbr: 1084 Lim: 15 SO T 01:30pm-04:00pm   
STATH203A001 Statistical Methods and Their Applications Butler, Lynne Class Nbr: 1687 Lim: 20 Div: Q; QM; QU MW 11:15am-12:45pm   
STATH203A00A Statistical Methods and Their Applications Butler, Lynne Class Nbr: 1688 Lim: 20 Div: Q; QM; QU F 02:30pm-04:00pm   
WRPRH176A001 Are You What You Eat? Eating and Identity Blake, Elizabeth A. Class Nbr: 1461 Lim: 12 FW TTh 10:00am-11:30am   
WRPRH176A002 Are You What You Eat? Eating and Identity Blake, Elizabeth A. Class Nbr: 1553 Lim: 12 FW TTh 01:00pm-02:30pm

2018-19 Catalog Data

HLTH B115 Introduction to Health Studies
Fall 2018
The multidisciplinary foundation for the health studies minor. Students will be introduced to theories and methods from the life sciences, social sciences, and humanities and will learn to apply them to problems of health and illness. Topics include epidemiological, public health, and biomedical perspectives on health and disease; social, behavioral, and environmental determinants of health; globalization of health issues; cultural representations of illness; health inequalities, social justice, and the ethics of health as a human right.
Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Health Studies

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HLTH B398 Senior Seminar Health Studies
Required culminating seminar, which integrates the three tracks of the Health Studies minor. Students share and critically assess their own and fellow students' ongoing work to communicate across disciplines and understand the value and interconnectedness of different disciplinary approaches. Students present and defend their semester-long collaborative projects at the end of the course.
Counts toward Health Studies

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ANTH B210 Medical Anthropology
Not offered 2018-19
This course examines the relationships between culture, society, disease and illness. It considers a broad range of health-related experiences, discourses, knowledge and practice among different cultures and among individuals and groups in different positions of power. Topics covered include sorcery, herbal remedies, healing rituals, folk illnesses, modern disease, scientific medical perceptions, clinical technique, epidemiology and political economy of medicine. Prerequisite: ANTH 102, H103 or permission of instructor.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Environmental Studies
Counts toward Health Studies

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ANTH B312 Anthropology of Reproduction
Not offered 2018-19
An examination of social and cultural constructions of reproduction, and how power and politics in everyday life shapes reproductive behavior and its meaning in Western and non-Western cultures. The influence of competing interests within households, communities, states, and institutions on reproduction is considered. Prerequisite: ANTH B102 (or ANTH H103) or permission of instructor.
Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Health Studies

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ANTH B317 Disease and Human Evolution
Not offered 2018-19
This courses provides an introduction to evolutionary, or Darwinian, medicine, a relatively new field that recognizes that evolutionary processes and human evolutionary history shape health among contemporary human populations, aiming to answer the question "why do we get sick?" The field of evolutionary medicine emphasizes ultimate explanations, such as how natural selection and other evolutionary forces shape our susceptibility to disease, and how we have adapted to resist disease. This perspective complements that of biomedicine, which generally focuses on identifying the proximate mechanisms that give rise to diseases and malfunctions. This course will examine a variety of diseases using an evolutionary perspective, such as emerging infectious diseases, mental health issues, and cancers. We will emphasize chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, obesity, and diabetes, and will focus particularly on the role of diet and psychosocial stress in the development and progression of these conditions.
Counts toward Health Studies

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ANTH B322 Anthropology of the Body
Not offered 2018-19
This course examines a diversity of meanings and interpretations of the body in anthropology. It explores anthropological theories and methods of studying the body and social difference via a series of topics including the construction of the body in medicine, identity, race, gender, sexuality and as explored through cross-cultural comparison. Prerequisite: ANTH B102, ANTH H103 or permission of instructor.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Health Studies

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ANTH B331 Medical Anthro Seminar: Critical Thinking for Critical Times
Fall 2018
Advanced Medical Anthropology: Critical Thinking for Critical Times explores theoretical and applied frameworks used in medical anthropology to tackle pressing problems in our world today. Coupled with topical subjects and ethnographic examples, this seminar will enable students to delve deeply into sub-specialization areas in the field of medical anthropology, including: global health inequalities, cross-border disease transmission, genomics, science and technology studies, ethnomedicine, cross-cultural psychiatry/psychology, cross-cultural bioethics, and ecological approaches to studying health and behavior, among others. No prior experience in medical anthropology is required. Prerequisite: ANTH B102, ANTH H103, or permission of instructor.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Health Studies

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HIST B231 Medicine, Magic & Miracles in the Middle Ages
Not offered 2018-19
A lecture and discussion course on the therapeutic systems (humoral theory, faith healing, natural magic), the medical marketplace, and the social context for understanding health and disease in the medieval period. Topics covered include Greek, Arabic, and Latin medical textual traditions, the rise of hospitals and public health, and the Black Death.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

