This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's calendars page.

Fall 2018

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
ITAL B001-001Elementary ItalianSemester / 1Lecture: 9:10 AM-10:00 AM MWFOld Library 111Pisone,P., Pisone,P., Troncelliti,G., Troncelliti,G.
Lecture: 8:55 AM- 9:45 AM TTHOld Library 111
ITAL B001-002Elementary ItalianSemester / 1Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:00 AM MWFOld Library 111Giammei,A., Giammei,A., Troncelliti,G.
Lecture: 9:55 AM-10:45 AM TTHOld Library 111
ITAL B101-001Intermediate ItalianSemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHCarpenter Library 13Ricci,R.
ITAL B213-001Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities: Critical TheoriesSemester / 1Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MWOld Library 251Giammei,A.
ITAL B301-001DanteSemester / 1Lecture: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM TCarpenter Library 13Ricci,R.
ITAL B398-001Senior SeminarSemester / 1
ITAL B403-001Supervised WorkSemester / 1Dept. staff, TBA
ITAL B403-001Supervised WorkSemester / 1Dept. staff, TBA

Spring 2019

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
ITAL B002-001Elementary Italian IISemester / 1Lecture: 9:10 AM-10:00 AM MWFBenini,S., Troncelliti,G.
Lecture: 8:55 AM- 9:45 AM TTH
ITAL B002-002Elementary Italian IISemester / 1Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:00 AM MWFGiammei,A., Troncelliti,G.
Lecture: 9:55 AM-10:45 AM TTH
ITAL B102-001Intermediate Italian IISemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHBenini,S.
ITAL B229-001The Politics of Food in Italian Literature, Culture, and CinemaSemester / 1Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHBenini,S.
ITAL B308-001Rome as Palimpsests: from Ruins to Virtual RealitySemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM WGiammei,A.
ITAL B399-001Senior ConferenceSemester / 1
ITAL B403-001Supervised WorkSemester / 1Dept. staff, TBA
ITAL B403-001Supervised WorkSemester / 1Dept. staff, TBA

Fall 2019

(Class schedules for this semester will be posted at a later date.)

2018-19 Catalog Data

ITAL B001 Elementary Italian
Fall 2018
The course is for students with no previous knowledge of Italian. It aims at giving the students a complete foundation in the Italian language, with particular attention to oral and written communication. The course will be conducted in Italian and will involve the study of all the basic structures of the language--phonological, grammatical, syntactical--with practice in conversation, reading, composition. Readings are chosen from a wide range of texts, while use of the language is encouraged through role-play, debates, songs, and creative composition
Course does not meet an Approach

Back to top

ITAL B002 Elementary Italian II
Spring 2019
This course is the continuation of ITAL B001 and is intended for students who have started studying Italian the semester before. It aims at giving the students a complete foundation in the Italian language, with particular attention to oral and written communication. The course will be conducted in Italian and will involve the study of all the basic structures of the language--phonological, grammatical, syntactical--with practice in conversation, reading, composition. Readings are chosen from a wide range of texts, while use of the language is encouraged through role-play, debates, songs, and creative composition. Prerequisite: ITAL B001 or placement.
Course does not meet an Approach

Back to top

ITAL B101 Intermediate Italian
Fall 2018
This course provides students with a broader basis for learning to communicate effectively and accurately in Italian. While the principal aspect of the course is to further develop language abilities, the course also imparts a foundation for the understanding of modern and contemporary Italy. Students will gain an appreciation for Italian culture and be able to communicate orally and in writing in a wide variety of topics. We will read newspaper and magazine articles to analyze aspects on modern and contemporary Italy. We will also view and discuss Italian films and internet materials.
Course does not meet an Approach

Back to top

ITAL B102 Intermediate Italian II
Spring 2019
This course provides students with a broader basis for learning to communicate effectively and accurately in Italian. While the principal aspect of the course is to further develop language abilities, the course also imparts a foundation for the understanding of modern and contemporary Italy. Students will gain an appreciation for Italian culture and be able to communicate orally and in writing in a wide variety of topics. We will read a novel to analyze aspects on modern and contemporary Italy. We will also view and discuss Italian films and internet materials. Prerequisite: ITAL B101 or placement.
Course does not meet an Approach

