This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's calendars page.

Students must choose a major subject and may choose a minor subject. Students may also select from one of seven concentrations, which are offered to enhance a student's work in the major or minor and to focus work on a specific area of interest.

Concentrations are an intentional cluster of courses already offered by various academic departments or through general programs. These courses may also be cross-listed in several academic departments. Therefore, when registering for a course that counts toward a concentration, a student should register for the course listed in her major or minor department. If the concentration course is not listed in her major or minor department, the student may enroll in any listing of that course.

Fall 2020

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
ENVS B322-001Decolonial Science, Technology and EnvironmentSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM WDhillon,C.
HIST B212-001Pirates, Travelers, and Natural Historians: 1492-1750Semester / 1Lecture: 11:10 AM-12:30 PM WSGallup-Diaz,I.
SOCL B235-001Mexican-American CommunitiesSemester / 1Lecture: 11:10 AM-12:30 PM TFPark 25Montes,V.
SPAN B120-001Introducción al análisis literarioSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:00 PM MWFTaylor Hall FSacerio-Garí,E.
SPAN B120-002Introducción al análisis literarioSemester / 1Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM TFDalton Hall 1Corujo-Martín,I.
SPAN B208-001Drama y sociedad en EspañaSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MTHCarpenter Library 21Quintero,M.
SPAN B260-001Ariel/Calibán: colonialismo y neocolonialismoSemester / 1Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MTHDalton Hall 2Sacerio-Garí,E.
SPAN B315-001El futuro ya llegó: relatos del presente en América LatinaSemester / 1Lecture: 9:40 AM-12:30 PM THTaylor Hall FGaspar,M.
SPAN B370-001Literatura y delincuenciaSemester / 1Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:30 PM TTaylor Hall EQuintero,M.

Spring 2021

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
ANTH B235-001Comparative Colonialism in Latin AmericaSemester / 1Lecture: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTHNorman,S.
ENGL B217-001Narratives of LatinidadSemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHHarford Vargas,J.
ENVS B322-001Decolonial Science, Technology and EnvironmentSemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHPark 245Dhillon,C.
SOCL B232-001A Sociological Journey to Immigrant Communities in PhillySemester / 1Lecture: 12:15 PM- 3:00 PM WMontes,V.
SPAN B120-001Introducción al análisis literarioSemester / 1Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTHQuintero,M.
SPAN B120-002Introducción al análisis literarioSemester / 1Lecture: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTHGozalo-Salellas,I.
SPAN B211-001Borges y sus lectoresSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWSacerio-Garí,E.
SPAN B243-001Temas de la literatura hispanaSemester / 1Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHQuintero,M.
SPAN B252-001Compassion, Indignation, and Anxiety in Latin American FilmSemester / 1Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MWGaspar,M.
SPAN B315-001El futuro ya llegó: relatos del presente en América LatinaSemester / 1Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:30 AM MWGaspar,M.
SPAN B330-001La novela de formación femenina en América LatinaSemester / 1Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:30 AM MWGaspar,M.
SPAN B332-001Novelas de las AméricasSemester / 1Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:30 AM MWGaspar,M.
SPAN B351-001Tradición y revolución: Cuba y su literaturaSemester / 1Lecture: 12:10 PM- 1:30 PM TTHSacerio-Garí,E.

Fall 2021

(Class schedules for this semester will be posted at a later date.)

2020-21 Catalog Data

HIST B200 The Atlantic World 1492-1800
Not offered 2020-21
The aim of this course is to provide an understanding of the way in which peoples, goods, and ideas from Africa, Europe. and the Americas came together to form an interconnected Atlantic World system. The course is designed to chart the manner in which an integrated system was created in the Americas in the early modern period, rather than to treat the history of the Atlantic World as nothing more than an expanded version of North American, Caribbean, or Latin American history.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

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ANTH B235 Comparative Colonialism in Latin America
Spring 2021
This course takes a comparative perspective to consider state development in Central and South America through the early Spanish Colonial era. The course is divided into three sections: in the first third, students learn about the development of the Maya and the Wari, consider the cultural distinctions between the two states, and compare how each state set the stage for the upcoming major imperial empires. The second section studies how Aztec and Inka civilizations built upon (or not) existing infrastructures and religious traditions to become major powers. The third section investigates how Spanish colonial processes were shaped by cultural traditions in Mexico and Peru. Specifically, this third section explores how cultural structures and shifting alliances led to Spanish forces adapting and exacerbating these factors in their ultimately successful conquests of each region. Readings are based mostly on current literature and some book sections. Assignments include a comparative essay based on some aspect of empire (economic strategy, religious practices, hegemonic vs. militaristic conquests), various hands-on small projects and activities, and a final exam.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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ANTH B288 Global Latin America
Not offered 2020-21
This course will explore how the region has been constituted and shaped by global forces and how Latin America and its people also influence the world on a global scale. We will focus on three historical moments - the colonial encounter, the Cold War, and the neoliberal era - and their legacies. Guiding questions will include: how has the patriarchal system instituted under Spanish colonialism influenced ideas about gender, race, and religion? How does the legacy of U.S. Cold War intervention in Latin America subtly play out in within contemporary discussions about democracy, human rights, and development? How have neoliberal policies produced a discourse of economic growth that ignores increasing economic polarization in the region? How do these broad structures of power influence the everyday lives of Latin Americans? The course will focus primarily, although not exclusively, on South America.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies
Counts toward International Studies

