This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's master calendar.

Fall 2018

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
POLS B131-001Introduction to Comparative PoliticsSemester / 1Lecture: 11:40 AM- 1:00 PM MWDalton Hall 1Fenner,S.
POLS B141-001Introduction to International PoliticsSemester / 1Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHCollege Hall 111Allen,M.
POLS B205-001European Politics: Between Unification and DissolutionSemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHTaylor Hall FHager,C.
POLS B227-001Field Seminar in Comparative PoliticsSemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHDalton Hall 2Oh,S.
POLS B231-001Introduction to Political Philosophy: ModernSemester / 1Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHDalton Hall 119Schlosser,J.
POLS B245-001Philosophy of LawSemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHBettws Y Coed 127Elkins,J.
POLS B339-001American Politics & Policy in Polarized TimesSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM WDalton Hall 212EGolden,M.
POLS B350-001Equalities and Inequalities in Politics and SocietySemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM TDalton Hall 212AElkins,J.
POLS B367-001China and the World: Implications of China's RiseSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM TCollege Hall 118Oh,S.
POLS B372-001Comparative Democratic InstitutionsSemester / 1Lecture: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM TDalton Hall 119Fenner,S.
POLS B391-001International Political EconomySemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM WDalton Hall 1Allen,M.
ECON B385-001Democracy and DevelopmentSemester / 1Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHTaylor Hall ERock,M.
HIST B286-001Topics in the British Empire: Birth of Nations, Nationalism and DecolonizationSemester / 1LEC: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MWCollege Hall 102Kale,M.
SOCL B317-001Comparative Social Policy: Cuba, China, US, ScandinaviaSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM MDalton Hall 1Karen,D.

Spring 2019

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
POLS B121-001Introduction to U.S. PoliticsSemester / 1Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHGolden,M.
POLS B222-001Environmental Issues: Movements and Policy Making in Comparative Perspective: Movements, Controversies and Policy MakingSemester / 1LEC: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWHager,C.
POLS B241-001The Politics of International Law and InstitutionsSemester / 1Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTHAllen,M.
POLS B249-001Politics of Economic DevelopmentSemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHOh,S.
POLS B272-001The Power of the People: Democratic RevolutionsSemester / 1Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHSchlosser,J.
POLS B283-001Middle East PoliticsSemester / 1Lecture: 11:40 AM- 1:00 PM MWFenner,S.
POLS B326-001Comparative Environmental Politics in East and Southeast AsiaSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM TOh,S.
POLS B354-001Comparative Social Movements: Power and MobilizationSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM THHager,C.
POLS B360-001Islam and PoliticsSemester / 1Lecture: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM TFenner,S.
POLS B399-001Senior EssaySemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 3:00 PM FDept. staff, TBA
POLS B399-002Senior EssaySemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM TDept. staff, TBA
POLS B399-003Senior EssaySemester / 1Lecture: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM WDept. staff, TBA
PHIL B225-001Global Ethical IssuesSemester / 1Lecture: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTHFugo,J.

Fall 2019

(Class schedules for this semester will be posted at a later date.)

2018-19 Catalog Data

POLS B121 Introduction to U.S. Politics
Spring 2019
An introduction to the major features and characteristics of the American political system. Features examined include voting and elections; the institutions of government (Congress, the Presidency, the courts and the bureaucracy); the policy-making process; and the role of groups (interest groups, women, and ethnic and racial minorities) in the political process. Writing Attentive.
Course does not meet an Approach

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POLS B131 Introduction to Comparative Politics
Fall 2018
This course is designed to provide an introduction to the discipline of comparative politics. We will explore the primary approaches and concepts scholars employ in order to systematically analyze the political world. In doing so, we will also examine the political structures, institutions, and behaviors of a number of countries around the world. Questions we will engage include: What is power and how is it exercised? What are the differences between democratic and authoritarian regimes? How do different countries develop their economies? What factors affect the way countries behave in the international arena? By the end of this course, students will be equipped to answer these questions and prepared for further study in political science. Writing Attentive.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

