This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's master calendar.

Fall 2017

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
PSYC B105-001Introductory PsychologySemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHCarpenter Library 21Rescorla,L.
Lab: 6:30 PM- 8:30 PM MBettws Y Coed 35
Lab: 6:30 PM- 8:30 PM TBettws Y Coed 35
Lab: 6:30 PM- 8:30 PM WBettws Y Coed 35
Lab: 6:30 PM- 8:30 PM THBettws Y Coed 35
Lab: 4:00 PM- 6:00 PM SUBettws Y Coed 35
PSYC B203-001Educational PsychologySemester / 1Lecture: 8:25 AM- 9:45 AM TTHDalton Hall 119Cassidy,K.
PSYC B205-001Research Methods and StatisticsSemester / 1Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTHCarpenter Library 21Thapar,A.
Lecture: Date/Time TBA
PSYC B206-001Developmental PsychologySemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWDalton Hall 300Albert,D.
PSYC B208-001Social PsychologySemester / 1Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MWTaylor Hall FLee,J.
PSYC B224-001Cross-Cultural PsychologySemester / 1Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHCollege Hall 224Park,H.
PSYC B282-001Laboratory in Cognitive PsychologySemester / 0.5Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TBettws Y Coed 131Thapar,A.
PSYC B285-001Laboratory in Cultural PsychologySemester / 0.5Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:30 AM WBettws Y Coed 131Park,H.
PSYC B289-001Laboratory in Clinical PsychologySemester / 0.5Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM WBettws Y Coed 100Schulz,M.
PSYC B311-001Personality and Social ContextsSemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHCollege Hall 104Lee,J.
PSYC B327-001Adolescent DevelopmentSemester / 1Lecture: 9:10 AM-12:00 PM FBettws Y Coed 239Albert,D.
PSYC B353-001Advanced Topics in Clinical Psychology: MindfulnessSemester / 1LEC: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTHBettws Y Coed 239Schulz,M.
PSYC B375-001Movies and Madness: Abnormal Psychology Through FilmsSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM WBettws Y Coed 239Rescorla,L.
PSYC B398-001Senior ThesisSemester / 1Lecture: Date/Time TBADept. staff, TBA
PSYC B398-002Senior ThesisSemester / 1Lecture: Date/Time TBADept. staff, TBA
PSYC B398-003Senior ThesisSemester / 1Lecture: Date/Time TBADept. staff, TBA
PSYC B398-004Senior ThesisSemester / 1Lecture: Date/Time TBADept. staff, TBA
PSYC B398-005Senior ThesisSemester / 1
PSYC B398-006Senior ThesisSemester / 1
PSYC B398-007Senior ThesisSemester / 1
PSYC B398-008Senior ThesisSemester / 1
PSYC B401-001Supervised Research in NeuroscienceSemester / 1Dept. staff, TBA
PSYC B401-001Supervised Research in NeuroscienceSemester / 1Dept. staff, TBA
PSYC B403-001Supervised ResearchSemester / 1Dept. staff, TBA
PSYC B403-001Supervised ResearchSemester / 1Dept. staff, TBA
PSYC B499-001Junior Brown BagSemester / 0LEC: 12:10 PM- 1:00 PM FBettws Y Coed 127
PSYC B701-001Supervised WorkSemester / 1Lecture: Date/Time TBAThapar,A.

Spring 2018

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
PSYC B105-001Introductory PsychologySemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHPark,H., Park,H., Park,H., Park,H., Park,H., Park,H.
Lecture: Date/Time TBA
Lab: 6:30 PM- 8:30 PM M
Lab: 6:30 PM- 8:30 PM T
Lab: 6:30 PM- 8:30 PM W
Lab: 6:30 PM- 8:30 PM TH
PSYC B205-001Research Methods and StatisticsSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWAlbert,D.
Lecture: Date/Time TBA
PSYC B208-001Social PsychologySemester / 1Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MWLee,J.
PSYC B218-001Behavioral NeuroscienceSemester / 1Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:00 AM MWFThomas,E.
PSYC B250-001Autism Spectrum DisordersSemester / 1Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHWozniak,R.
PSYC B283-001Laboratory in Developmental PsychologySemester / 0.5Lecture: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TAlbert,D.
PSYC B288-001Laboratory in Social PsychologySemester / 0.5LEC: 12:55 PM- 2:41 PM THLee,J.
PSYC B303-001Portraits of Maladjustment in Classic Children's NovelsSemester / 0.5LEC: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM WRescorla,L.
PSYC B312-001History of Modern American PsychologySemester / 1Lecture: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM TWozniak,R.
PSYC B314-001Advanced Data Science:Regression & Multivariate StatisticsSemester / 1Lecture: 9:10 AM-12:00 PM THSchulz,M.
PSYC B322-001Culture and DevelopmentSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM FPark,H.
PSYC B395-001PsychopharmacologySemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:00 PM MWFThomas,E.
PSYC B398-001Senior ThesisSemester / 1Lecture: Date/Time TBADept. staff, TBA
PSYC B398-002Senior ThesisSemester / 1Lecture: Date/Time TBADept. staff, TBA
PSYC B398-003Senior ThesisSemester / 1Lecture: Date/Time TBADept. staff, TBA
PSYC B398-004Senior ThesisSemester / 1Lecture: Date/Time TBADept. staff, TBA
PSYC B398-005Senior ThesisSemester / 1
PSYC B398-006Senior ThesisSemester / 1
PSYC B398-007Senior ThesisSemester / 1
PSYC B398-008Senior ThesisSemester / 1
PSYC B399-001Senior SeminarSemester / 1Lecture: 10:30 AM-12:30 PM WDept. staff, TBA
PSYC B401-001Supervised Research in NeuroscienceSemester / 1Dept. staff, TBA
PSYC B401-001Supervised Research in NeuroscienceSemester / 1Dept. staff, TBA
PSYC B403-001Supervised ResearchSemester / 1Dept. staff, TBA
PSYC B403-001Supervised ResearchSemester / 1Dept. staff, TBA
PSYC B701-001Supervised WorkSemester / 1Lecture: Date/Time TBAThapar,A.