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GNST B245 Introduction to Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Not offered 2020-21
A broad, interdisciplinary survey of themes uniting and dividing societies from the Iberian Peninsula to the Americas. The class introduces the methods and interests of all departments in the concentration, posing problems of cultural continuity and change, globalization and struggles within dynamic histories, political economies, and creative expressions. Course is taught in English.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

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SPAN B211 Borges y sus lectores
Spring 2021
Primary emphasis on Borges and his poetics of reading; other writers are considered to illustrate the semiotics of texts, society, and traditions. Prerequisite: SPAN B120; or another SPAN 200-level course. Critical Interpretation (CI). Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx

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SPAN B260 Ariel/Calibán: colonialismo y neocolonialismo
Fall 2020
A study of the transformations of Ariel/Calibán as images of Latin American and Caribbean cultures. Prerequisite: B120 or another SPAN 200-level course.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx

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SPAN B332 Novelas de las Américas
Spring 2021
What do we gain by reading a Latin American or a US novel as "American" in the continental sense? What do we learn by comparing novels from "this" America to classics of the "other" Americas? Can we find through this Panamericanist perspective common aesthetics, interests, conflicts? In this course we will explore these questions by connecting and comparing major US novels with Latin American classics of the 20th and 21st century. We will read these works in clusters to illuminate aesthetic, political and cultural resonances and affinities. This course is taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: at least one SPAN 200-level course.
Counts toward Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx

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ENGL B345 Topics in Narrative Theory
Section 001 (Fall 2019): Theory of the Ethnic Novel
Not offered 2020-21
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx

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SPAN B370 Literatura y delincuencia
Fall 2020
A study of the origins, development and transformation of the picaresque genre from its origins in 16th- and 17th-century Spain through the 21st century. Using texts, literature, painting, and film from Spain and Latin America, we will explore topics such as the construction of the fictive self, the poetics and politics of criminality, transgression in gender and class. Among the topics to be discussed: criminalization of poverty, prostitution, and the feminine picaresque. Prerequiste: At least one SPAN 200-level course. Course fulfills pre-1700 requirement and HC's pre-1898 requirement.
Counts toward Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx