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POLS B141 Introduction to International Politics
Fall 2018
An introduction to international relations, exploring its main subdivisions and theoretical approaches. Phenomena and problems in world politics examined include systems of power management, imperialism, globalization, war, bargaining, and peace. Problems and institutions of international economy and international law are also addressed. This course assumes a reasonable knowledge of modern world history.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward International Studies
Counts toward Peace, Justice and Human Rights

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POLS B205 European Politics: Between Unification and Dissolution
Fall 2018
This course introduces students to some of the major political issues in contemporary Europe as well as the political institutions and coalitions that influence policymaking capacity at national and European levels. Our focus is on the forces, both internal and external to Europe, that produce cross-cutting pressures toward European unification and dissolution of the European experiment. Issues may include immigration and refugee policy, health care, defense and security, energy and climate, economic and industrial policy.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

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POLS B213 Political Economy of Human Rights
Not offered 2018-19
This course will investigate the political economic logic underlying governmental decisions on human rights protection/abuse and the consequences of such decisions. It will consider factors at both domestic and international levels that influence respect for human rights. It covers countries in both developed and developing worlds, and in both democratic and non-democratic settings. It also effectively integrates relevant philosophical and sociological perspectives into the investigation. It emphasizes equally quantitative and qualitative analyses. Upon finishing this course, students will not only acquire a deeper/new understanding of widely known human rights incidents in the past and the present, but will also furnish themselves with a valid analytical toolkit to better understand incidents of such kinds in the future.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

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POLS B220 Topics in Constitutional Law and Theory
Section 001 (Fall 2017): First Amendment and Equality
Not offered 2018-19
Through a reading of (mostly) Supreme Court cases and other materials, this course takes up some central theoretical questions concerning the role of constitutional principles and constitutional review in mediating the relationship between public and private power.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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POLS B222 Environmental Issues: Movements and Policy Making in Comparative Perspective
Section 001 (Spring 2019): Movements, Controversies and Policy Making
Spring 2019
An exploration of the ways in which different cultural, economic, and political settings have shaped issue emergence and policy making. We examine the politics of particular environmental issues in selected countries and regions, paying special attention to the impact of environmental movements. We also assess the prospects for international cooperation in addressing global environmental problems such as climate change.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Environmental Studies

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POLS B227 Field Seminar in Comparative Politics
Fall 2018
This seminar introduces the intellectual history of comparative politics, and explore the primary approaches and concepts scholars employ in order to systematically analyze the political world. In doing so, we will also examine the political structures, institutions, and behaviors of a number of countries around the world. Key questions we will discuss include: What is power and how is it exercised? What are the differences between democratic and authoritarian regimes? How do different countries develop their economies? What factors affect the way that countries behave in the international arena? By the end of this course, students will be equipped to answer these questions, and prepared for further study in political science. Freshman may not take this course and can take POLS B131. If you took POLS 131 in 2014 or 2015, you may not take this course.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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POLS B228 Introduction to Political Philosophy: Ancient and Early Modern
Not offered 2018-19
An introduction to the fundamental problems of political philosophy, especially the relationship between political life and the human good or goods. Readings from Herodotus, Thucydides, Plato, Aristotle, Polybius, Cicero, Epictetus, Machiavelli, and others.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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POLS B231 Introduction to Political Philosophy: Modern
Fall 2018
A continuation of POLS 228, although 228 is not a prerequisite. Particular attention is given to the various ways in which the concept of freedom is used in explaining political life. Readings from Hobbes, Locke, Adam Smith, Marx, Emma Goldman, Frantz Fanon, and others.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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POLS B241 The Politics of International Law and Institutions
Spring 2019
An introduction to international law, which assumes a working knowledge of modern world history and politics since World War II. The origins of modern international legal norms in philosophy and political necessity are explored, showing the schools of thought to which the understandings of these origins give rise. Significant cases are used to illustrate various principles and problems. Prerequisite: POLS B250.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward International Studies

