This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's master calendar.

Fall 2018

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
INST B398-001Senior SeminarSemester / 1Lecture: 12:10 PM- 2:00 PM MDept. staff, TBA
INST B403-001Supervised WorkSemester / 1Dept. staff, TBA
ANTH B294-001Culture, Power, and PoliticsSemester / 1Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MWFioratta,S.
ECON B225-001Economic DevelopmentSemester / 1Lecture: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTHRock,M.
ECON B385-001Democracy and DevelopmentSemester / 1Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHRock,M.
GERM B231-001Cultural Profiles in Modern ExileSemester / 1Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MWSeyhan,A.
HIST B200-001The Atlantic World 1492-1800Semester / 1Lecture: 11:40 AM- 1:00 PM MWGallup-Diaz,I.
HIST B237-001Themes in Modern African History: Public History in AfricaSemester / 1Lecture: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTHNgalamulume,K.
POLS B141-001Introduction to International PoliticsSemester / 1Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHAllen,M.
POLS B391-001International Political EconomySemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM WAllen,M.
SOCL B102-001Society, Culture, and the IndividualSemester / 1Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MWPinto-Coelho,J.
SOCL B317-001Comparative Social Policy: Cuba, China, US, ScandinaviaSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM MDalton Hall 10Karen,D.

Spring 2019

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
ANTH B102-001Introduction to Cultural AnthropologySemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWPashigian,M.
ANTH B102-002Introduction to Cultural AnthropologySemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHFioratta,S.
ANTH B301-001Anthropology of GlobalizationSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 3:30 PM WFioratta,S.
PHIL B221-001EthicsSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWInterim,R.
PHIL B225-001Global Ethical IssuesSemester / 1Lecture: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTHFugo,J.
POLS B241-001The Politics of International Law and InstitutionsSemester / 1Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTHAllen,M.
POLS B249-001Politics of Economic DevelopmentSemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHOh,S.

Fall 2019

(Class schedules for this semester will be posted at a later date.)

2018-19 Catalog Data

INST B398 Senior Seminar
This non-thesis capstone course is a seminar in which students do research, presentations and a final essay. These delve into topics from relevant courses in previously-taken tracks and may incorporate experiences from Praxis, Summer, or Study Abroad.
Counts toward International Studies

Back to top

INST B399 Senior Project in International Studies
This involves the writing of a thesis or the production of an extended document on platforms such as a DVD or a website with the guidance of a designated adviser in International Studies.
Counts toward International Studies

Back to top

INST B403 Supervised Work

Back to top

ANTH B102 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Spring 2019
An introduction to the methods and theories of cultural anthropology in order to understand and explain cultural similarities and differences among contemporary societies.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

Back to top

ANTH B294 Culture, Power, and Politics
Fall 2018
What do a country's national politics have to do with culture? Likewise, how are politics hidden below the surface of our everyday social lives? This course explores questions like these through anthropological approaches. Drawing on both classic and contemporary ethnographic studies from the U.S. and around the world, we will examine how social and cultural frameworks help us understand politics in new ways. We will investigate how people perceive the meanings and effects of the state; how nationalism and citizenship shape belonging on the one hand, and exclusion on the other; how understandings of gender, race, and difference converge with political action, ideology, and power; and how politics infuse everyday spaces including schools, businesses, homes, and even the dinner table. Prerequisite: ANTH B102, H103 or permission of the instructor.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

Back to top

ANTH B301 Anthropology of Globalization
Spring 2019
This class explores globalization from an anthropological perspective. With a focus on the social, cultural, and historical aspects of global connections, we seek to understand how the growing integration of different places and systems around the world shapes everyday life experience. Conversely, we also explore how individuals actively engage with, and sometimes help shape, dynamic global processes. Questioning assumptions that link globalization with worldwide cultural and economic homogeneity, we will examine how gender, race, class, and other structures of difference and inequality become meaningful within a global systems of power. Working through a series of ethnographic analyses and conducting our own research, we will gain a better understanding of how people around the world experience and actively make "the global." Prerequisite: ANTH B102, ANTH H103 or permission of the instructor.
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

Back to top

ANTH B334 Digital Cultures
Not offered 2018-19
How do we do anthropology in, and of, the digital age? What does it mean to do ethnography of digital spaces, when we, as humans, exist simultaneously in overlapping virtual and actual worlds? Specific topics to be covered include surveillance, telecommunications infrastructures, activism, social movements, gender and sexuality, disability, space and place, and virtual ethnography. Prerequisite: Anth B102 or Anth H103 or permission of instructor.
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

