This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's calendars page.

Spring 2021

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION / INSTRUCTION MODE INSTR(S)
PHIL B101-001Happiness and Reality in Ancient ThoughtSecond Half / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MTHGoodhart Hall Auditorium
In Person
Heisenberg,T.
PHIL B102-001Science and Morality in ModernitySecond Half / 1Lecture: 11:10 AM-12:30 PM TFRemote InstructionFugo,J.
PHIL B103-001Introduction to LogicSecond Half / 1Lecture: 9:40 AM-11:00 AM MTHRemote InstructionRice,C.
PHIL B103-002Introduction to LogicSecond Half / 1Lecture: 9:40 AM-11:00 AM TFRemote InstructionRice,C.
PHIL B221-001EthicsSecond Half / 1Lecture: 11:10 AM-12:30 PM WSPark 245
Hybrid: In-Person & Remote
Bell,M.
PHIL B225-001Global Ethical IssuesSecond Half / 1Lecture: 4:10 PM- 5:30 PM MTHRemote InstructionFugo,J.
PHIL B248-001Markets and MoralitySecond Half / 1Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MTHGoodhart Hall Auditorium
In Person
Heisenberg,T.
PHIL B305-001Topics in Value Theory: The Ethics of 'Wokeness"Second Half / 1LEC: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM WDalton Hall 119
In Person
Bell,M.
PHIL B399-001Senior SeminarSecond Half / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM TRemote InstructionDept. staff, TBA
PHIL B403-001Supervised WorkSecond Half / 1Dept. staff, TBA
PHIL B403-001Supervised WorkSecond Half / 1Dept. staff, TBA
FREN B213-001Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the HumanitiesSecond Half / 1Lecture: 9:40 AM-11:00 AM MTHDalton Hall 300
Hybrid: In-Person & Remote
Crucifix,E.
POLS B224-001Comparative Political Phil: China, Greece, and the "West"Second Half / 1Lecture: 9:40 AM-12:30 PM THRemote InstructionSalkever,S.

Fall 2021

(Class schedules for this semester will be posted at a later date.)

Spring 2022

(Class schedules for this semester will be posted at a later date.)

2021-22 Catalog Data

PHIL B101 Happiness and Reality in Ancient Thought
Not offered 2021-22
What makes us happy? The wisdom of the ancient world has importantly shaped the tradition of Western thought but in some important respects it has been rejected or forgotten. What is the nature of reality? Can we have knowledge about the world and ourselves, and, if so, how? In this course we explore answers to these sorts of metaphysical, epistemological, ethical, and political questions by examining the works of the two central Greek philosophers: Plato and Aristotle. We will consider earlier Greek religious and dramatic writings, a few Presocratic philosophers, and the person of Socrates who never wrote a word.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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PHIL B102 Science and Morality in Modernity
Not offered 2021-22
In this course, we explore answers to fundamental questions about the nature of the world and our place in it by examining the works of some of the central figures in modern western philosophy. Can we obtain knowledge of the world and, if so, how? Does God exist? What is the nature of the self? How do we determine morally right answers? What sorts of policies and political structures can best promote justice and equality? These questions were addressed in "modern" Europe in the context of the development of modern science and the religious wars. In a time of globalization we are all, more or less, heirs of the Enlightenment which sees its legacy to be modern science and the mastery of nature together with democracy and human rights. This course explores the above questions and considers them in their historical context. Some of the philosophers considered include Descartes, Locke, Hume, Kant, and Wollstonecraft.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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PHIL B103 Introduction to Logic
Not offered 2021-22
Logic is the study of formal reasoning, which concerns the nature of valid arguments and inferential fallacies. In everyday life our arguments tend to be informal and sometimes imprecise. The study of logic concerns the structure and nature of arguments, and so helps to analyze them more precisely. Topics will include: valid and invalid arguments, determining the logical structure of ordinary sentences, reasoning with truth-functional connectives, and inferences involving quantifiers and predicates. This course does not presuppose any background knowledge in logic.
Quantitative Methods (QM)