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POLS B243 African and Caribbean Perspectives in World Politics
Not offered 2018-19
This course makes African and Caribbean voices audible as they create or adopt visions of the world that explain their positions and challenges in world politics. Students learn analytical tools useful in understanding other parts of the world. Prerequisite: POLS 141 or 1 course in African or Latin American history.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Africana Studies

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POLS B245 Philosophy of Law
Fall 2018
Introduces students to a variety of questions in the philosophy of law. Readings will be concerned with the nature of law, the character of law as a system, the ethical character of law, and the relationship of law to politics, power, authority, and society. Readings will include philosophical arguments about law, as well as judicial cases through which we examine these ideas within specific contexts, especially tort and contracts. Most or all of the specific issues discussed will be taken from Anglo-American law, although the general issues considered are not limited to those legal systems. Recommended Prerequisite: sophomore standing, freshman only with professor's consent.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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POLS B249 Politics of Economic Development
Spring 2019
How do we explain the variations of political and economic systems in the world? What is the relationship between the state and the market? To what extent does the timing of industrialization affect the viability of certain developmental strategies? This seminar introduces the intellectual history of comparative political economy and development studies with readings on both comparative political economy and international political economy. First, we will examine the debates on the dynamics of the state and the market in the development and globalization process. Second, we will explore specific case studies to discuss: 1) how the political and economic processes have changed in response to the interaction of the domestic and international arenas, 2) whether and how the late developers learned from the experiences of early developers, 3) how the international economy and international financial crisis shaped domestic development strategies. Lastly, we will analyze the developmental concerns at the sub-national level with financial liberalization. Prerequisite: Freshman can enroll after they have taken 100 level courses in social science and after getting instructor permission.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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POLS B251 Democracy, Politics and the Media
Not offered 2018-19
The last election cycle has seen political candidates using various media to interact with voters, to persuade them to vote to one candidate or dissuade them from voting for another. From printed targeted advertising, to TV ads, social media posts, political satire, televised debates, and automated calls, media have been a key component in both parties' campaign strategy. This relationship between the media and the political arena, however, is not a new phenomenon, and the field of political communication has been exploring it for nearly a century, drawing on various fields from political science and psychology to computer science, sociology and more. This course is aimed at introducing students to this rich area of research, providing an overview of the various facets of the discipline, from media effects theories such as cognitive dissonance, framing and priming to critical, cultural, and normative theories on the role of the media in modern democracy. Most importantly, class discussions will examine current political issues (such as social protests, foreign affairs coverage, political campaigns, social media and political entertainment) exploring whether these older theories and approaches are still relevant in a media landscape so different (in quantity and quality) from the one in which they were originated - and what can we learn from them about modern political phenomena.

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POLS B256 Global Politics of Climate Change
Not offered 2018-19
This course will introduce students to important political issues raised by climate change locally, nationally, and internationally, paying particular attention to the global implications of actions at the national and subnational levels. It will focus not only on specific problems, but also on solutions; students will learn about some of the technological and policy innovations that are being developed worldwide in response to the challenges of climate change.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Environmental Studies

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POLS B272 The Power of the People: Democratic Revolutions
Spring 2019
We often invoke "democracy" as the very ground of political legitimacy, but there is very little agreement on what democracy means, why we might desire it, or how state institutions, law, and political culture might embody it. In this seminar we will grapple with some recent and influential accounts of democratic governance and democratic movements today. Our objective will be to develop a critical vocabulary for understanding what democracy might mean, what conditions it requires, and what "best practices" citizens committed to democracy might enlist to confront political challenges such as the structural divisions that persist among class, gender, and race; persistent inequality and influence of money and corporations; and the potential for democratic, grass-roots power as a vital ingredient to democratic flourishing. Writing Intensive.
Course does not meet an Approach

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POLS B273 Race and the Law in the American Context
Not offered 2018-19
An examination of the intersection of race and law, evaluating the legal regulations of race, the history and meanings of race, and how law, history and the Supreme Court helped shape and produce those meanings. It will draw on materials from law, history, public policy, and critical race theory.