ANTH B354 Political Economy, Gender, Ethnicity and Transformation in Vietnam
Not offered 2018-19
Today, Vietnam is in the midst of dramatic social, economic and political changes brought about through a shift from a central economy to a market/capitalist economy since the late 1980s. These changes have resulted in urbanization, a rise in consumption and shifts in social and economic relationships and cultural practices as the country has moved from low income to middle income status. This course examines culture and society in Vietnam focusing largely on contemporary Vietnam, but with a view to continuities and historical precedent in past centuries. In this course, we will draw on anthropological studies of Vietnam, as well as literature and historical studies. Relationships between the individual, family, gender, ethnicity, community and state will pervade the topics addressed in the course, as will the importance of political economy, nation, and globalization. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher.
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

Back to top

COML B293 The Play of Interpretation
Not offered 2018-19
Designated theory course. A study of the methodologies and regimes of interpretation in the arts, humanistic sciences, and media and cultural studies, this course focuses on common problems of text, authorship, reader/spectator, and translation in their historical and formal contexts. Literary, oral, and visual texts from different cultural traditions and histories will be studied through interpretive approaches informed by modern critical theories. Readings in literature, philosophy, popular culture, and film will illustrate how theory enhances our understanding of the complexities of history, memory, identity, and the trials of modernity.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

Back to top

EALC B353 The Environment on China's Frontiers
Not offered 2018-19
This seminar explores environmental issues on China's frontiers from a historical perspective. It focuses on the particular relationship between the environment and the frontier, examining how these two variables have interacted. The course will deal with the issues such as the relationship between the environment and human ethnic and cultural traditions, social movements, economic growth, political and legal institutions and practices, and changing perceptions. The frontier regions under discussion include Tibet, Xinjiang, Inner Mongolia, and the southwestern ethnic areas, which are all important in defining what China is and who the Chinese are.

Back to top

ECON B225 Economic Development
Fall 2018
Examination of the issues related to and the policies designed to promote economic development in the developing economies of Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East. Focus is on why some developing economies grow faster than others and why some growth paths are more equitable, poverty reducing, and environmentally sustainable than others. Includes consideration of the impact of international trade and investment policy, macroeconomic policies (exchange rate, monetary and fiscal policy) and sector policies (industry, agriculture, education, population, and environment) on development outcomes in a wide range of political and institutional contexts. Prerequisite: ECON B105.
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

Back to top

ECON B236 The Economics of Globalization
Not offered 2018-19
An introduction to international economics through theory, policy issues, and problems. The course surveys international trade and finance, as well as topics in international economics. It investigates why and what a nation trades, the consequences of such trade, the role of trade policy, the behavior and effects of exchange rates, and the macroeconomic implications of trade and capital flows. Topics may include the economics of free trade areas, world financial crises, outsourcing, immigration, and foreign investment. Prerequisites: ECON B105. The course is not open to students who have taken ECON B316 or B348.
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

Back to top

ECON B385 Democracy and Development
Fall 2018
From 1974 to the late 1990's the number of democracies grew from 39 to 117. This "third wave," the collapse of communism and developmental successes in East Asia have led some to argue the triumph of democracy and markets. Since the late 1990's, democracy's third wave has stalled, and some fear a reverse wave and democratic breakdowns. We will question this phenomenon through the disciplines of economics, history, political science and sociology drawing from theoretical, case study and classical literature. Prerequisites: ECON 200; ECON 253 or 304; and one course in Political Science OR Junior or Senior Standing in Political Science OR Permission of the Instructor.
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Peace, Justice and Human Rights

Back to top

GERM B231 Cultural Profiles in Modern Exile
Fall 2018
This course investigates the anthropological, philosophical, psychological, cultural, and literary aspects of modern exile. It studies exile as experience and metaphor in the context of modernity, and examines the structure of the relationship between imagined/remembered homelands and transnational identities, and the dialectics of language loss and bi- and multi-lingualism. Particular attention is given to the psychocultural dimensions of linguistic exclusion and loss. Readings of works by Julia Alvarez, Albert Camus, Ana Castillo, Sigmund Freud, Eva Hoffman, Maxine Hong Kingston, Milan Kundera, Friedrich Nietzsche, Salman Rushdie, W. G. Sebald, Kurban Said, and others.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

Back to top

GNST B245 Introduction to Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Not offered 2018-19
A broad, interdisciplinary survey of themes uniting and dividing societies from the Iberian Peninsula to the Americas. The class introduces the methods and interests of all departments in the concentration, posing problems of cultural continuity and change, globalization and struggles within dynamic histories, political economies, and creative expressions. Course is taught in English.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