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PHIL B206 Introduction to the Philosophy of Science
Not offered 2021-22
Scientific ideas and inferences have a huge impact on our daily lives and the lives of practicing scientists. But what is science, how does it work, and what does it able us to know? In this introductory course, we will be considering some traditional philosophical questions applied to the foundations and practice of natural science. These questions may include the history of philosophical approaches in science, the nature of scientific knowledge, changes in scientific knowledge over time, how science provides explanations of what we observe, the justification of false assumptions in science, the nature of scientific theories, and some questions about the ethics and values involved in scientific practice.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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PHIL B207 Africana Philosophy
Not offered 2021-22
Africana philosophy is also called African diasporic philosophy. It is a modern form of philosophy addressing problems of what could be called the "underside of Western philosophy," problems often avoided in Western philosophy, and thus paradoxically become more central in significance than many Western philosophers may realize. Students will examine these problems across African American philosophy, Afro-Caribbean philosophy, and African philosophy, through resources from Africana analytical, dialectical, existential, feminist, phenomenological, and pragmatist thought. While examining these problems, students will learn about the major scholars and schools of Africana philosophical thought.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Africana Studies

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PHIL B211 Theory of Knowledge
Not offered 2021-22
Varieties of realism and relativism address questions about what sorts of things exist and the constraints on our knowledge of them. The aim of this course is to develop a sense of how these theories interrelate, and to instill philosophical skills in the critical evaluation of them. Discussions will be based on contemporary readings.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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PHIL B212 Metaphysics
Not offered 2021-22
Metaphysics is inquiry into basic features of the world and ourselves. This course considers two topics of metaphysics, free will and personal identity, and their relationship. What is free will and are we free? Is freedom compatible with determinism? Does moral responsibility require free will? What makes someone the same person over time? Can a person survive without their body? Is the recognition of others required to be a person?
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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PHIL B221 Ethics
Not offered 2021-22
An introduction to ethics by way of an examination of moral theories and a discussion of important ancient, modern, and contemporary texts which established theories such as virtue ethics, deontology, utilitarianism, relativism, emotivism, care ethics. This course considers questions concerning freedom, responsibility, and obligation. How should we live our lives and interact with others? How should we think about ethics in a global context? Is ethics independent of culture? A variety of practical issues such as reproductive rights, euthanasia, animal rights and the environment will be considered.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward International Studies

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PHIL B225 Global Ethical Issues
Not offered 2021-22
The need for a critical analysis of what justice is and requires has become urgent in a context of increasing globalization, the emergence of new forms of conflict and war, high rates of poverty within and across borders and the prospect of environmental devastation. This course examines prevailing theories and issues of justice as well as approaches and challenges by non-western, post-colonial, feminist, race, class, and disability theorists.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward International Studies

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PHIL B234 The Nature of Public Art and the Ethics of Commemoration
Not offered 2021-22
Philadelphia has the largest number of public artworks in the country and is also the first city in the nation to require that developers use a portion of their construction budget for public art. It is also home to a number of well-known memorials. In this course, we will take up a number of philosophical questions about the nature of public art, political aesthetics, and the ethics of commemoration using case studies drawn from Philadelphia. Some of the questions we will consider include the following: What is public art? What is public space? What is the role of public art in a democracy? Is there a distinct category of "street art" which can be distinguished from public art on the one hand and graffiti on the other? What is the moral value of commemorative art? What, if anything, do we have a moral obligation to commemorate and what grounds that obligation? How should we assess controversies surrounding the removal of art honoring persons or groups many judge to be morally objectionable, such as Confederate monuments? How should we memorialize victims of injustice? Prerequisites: At least one previous Philosophy class is suggested.
Course does not meet an Approach