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BIOL B201 Genetics
Fall 2018
This course focuses on the principles of genetics, including classical genetics, population genetics and molecular genetics. Topics to be covered include the genetic and molecular nature of mutations and phenotypes, genetic mapping and gene identification, chromosome abnormalities, developmental genetics, genome editing and epigenetics. Examples of genetics analyses are drawn from a variety of organisms including Drosophila, C. elegans, mice and humans. Lecture three hours a week. Prerequisite: BIOL B110 and CHEM B104.
Quantitative Readiness Required (QR)
Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts toward Counts toward Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

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BIOL B215 Experimental Design and Statistics
Spring 2019
An introductory course in designing experiments and analyzing biological data. This course is structured to develop students' understanding of when to apply different quantitative methods, and how to implement those methods using the R statistics environment. Topics include summary statistics, distributions, randomization, replication, parametric and nonparametric tests, and introductory topics in multivariate and Bayesian statistics. The course is geared around weekly problem sets and interactive learning. Suggested Preparation: BIOL B110 or B111 is highly recommended.
Quantitative Methods (QM)
Quantitative Readiness Required (QR)
Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts toward Counts toward Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

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BIOL B216 Genomics
Fall 2018
An introduction to the study of genomes and genomic data. This course will examine the types of biological questions that can be answered using large biological data sets and complete genome sequences as well as the techniques and technologies that make such studies possible. Topics include genome organization and evolution, comparative genomics, and analysis of transcriptomes and proteomes. Prerequisite: One semester of BIOL 110-111. BIOL 201 highly recommended.
Quantitative Methods (QM)
Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts toward Counts toward Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

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CHEM B242 Biological Chemistry
Fall 2018
The structure, chemistry and function of amino acids, proteins, lipids, polysaccharides and nucleic acids; enzyme kinetics; metabolic relationships of carbohydrates, lipids and amino acids, and the control of various pathways. Lecture three hours a week. Prerequisite: CHEM B212 or CHEM H222.
Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Counts toward Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

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BIOL B255 Microbiology
Spring 2019
Invisible to the naked eye, microbes occupy every niche on the planet. This course will examine how microbes have become successful colonizers; review aspects of interactions between microbes, humans and the environment; and explore practical uses of microbes in industry, medicine and environmental management. The course will combine lecture, discussion of primary literature and student presentations. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 110 and CHEM B104.
Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts toward Counts toward Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

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BIOL B271 Developmental Biology
Fall 2018
An introduction to embryology and the concepts of developmental biology. Concepts are illustrated by analyzing the experimental observations that support them. Topics include gametogenesis and fertilization, morphogenesis, cell fate specification and differentiation, pattern formation, regulation of gene expression, neural development, and developmental plasticity. The laboratory focuses on observations and experiments on living embryos. Lecture three hours, laboratory three scheduled hours a week; most weeks require additional hours outside of the regularly scheduled lab. Prerequisite: one semester of BIOL 110-111 or permission of instructor.
Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts toward Counts toward Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

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BIOL B201 Genetics
Fall 2018
This course focuses on the principles of genetics, including classical genetics, population genetics and molecular genetics. Topics to be covered include the genetic and molecular nature of mutations and phenotypes, genetic mapping and gene identification, chromosome abnormalities, developmental genetics, genome editing and epigenetics. Examples of genetics analyses are drawn from a variety of organisms including Drosophila, C. elegans, mice and humans. Lecture three hours a week. Prerequisite: BIOL B110 and CHEM B104.
Quantitative Readiness Required (QR)
Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts toward Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Counts toward Health Studies

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BIOL B210 Biology and Public Policy
Spring 2019
A lecture/discussion course on major issues and advances in biology and their implications for public policy decisions. Topics discussed include reproductive technologies, the Human Genome project, environmental health hazards, bioterrorism, and euthanasia and organ transplantation. Readings include scientific articles, public policy and ethical considerations, and lay publications. Lecture three hours a week. This class involves considerable writing. Prerequisite: One semester of BIOL 110-111, or permission of instructor.
Counts toward Environmental Studies
Counts toward Health Studies

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BIOL B215 Experimental Design and Statistics
Spring 2019
An introductory course in designing experiments and analyzing biological data. This course is structured to develop students' understanding of when to apply different quantitative methods, and how to implement those methods using the R statistics environment. Topics include summary statistics, distributions, randomization, replication, parametric and nonparametric tests, and introductory topics in multivariate and Bayesian statistics. The course is geared around weekly problem sets and interactive learning. Suggested Preparation: BIOL B110 or B111 is highly recommended.
Quantitative Methods (QM)
Quantitative Readiness Required (QR)
Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts toward Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Counts toward Health Studies

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BIOL B216 Genomics
Fall 2018
An introduction to the study of genomes and genomic data. This course will examine the types of biological questions that can be answered using large biological data sets and complete genome sequences as well as the techniques and technologies that make such studies possible. Topics include genome organization and evolution, comparative genomics, and analysis of transcriptomes and proteomes. Prerequisite: One semester of BIOL 110-111. BIOL 201 highly recommended.
Quantitative Methods (QM)
Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts toward Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Counts toward Health Studies

Back to top

BIOL B255 Microbiology
Spring 2019
Invisible to the naked eye, microbes occupy every niche on the planet. This course will examine how microbes have become successful colonizers; review aspects of interactions between microbes, humans and the environment; and explore practical uses of microbes in industry, medicine and environmental management. The course will combine lecture, discussion of primary literature and student presentations. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 110 and CHEM B104.
Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts toward Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Counts toward Environmental Studies
Counts toward Health Studies