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ENGL B217 Narratives of Latinidad
Spring 2021
This course explores how Latina/o writers fashion bicultural and transnational identities and narrate the intertwined histories of the U.S. and Latin America. We will focus on topics of shared concern among Latino groups such as struggles for social justice, the damaging effects of machismo and racial hierarchies, the politics of Spanglish, and the affective experience of migration. By analyzing a range of cultural production, including novels, poetry, testimonial narratives, films, activist art, and essays, we will unpack the complexity of Latinidad in the Americas.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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ENGL B236 Latina/o Culture and the Art of Migration
Not offered 2020-21
Gloria Anzaldúa has famously described the U.S.-Mexico border as an open wound and the border culture that arises from this fraught site as a third country. This course will explore how Chicana/os and Latina/os creatively represent different kinds of migrations across geo-political borders and between cultural traditions to forge transnational identities and communities. We will use cultural production as a lens for understanding how citizenship status, class, gender, race, and language shape the experiences of Latin American migrants and their Latina/o children. We will also analyze alternative metaphors and discourses of resistance that challenge anti-immigrant rhetoric and reimagine the place of undocumented migrants and Latina/os in contemporary U.S. society. Over the course of the semester, we will probe the role that literature, art, film, and music can play in the struggle for migrants' rights and minority civil rights, querying how the imagination and aesthetics can contribute to social justice. We will examine a number of different genres, as well as read and apply key theoretical texts on the borderlands and undocumented migration.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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ENGL B239 African American Poetry
Not offered 2020-21
This course explores the work of black poets in the Americas. Focusing on a range of poetic forms from the 18th century through the present, we will consider key questions that have animated the works of black poets in North America and the Caribbean, and how they have used poetic strategy to engage these questions. How do black poets explore black political and social life in various historical and geographical contexts? How do they use particular formal strategies (for example, form poetry, free verse, narrative poetry, and experimental modes) to interrogate notions of blackness? How do political movements around gender, class, and sexuality factor in? As we approach these questions, we will consider important critical conversations on African American poetry and poetics, examining how both well-known and underexplored poets use form to complicate blackness and imagine various forms of freedom. Our work will take us through several poetic genres and forms, including print works, performance poetry, hip hop music, and digital media. Throughout our analysis, we will consider how discourses on gender, sexuality, class, national and transnational identity, and other engagements with difference shape black poetic expression, both historically and in our current moment.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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ENGL B274 Ethnic Speculative Fiction
Not offered 2020-21
This course will explore how Latina/os, Latin Americans, African Americans, and Native Americas deploy speculative fiction to interrogate white supremacy and imperialism and to imagine decolonial futures. We will analyze representations of racism, heteropatriarchy, classism, colonialism, environmental destruction, and anti-immigrant discrimination in what Walidah Imarisha terms "visionary fiction." Students will be introduced to theoretical concepts such as intersectionality, modernity/coloniality, Afrofuturism, marvelous realism, and zombie capitalism that will help them unpack the critical work accomplished by genre fiction. Over the course of the semester, we will probe the role that literature, comic books, film, and art can play in the struggle to build more radically egalitarian societies, querying how the imagination and aesthetics can contribute to social justice.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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ENGL B320 Black Feminist Literature
Not offered 2020-21
This course explores contemporary black feminist literature and culture on a transnational stage. We will consider the works of prominent, emerging, and underexplored black feminist writers from various African diaspora locations, including South Africa, West Africa, Europe, North America, and the Caribbean. How do these writers engage with key currents in global black feminist politics, including understandings of gender, sexuality, class, nationality and colonialism? How do they complicate these discussions in their work? We will ground our exploration in close study of black feminist poetics--the specific formal and creative choices that black feminist poets, fiction writers, visual artists, hip hop artists, webseries producers and others use to examine gender end sexuality in their art. Paying particular attention to the work of queer and LGBTI+ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans* and Intersex) artists, we will consider the various meanings of t erms such as "black," "feminist," and "queer" in various parts of the African Diaspora. Our work will emphasize close analysis of black feminist writers' works, as well as collaborative exercises and invited in-class discussions with several contemporary black diasporic feminist artists themselves. Requirements include two short papers, regular response papers, and a final project.
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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SPAN B332 Novelas de las Américas
Spring 2021
What do we gain by reading a Latin American or a US novel as "American" in the continental sense? What do we learn by comparing novels from "this" America to classics of the "other" Americas? Can we find through this Panamericanist perspective common aesthetics, interests, conflicts? In this course we will explore these questions by connecting and comparing major US novels with Latin American classics of the 20th and 21st century. We will read these works in clusters to illuminate aesthetic, political and cultural resonances and affinities. This course is taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: at least one SPAN 200-level course.
Counts toward Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx

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ENGL B339 Latina/o Culture and the Art of Migration
Not offered 2020-21
Gloria Anzaldúa has famously described the U.S.-Mexico border as an open wound and the border culture that arises from this fraught site as a third country. This course will explore how Chicana/os and Latina/os creatively represent different kinds of migrations across geo-political borders and between cultural traditions to forge transnational identities and communities. We will use cultural production as a lens for understanding how citizenship status, class, gender, race, and language shape the experiences of Latin American migrants and their Latina/o children. We will also analyze alternative metaphors and discourses of resistance that challenge anti-immigrant rhetoric and reimagine the place of undocumented migrants and Latina/os in contemporary U.S. society. Over the course of the semester, we will probe the role that literature, art, film, and music can play in the struggle for migrants' rights and minority civil rights, querying how the imagination and aesthetics can contribute to social justice. We will examine a number of different genres, as well as read and apply key theoretical texts on the borderlands and undocumented migration.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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ENGL B345 Topics in Narrative Theory
Section 001 (Fall 2019): Theory of the Ethnic Novel
Not offered 2020-21
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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ENVS B322 Decolonial Science, Technology and Environment
Fall 2020, Spring 2021
The course explores the application of decolonial concepts at the intersections of science, technology, and environmental studies. How can we understand uneven social dynamics bound to sciences and technologies--with corresponding opportunities to reconfigure environmental scientific approaches? We analyze case studies that foreground diverse Latina/o and Indigenous populations of the Americas and Caribbean. Four segments include: (I) bridging sociology of science and technology with decolonial theory; (II) conservation and forestry practices; (III) science contestations around pollution and pesticides; and (IV) climate change and disasters. Prerequisite: 200-level course in ENVS or LAILS or SOCL or ANTH or permission of instructor.
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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GNST B245 Introduction to Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Not offered 2020-21
A broad, interdisciplinary survey of themes uniting and dividing societies from the Iberian Peninsula to the Americas. The class introduces the methods and interests of all departments in the concentration, posing problems of cultural continuity and change, globalization and struggles within dynamic histories, political economies, and creative expressions. Course is taught in English.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies
Counts toward International Studies