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PHIL B238 Science, Technology and the Good Life
Not offered 2021-22
"Science, Technology, and the Good Life" considers the relation of science and technology to each other and to everyday life, particularly with respect to questions of ethics and politics. In this course, we try to get clear about how we understand these domains and their interrelationships in our contemporary world. We try to clarify the issues relevant to these questions by looking at the contemporary debates about the role of automation and digital media and the problem of climate change. These debates raise many questions including: the appropriate model of scientific inquiry (is there a single model for science?, how is science both experimental and deductive?, is science merely trial and error?, is science objective?, is science value-free?), the ideological standing of science (has science become a kind of ideology?), the autonomy of technology (have the rapidly developing technologies escaped our power to direct them?), the politics of science (is science somehow essentially democratic?, and are "scientific" cultures more likely to foster democracy?, or is a scientific culture essentially elitist and autocratic?), the relation of science to the formation of public policy (experts rule?, are we in or moving toward a technocracy?), the role of technology and science in the process of modernization, Westernization, and globalization (what role has science played in industrialization and what role does it now play in a post-industrial world?). To find an appropriate way to consider these questions, we look at the pairing of science with democracy in the Enlightenment project and study contemporary work in the philosophy of science, political science, and ethics.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Environmental Studies

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PHIL B248 Markets and Morality
Not offered 2021-22
Markets are everywhere today: if you want to find a job, if you want to buy some good, or if you want to sell some service, you will inevitably have to submit yourself to their norms. Yet, this omnipresence of markets raises fundamental ethical questions. Is it really good that we organize exchange and production largely through markets? How are societies and individuals impacted by centrally relying on them? Should we, much rather, prefer a planned economy? Or would such a planned economy unduly constrain people's freedom? And, if we opt for markets, what are their moral limits? Should human organs or access to lawmakers be distributed via a market? Should access to health-care be governed by market principles? This seminar explores these ethical and political questions through an unusually diverse set of texts. The syllabus brings together a broad set of perspectives from both the history of philosophy as well as from the contemporary Anglo-American debate. That way, we draw on a broad set of ideas in order to tackle the philosophical, moral and existential challenge that markets pose: and, while going along, familiarize ourselves with classic authors from both the European and Anglo-American traditions in social/political philosophy.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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PHIL B252 Feminist Theory
Not offered 2021-22
Beliefs that gender discrimination has been eliminated and women have achieved equality have become commonplace. We challenge these assumptions examining the concepts of patriarchy, sexism, and oppression. Exploring concepts central to feminist theory, we attend to the history of feminist theory and contemporary accounts of women's place and status in different societies, varied experiences, and the impact of the phenomenon of globalization. We then explore the relevance of gender to philosophical questions about identity and agency with respect to moral, social and political theory. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy or permission of instructor.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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PHIL B256 Scientific Modeling, Idealization, and Policy Making
Not offered 2021-22
This course will focus on the role of scientific models, theories, and research in democratic policy making. In particular, we will consider the epistemological and ethical questions surrounding the use of scientific models in conservation ecology, climate change, and other areas of biology. The goal of the course will be to focus on how scientific research ought to be funded, practiced and incorporated into policy within a democratic society.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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PHIL B271 Minds and Machines
Not offered 2021-22
What is the relationship between the mind and the body? What is consciousness? Is your mind like a computer, or do some aspects of the mind resist this analogy? Is it possible to build an artificial mind? In this course, we'll explore these questions and more, drawing on perspectives from philosophy, psychology and cognitive neuroscience. We will consider the viability of different ways of understanding the relationship between mind and body as a framework for studying the mind, as well as the distinctive issues that arise in connection with the phenomenon of consciousness. No prior knowledge or experience with any of the subfields is assumed or necessary.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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PHIL B305 Topics in Value Theory
Section 001 (Spring 2021): The Ethics of 'Wokeness"
Not offered 2021-22

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PHIL B308 German Philosophy: From Kant to Hegel
Not offered 2021-22
In the wake of Kant's critical philosophy, German philosophy goes through a period of philosophical excitement and intellectual upheaval. In a space of only roughly thirty years, philosophers such as Fichte, Schelling and Hegel compose a flurry of competing responses to the Kantian proposal, generating new approaches to epistemology, metaphysics, ethics and politics that, in turn, come to define European thought for centuries. But what was this controversy originally about? What aspects of Kant's critical project caused it? What are unifying themes in Fichte, Schelling and Hegel's responses to Kant? In what ways do they diverge? And what, if anything, can we today still learn from this brief, yet turbulent period in the history of philosophy? In this upper-level seminar we ask these questions through a careful examination of some of the most important primary texts of that time, and through a thorough discussion of their contemporary implications. Prerequisite: One previous Philosophy course or permission from instructor.
Course does not meet an Approach