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BIOL B271 Developmental Biology
Fall 2018
An introduction to embryology and the concepts of developmental biology. Concepts are illustrated by analyzing the experimental observations that support them. Topics include gametogenesis and fertilization, morphogenesis, cell fate specification and differentiation, pattern formation, regulation of gene expression, neural development, and developmental plasticity. The laboratory focuses on observations and experiments on living embryos. Lecture three hours, laboratory three scheduled hours a week; most weeks require additional hours outside of the regularly scheduled lab. Prerequisite: one semester of BIOL 110-111 or permission of instructor.
Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts toward Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Counts toward Health Studies

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BIOL B303 Human Physiology
Spring 2019
A comprehensive study of the physical and chemical processes in tissues, organs and organ systems that form the basis of animal and human function. Homeostasis, control systems and the structural basis of function are emphasized. Laboratories are designed to introduce basic physiological techniques and the practice of scientific inquiry. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours a week. Prerequisites: One semester of BIOL 110-111, CHEM 103, 104 and one 200-level biology course.
Counts toward Health Studies

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ANTH B317 Disease and Human Evolution
Not offered 2018-19
This courses provides an introduction to evolutionary, or Darwinian, medicine, a relatively new field that recognizes that evolutionary processes and human evolutionary history shape health among contemporary human populations, aiming to answer the question "why do we get sick?" The field of evolutionary medicine emphasizes ultimate explanations, such as how natural selection and other evolutionary forces shape our susceptibility to disease, and how we have adapted to resist disease. This perspective complements that of biomedicine, which generally focuses on identifying the proximate mechanisms that give rise to diseases and malfunctions. This course will examine a variety of diseases using an evolutionary perspective, such as emerging infectious diseases, mental health issues, and cancers. We will emphasize chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, obesity, and diabetes, and will focus particularly on the role of diet and psychosocial stress in the development and progression of these conditions.
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

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BIOL B380 Topics in Cellular and Organismal Physiology
Not offered 2018-19
Physiology is the study of the normal functioning of a living organism and its components, including all its physical and chemical processes. The integration of function across many levels of organization will be emphasized. Prerequisite: One semester of BIOL 110-111, CHEM 103, 104 and one 200-level biology course
Counts toward Health Studies

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HIST B231 Medicine, Magic & Miracles in the Middle Ages
Not offered 2018-19
A lecture and discussion course on the therapeutic systems (humoral theory, faith healing, natural magic), the medical marketplace, and the social context for understanding health and disease in the medieval period. Topics covered include Greek, Arabic, and Latin medical textual traditions, the rise of hospitals and public health, and the Black Death.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

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CHEM B242 Biological Chemistry
Fall 2018
The structure, chemistry and function of amino acids, proteins, lipids, polysaccharides and nucleic acids; enzyme kinetics; metabolic relationships of carbohydrates, lipids and amino acids, and the control of various pathways. Lecture three hours a week. Prerequisite: CHEM B212 or CHEM H222.
Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Counts toward Health Studies

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ANTH B210 Medical Anthropology
Not offered 2018-19
This course examines the relationships between culture, society, disease and illness. It considers a broad range of health-related experiences, discourses, knowledge and practice among different cultures and among individuals and groups in different positions of power. Topics covered include sorcery, herbal remedies, healing rituals, folk illnesses, modern disease, scientific medical perceptions, clinical technique, epidemiology and political economy of medicine. Prerequisite: ANTH 102, H103 or permission of instructor.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

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ECON B214 Public Finance
Spring 2019
Analysis of government's role in resource allocation, emphasizing effects of tax and expenditure programs on income distribution and economic efficiency. Topics include sources of inefficiency in markets and possible government responses; federal budget composition; social insurance and antipoverty programs; U.S. tax structure and incidence. Prerequisites: ECON B105.
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

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HIST B249 History of Global Health
Not offered 2018-19
This course examines the interrelated histories of public health, international health, and global health from the late 18th to the 21st centuries as part of a broader history of epidemics, empire, and global mobility. We will pay particular attention this semester to the use of architectural and spatial strategies for managing crises of contagion, disaster, and epidemic. The architectural spaces to be examined will include urban-based hospitals, public health infrastructure, and quarantine buildings as well as mobile architectural technologies such as incubators, wartime pop-up surgical tents, and floating hospitals in both Western and non-Western environments. The course will trace the role of health and medicine in mediating the relationships between metropolis and colony, state and citizen, research practice and human subject.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

Back to top

HIST B231 Medicine, Magic & Miracles in the Middle Ages
Not offered 2018-19
A lecture and discussion course on the therapeutic systems (humoral theory, faith healing, natural magic), the medical marketplace, and the social context for understanding health and disease in the medieval period. Topics covered include Greek, Arabic, and Latin medical textual traditions, the rise of hospitals and public health, and the Black Death.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