Back to top

ITAL B200 Pathways to Proficiency
Not offered 2018-19
This course is intended for students who have already completed the elementary-intermediate sequence and who are interested in pursuing the study of Italian. The aim of the course is to improve students' proficiency in the Italian language, so that they will be able to take more advanced courses in Italian literature and cultural studies. The focus of this course is to expose students to crucial issues that have influenced Italian culture and society, concurring to develop distinctive ways of thinking, cultural artifacts (literary works, music, works of art, and so on), and that are at the core of contemporary Italian society. Prerequisite: ITAL102 or placement.

Back to top

ITAL B211 Primo Levi, the Holocaust, and Its Aftermath
Not offered 2018-19
A consideration, through analysis and appreciation of his major works, of how the horrific experience of the Holocaust awakened in Primo Levi a growing awareness of his Jewish heritage and led him to become one of the dominant voices of that tragic historical event, as well as one of the most original new literary figures of post-World War II Italy. Always in relation to Levi and his works, attention will also be given to Italian women writers whose works are also connected with the Holocaust. Course is taught in English. An extra hour will be scheduled for those students taking the course for Italian or Romance Languages credit.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Back to top

ITAL B212 Italy today: Migration Studies
Not offered 2018-19
There are numerous economic, political, and cultural elements that encumber on the existential condition of the migrant. In political and ideological parlance the term migrant has come to mean poor, needy, precarious, unhappy, primitive, and even criminal. In Italy, furthermore, the colonial past has been foreclosed, leading to a strengthening of stereotypes that continue to populate the discourse on migration. In this course we will examine issues related to migration, such as colonialism. racism, gender relations, discrimination, identity and difference and how they re-present new forms of multicultural and contaminated life and their impact on geography, security, identity, and belonging. . Is multiculturalism the answer to all the problems? Does it resolve the problem of closed communities so eloquently discussed by Bauman? With the help of Italian cinema of migration and selected critical articles we will discuss different positions and follow the migrants as they cross desert and sea to reach the European metropolis. From Libya to Lampedusa, from the Balkans to Puglia, and from there to the Roman peripheries, to the center of the city.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

ITAL B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Critical Theories
Fall 2018
What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.
Current topic description: What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.

Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

ITAL B214 The Myth of Venice (1800-2000)
Not offered 2018-19
In English. The Republic of Venice existed for over a millennium. This course begins in the year 1797 at the end of the Republic and the emerging of an extensive body of literature centered on Venice and its mythical facets. Readings will include the Romantic views of Venice (excerpts from Lord Byron, Fredrick Schiller, Wolfang von Goethe, Ugo Foscolo, Alessandro Manzoni) and the 20th century reshaping of the literary myth (readings from Thomas Mann, Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, Gabriele D'Annunzio, Henry James, and others). A journey into this fascinating tradition will shed light on how the literary and visual representation of Venice, rather than focusing on a nostalgic evocation of the death of the Republic, became a territory of exploration for literary modernity. The course is offered in English; all texts are provided in translation. One additional hour for students who want Italian credit. Suggested Preparation: Counts toward Comp Lit. Counts toward Film Studies.
Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

ITAL B229 The Politics of Food in Italian Literature, Culture, and Cinema
Spring 2019
In English. A profile of Italian literature/culture/cinema obtained through an analysis of gastronomic documents, films, literary texts, and magazines. We will also include a discussion of the Slow Food Revolution, a movement initiated in Italy in 1980 and now with a world-wide following, and its social, economic, ecological, aesthetic, and cultural impact to counteract fast food and to promote local food traditions. Course taught in English. One additional hour for students who want Italian credit.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