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HIST B127 Indigenous Leaders 1492-1750
Not offered 2020-21
Studies the experiences of indigenous men and women who exercised local authority in the systems established by European colonizers. In return for places in the colonial administrations, these leaders performed a range of tasks. At the same time they served as imperial officials, they exercised "traditional" forms of authority within their communities, often free of European presence. These figures provide a lens through which early modern colonialism is studied.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies
Counts toward Peace, Justice and Human Rights

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HIST B129 The Religious Conquest of the Americas
Not offered 2020-21
The course examines the complex aspects of the European missionization of indigenous people, and explores how two traditions of religious thought/practice came into conflict. Rather than a transposition of Christianity from Europe to the Americas, something new was created in the contested colonial space.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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HIST B200 The Atlantic World 1492-1800
Not offered 2020-21
The aim of this course is to provide an understanding of the way in which peoples, goods, and ideas from Africa, Europe. and the Americas came together to form an interconnected Atlantic World system. The course is designed to chart the manner in which an integrated system was created in the Americas in the early modern period, rather than to treat the history of the Atlantic World as nothing more than an expanded version of North American, Caribbean, or Latin American history.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies
Counts toward International Studies

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HIST B212 Pirates, Travelers, and Natural Historians: 1492-1750
Fall 2020
In the early modern period, conquistadors, missionaries, travelers, pirates, and natural historians wrote interesting texts in which they tried to integrate the New World into their existing frameworks of knowledge. This intellectual endeavor was an adjunct to the physical conquest of American space, and provides a framework though which we will explore the processes of imperial competition, state formation, and indigenous and African resistance to colonialism.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Environmental Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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HIST B215 Europe and the Other 1492-1800
Not offered 2020-21
This course will introduce students to process through which Europeans created systems and categories of difference into which they placed Indigenous, African, and Asian peoples between the years 1492 and 1815. Topics of study include Indigenous leaders, slave and free communities, and cultural mediators on colonial frontiers.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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HIST B265 Colonial Encounters in the Americas
Not offered 2020-21
The course explores the confrontations, conquests and accommodations that formed the "ground-level" experience of day-to-day colonialism throughout the Americas. The course is comparative in scope, examining events and structures in North, South and Central America, with particular attention paid to indigenous peoples and the nature of indigenous leadership in the colonial world of the 18th century.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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HIST B327 Topics in Early American History
Section 001 (Spring 2020): Settler Colonialism in the Americas 1500-1800
Not offered 2020-21
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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HIST B371 Topics in Atlantic History: The Early Modern Pirate in Fact and Fiction
Not offered 2020-21
This course will explore piracy in the Americas in the period 1550-1750. We will investigate the historical reality of pirates and what they did, and the manner in which pirates have entered the popular imagination through fiction and films. Pirates have been depicted as lovable rogues, anti-establishment rebels, and enlightened multiculturalists who were skilled in dealing with the indigenous and African peoples of the Americas. The course will examine the facts and the fictions surrounding these important historical actors.
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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HIST B200 The Atlantic World 1492-1800
Not offered 2020-21
The aim of this course is to provide an understanding of the way in which peoples, goods, and ideas from Africa, Europe. and the Americas came together to form an interconnected Atlantic World system. The course is designed to chart the manner in which an integrated system was created in the Americas in the early modern period, rather than to treat the history of the Atlantic World as nothing more than an expanded version of North American, Caribbean, or Latin American history.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

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GNST B245 Introduction to Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Not offered 2020-21
A broad, interdisciplinary survey of themes uniting and dividing societies from the Iberian Peninsula to the Americas. The class introduces the methods and interests of all departments in the concentration, posing problems of cultural continuity and change, globalization and struggles within dynamic histories, political economies, and creative expressions. Course is taught in English.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

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LING B140 Language and Empire in Mesoamerica
Not offered 2020-21
In this course we look at language and empire in Mesoamerica from a linguistic perspective. Students learn about the languages and linguistic features of the Mesoamerican area. The course features three "imperial" languages: Nahuatl, Spanish, and English. We consider the roles that language can have in building and maintaining empire and explore the linguistic landscape of Mesoamerica in its entirety. For example, we examine the role of Nahuatl in place names throughout Mesoamerica, the use of Spanish bilingual texts in the spread of Catholicism, and why in modern Mexico, speaking Spanish with an English accent might be viewed as "cool" but speaking Spanish with a Zapotec accent can be viewed as "uneducated". The course ends with a unit on ways that speakers of indigenous Mesoamerican languages push back against linguistic colonialism, including opportunities to hear first hand from language activists about their experiences and efforts. This course is reading, writing, and discussion heavy. This course is designated as satisfying the following approaches at BMC: CI and CC. This course should also count towards the Latin American, Iberian, and Latino Studies concentration.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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SPAN B110 Análisis cultural y grámatica en contexto
Not offered 2020-21
An introduction to the history and cultures of the Spanish-speaking world in a global context: art, folklore, geography, literature, sociopolitical issues, and multicultural perspectives. Written and oral proficiency is emphasized. This course is a requisite for the Spanish major. Prerequisite: SPAN 102 or placement.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx