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PHIL B319 Philosophy of Mind
Not offered 2021-22
The conscious mind remains a philosophical and scientific mystery. In this course, we will explore the nature of consciousness and its place in the physical world. Some questions we will consider include: How is consciousness related to the brain and the body? Are minds a kind of computer? Is the conscious mind something non-physical or immaterial? Is it possible to have a science of consciousness, or will consciousness inevitably resist scientific explanation? We will explore these questions from a philosophical perspective that draws on relevant literature from cognitive neuroscience.
Counts toward Neuroscience

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PHIL B330 Kant
Not offered 2021-22
The significance of Kant's transcendental philosophy for thought in the 19th and 20th centuries cannot be overstated. His work is profoundly important for both the analytical and the so-called "continental" schools of thought. This course will provide a close study of Kant's breakthrough work: The Critique of Pure Reason. We will read and discuss the text with reference to its historical context and with respect to its impact on developments in epistemology, metaphysics, philosophy of mind, philosophy of science, philosophy of religion as well as developments in German Idealism, 20th-century phenomenology., and contemporary analytic philosophy. Prerequisite: PHIL 102 or at least one 200 level Philosophy course.

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PHIL B338 Phenomenology: Heidegger and Husserl
Not offered 2021-22
This upper-level seminar will consider the two main proponents of phenomenology--a movement in philosophy in the 20th century that attempted to restart philosophy in a radical way. Its concerns are philosophically comprehensive: ontology, epistemology, philosophy of science, ethics, and so on. Phenomenology provides the important background for other later developments in 20th-century philosophy and beyond: existentialism, deconstruction, post-modernism. This seminar will focus primarily on Edmund Husserl's Crisis of the European Sciences and Martin Heidegger's Being and Time. Other writings to be considered include some of Heidegger's later work and Merleau-Ponty's preface to his Phenomenology of Perception.

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PHIL B343 Philosophy of Biology
Not offered 2021-22
The theory of evolution has had a huge impact on the way we view the world around us, our place in that world, and our knowledge of biological organisms. But what is the theory of evolution, how does it work, and what does it enable us to know? In this course, we will be considering some philosophical issues surrounding the practice and development of biological theory. We will begin by investigating Darwin's original theory and how that theory has changed since Darwin's time. We will also look at the debate between evolution and creationism. Then we will investigate several problems within the philosophy of biology including: the nature of fitness, the units of selection, adaptationism, optimization, idealization, reductionism, and complexity. Finally, we will look at the application of evolutionary theory in our attempts to understand the human mind and nature.

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PHIL B398 Senior Seminar
Senior majors are required to write an undergraduate thesis on an approved topic. The senior seminar is a two-semester course in which research and writing are directed. Seniors will meet collectively and individually with the supervising instructor.

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PHIL B399 Senior Seminar
The senior seminar is a required course for majors in Philosophy. It is the course in which the research and writing of an undergraduate thesis is directed both in and outside of the class time. Students will meet sometimes with the class as a whole and sometimes with the professor separately to present and discuss drafts of their theses.

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PHIL B403 Supervised Work

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PHIL B403 Supervised Work

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CMSC B325 Computational Linguistics
Not offered 2021-22
Introduction to computational models of understanding and processing human languages. How elements of linguistics, computer science, and artificial intelligence can be combined to help computers process human language and to help linguists understand language through computer models. Topics covered: syntax, semantics, pragmatics, generation and knowledge representation techniques. Prerequisite: CMSC 206 , or H106 and CMSC 231 or permission of instructor.
Counts toward Counts toward Neuroscience

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COML B293 The Play of Interpretation
Not offered 2021-22
Designated theory course. A study of the methodologies and regimes of interpretation in the arts, humanistic sciences, and media and cultural studies, this course focuses on common problems of text, authorship, reader/spectator, and translation in their historical and formal contexts. Literary, oral, and visual texts from different cultural traditions and histories will be studied through interpretive approaches informed by modern critical theories. Readings in literature, philosophy, popular culture, and film will illustrate how theory enhances our understanding of the complexities of history, memory, identity, and the trials of modernity.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