ITAL B235 Scrittrici e registe italiane: Heroines In and Out of the Canon
Not offered 2018-19
Emphasis will be put on Italian women writers and film directors, who are often left out of syllabi adhering to traditional canons. Particular attention will be paid to: a) women writers who have found their voices (through writing) as a means of psychological survival in a patriarchal world; b) women engaged in the women's movement of the 70's and who continue to look at, and rewrite, women's stories of empowerment and solidarity; c) "divaism", fame, via beauty and sex with a particular emphasis on the '60s (i.e. Gina Lollobrigida, Sofia Loren, Claudia Cardinale). Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies; Counts toward Film Studies.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Back to top

ITAL B255 Uomini d'onore in Sicilia: Italian Mafia in Literature and Cinema
Not offered 2018-19
This course aims to explore representations of Mafia figures in Italian literature and cinema, starting from the 'classical' example of Sicily. From Sicily, the "octopus" (piovra), as the Mafia is called in Italy, has spread throughout Italy, and has pervaded almost every facet of Italian life, including cultural life. The course will introduce students to both Italian Studies from an interdisciplinary prospective and also to narrative, using fiction and non-fiction texts written by 19th, 20th, and 21st century writers. Novels, films, testimonies and TV series will offer different representations of the Mafia: its ethics, its relation with politics, religion and business, its ideas of friendship, family, masculinity and femininity. Internships in Italy will be available connected with this course. Course is taught in Italian. Prerequisite: ITAL B102 or permission of the instructor.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

ITAL B301 Dante
Fall 2018
A reading of the Vita Nuova (Poems of Youth) and The Divine Comedy: Hell, Purgatory and Paradise in order to discover the subtle nuances of meaning in the text and to introduce students to Dante's tripartite vision of the afterlife. Dante's masterpiece lends itself to study from various perspectives: theological, philosophical, political, allegorical, historical, cultural, and literary. Personal journey, civic responsibilities, love, genre, governmental accountability, church-state relations, the tenuous balance between freedom of expression and censorship--these are some of the themes that will frame the discussions. One additional hour for students who want Italian credit. Prerequisite: At least two 200-level literature courses.

Back to top

ITAL B306 Youth in 20th Century Italian Literature and Cinema
Not offered 2018-19
This interdisciplinary course focuses on literary texts and visual material dealing with youth and youth culture in post-fascist Italy. How is youth described in Italian culture after WWII? What does youth represent in the Italian imagination of 20th century Italy? Which language is used by the youth? While the focus in analyzing the challenges faced by youth is primarily on literature and film studies, throughout the semester the course will also touch upon sociological, cultural, and anthropological perspectives concerning the role of the family, peer relationships, prostitution, drugs, criminality and violence, diversity, gender identity, and sexuality. Students will be required to attend film screenings or view films on their own devices. Prerequisite: One literature course at the 200 level. or permission by the instructor.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

ITAL B307 Insiders and Outsiders: Otherness in Italian Literature
Not offered 2018-19
This course will introduce students to the most representative works in Italian literature of all genres --poetry, novels, scientific prose, theater, diaries, narrative, epistolary--throughout the centuries, with emphasis on marginalization, exile, political persecution, national identity, violence, and otherness. We will bring works of literature to the attention of students who are interested in the key role played by Italian culture in the development of a European civilization, including the international debate on modernity and post-modernity. Readings and lectures will move from 14th century writers (Dante, Boccaccio) to Humanistic Thought (Florentine political revolution) and the Renaissance (Machiavelli); from the Enlightenment (Foscolo, Leopardi, Manzoni) to modernity (Pirandello, Svevo) and post-modernism (Calvino). Prerequisite: One literature course at the 200 level. or permission by the instructor.
Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

ITAL B308 Rome as Palimpsests: from Ruins to Virtual Reality
Spring 2019
From the urban dream that Raphael confessed to pope Leo X in the middle of the Renaissance to the parkour on the top of the Colosseum in the Assassin's Creed videogames, Rome has always been both a memory and a vision: a place of nostalgia and endless potential. In this course we will investigate some crucial places, moments, and ideas in the modern history of this ancient capital of Western culture: XVI century Mannerist painting and the Pop Art of Piazza del Popolo, the early modern re-uses of the Colosseum and its cubic clone designed under fascism, the narrations of Romantic grand-tours and the ones of contemporary postcolonial authors. We will adopt a trans-historical and inter-disciplinary perspective, focusing on the main attempts to revive the glory of the ancient empire. We will try to understand weather Italy's capital is a museum to be preserved, an old laboratory of urban innovations, a cemetery, a sanctuary, or simply an amalgam of past and future, glory and misery, beauty and horror. For Italian majors you will have an additional hour for credit. Prerequisite: One two-hundred level course for students interested in taking the course towards Italian credits.
Counts toward Museum Studies
Counts toward Praxis Program