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SOCL B232 A Sociological Journey to Immigrant Communities in Philly
Spring 2021
This course will use the lenses of sociology to critically and comparatively examine various immigrant communities living in greater Philadelphia. It will expose students to the complex historical, economic, political, and social factors influencing (im)migration, as well as how migrants and the children of immigrants develop their sense of belonging and their homemaking practices in the new host society. In this course, we will probe questions of belonging, identity, homemaking, citizenship, transnationalism, and ethnic entrepreneurship and how individuals, families, and communities are transformed locally and across borders through the process of migration. This course also seeks to interrogate how once in a new country, immigrant communities not only develop a sense of belonging but also how they reconfigure their own identities while they transform the social, physical, and cultural milieus of their new communities of arrival. To achieve these ends, this course will engage in a multidisciplinary approach consisting of materials drawn from such disciplines as cultural studies, anthropology, history, migration studies, and sociology to examine distinct immigrant communities that have arrived in Philadelphia over the past 100 years. Although this course will also cover the histories of migrant communities arriving in the area in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, a greater part of the course will focus on recent migrant communities, mainly from Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Caribbean and arriving in the area of South Philadelphia. A special focus will be on the Mexican American migrant community that stands out among those newly arrived migrant communities.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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SOCL B235 Mexican-American Communities
Fall 2020
For its unique history, the number of migrants, and the two countries' proximity, Mexican migration to the United States represents an exceptional case in world migration. There is no other example of migration with more than 100 years of history. The copious presence of migrants concentrated in a host country, such as we have in the case of the 11.7 million Mexican migrants residing in the United States, along with another 15 million Mexican descendants, is unparalleled. The 1,933-mile-long border shared by the two countries makes it one of the longest boundary lines in the world and, unfortunately, also one of the most dangerous frontiers in the world today. We will examine the different economic, political, social and cultural forces that have shaped this centenarian migration influx and undertake a macro-, meso-, and micro-levels of analysis. At the macro-level of political economy, we will investigate the economic interdependency that has developed between Mexico and the U.S. over different economic development periods of these countries, particularly, the role the Mexican labor force has played to boosting and sustaining both the Mexican and the American economies. At the meso-level, we will examine different institutions both in Mexico and the U.S. that have determined the ways in which millions of Mexican migrate to this country. Last, but certainly not least, we will explore the impacts that both the macro-and meso-processes have had on the micro-level by considering the imperatives, aspirations, and dreams that have prompted millions of people to leave their homes and communities behind in search of better opportunities. This major life decision of migration brings with it a series of social transformations in family and community networks, this will look into the cultural impacts in both the sending and receiving migrant communities. In sum, we will come to understand how these three levels of analysis work together.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies
Counts toward Praxis Program