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ECON B214 Public Finance
Spring 2019
Analysis of government's role in resource allocation, emphasizing effects of tax and expenditure programs on income distribution and economic efficiency. Topics include sources of inefficiency in markets and possible government responses; federal budget composition; social insurance and antipoverty programs; U.S. tax structure and incidence. Prerequisites: ECON B105.
Counts toward Health Studies

Back to top

ANTH B210 Medical Anthropology
Not offered 2018-19
This course examines the relationships between culture, society, disease and illness. It considers a broad range of health-related experiences, discourses, knowledge and practice among different cultures and among individuals and groups in different positions of power. Topics covered include sorcery, herbal remedies, healing rituals, folk illnesses, modern disease, scientific medical perceptions, clinical technique, epidemiology and political economy of medicine. Prerequisite: ANTH 102, H103 or permission of instructor.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

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POLS B310 Comparative Public Policy
Not offered 2018-19
A comparison of policy processes and outcomes across space and time. Focusing on particular issues such as health care, domestic security, water and land use, we identify institutional, historical, and cultural factors that shape policies. We also examine the growing importance of international-level policy making and the interplay between international and domestic pressures on policy makers. Prerequisite: One course in Political Science or public policy.
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

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HIST B209 Introduction to the History of Medicine
Not offered 2018-19
This course provides an introduction to the history of medicine, from Hippocrates to the Black Plague to contemporary struggles to combat HIV/AIDS. It examines topics including epidemic disease, the processes of medical knowledge production, the hospital and the rise of clinical medicine, and issues of hygiene and public health. We will focus on the intersecting social, political, and cultural histories of medicine, addressing themes of race, gender, and constructions of biological difference; the history of the body; professionalization; and medical ethics. Disrupting straightforward narratives of medical progress, this course will focus on the contingencies involved in medical knowledge production and situate elements of historical medical practice, for example humoral theory or polypharmacy, within their appropriate historical context.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Health Studies

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HIST B231 Medicine, Magic & Miracles in the Middle Ages
Not offered 2018-19
A lecture and discussion course on the therapeutic systems (humoral theory, faith healing, natural magic), the medical marketplace, and the social context for understanding health and disease in the medieval period. Topics covered include Greek, Arabic, and Latin medical textual traditions, the rise of hospitals and public health, and the Black Death.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Health Studies

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HIST B233 Health and Disability in the U.S.
Not offered 2018-19
This course examines how scientific, medical, and cultural discourses have shaped the construction of health and disability in U.S. history. Paying attention to the ways in which health and disability are constructed in relationship to other social categories such as race, class, gender, sexuality, and nationality, we will examine the processes through which certain bodies are defined as healthy, useful and productive while others are marked as diseased, defective, and socially undesirable. Topics will include eugenics, public health, immigration policies, birth control and sterilization, the women's health movement, AIDS activism, disability rights, mental health, obesity, biological citizenship, and health consumerism.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Health Studies

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HIST B249 History of Global Health
Not offered 2018-19
This course examines the interrelated histories of public health, international health, and global health from the late 18th to the 21st centuries as part of a broader history of epidemics, empire, and global mobility. We will pay particular attention this semester to the use of architectural and spatial strategies for managing crises of contagion, disaster, and epidemic. The architectural spaces to be examined will include urban-based hospitals, public health infrastructure, and quarantine buildings as well as mobile architectural technologies such as incubators, wartime pop-up surgical tents, and floating hospitals in both Western and non-Western environments. The course will trace the role of health and medicine in mediating the relationships between metropolis and colony, state and citizen, research practice and human subject.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Health Studies

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HIST B337 Topics in African History
Section 001 (Fall 2017): Hist of Global Health Africa
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Hist of Global Health Africa
Section 001 (Spring 2019): Hist of Global Health Africa
Fall 2018, Spring 2019
This is a topics course. Topics vary.
Current topic description: The course will focus on the issues of public health history, social and cultural history of disease as well as the issues of the history of medicine. We will examine the histories of global initiatives to control disease in Africa from an interdisciplinary perspective (history, and social and biomedical sciences), using case studies from across the continent. These initiatives involve the relationship between states, NGOs, universities, pharmaceutical companies, and other nonstate actors. We will explore various themes, such as the indigenous theories of disease and therapies; disease, imperialism and medicine; the emerging diseases, medical education, women in medicine, and differential access to health care. We will also explore the questions regarding the sources of African history and their quality.
Current topic description: The course examines the history of global health initiatives to deal with the burden of disease in Africa. It offers historical (and anthroplogical) perspectives on the ways in which medicine and public health in Africa have been transformed under the pressures of broad forces and factors, including colonial exploitation and rule, post-Second World War initiatives, the postcolonial economic and political liberalization and globalization, and rise of 'para-states' in Africa.

Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Health Studies

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BIOL B201 Genetics
Fall 2018
This course focuses on the principles of genetics, including classical genetics, population genetics and molecular genetics. Topics to be covered include the genetic and molecular nature of mutations and phenotypes, genetic mapping and gene identification, chromosome abnormalities, developmental genetics, genome editing and epigenetics. Examples of genetics analyses are drawn from a variety of organisms including Drosophila, C. elegans, mice and humans. Lecture three hours a week. Prerequisite: BIOL B110 and CHEM B104.
Quantitative Readiness Required (QR)
Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts toward Counts toward Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

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PSYC B209 Abnormal Psychology
Spring 2019
This course examines the experience, origins and consequences of psychological difficulties and problems. Among the questions we will explore are: What do we mean by abnormal behavior or psychopathology? What are the strengths and limitations of the ways in which psychopathology is assessed and classified? What are the major forms of psychopathology? How do psychologists study and treat psychopathology? How is psychopathology experienced by individuals? What causes psychological difficulties and what are their consequences? How do we integrate social, biological and psychological perspectives on the causes of psychopathology? Do psychological treatments (therapies) work? How do we study the effectiveness of psychology treatments? Prerequisite: Introductory Psychology (PSYC B105 or H100).
Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

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BIOL B210 Biology and Public Policy
Spring 2019
A lecture/discussion course on major issues and advances in biology and their implications for public policy decisions. Topics discussed include reproductive technologies, the Human Genome project, environmental health hazards, bioterrorism, and euthanasia and organ transplantation. Readings include scientific articles, public policy and ethical considerations, and lay publications. Lecture three hours a week. This class involves considerable writing. Prerequisite: One semester of BIOL 110-111, or permission of instructor.
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

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ANTH B210 Medical Anthropology
Not offered 2018-19
This course examines the relationships between culture, society, disease and illness. It considers a broad range of health-related experiences, discourses, knowledge and practice among different cultures and among individuals and groups in different positions of power. Topics covered include sorcery, herbal remedies, healing rituals, folk illnesses, modern disease, scientific medical perceptions, clinical technique, epidemiology and political economy of medicine. Prerequisite: ANTH 102, H103 or permission of instructor.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

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ECON B214 Public Finance
Spring 2019
Analysis of government's role in resource allocation, emphasizing effects of tax and expenditure programs on income distribution and economic efficiency. Topics include sources of inefficiency in markets and possible government responses; federal budget composition; social insurance and antipoverty programs; U.S. tax structure and incidence. Prerequisites: ECON B105.
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

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BIOL B215 Experimental Design and Statistics
Spring 2019
An introductory course in designing experiments and analyzing biological data. This course is structured to develop students' understanding of when to apply different quantitative methods, and how to implement those methods using the R statistics environment. Topics include summary statistics, distributions, randomization, replication, parametric and nonparametric tests, and introductory topics in multivariate and Bayesian statistics. The course is geared around weekly problem sets and interactive learning. Suggested Preparation: BIOL B110 or B111 is highly recommended.
Quantitative Methods (QM)
Quantitative Readiness Required (QR)
Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts toward Counts toward Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

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BIOL B216 Genomics
Fall 2018
An introduction to the study of genomes and genomic data. This course will examine the types of biological questions that can be answered using large biological data sets and complete genome sequences as well as the techniques and technologies that make such studies possible. Topics include genome organization and evolution, comparative genomics, and analysis of transcriptomes and proteomes. Prerequisite: One semester of BIOL 110-111. BIOL 201 highly recommended.
Quantitative Methods (QM)
Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts toward Counts toward Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

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PSYC B231 Health Psychology
Fall 2018
This course will provide an overview of the field of health psychology using lecture, exams, videos, assignments, and an article critique. We will examine the current definition of health psychology, as well as the theories and research behind many areas in health psychology (both historical and contemporary). The course will focus on specific health and social psychological theories, empirical research, and applying the theory and research to real world situations. Prerequisite: Introductory Psychology (PSYC B105) or Foundations of Psychology (PSYC H100)
Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Museum Studies

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CHEM B242 Biological Chemistry
Fall 2018
The structure, chemistry and function of amino acids, proteins, lipids, polysaccharides and nucleic acids; enzyme kinetics; metabolic relationships of carbohydrates, lipids and amino acids, and the control of various pathways. Lecture three hours a week. Prerequisite: CHEM B212 or CHEM H222.
Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Counts toward Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

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HIST B249 History of Global Health
Not offered 2018-19
This course examines the interrelated histories of public health, international health, and global health from the late 18th to the 21st centuries as part of a broader history of epidemics, empire, and global mobility. We will pay particular attention this semester to the use of architectural and spatial strategies for managing crises of contagion, disaster, and epidemic. The architectural spaces to be examined will include urban-based hospitals, public health infrastructure, and quarantine buildings as well as mobile architectural technologies such as incubators, wartime pop-up surgical tents, and floating hospitals in both Western and non-Western environments. The course will trace the role of health and medicine in mediating the relationships between metropolis and colony, state and citizen, research practice and human subject.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

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BIOL B255 Microbiology
Spring 2019
Invisible to the naked eye, microbes occupy every niche on the planet. This course will examine how microbes have become successful colonizers; review aspects of interactions between microbes, humans and the environment; and explore practical uses of microbes in industry, medicine and environmental management. The course will combine lecture, discussion of primary literature and student presentations. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 110 and CHEM B104.
Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts toward Counts toward Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