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POLS B283 Middle East Politics
Spring 2019
This course is a multidisciplinary approach to understanding the politics of the region, using works of history, political science, political economy, film, and fiction as well as primary sources. Prerequisite: Any Intro level Political Science course.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Middle Eastern Studies

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POLS B290 Power and Resistance
Not offered 2018-19
What more is there to politics than power? What is the force of the "political" for specifying power as a practice or institutional form? What distinguishes power from authority, violence, coercion, and domination? How is power embedded in and generated by cultural practices, institutional arrangements, and processes of normalization? This course seeks to address questions of power and politics in the context of domination, oppression, and the arts of resistance. Our general topics will include authority, the moralization of politics, the dimensions of power, the politics of violence (and the violence of politics), language, sovereignty, emancipation, revolution, domination, normalization, governmentality, genealogy, and democratic power. Writing projects will seek to integrate analytical and reflective analyses as we pursue these questions in common. Writing Intensive.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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POLS B291 Arts of Freedom
Not offered 2018-19
Observing political life in the early United States, Alexis de Tocqueville wrote: "It cannot be repeated too often: nothing is more fertile in wondrous effects than the art of being free, but nothing is harder than freedom's apprenticeship." What is this "art of freedom" and how can we take up "freedom's apprenticeship"? This course investigates questions of freedom in the contexts of democracy, oppression, and revolution. Together we will study not just the historical meanings of freedom but also who has experienced freedom and who struggles for freedom in concrete terms. Over the course of the semester, we will develop a theoretical vocabulary with which to analyze freedom in different social and political contexts; we will, moreover, learn these concepts through their use, analyzing how they function within theories of freedom and how different theorists and actors understand and actualize freedom. All of this work will culminate in taking the theoretical insights we develop to contemporary politics and society by writing an extended reflective letter integrating the analytical work we have done over the course of the semester (in short essays) and reflecting on the arts and apprenticeship of freedom in our own lives today.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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POLS B310 Comparative Public Policy
Not offered 2018-19
A comparison of policy processes and outcomes across space and time. Focusing on particular issues such as health care, domestic security, water and land use, we identify institutional, historical, and cultural factors that shape policies. We also examine the growing importance of international-level policy making and the interplay between international and domestic pressures on policy makers. Prerequisite: One course in Political Science or public policy.
Counts toward Environmental Studies
Counts toward Health Studies

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POLS B313 Advanced Topics in Constitutional Law
Not offered 2018-19
This course will focus on cases that are on the Supreme Court's docket for decision in the current term. Through readings of cases and secondary material, students will examine the background of the current controversies, and the political and social issues that they raise. As a part of the course, each student will participate in mock hearings on the cases, acting sometimes as an advocate for one party and sometimes as a judge. In preparation for this, students will conduct research under supervision. Students will also participate in gathering materials on the broader political-social implications of the controversies which will be read and discussed by the class. Prerequisite: one course requiring the reading of legal cases (POLS B220, POLS/PHIL B245, POLS B273, POLS H215, H216) or consent of instructor.

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POLS B320 Topics in Greek Political Philosophy
Section 001 (Spring 2018): Ethics/Politics: Aristotle Then and Now
Not offered 2018-19
This is a topics course, course content varies. Past topics include: Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics and Politics and Thucydides,Plato, Aristotle. Prerequisites: At least two semesters of philosophy or political theory, including some work with Greek texts, or consent of the instructor.