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SOCL B246 Sociology of Migration: A Cross-Cultural Overview of Contemporary Challenges
Not offered 2020-21
The twenty-first century began much as the twentieth century did for the United States with high levels of immigration. This has affected not only the nation, but the discipline of sociology. Just as early twentieth century Chicago School sociology focused on immigration and settlement issues, so too the first decade of the twenty-first century shows a flurry of sociological imagination devoted to immigration scholarship. This course will center on the key texts, issues, and approaches coming out of this renovated sociology of immigration, but we will also include approaches to the study of immigration from history, anthropology, and ethnic studies. While we will consider comparative and historical approaches, our focus will be on the late twentieth century through the present, and we will spend a good deal of time focusing on the longest running labor migration in the world, Mexican immigration to the U.S., as well as on Central American migrant communities in the U.S. Students with an interest in contemporary U.S. immigration will be exposed to a survey of key theoretical approaches and relevant issues in immigration studies in the social sciences. Current themes, such as globalization, transnationalism, gendered migration, immigrant labor markets, militarization of the U.S.-Mexican border, U.S. migration policy, the new second generation and segmented assimilation, and citizenship will be included.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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SPAN B110 Análisis cultural y grámatica en contexto
Not offered 2020-21
An introduction to the history and cultures of the Spanish-speaking world in a global context: art, folklore, geography, literature, sociopolitical issues, and multicultural perspectives. Written and oral proficiency is emphasized. This course is a requisite for the Spanish major. Prerequisite: SPAN 102 or placement.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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SPAN B120 Introducción al análisis literario
Fall 2020, Spring 2021
Readings from Spanish and Spanish-American works of various periods and genres (drama, poetry, short stories). Main focus on developing analytical skills with attention to improvement of grammar. This course is a requisite for the Spanish major. Prerequisite: SPAN 102, or placement. This course can satisfy the Writing Intensive (WI) requirement for the Spanish major. Critical Interpretation (CI). Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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SPAN B208 Drama y sociedad en España
Fall 2020
A study of the rich dramatic tradition of Spain from the Golden Age (16th and 17th centuries) to the 20th century within specific cultural and social contexts. The course considers a variety of plays as manifestations of specific sociopolitical issues and problems. Topics include theater as a site for fashioning a national identity; the dramatization of gender conflicts; and plays as vehicles of protest in repressive circumstances. Counts toward the Latin American, Latino and Iberian Peoples and Cultures Concentration. Prerequiste: SPAN B120; or another SPAN 200-level course. Critical Interpretation (CI). Inquiry into the Past (IP). Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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SPAN B209 Lo que hemos comido: Identidades en España
Not offered 2020-21
This course considers the relationship between the food we eat and our sense of identity in the context of regional identity politics in Spain. We will review the historical tension as they surface in diverse linguistic and cultural communities and currently challenged by the new wave of immigration to the peninsula. Amid this intersection of different cultures and practices, we will study how each region as turned to its traditional cuisine and local culinary products to strengthen their sense of regional identity while strategizing to communicate this uniqueness beyond the brand of "Spain" to the world. We will examine, for instance, how this new trend compares to the tourism industry endorsed by the dictatorship in the 1960s. This discussion will serve as a case study to explore how communities remember and narrate their own histories to themselves and to others, using concepts such as taste, terroir, memory, and identity. Students in the course will view films and read fiction, essays, and culinary essays from around Spain. Prerequisite: SPAN 120 or permission of instructor. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC). Critical Interpretation (CI). Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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SPAN B211 Borges y sus lectores
Spring 2021
Primary emphasis on Borges and his poetics of reading; other writers are considered to illustrate the semiotics of texts, society, and traditions. Prerequisite: SPAN B120; or another SPAN 200-level course. Critical Interpretation (CI). Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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ENGL B217 Narratives of Latinidad
Spring 2021
This course explores how Latina/o writers fashion bicultural and transnational identities and narrate the intertwined histories of the U.S. and Latin America. We will focus on topics of shared concern among Latino groups such as struggles for social justice, the damaging effects of machismo and racial hierarchies, the politics of Spanglish, and the affective experience of migration. By analyzing a range of cultural production, including novels, poetry, testimonial narratives, films, activist art, and essays, we will unpack the complexity of Latinidad in the Americas.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx

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SPAN B223 Género y modernidad en España
Not offered 2020-21
A reading of 19th-century Spanish narrative by both men and women writers, to assess how they come together in configuring new ideas of female identity and its social domains, as the country is facing new challenges in its quest for modernity. Prerequisites: B120 or a SPAN 200-level course.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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SPAN B231 El cuento y novela corta en España
Not offered 2020-21
Traces the development of the novella and short story in Spain, from its origins in the Middle Ages to our time. The writers will include Pardo Bazán, Cervantes, Clarín, Don Juan Manuel, Matute, Zayas, and a number of contemporary writers such as Mayoral and Montero. Our approach will include formal and thematic considerations, and attention will be given to sociopolitical and historical contexts. Prerequiste: SPAN B120; or another SPAN 200-level course.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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SPAN B233 Focus: La Habana y sus textos
Not offered 2020-21
La Habana (a historical, artistic and literary crossroad) is studied in its intersemiotic complexity. Readings from the colonial period to the present. Authors included, among others: La Condesa de Merlín, Alexander von Humboldt, Alejo Carpentier, José Lezama Lima, Reinaldo Arenas, Marilyn Bobes, Leonardo Padura. Selective films by Cuban directors. Prerequisite: SPAN B120 or one 200-level Spanish course.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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SPAN B234 Focus: El cuento de lo fantástico en Hispanoamérica
Not offered 2020-21
A survey of Spanish American short story, focused on the fantastic. Authors include Poe, Quiroga, Borges, Cortázar, Ocampo, Peri Rossi, Ferré, Mutis, Poniatowska and Valenzuela. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN B120 or another 200-level Spanish course.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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ENGL B236 Latina/o Culture and the Art of Migration
Not offered 2020-21
Gloria Anzaldúa has famously described the U.S.-Mexico border as an open wound and the border culture that arises from this fraught site as a third country. This course will explore how Chicana/os and Latina/os creatively represent different kinds of migrations across geo-political borders and between cultural traditions to forge transnational identities and communities. We will use cultural production as a lens for understanding how citizenship status, class, gender, race, and language shape the experiences of Latin American migrants and their Latina/o children. We will also analyze alternative metaphors and discourses of resistance that challenge anti-immigrant rhetoric and reimagine the place of undocumented migrants and Latina/os in contemporary U.S. society. Over the course of the semester, we will probe the role that literature, art, film, and music can play in the struggle for migrants' rights and minority civil rights, querying how the imagination and aesthetics can contribute to social justice. We will examine a number of different genres, as well as read and apply key theoretical texts on the borderlands and undocumented migration.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx