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PSYC B260 The Psychology of Mindfulness
Not offered 2018-19
This course focuses on psychological theory and research on mindfulness and meditative practices. Readings and discussion will introduce students to modern conceptualizations and implementation of mindfulness practices that have arisen in the West. Students will be encouraged to engage in mindfulness activities as part of their involvement in this course.
Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

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BIOL B271 Developmental Biology
Fall 2018
An introduction to embryology and the concepts of developmental biology. Concepts are illustrated by analyzing the experimental observations that support them. Topics include gametogenesis and fertilization, morphogenesis, cell fate specification and differentiation, pattern formation, regulation of gene expression, neural development, and developmental plasticity. The laboratory focuses on observations and experiments on living embryos. Lecture three hours, laboratory three scheduled hours a week; most weeks require additional hours outside of the regularly scheduled lab. Prerequisite: one semester of BIOL 110-111 or permission of instructor.
Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts toward Counts toward Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

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BIOL B303 Human Physiology
Spring 2019
A comprehensive study of the physical and chemical processes in tissues, organs and organ systems that form the basis of animal and human function. Homeostasis, control systems and the structural basis of function are emphasized. Laboratories are designed to introduce basic physiological techniques and the practice of scientific inquiry. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours a week. Prerequisites: One semester of BIOL 110-111, CHEM 103, 104 and one 200-level biology course.
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

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PSYC B331 Health Behavior and Context
Spring 2019
This seminar will be devoted to a discussion of theory and research in health psychology. We will investigate both historical and contemporary perspectives on the psychology of wellness and illness. We will begin with a consideration of how psychosocial forces influence health cognitions, behaviors, and physiological processes. The second half of the course will focus on contextual factors, interventions, and emerging topics in research. We will debate the question of whether/how psychological forces influence health outcomes. Prerequisite: PSYC B105 and PSYC B231 or PSYC B208, or by permission of the instructor.
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

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PSYC B351 Developmental Psychopathology
Not offered 2018-19
This course will examine emotional and behavioral disorders of children and adolescents, including autism, attention deficit disorder, conduct disorder, phobias, obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression, anorexia, and schizophrenia. Major topics covered will include: contrasting models of psychopathology; empirical and categorical approaches to assessment and diagnosis; outcome of childhood disorders; risk, resilience, and prevention; and therapeutic approaches and their efficacy .Prerequisite: PSYC 206 or 209.
Counts toward Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Neuroscience

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PSYC B395 Psychopharmacology
Not offered 2018-19
A study of the role of drugs in understanding basic brain-behavior relations. Topics include the pharmacological basis of motivation and emotion; pharmacological models of psychopathology; the use of drugs in the treatment of psychiatric disorders such as anxiety, depression, and psychosis; and the psychology and pharmacology of drug addiction. Prerequisite: PSYC B218 or BIOL B202 or PSYC H217 or permission of instructor.
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Neuroscience

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SOCL B317 Comparative Social Policy: Cuba, China, US, Scandinavia
Fall 2018
This course will examine different countries' policy choices to address different societal challenges. Four societal types - socialist (Cuba), post-socialist (China), capitalist (US), and social-democratic (Scandinavia) - will be studies to help us understand how these different kinds of societies conceive of social problems and propose and implement attempted solutions. We will examine particular problems/solutions in four domains: health/sports; education; environment; technological development. As we explore these domains, we will attend to methodological issues involved in making historical and institutional comparisons
Counts toward Counts toward Education
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

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POLS B310 Comparative Public Policy
Not offered 2018-19
A comparison of policy processes and outcomes across space and time. Focusing on particular issues such as health care, domestic security, water and land use, we identify institutional, historical, and cultural factors that shape policies. We also examine the growing importance of international-level policy making and the interplay between international and domestic pressures on policy makers. Prerequisite: One course in Political Science or public policy.
Counts toward Environmental Studies
Counts toward Health Studies

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SOCL B317 Comparative Social Policy: Cuba, China, US, Scandinavia
Fall 2018
This course will examine different countries' policy choices to address different societal challenges. Four societal types - socialist (Cuba), post-socialist (China), capitalist (US), and social-democratic (Scandinavia) - will be studies to help us understand how these different kinds of societies conceive of social problems and propose and implement attempted solutions. We will examine particular problems/solutions in four domains: health/sports; education; environment; technological development. As we explore these domains, we will attend to methodological issues involved in making historical and institutional comparisons
Counts toward Counts toward Education
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

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PSYC B209 Abnormal Psychology
Spring 2019
This course examines the experience, origins and consequences of psychological difficulties and problems. Among the questions we will explore are: What do we mean by abnormal behavior or psychopathology? What are the strengths and limitations of the ways in which psychopathology is assessed and classified? What are the major forms of psychopathology? How do psychologists study and treat psychopathology? How is psychopathology experienced by individuals? What causes psychological difficulties and what are their consequences? How do we integrate social, biological and psychological perspectives on the causes of psychopathology? Do psychological treatments (therapies) work? How do we study the effectiveness of psychology treatments? Prerequisite: Introductory Psychology (PSYC B105 or H100).
Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Health Studies