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POLS B321 Technology and Politics
Not offered 2018-19
A multi-media analysis of the complex role of technology in political and social life. We focus on the relationship between technological change and democratic governance. We begin with historical and contemporary Luddism as well as pro-technology movements around the world. Substantive issue areas include security and surveillance, electoral politics, economic development and women's empowerment, warfare, social media, net neutrality, GMO foods and industrial agriculture, climate change and energy politics.
Counts toward Environmental Studies

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POLS B326 Comparative Environmental Politics in East and Southeast Asia
Spring 2019
East Asia (referring to both Northeast and Southeast Asia) is often discussed as one unit vis-à-vis other economic blocs yet this region is a home to the largest population in the world with various divergent cultures, colonial histories, religions, political system and state-society relations, as well as the level of economic development. With increasing focus on 3Es-- Economic growth, Environment protection, and Energy security-- as shared priorities at the regional level, such diversities serve not only as opportunities but challenges for East Asian states to cope with environmental issues. Geographic proximity makes countries in the region environmentally interdependent, and heavy dependence on imported fossil fuels make energy security as a matter of survival. Increasing public outcry over pollution and resultant health problems has also challenged political legitimacy and sustainable economic development. his course explores contemporary environmental issues in East Asia from comparative political economy perspective and sheds light on how environmental problems - and solutions - are often shaped by political context and interweaved into varying actors' perceived interest. Main questions in the course include: What kind of environmental problems East Asia face and how diverse historical, political and economic conditions of each country shape the context in which countries deal with the problem either individually or collectively? What are the roles of various social, political and market actors in environmental politics? What sorts of approaches seem most likely to solve local, national and regional environmental issues such as air pollution, natural resource depletion, and climate change? What are the impacts of globalization and technological innovation in dealing with environmental issues?
Counts toward East Asian Languages and Cultures

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POLS B327 Political Philosophy in the 20th Century
Not offered 2018-19
A study of 20th- and 21st-century extensions of three traditions in Western political philosophy: the adherents of the German and English ideas of freedom and the founders of classical naturalism. Authors read include Hannah Arendt, Michel Foucault, Jurgen Habermas, and John Rawls. Topics include the relationship of individual rationality and political authority, the "crisis of modernity," and the debate concerning contemporary democratic citizenship. Prerequisites: POLS 228 and 231, or PHIL 101 and 201.

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POLS B334 Three Faces of Chinese Power: Money, Might, and Minds
Not offered 2018-19
China's extraordinary growth for the past 30 years has confirmed the power of free markets, while simultaneously challenging our thoughts on the foundations and limits of the market economy. Moreover, China's ever-increasing economic freedom and prosperity have been accompanied by only limited steps toward greater political freedom and political liberalization, running counter to one of the most consistent patterns of political economic development in recent history. This course examines China's unique economic and political development path, and the opportunities and challenges it accompanies. This course has three aims: 1) to facilitate an in-depth understanding of the political and economic development with Chinese characteristics, 2) to conduct a comprehensive analysis of three dimensions of Chinese economic, political and cultural power, and 3) to construct a thorough understanding of challenges and opportunities for China from its extraordinary developmental path. This is a senior seminar. Prerequisite: two courses either in Political Science or East Asian Languages and Culture. Junior or Senior Standing required.

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POLS B339 American Politics & Policy in Polarized Times
Fall 2018
This course will examine American politics and policy-making through the lens of partisan polarization in the electorate and in policy-making institutions. The course serves dual aims: to help prepare students (especially senior majors) to conduct independent research and to probe more deeply into scholarly debates about the impact of polarization (and other factors) on elections and policy-making. Counts as POLS 300-level pre-thesis seminar. Prerequisite: One prior course in American Politics or public policy or permission of the instructor. Enrollment is limited to 18 students.
Counts toward Environmental Studies

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POLS B339 Race, Ethnicity, & Politics in the U.S.
Not offered 2018-19
This upper-level course examines the political experience in the United States of the four principal racial minority groups: blacks, Latinos, Asian Americans and American Indians. The importance of race and ethnicity in American politics, and the historical, legal, attitudinal, and behavioral experiences of these groups are explored in the context of a majority white nation via protest activity and conventional electoral politics. We will describe and analyze how the structures of the American political system and its present operation disadvantage and/or advantage these groups as they attempt to gain the full benefits of American society. A variety of theories are explored towards that end.