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SPAN B242 José Martí y el equilibrio mundial
Not offered 2020-21
An introductory course on José Martí: the writer, the thinker, the revolutionary. Texts include selections from La Edad de Oro (a magazine for children), essays on the arts, the United States, Nuestra América, political struggle and interdependence ("world equilibrium"), a selection of his poetic works and a novella. Prerequiste: SPAN B120 or another SPAN 200-level course.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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SPAN B243 Temas de la literatura hispana
Spring 2021
This is a topic course. Topics vary. Prerequisite: SPAN B120; or another 200-level. This course can satisfy the Writing Intensive (WI) requirement for the Spanish major.
Current topic description: The early writings of the New World straddle between history and fantasy, fact and legend. This period is rich in chronicles that made no distinction between real and imaginary places and creatures, at a time when ambitious colonial enterprises were guided by myths (finding El Dorado, the Fountain of Youth, Paradise.) This course examines fantasies of imperial imagination that have persisted to this day by looking at both early chronicles and recent films. Critical Interpretation (CI). Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies.
Current topic description: This course will deal with the following women writers in Spain and the New World from the early modern era. Among the writers we will consider: Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, María de Zayas, and Emilia Pardo Bazán.

Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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GNST B245 Introduction to Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies
Not offered 2020-21
A broad, interdisciplinary survey of themes uniting and dividing societies from the Iberian Peninsula to the Americas. The class introduces the methods and interests of all departments in the concentration, posing problems of cultural continuity and change, globalization and struggles within dynamic histories, political economies, and creative expressions. Course is taught in English.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

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SPAN B252 Compassion, Indignation, and Anxiety in Latin American Film
Spring 2021
Stereotypically, Latin Americans are viewed as "emotional people"--often a euphemism to mean irrational, impulsive, wildly heroic, fickle. This course takes this expression at face value to ask: Are there particular emotions that identify Latin Americans? And, conversely, do these "people" become such because they share certain emotions? Can we find a correlation between emotions and political trajectories? To answer these questions, we will explore three types of films that seem to have, at different times, taken hold of the Latin American imagination and feelings: melodramas (1950s-1960s), documentaries (1970s-1990s), and "low-key" comedies (since 2000s.)
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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SPAN B260 Ariel/Calibán: colonialismo y neocolonialismo
Fall 2020
A study of the transformations of Ariel/Calibán as images of Latin American and Caribbean cultures. Prerequisite: B120 or another SPAN 200-level course.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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ENGL B274 Ethnic Speculative Fiction
Not offered 2020-21
This course will explore how Latina/os, Latin Americans, African Americans, and Native Americas deploy speculative fiction to interrogate white supremacy and imperialism and to imagine decolonial futures. We will analyze representations of racism, heteropatriarchy, classism, colonialism, environmental destruction, and anti-immigrant discrimination in what Walidah Imarisha terms "visionary fiction." Students will be introduced to theoretical concepts such as intersectionality, modernity/coloniality, Afrofuturism, marvelous realism, and zombie capitalism that will help them unpack the critical work accomplished by genre fiction. Over the course of the semester, we will probe the role that literature, comic books, film, and art can play in the struggle to build more radically egalitarian societies, querying how the imagination and aesthetics can contribute to social justice.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx

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SPAN B307 Cervantes
Not offered 2020-21
A study of themes, structure, and style of Cervantes' masterpiece Don Quijote and its impact on world literature. In addition to a close reading of the text and a consideration of narrative theory, the course examines the impact of Don Quijote on the visual arts, music, film, and popular culture. Counts toward the Latin American, Latino and Iberian Peoples and Cultures Concentration. Prerequisite: at least one SPAN 200-level course. Course fulfills pre-1700 requirement and HC's pre-1898 requirement
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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SPAN B309 La mujer en la literatura española del Siglo de Oro
Not offered 2020-21
A study of the depiction of women in the fiction, drama, and poetry of 16th- and 17th-century Spain. Topics include the construction of gender; the idealization and codification of women's bodies; the politics of feminine enclosure (convent, home, brothel, palace); and the performance of honor. The first half of the course will deal with representations of women by male authors (Calderón, Cervantes, Lope, Quevedo) and the second will be dedicated to women writers such as Teresa de Ávila, Ana Caro, Juana Inés de la Cruz, and María de Zayas. Prerequisite: at least one SPAN 200-level course. Course fulfills pre-1700 requirement and HC's pre-1898 requirement. Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies. Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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SPAN B312 Latin American and Latino Art and the Question of the Masses
Not offered 2020-21
The course examines the ways in which Latin American and Latino texts (paintings, murals, sculptures, and some narratives) construct "minor," "featureless" and "anonymous" characters, thus demarcating how and which members of society can and cannot advance a plot, act independently and/or be agents of change. By focusing the attention on what is de-emphasized, we will explore how artistic works, through their form, are themselves political actors in the social life of Latin America, the US, and beyond. We will also consider the place of Latin American and Latino Art in the US imaginary and in institutions such as museums and galleries. Prerequisites: Course is taught in English and is open to all juniors or seniors who have taken at least one 200-level course in a literature department. Students seeking Spanish credit must have taken BMC Spanish 120 and at least one other Spanish course at a 200-level, or received permission from instructor. Course does not meet an Approach. Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies. Counts toward Museum Studies.
Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies
Counts toward Museum Studies