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PSYC B231 Health Psychology
Fall 2018
This course will provide an overview of the field of health psychology using lecture, exams, videos, assignments, and an article critique. We will examine the current definition of health psychology, as well as the theories and research behind many areas in health psychology (both historical and contemporary). The course will focus on specific health and social psychological theories, empirical research, and applying the theory and research to real world situations. Prerequisite: Introductory Psychology (PSYC B105) or Foundations of Psychology (PSYC H100)
Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Health Studies
Counts toward Museum Studies

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PSYC B260 The Psychology of Mindfulness
Not offered 2018-19
This course focuses on psychological theory and research on mindfulness and meditative practices. Readings and discussion will introduce students to modern conceptualizations and implementation of mindfulness practices that have arisen in the West. Students will be encouraged to engage in mindfulness activities as part of their involvement in this course.
Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Health Studies

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PSYC B303 Portraits of Maladjustment in Classic Children's Novels
Not offered 2018-19
This writing-intensive seminar (maximum enrollment = 16 students) .5 unit course deals with critical analysis of how various forms of psychological maladjustment and health are depicted in selected classic novels for children. Many such novels were written in the Victorian period. Long before developmental psychopathology was a scientific discipline, its main questions were insightfully probed by 19th and early 20th century novelists in books such as "The Secret Garden." In this course, each book will be analyzed for the literary devices used to portray healthy adjustment and maladjustment, the implicit theories of psychological causation captured in the narratives, and the ways the novelist depicts life experiences that bring about mental health and personal growth. Each book will be discussed in its historical/literary contexts, and compared with current views drawn from psychological research. The course integrates literary analysis of classic children's novels with important concepts derived from the field of developmental psychopathology.
Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Health Studies

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PSYC B314 Advanced Data Science:Regression & Multivariate Statistics
Not offered 2018-19
This course is designed to improve your data science skills by introducing you to advanced statistical techniques that have become increasingly important in psychology and a variety of fields. The focus will be on understanding the advantages and limitations of regression approaches and multivariate analytic techniques that permit simultaneous prediction of multiple outcomes. Topics covered will include basic regression approaches, advanced regression strategies, structural equation modeling, factor analysis, measurement models, path modeling, modeling of longitudinal data sets, multilevel modeling approaches and growth curve modeling. Students will gain familiarity with these techniques by working with actual data sets. Prerequisites: Required: PSYCH Research Methods and Statistics 205 (BMC), Psych 200 (HC) Experimental Methods and Statistics, or BIOL B215 Experimental Design and Statistics. Students with good statistical preparation in math or other disciplines and some knowledge of core methods used in social science or health-related research should consult with the instructor to gain permission to take the class.
Counts toward Health Studies

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PSYC B327 Adolescent Development
Not offered 2018-19
Is adolescence a biologically distinct stage of life, or a social "holding ground" invented by modern culture for young people unready or unwilling to assume the responsibilities of adulthood? Are adolescents destined to make risky decisions because of their underdeveloped brains? At what age should they be held accountable as adults in a court of law? This course will explore these and other questions about the biological, social, and legal forces that define the boundaries and shape the experience of adolescents growing up in the modern world. Students will learn about: (1) historical changes in understanding and treatment of adolescents; (2) puberty-related biological changes marking the beginning of adolescence; (3) brain, behavioral, cognitive, and social development during adolescence; and (4) contemporary debates regarding age of adult maturity, and their implications for law and policy. Prerequisite: PSYC B206 (Developmental Psychology) or permission or instructor. PSYC B205 is recommended.
Counts toward Health Studies

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PSYC B331 Health Behavior and Context
Spring 2019
This seminar will be devoted to a discussion of theory and research in health psychology. We will investigate both historical and contemporary perspectives on the psychology of wellness and illness. We will begin with a consideration of how psychosocial forces influence health cognitions, behaviors, and physiological processes. The second half of the course will focus on contextual factors, interventions, and emerging topics in research. We will debate the question of whether/how psychological forces influence health outcomes. Prerequisite: PSYC B105 and PSYC B231 or PSYC B208, or by permission of the instructor.
Counts toward Health Studies

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PSYC B351 Developmental Psychopathology
Not offered 2018-19
This course will examine emotional and behavioral disorders of children and adolescents, including autism, attention deficit disorder, conduct disorder, phobias, obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression, anorexia, and schizophrenia. Major topics covered will include: contrasting models of psychopathology; empirical and categorical approaches to assessment and diagnosis; outcome of childhood disorders; risk, resilience, and prevention; and therapeutic approaches and their efficacy .Prerequisite: PSYC 206 or 209.
Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Health Studies
Counts toward Neuroscience

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PSYC B395 Psychopharmacology
Not offered 2018-19
A study of the role of drugs in understanding basic brain-behavior relations. Topics include the pharmacological basis of motivation and emotion; pharmacological models of psychopathology; the use of drugs in the treatment of psychiatric disorders such as anxiety, depression, and psychosis; and the psychology and pharmacology of drug addiction. Prerequisite: PSYC B218 or BIOL B202 or PSYC H217 or permission of instructor.
Counts toward Health Studies
Counts toward Neuroscience