Back to top

HIST B200 The Atlantic World 1492-1800
Fall 2018
The aim of this course is to provide an understanding of the way in which peoples, goods, and ideas from Africa, Europe. and the Americas came together to form an interconnected Atlantic World system. The course is designed to chart the manner in which an integrated system was created in the Americas in the early modern period, rather than to treat the history of the Atlantic World as nothing more than an expanded version of North American, Caribbean, or Latin American history.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

Back to top

HIST B237 Themes in Modern African History
Section 001 (Spring 2018): African Economic Development
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Public History in Africa
Section 001 (Fall 2017): Urban History
Fall 2018
This is a topics course. Course content varies
Current topic description:The course will explore the colonial and postcolonial practices in public history. It will address the following question: in an age of "fake news" and "history wars", how can we understand the relationship between the public and the place of the past? Topics will include exhibitions; museum practices and colonial outlooks; commemorations and identities; monuments; film, popular history and memory; heritage and regeneration; oral history and public engagement; and public policy. We will also discuss ongoing inter-sectional and interdisciplinary decolonizing approaches to breaking received hierarchies and narratives. The course will also introduce students to the multi-faceted method of public history - in theory, application, and critique.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

HIST B258 British Empire: Imagining Indias
Not offered 2018-19
This course considers ideas about and experiences of "modern" India, i.e., India during the colonial and post-Independence periods (roughly 1757-present). While "India" and "Indian history" along with "British empire" and "British history" will be the ostensible objects of our consideration and discussions, the course proposes that their imagination and meanings are continually mediated by a wide variety of institutions, agents, and analytical categories (nation, religion, class, race, gender, to name a few examples). The course uses primary sources, scholarly analyses, and cultural productions to explore the political economies of knowledge, representation, and power in the production of modernity.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

Back to top

ITAL B212 Italy today: Migration Studies
Not offered 2018-19
There are numerous economic, political, and cultural elements that encumber on the existential condition of the migrant. In political and ideological parlance the term migrant has come to mean poor, needy, precarious, unhappy, primitive, and even criminal. In Italy, furthermore, the colonial past has been foreclosed, leading to a strengthening of stereotypes that continue to populate the discourse on migration. In this course we will examine issues related to migration, such as colonialism. racism, gender relations, discrimination, identity and difference and how they re-present new forms of multicultural and contaminated life and their impact on geography, security, identity, and belonging. . Is multiculturalism the answer to all the problems? Does it resolve the problem of closed communities so eloquently discussed by Bauman? With the help of Italian cinema of migration and selected critical articles we will discuss different positions and follow the migrants as they cross desert and sea to reach the European metropolis. From Libya to Lampedusa, from the Balkans to Puglia, and from there to the Roman peripheries, to the center of the city.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

PHIL B221 Ethics
Spring 2019
An introduction to ethics by way of an examination of moral theories and a discussion of important ancient, modern, and contemporary texts which established theories such as virtue ethics, deontology, utilitarianism, relativism, emotivism, care ethics. This course considers questions concerning freedom, responsibility, and obligation. How should we live our lives and interact with others? How should we think about ethics in a global context? Is ethics independent of culture? A variety of practical issues such as reproductive rights, euthanasia, animal rights and the environment will be considered.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

Back to top

PHIL B225 Global Ethical Issues
Spring 2019
The need for a critical analysis of what justice is and requires has become urgent in a context of increasing globalization, the emergence of new forms of conflict and war, high rates of poverty within and across borders and the prospect of environmental devastation. This course examines prevailing theories and issues of justice as well as approaches and challenges by non-western, post-colonial, feminist, race, class, and disability theorists.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

Back to top

POLS B141 Introduction to International Politics
Fall 2018
An introduction to international relations, exploring its main subdivisions and theoretical approaches. Phenomena and problems in world politics examined include systems of power management, imperialism, globalization, war, bargaining, and peace. Problems and institutions of international economy and international law are also addressed. This course assumes a reasonable knowledge of modern world history.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Peace, Justice and Human Rights

Back to top

POLS B228 Introduction to Political Philosophy: Ancient and Early Modern
Not offered 2018-19
An introduction to the fundamental problems of political philosophy, especially the relationship between political life and the human good or goods. Readings from Herodotus, Thucydides, Plato, Aristotle, Polybius, Cicero, Epictetus, Machiavelli, and others.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