Back to top

ITAL B319 Multiculturalism and Diversity in Medieval Italy
Not offered 2018-19
This interdisciplinary course will reflect upon history, religion, literature, politics, and built environment of Italy from ca. 1000 to 1400. Italy was famous for its diverse cultural landscape of urban towers and fortified castles, its Mediterranean trade, and its ethnically and religiously differentiated voices. The course examines cross-cultural interactions played out through the patronage, production, and reception of works of art, literature, and architecture. Sites of patronage and production include the cities of Venice, Palermo, and Pisa. It counts towards Art History and City.

Back to top

ITAL B320 Nationalism and Freedom: The Italian Risorgimento in Foscolo, Manzoni, Leopardi
Not offered 2018-19
This course deals with 19th century Italian poetry and literary movement for Italian unification inspired by the realities of the new economic and political forces at work after 1815. As a manifestation of the nationalism sweeping over Europe during the nineteenth century, the Risorgimento aimed to unite Italy under one flag and one government. For many Italians, however, Risorgimento meant more than political unity. It described a movement for the renewal of Italian society and people beyond purely political aims. Among Italian patriots the common denominator was a desire for freedom from foreign control, liberalism, and constitutionalism. The course will discuss issues such as Enlightenment, Romanticism, Nationalism, and the complex relationship between history and literature in Foscolo, Manzoni, and Leopardi. This course is taught in Italian. Prerequisite: one 200 level Italian course.

Back to top

ITAL B380 Modernity and Psychoanalysis: Crossing National Boundaries in 20th c. Italy and Europe
Not offered 2018-19
Designed as an in-depth interdisciplinary exploration of Italy's intellectual life, the course is organized around major literary and cultural trends in 20th century Europe, including philosophical ideas and cinema. We investigate Italian fiction in the global and international perspective, from modernity to Freud and Psychoanalysis, going beyond national boundaries and proposing ethical models across historical times. Prerequisite: One 200-Level course in Italian

Back to top

ITAL B398 Senior Seminar
This course is open only to seniors in Italian and in Romance Languages. Under the direction of the instructor, each student prepares a senior thesis on an author or a theme that the student has chosen. By the end of the fall semester, students must have completed an abstract and a critical annotated bibliography to be presented to the department. See Thesis description. Prerequisite: This course is open only to seniors in Italian Studies and Romance Languages with a GPA of 3.7.

Back to top

ITAL B399 Senior Conference
Under the direction of the instructor, each student prepares a senior thesis on an author or a theme that the student has chosen. In April there will be an oral defense with members and majors of the Italian Department. See Thesis description. Prerequisite: This course is open only to seniors in Italian Studies and Romance Languages.

Back to top

ITAL B403 Supervised Work
Offered with approval of the Department.

Back to top

ITAL B403 Supervised Work
Offered with approval of the Department.

Back to top

FREN B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Not offered 2018-19
By bringing together the study of major theoretical currents of the 20th century and the practice of analyzing literary works in the light of theory, this course aims at providing students with skills to use literary theory in their own scholarship. The selection of theoretical readings reflects the history of theory (psychoanalysis, structuralism, narratology), as well as the currents most relevant to the contemporary academic field: Post-structuralism, Post-colonialism, Gender Studies, and Ecocriticism. They are paired with a diverse range of short stories (Poe, Kafka, Camus, Borges, Calvino, Morrison, Djebar, Ngozi Adichie) that we discuss along with our study of theoretical texts. The class will be conducted in English with an additional hour in French for students wishing to take it for French credit.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

Back to top