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SOCL B248 Sociology of Bioethics
Not offered 2018-19
This course is a study of the field of bioethics using the tools of sociology. The study of bioethics as a discipline and as a profession will be explored by addressing a series of topics that have been prominent in the field. We will use sociological concepts and theory to investigate American bioethics, rather than conduct a study of the merits of the debates themselves. This approach will consider the cultural, social, political, and symbolic meanings of these bioethical issues. We will address questions about the stakeholders in the debates, the timing of the debates, the rise and fall of certain issues, and the charismatic influence of key players. A key component in the readings will be the connections to bio-medicine and issues of treatment versus enhancement. Readings will be drawn from philosophy, bioethics, sociology, feminist studies, and sociology of medicine. Suggested: One course in the social social sciences and freshman students require permission from the instructor.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Health Studies

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SOCL B304 Sociology of Medicine
Not offered 2018-19
This course is an introduction to major topics in the sociology of medicine, with an emphasis on current American medical practice. A primary aim of the course is to use a sociological perspective to investigate our shared/contested understandings of illness and health, as well as the evolving medical responses to these human conditions. We will discuss the structure of the medical professions, social organization of hospitals, social and cultural influences on doctor-patient communication and decision-making, and the history and social context of bioethics. The course will trace the influence of race, gender and economics on healthcare as we explore issues of legitimacy, training, professional socialization, patient autonomy, and barriers to access and provision of health services. Prerequisite: One sociology course.
Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Health Studies

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SOCL B317 Comparative Social Policy: Cuba, China, US, Scandinavia
Fall 2018
This course will examine different countries' policy choices to address different societal challenges. Four societal types - socialist (Cuba), post-socialist (China), capitalist (US), and social-democratic (Scandinavia) - will be studies to help us understand how these different kinds of societies conceive of social problems and propose and implement attempted solutions. We will examine particular problems/solutions in four domains: health/sports; education; environment; technological development. As we explore these domains, we will attend to methodological issues involved in making historical and institutional comparisons
Counts toward Education
Counts toward Health Studies

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SOCL B326 Feminist Perspectives on Hlth
Not offered 2018-19
Increasingly, an individual's sense of self and worth as a citizen turn on their health identity. In this course we will draw on theories of gender, sexuality, medicalization, and biocitizenship to unravel the ways in which gender structures and medical institutions are mutually constitutive and to explore how this relationship, in turn, impacts individual identity. The course will take a global approach to feminist engagement with health issues with an emphasis on human rights and bodily autonomy.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Health Studies

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SOCL B342 Bodies in Social Life
Fall 2018
Can social life exist without bodies? How can attention to the body influence our understanding of social processes of subjectivity, interaction, and practice? While the body has long been an "absent presence" in sociology, multiple approaches to theorizing and researching the body have emerged in recent decades. A sociological approach to the body and embodiment provides an opportunity to bridge the gap between everyday experience and analyses of broad social structures which can seem disconnected from daily life. In this course, we will examine the processes by which individual bodies are shaped by and, in turn, shape social life. Key questions to be explored include: how are bodies regulated by social forces; how do individuals perform the body and how does interactional context influence this performance; what is the meaning of the body in social life; and is there a "right" body? Suggested preparation: At least one course in the social sciences.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Health Studies

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 B554 The Social Determinants of Health and Health Equity

This main purpose of this course is to provide students with knowledge and an understanding of how structural factors (racism, sexism, homophobia, classism, discrimination, the built environment, poverty, working conditions, and the unequal distribution of power, income, goods, and services) contribute to racial/ ethnic and gender disparities in health and well-being. "These inequities in health, avoidable health inequalities, arise because of the circumstances in which people grow, live, work, and age, and the systems put in place to deal with illness. The conditions in which people live and die are, in turn, shaped by political, social, and economic forces" (World Health Organization, Commission on Social Determinants of Health, 2008, Executive Summary). You will learn about the most recent findings, while critically examining the health disparities literature, debate the causes and consequences of social inequalities in health and the differential assumptions underlying various explanatory paradigms, and engage in meaningful dialogue regarding the processes through which these disparities in health occur. You will also analyze and discuss the strategies, policies, interventions and programs, across the whole of society, that have been designed to address the social determinants of health and improve health equity. Taking action to tackle these inequities - the huge and remediable differences in health between and within countries - is a matter of social justice.The recently released Institute of Medicine Report clearly documented the relationship between racial and ethnic disparities in health status and health care. In the report, David Williams and others set out the multidimensional nature of the problem between health disparities and health care, linking both to a myriad of conditions within the greater society. They noted that the reasons for health status disparities were complex and that in situations where individual risks were pronounced; those individual risks were also confounded by socioeconomic position and environmental health conditions. These and other risks factors associated with health and poor health, illustrate that racial and ethnic disparities in health status largely reflect differences in social, socioeconomic, and behavioral risk factors and environmental living conditions. (House and Williams, 2000 in Unequal Treatment: Confronting Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care, 2002, pp. 30). Healthcare is therefore necessary but insufficient in and of itself to redress racial and ethnic disparities in health status (Williams, 1999 in Unequal Treatment: Confronting Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care, 2002, pp. 30).
Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Health Studies

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