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POLS B350 Equalities and Inequalities in Politics and Society
Fall 2018
The modern state rests on a claim of equality (of a certain sort) between citizens. At the same time, modern societies are marked by significant and increasing inequalities (of various sorts). How should we regard the co-existence of the claim of equality and the existence of inequalities? For some, the existence of large-scale inequalities may be seen not only as wholly consistent with the equality of citizens, but an expected, natural, and proper outcome of that equality. For others, the existence of significant inequalities marks a failure of the promise of equality among citizens. Beyond these disagreements, people disagree about the significance of the distinction between citizens and non-citizens. What kinds of equalities, if any, that are not acceptable between citizens are acceptable between citizens and non-citizens? In this course, we shall explore such questions concerning the relationship between claims of equality and the existence of inequalities in modern societies. We will examine these various questions at both an abstract level (reading essays of political theory and philosophy) and in the context of particular problems of social policy. While the instructor will be largely responsible for assigning readings of the first sort, students will share the responsibility for finding readings of the second. They will do this as part of their own semester-long research projects. This course is open to all students who have the prerequisites. It also serves as a thesis prep course for political science senior majors. Suggested Preparation: At least one course in political theory OR Political Science Senior OR consent of instructor.
Counts toward Africana Studies

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POLS B354 Comparative Social Movements: Power and Mobilization
Spring 2019
A consideration of the conceptualizations of power and "legitimate" and "illegitimate" participation, the political opportunity structure facing potential activists, the mobilizing resources available to them, and the cultural framing within which these processes occur. Specific attention is paid to recent movements within and across countries, such as feminist, environmental, and anti-globalization movements, and to emerging forms of citizen mobilization, including transnational and global networks, electronic mobilization via social media, and collaborative policymaking institutions. Writing Attentive. Prerequisite: one course in POLS or SOCL or permission of instructor.
Counts toward Environmental Studies

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POLS B356 Topics in American Politics
Not offered 2018-19
This course helps prepare students for the senior thesis by exploring a gamut of "hot topics" in the study of American politics. Its focus is on points of contention-theoretical, empirical and methodological-between and among the political scientists studying these topics. This course is open to all students who have the prerequisites. It also serves as a thesis prep course for political science senior majors.

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POLS B360 Islam and Politics
Spring 2019
This course locates and explores the politics of Islam in the politics of interpretation, taking into account texts both literal and social. More broadly, this course will consider evolving approaches to culture, religion, and ideology in political science, exploring not just the effect of Islam on politics but also the ways in which politics have shaped the Islamic tradition over time. This course is open to all students who have the prerequisites. It also serves as a thesis prep course for political science senior majors. Prerequisite: POLS B283 or instructor consent.
Counts toward Middle Eastern Studies

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POLS B367 China and the World: Implications of China's Rise
Fall 2018
In the 20th Century, China's rise has been one of the most distinctive political affairs changing the landscape of regional and world politics. Especially, China's breathtaking growth has challenged the foundations and limits of the market economy and political liberalization theoretically and empirically. This course examines the Chinese economic and political development and its implications for other Asian countries and the world. This course has three aims: 1) to facilitate an in-depth understanding of the Chinese Economic development model in comparison to other development models, 2) to conduct a comprehensive analysis of political and socio-economic exchanges of China and its relations with other major countries in East Asia, and 3) to construct a thorough understanding of challenges and opportunities for China from its extraordinary economic growth. This is a senior seminar, and a previous course in comparative politics, international relations or East Asian studies is required. It also serves as a thesis prep course for political science majors. Writing Intensive. Prerequisite: junior or senior.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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POLS B371 Topics in Political Philosophy
Section 001 (Fall 2017): Justice
Not offered 2018-19
An advanced seminar on a topic in political or legal philosophy/theory. Topics vary by year. This course fulfills the 300-level thesis prep course to be taken in the fall semester of the senior year by political science majors. It is also open to non-seniors and other majors. Prerequisite: At least one course in political theory or philosophy or consent of instructor.