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SPAN B314 Latinoamérica:Diversidad Conflicto Cult
Not offered 2020-21
This class studies the representation of regional, national, and individual identity in contemporary Latin American novels. Works include novels from Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Peru written by female and male writers. The selected novels present different strands of cultural conflict due to the simultaneous presence of markedly different modes of identity. Several primary questions will guide our analysis of the course texts: What is identity? How are national and regional identities constructed and why? What are the socio-historical, cultural and political influences on identity? What does the study of the Latin American novel reveal about the relationship among economic development, the construction of social identities, and citizenship? How can the study of the novel help us to understand the dynamics of race, class and gender in specific Latin American contexts? Prerequisite: at least one SPAN 200-level course.
Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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SPAN B315 El futuro ya llegó: relatos del presente en América Latina
Fall 2020, Spring 2021
Taught in Spanish. In the 21st Century, "Here and now" is not what it used to be. There is no single "here" but instead multiple, coexisting realities (that of the cellphone, the street, the 'world'.) There's no clear present when the "now" is multiple. In this course we will explore 21st century Latin American shorts-stories, films, works of art, and novellas that synchronize with our contemporary circumstances---fictions and representations where realities alternate, identities flow, and the world appears oddly out of scale. As contemporaries, you will also be asked to write fictions about life "here and now." Throughout, we will keep two fundamental questions in mind: What is reality (here)? What is the contemporary (now)? Prerequisite: at least one SPAN 200-level course.
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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SPAN B326 Voces trasplantadas: teoría y práctica de la traducción
Not offered 2020-21
Taught in Spanish. Translation has been argued to be both impossible and inevitable. Theoretically impossible, because no two languages are perfectly equivalent; practically inevitable, because cultures, and human beings, are constantly interpreting one another--and understanding themselves in the process. This course is an introduction to translation as a practice with linguistic, literary, and cultural implications. It is organized in three steps. We will begin by exploring the linguistic aspect of translation: the theories (and myths) about language difference and equivalence, and how they can be put into practice. Then we will focus on translating literary texts of different genres (from canonical epics to film, from poems to short stories and proverbs), and we will simultaneously examine how the various types of texts have spurred very different opinions about what is a good or bad translation, what is desirable, and what is not. Finally, we will trace the role of translation in cultural exchanges, as well as its defining presence in contemporary debates on "world literature." Prerequisite: At least one 200 level Spanish course.
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies
Counts toward Praxis Program

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SPAN B330 La novela de formación femenina en América Latina
Spring 2021
Perhaps the most successful novelistic genre is the Bildungsroman or "coming-of-age": novels that follow the development of a person from youth to adulthood, from inexperienced to mature. But what happens when these protagonists are women, often facing the hurdles of societies that impede or limit growth and choice? Since the 19th Century, Latin American female authors have explored the struggles of "growth" and the various models of womanhood available in their societies. In this course, we will read a total of six Latin American Bilgunsromane of the 19th, 20th, and 21st century written by women authors from various countries. We will look at normative definitions and expectations of coming-of-age novels and how these authors created new options for themselves, for their characters, and for their readers.
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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SPAN B332 Novelas de las Américas
Spring 2021
What do we gain by reading a Latin American or a US novel as "American" in the continental sense? What do we learn by comparing novels from "this" America to classics of the "other" Americas? Can we find through this Panamericanist perspective common aesthetics, interests, conflicts? In this course we will explore these questions by connecting and comparing major US novels with Latin American classics of the 20th and 21st century. We will read these works in clusters to illuminate aesthetic, political and cultural resonances and affinities. This course is taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: at least one SPAN 200-level course.
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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SPAN B351 Tradición y revolución: Cuba y su literatura
Spring 2021
An examination of Cuba, its history and its literature with emphasis on the analysis of cultural and economic transformations. Major topics include slavery and resistance; Cuba's struggles for freedom; changing cultural policies and film of the Revolution. Prerequisite: at least one SPAN 200-level course. Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies.
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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SPAN B370 Literatura y delincuencia
Fall 2020
A study of the origins, development and transformation of the picaresque genre from its origins in 16th- and 17th-century Spain through the 21st century. Using texts, literature, painting, and film from Spain and Latin America, we will explore topics such as the construction of the fictive self, the poetics and politics of criminality, transgression in gender and class. Among the topics to be discussed: criminalization of poverty, prostitution, and the feminine picaresque. Prerequiste: At least one SPAN 200-level course. Course fulfills pre-1700 requirement and HC's pre-1898 requirement.
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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