Back to top

POLS B241 The Politics of International Law and Institutions
Spring 2019
An introduction to international law, which assumes a working knowledge of modern world history and politics since World War II. The origins of modern international legal norms in philosophy and political necessity are explored, showing the schools of thought to which the understandings of these origins give rise. Significant cases are used to illustrate various principles and problems. Prerequisite: POLS B250.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

Back to top

POLS B249 Politics of Economic Development
Spring 2019
How do we explain the variations of political and economic systems in the world? What is the relationship between the state and the market? To what extent does the timing of industrialization affect the viability of certain developmental strategies? This seminar introduces the intellectual history of comparative political economy and development studies with readings on both comparative political economy and international political economy. First, we will examine the debates on the dynamics of the state and the market in the development and globalization process. Second, we will explore specific case studies to discuss: 1) how the political and economic processes have changed in response to the interaction of the domestic and international arenas, 2) whether and how the late developers learned from the experiences of early developers, 3) how the international economy and international financial crisis shaped domestic development strategies. Lastly, we will analyze the developmental concerns at the sub-national level with financial liberalization. Prerequisite: Freshman can enroll after they have taken 100 level courses in social science and after getting instructor permission.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

Back to top

POLS B391 International Political Economy
Fall 2018
This seminar examines the growing importance of economic issues in world politics and traces the development of the modern world economy from its origins in colonialism and the industrial revolution, through to the globalization of recent decades. Major paradigms in political economy are critically examined. Aspects of and issues in international economic relations such as development, finance, trade, migration, and foreign investment are examined in the light of selected approaches. This course is open to all students who have the prerequisites. It also serves as a thesis prep course for political science seniors. Prerequisite: One course in International Politics or Economics is required. Preference is given to seniors although juniors are accepted.
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

Back to top

RUSS B209 Russia and the East: Siberia in Russian Culture
Not offered 2018-19
"We are Asians!," famously declared the Russian poet Aleksandr Blok in 1918. Russian culture has long celebrated the nation's close ties to the east as well as its ancient eastern heritage. From the time of Genghis Khan and the Mongolian yoke's invasion of Kievan Rus' in the 13th century to the present day and Vladimir Putin's ongoing geopolitical pivot to the east, Russia has grappled with its eastern roots, its vast eastern expanse, and Sino-Russian relations. This course will explore a wide variety of cultural manifestations of Russia's eastern orientation: Russian philosophy at the turn into the 20th century that emphasized Russia's eastern, mystical focus; Russian symbolist poetry and prose that amplified Russia's ties to the East; silent cinema of the 1920s that linked revolution to the East; non-fiction accounts of penal colonies and work camps scattered throughout Siberia (with particular emphasis on the work of Chekhov, Solzhenitsyn, Shalamov); late Soviet fiction probing life in rural Siberia; and contemporary Russian fiction that revisits Russia's eastern mysticism. Exploring Russia's ties to the East from a variety of historical, artistic, and social perspectives, this course aims to explore Russian culture's Eurasian essence.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

Back to top

SOCL B102 Society, Culture, and the Individual
Fall 2018
Analysis of the basic sociological methods, perspectives, and concepts used in the study of society, with emphasis on social structure, education, culture, the self, and power. Theoretical perspectives that focus on sources of stability, conflict, and change are emphasized throughout.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

Back to top

SOCL B218 Sociology of International Development
Not offered 2018-19
This course examines the persistent gap between the Global North and Global South around problems such as poverty, food insecurity, and access to health and education. We will examine theories and perspectives that address this disparity and explore alternatives to Western models of social organization, as put forth by social movements in the Global South. Throughout the course, we will read key primary texts (manifestos, communiqués, oral histories, and world financial institution reports) to understand the role of different players in the international development field, including global economic and governance institutions, non-governmental organizations, and--most importantly--feminist, afro-descendant, indigenous, and other voices emerging in the Global South.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Back to top

SOCL B317 Comparative Social Policy: Cuba, China, US, Scandinavia
Fall 2018
This course will examine different countries' policy choices to address different societal challenges. Four societal types - socialist (Cuba), post-socialist (China), capitalist (US), and social-democratic (Scandinavia) - will be studies to help us understand how these different kinds of societies conceive of social problems and propose and implement attempted solutions. We will examine particular problems/solutions in four domains: health/sports; education; environment; technological development. As we explore these domains, we will attend to methodological issues involved in making historical and institutional comparisons
Counts toward Counts toward Education
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

Back to top