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CSTS B203 Technology and Humanity in the Ancient World
Not offered 2021-22
In this course, we will study the development, impact, and ethical implications of technology in the ancient world. While investigating the attitudes toward technology expressed by scientific and non-scientific authors of the Graeco-Roman world, students will be exposed to perspectives and methods from a variety of disciplines including literary studies, anthropology, social psychology, and 4E cognition, engaging with questions related to areas of social justice, human ecology, artificial intelligence, urban planning, environmental management, and medicine. Through readings by authors such as Aristophanes, Euripides, Aristotle, Cicero, Seneca, Apuleius and Galen, we will discuss the technologies used to aid memory, carry out calculative activities, perform labor, influence human behavior, and improve quality of life. In addition to gaining a broad understanding of ancient technologies (real and imagined), students will a) become familiar with the major periods and events of Graeco-Roman history and be able to contextualize attitudes towards technology within those periods; b) become familiar with the styles of literature and material arts during major periods of Graeco-Roman history, and c) develop skills necessary for reading primary texts (literary, philosophical, and historical) as documents representing the intellectual history of classical antiquity. No previous knowledge of the ancient world is required.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

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FREN B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Not offered 2021-22
By bringing together the study of major theoretical currents of the 20th century and the practice of analyzing literary works in the light of theory, this course aims at providing students with skills to use literary theory in their own scholarship. The selection of theoretical readings reflects the history of theory (psychoanalysis, structuralism, narratology), as well as the currents most relevant to the contemporary academic field: Post-structuralism, Post-colonialism, Gender Studies, and Ecocriticism. They are paired with a diverse range of short stories (Poe, Kafka, Camus, Borges, Calvino, Morrison, Djebar, Ngozi Adichie) that we discuss along with our study of theoretical texts. The class will be conducted in English with an additional hour in French for students wishing to take it for French credit.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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GERM B212 Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, and the Rhetoric of Modernity
Not offered 2021-22
This course examines selected writings by Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud as pre-texts for a critique of cultural reason and underlines their contribution to questions of language, representation, history, ethics, and art. These three visionaries of modernity have translated the abstract metaphysics of "the history of the subject" into a concrete analysis of human experience. Their work has been a major influence on the Frankfurt School of critical theory and has also led to a revolutionary shift in the understanding and writing of history and literature now associated with the work of modern French philosophers Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, Julia Kristeva, and Jacques Lacan. Our readings will, therefore, also include short selections from these philosophers in order to analyze the contested history of modernity and its intellectual and moral consequences. Special attention will be paid to the relation between rhetoric and philosophy and the narrative forms of "the philosophical discourse(s) of modernity" (e.g., sermon and myth in Marx; aphorism and oratory in Nietzsche, myth, fairy tale, case hi/story in Freud). Course is taught in English. One additional hour will be added for those students wanting German credit. Course counts toward Philosophy.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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ITAL B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Not offered 2021-22
What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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POLS B224 Comparative Political Phil: China, Greece, and the "West"
Not offered 2021-22
An introduction to the dialogic construction of comparative political philosophy, using texts from several cultures or worlds of thought: ancient and modern China, ancient Greece, and the modern West. The course will have three parts. First, a consideration of the synchronous emergence of philosophy in ancient (Axial Age) China and Greece; second, the 19th century invention of the modern "West" and Chinese responses to this development; and third, the current discussions and debates about globalization, democracy, and human rights now going on in China and the West. Prerequisite: At least one course in either Philosophy, Political Theory, or East Asian Studies, or consent of the instructor.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