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POLS B372 Comparative Democratic Institutions
Fall 2018
This is an advanced seminar covering issues of regime stasis and change. Particular attention will be paid to processes of democratic collapse and authoritarianization. Writing Intensive. Counts as a 300-level thesis prep course for Political Science Seniors. Prerequisite: POLS 131, Introduction to Comparative Politics or instructor consent.

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POLS B374 Education Politics & Policy
Not offered 2018-19
This course will examine education policy through the lens of federalism and federalism through a case study of education policy. The dual aims are to enhance our understanding of this specific policy area and our understanding of the impact that our federal system of government has on policy effectiveness.

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POLS B381 Nietzsche
Not offered 2018-19
This course examines Nietzsche's thought, with particular focus on such questions as the nature of the self, truth , irony, aggression, play, joy, love, and morality. The texts for the course are drawn mostly from Nietzsche's own writing, but these are complemented by some contemporary work in moral philosophy and philosophy of mind that has a Nietzschean influence.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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POLS B391 International Political Economy
Fall 2018
This seminar examines the growing importance of economic issues in world politics and traces the development of the modern world economy from its origins in colonialism and the industrial revolution, through to the globalization of recent decades. Major paradigms in political economy are critically examined. Aspects of and issues in international economic relations such as development, finance, trade, migration, and foreign investment are examined in the light of selected approaches. This course is open to all students who have the prerequisites. It also serves as a thesis prep course for political science seniors. Prerequisite: One course in International Politics or Economics is required. Preference is given to seniors although juniors are accepted.
Counts toward International Studies

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POLS B399 Senior Essay

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POLS B403 Supervised Work

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POLS B403 Supervised Work

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POLS B425 Praxis III: Independent Study
Praxis III courses are Independent Study courses and are developed by individual students, in collaboration with faculty and field supervisors. A Praxis courses is distinguished by genuine collaboration with fieldsite organizations and by a dynamic process of reflection that incorporates lessons learned in the field into the classroom setting and applies theoretical understanding gained through classroom study to work done in the broader community.
Counts toward Praxis Program

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ARCH B244 Great Empires of the Ancient Near East
Not offered 2018-19
A survey of the history, material culture, political and religious ideologies of, and interactions among, the five great empires of the ancient Near East of the second and first millennia B.C.E.: New Kingdom Egypt, the Hittite Empire in Anatolia, the Assyrian and Babylonian Empires in Mesopotamia, and the Persian Empire in Iran.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Middle Eastern Studies

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ECON B385 Democracy and Development
Fall 2018
From 1974 to the late 1990's the number of democracies grew from 39 to 117. This "third wave," the collapse of communism and developmental successes in East Asia have led some to argue the triumph of democracy and markets. Since the late 1990's, democracy's third wave has stalled, and some fear a reverse wave and democratic breakdowns. We will question this phenomenon through the disciplines of economics, history, political science and sociology drawing from theoretical, case study and classical literature. Prerequisites: ECON 200; ECON 253 or 304; and one course in Political Science OR Junior or Senior Standing in Political Science OR Permission of the Instructor.
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Peace, Justice and Human Rights

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HIST B286 Topics in the British Empire
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Birth of Nations, Nationalism and Decolonization
Fall 2018
This is a topics course covering various "topics" in the study of the British Empire. Course content varies.
Current topic description: This course explores the politics and genealogies on nationalist movements in South Asia from the late 19th century through the establishment of sovereign nations from 1947-72, considering the implications and legacies of empire, nationalism and anti-colonialism for the nations and peoples of the subcontinent from independence through the present.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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PHIL B225 Global Ethical Issues
Spring 2019
The need for a critical analysis of what justice is and requires has become urgent in a context of increasing globalization, the emergence of new forms of conflict and war, high rates of poverty within and across borders and the prospect of environmental devastation. This course examines prevailing theories and issues of justice as well as approaches and challenges by non-western, post-colonial, feminist, race, class, and disability theorists.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

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PHIL B238 Science, Technology and the Good Life
Not offered 2018-19
"Science, Technology, and the Good Life" considers the relation of science and technology to each other and to everyday life, particularly with respect to questions of ethics and politics. In this course, we try to get clear about how we understand these domains and their interrelationships in our contemporary world. We try to clarify the issues relevant to these questions by looking at the contemporary debates about the role of automation and digital media and the problem of climate change. These debates raise many questions including: the appropriate model of scientific inquiry (is there a single model for science?, how is science both experimental and deductive?, is science merely trial and error?, is science objective?, is science value-free?), the ideological standing of science (has science become a kind of ideology?), the autonomy of technology (have the rapidly developing technologies escaped our power to direct them?), the politics of science (is science somehow essentially democratic?, and are "scientific" cultures more likely to foster democracy?, or is a scientific culture essentially elitist and autocratic?), the relation of science to the formation of public policy (experts rule?, are we in or moving toward a technocracy?), the role of technology and science in the process of modernization, Westernization, and globalization (what role has science played in industrialization and what role does it now play in a post-industrial world?). To find an appropriate way to consider these questions, we look at the pairing of science with democracy in the Enlightenment project and study contemporary work in the philosophy of science, political science, and ethics.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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PHIL B240 Environmental Ethics
Not offered 2018-19
This course surveys rights- and justice-based justifications for ethical positions on the environment. It examines approaches such as stewardship, intrinsic value, land ethic, deep ecology, ecofeminism, Asian and aboriginal. It explores issues such as obligations to future generations, to nonhumans and to the biosphere.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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PHIL B252 Feminist Theory
Not offered 2018-19
Beliefs that gender discrimination has been eliminated and women have achieved equality have become commonplace. We challenge these assumptions examining the concepts of patriarchy, sexism, and oppression. Exploring concepts central to feminist theory, we attend to the history of feminist theory and contemporary accounts of women's place and status in different societies, varied experiences, and the impact of the phenomenon of globalization. We then explore the relevance of gender to philosophical questions about identity and agency with respect to moral, social and political theory. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy or permission of instructor.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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PSYC B358 Political Psychology of Ethnic Conflict
Not offered 2018-19
This seminar explores the common interests of psychologists and political scientists in ethnic identification and ethnic-group conflict. Rational choice theories of conflict from political science will be compared with social psychological theories of conflict that focus more on emotion and essentializing. Each student will contribute a 200-300 word post in response to a reading or film assignment each week. Students will represent their posts in seminar discussion of readings and films. Each student will write a final paper analyzing the origins and trajectory of a case of violent ethnic conflict chosen by agreement with the instructor. Grading includes posts, participation in discussion, and the final paper. Prerequisite: PSYC B208, or PSYC B120, or PSYC B125, or one 200 level course in political science, or instructor's permission.
Counts toward Counts toward Peace, Justice and Human Rights

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SOCL B262 Public Opinion
Not offered 2018-19
This course explores public opinion: what it is, how it is measured, how it is shaped, and how it changes over time. Specific attention is given to the role of elites, the mass media, and religion in shaping public opinion. Examples include racial/ethnic civil rights, abortion, gay/lesbian/transgendered sexuality, and inequalities.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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SOCL B317 Comparative Social Policy: Cuba, China, US, Scandinavia
Fall 2018
This course will examine different countries' policy choices to address different societal challenges. Four societal types - socialist (Cuba), post-socialist (China), capitalist (US), and social-democratic (Scandinavia) - will be studies to help us understand how these different kinds of societies conceive of social problems and propose and implement attempted solutions. We will examine particular problems/solutions in four domains: health/sports; education; environment; technological development. As we explore these domains, we will attend to methodological issues involved in making historical and institutional comparisons
Counts toward Counts toward Education
Counts toward Counts toward Health Studies

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