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POLS B228 Introduction to Political Philosophy: Ancient and Early Modern
Not offered 2021-22
An introduction to the fundamental problems of political philosophy, especially the relationship between political life and the human good or goods.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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POLS B231 Introduction to Political Philosophy: Modern
Not offered 2021-22
A continuation of POLS 228, although 228 is not a prerequisite. Particular attention is given to the various ways in which the concept of freedom is used in explaining political life. Readings from Locke, J.S. Mill, Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche and others.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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POLS B245 Philosophy of Law
Not offered 2021-22
Introduces students to a variety of questions in the philosophy of law. Readings will be concerned with the nature of law, the character of law as a system, the ethical character of law, and the relationship of law to politics, power, authority, and society. Readings will include philosophical arguments about law, as well as judicial cases through which we examine these ideas within specific contexts, especially tort and contracts. Most or all of the specific issues discussed will be taken from Anglo-American law, although the general issues considered are not limited to those legal systems. Recommended Prerequisite: sophomore standing, freshman only with professor's consent.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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POLS B261 Sovereignty, Identity, and Law
Not offered 2021-22
What is sovereignty and what does it mean to say that a "people" is sovereign? Is popular sovereignty rule by the "will of the people?" Who is this "people" whose will is sovereign? What are the implications of our answers to these questions for our idea of law? Is law the expression of that pre-existing will, and of something that already exists, called "the people"? Or does law have a role in creating "the people" and its "will"? Drawing on theoretical, historical, and legal texts, this course will explore the idea of sovereignty and popular sovereignty and its relation to law and collective identity. Sophomore Standing. Freshman only with instructor's approval.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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POLS B272 The Power of the People: Democratic Revolutions
Not offered 2021-22
We often invoke "democracy" as the very ground of political legitimacy, but there is very little agreement on what democracy means, why we might desire it, or how state institutions, law, and political culture might embody it. In this seminar we will grapple with some recent and influential accounts of democratic governance and democratic movements today. Our objective will be to develop a critical vocabulary for understanding what democracy might mean, what conditions it requires, and what "best practices" citizens committed to democracy might enlist to confront political challenges such as the structural divisions that persist among class, gender, and race; persistent inequality and influence of money and corporations; and the potential for democratic, grass-roots power as a vital ingredient to democratic flourishing. Writing Intensive.
Course does not meet an Approach

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POLS B327 Political Philosophy in the 20th Century
Not offered 2021-22
A study of 20th- and 21st-century extensions of three traditions in Western political philosophy: the adherents of the German and English ideas of freedom and the founders of classical naturalism. Authors read include Hannah Arendt, Michel Foucault, Jurgen Habermas, and John Rawls. Topics include the relationship of individual rationality and political authority, cosmopolitanism, the "crisis of modernity," and the debate concerning contemporary democratic citizenship. Prerequisite: Two courses in text-based political philosophy or political theory, or consent of the instructor.

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POLS B350 Equalities and Inequalities in Politics and Society
Not offered 2021-22
The modern state rests on a claim of equality (of a certain sort) between citizens. At the same time, modern societies are marked by significant and increasing inequalities (of various sorts). How should we regard the co-existence of the claim of equality and the existence of inequalities? For some, the existence of large-scale inequalities may be seen not only as wholly consistent with the equality of citizens, but an expected, natural, and proper outcome of that equality. For others, the existence of significant inequalities marks a failure of the promise of equality among citizens. Beyond these disagreements, people disagree about the significance of the distinction between citizens and non-citizens. What kinds of equalities, if any, that are not acceptable between citizens are acceptable between citizens and non-citizens? In this course, we shall explore such questions concerning the relationship between claims of equality and the existence of inequalities in modern societies. We will examine these various questions at both an abstract level (reading essays of political theory and philosophy) and in the context of particular problems of social policy. While the instructor will be largely responsible for assigning readings of the first sort, students will share the responsibility for finding readings of the second. They will do this as part of their own semester-long research projects. This course is open to all students who have the prerequisites. It also serves as a thesis prep course for political science senior majors. Suggested Preparation: At least one course in political theory OR Political Science Senior OR consent of instructor.
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies

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POLS B371 Topics in Political Philosophy
Section 001 (Fall 2020): Anti-Political Theory
Not offered 2021-22
An advanced seminar on a topic in political or legal philosophy/theory. Topics vary by year. Prerequisite: At least one course in political theory or philosophy or consent of instructor.

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