Fall 2018

(Class schedules for this semester will be posted at a later date.)

2017-18 Catalog Data

PSYC B105 Introductory Psychology
Fall 2017, Spring 2018
How do biological predispositions, life experiences, culture, contribute to individual differences in human and animal behavior? This biopsychosocial theme will be examined by studying both "normal" and "abnormal" behaviors in domains such as perception, cognition, learning, motivation, emotion, and social interaction thereby providing an overview of psychology's many areas of inquiry. There is a laboratory component of this course that meets 2 hours per week (four evening times, one on Sunday).
Quantitative Readiness Required (QR)
Scientific Investigation (SI)

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PSYC B160 Focus: Psychology of Negotiations
Not offered 2017-18
Explores the psychology, art, and science of negotiations. The core of the course is a series of seven simulations designed to allow students to experiment with negotiation techniques. Debriefings and discussions of negotiation theory and behavioral research complement the simulations. This is a half-semester, 0.5 unit course.
Course does not meet an Approach

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PSYC B203 Educational Psychology
Fall 2017
Topics in the psychology of human cognitive, social, and affective behavior are examined and related to educational practice. Issues covered include learning theories, memory, attention, thinking, motivation, social/emotional issues in adolescence, and assessment/learning disabilities. This course provides a Praxis Level I opportunity. Classroom observation is required. Prerequisite: PSYC B105 (Introductory Psychology)
Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Praxis Program

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PSYC B205 Research Methods and Statistics
Fall 2017, Spring 2018
An introduction to experimental design, general research methodology, and the analysis and interpretation of data. Emphasis will be placed on issues involved with conducting psychological research. Topics include descriptive and inferential statistics, experimental design and validity, analysis of variance, and correlation and regression. Each statistical method will also be executed using computers. Lecture three hours, laboratory 90 minutes a week.
Quantitative Methods (QM)
Scientific Investigation (SI)

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PSYC B206 Developmental Psychology
Fall 2017
A topical survey of psychological development from infancy through adolescence, focusing on the interaction of personal and environmental factors in the ontogeny of perception, language, cognition, and social interactions within the family and with peers. Topics include developmental theories; infant perception; attachment; language development; theory of mind; memory development; peer relations, schools and the family as contexts of development; and identity and the adolescent transition. Prerequisite: PSYC B105 or PSYC H100
Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Child and Family Studies

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PSYC B208 Social Psychology
Fall 2017, Spring 2018
A survey of theories and data in the study of human social behavior. Special attention to methodological issues of general importance in the conduct and evaluation of research with humans. Topics include group dynamics (conformity, leadership, encounter groups, crowd behavior, intergroup conflict); attitude change (consistency theories, attitudes and behavior, mass media persuasion); and person perception (stereotyping, essentializing, moral judgment). Prerequisite: PSYC B105 or H100 (Introductory Psychology), or instructor's permission.
Course does not meet an Approach

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PSYC B209 Abnormal Psychology
Not offered 2017-18
This course examines the experience, origins and consequences of psychological difficulties and problems. Among the questions we will explore are: What do we mean by abnormal behavior or psychopathology? What are the strengths and limitations of the ways in which psychopathology is assessed and classified? What are the major forms of psychopathology? How do psychologists study and treat psychopathology? How is psychopathology experienced by individuals? What causes psychological difficulties and what are their consequences? How do we integrate social, biological and psychological perspectives on the causes of psychopathology? Do psychological treatments (therapies) work? How do we study the effectiveness of psychology treatments? Prerequisite: Introductory Psychology (PSYC B105 or H100).
Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Health Studies

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PSYC B212 Human Cognition
Not offered 2017-18
This course provides an overview of the field of Cognitive Psychology, the branch of psychology that studies how we acquire, store, process and communicate information. Over the semester we will survey classic and contemporary theory and findings on a wide range of mental processes that are used every day in almost all human activities - from attention and memory to language and problem solving - and our goal will be to understand how the human mind works! Prerequisite: PSYC B105 or H100 (Introductory Psychology), or instructor's permission.
Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts toward Neuroscience

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PSYC B218 Behavioral Neuroscience
Spring 2018
An interdisciplinary course on the neurobiological bases of experience and behavior, emphasizing the contribution of the various neurosciences to the understanding of basic problems of psychology. An introduction to the fundamentals of neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and neurochemistry with an emphasis upon synaptic transmission; followed by the application of these principles to an analysis of sensory processes and perception, emotion, motivation, learning, and cognition. Lecture three hours a week. Prerequisite: Introductory Psychology (PSYC 105).
Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Neuroscience

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PSYC B224 Cross-Cultural Psychology
Fall 2017
Explores human behavior as a product of cultural context. Why are some aspects of human behavior the same across cultures, while others differ? Topics include the relationships between culture and development, cognition, the self, and social behaviors. Discussions include implications of cross-cultural psychology for psychological theory and applications. Prerequisites: ANTH101, PSYCB105, PSYCH100, SOCL102 or permission of instructor
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

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PSYC B230 Forensic Psychology
Not offered 2017-18
The major goal of this course is to provide students with a broad overview of the field of forensic psychology and the numerous ways that psychology interacts with the law. Throughout this course, students will develop an understanding of the nature, scope, and basic methods used in forensic psychology and how these methods can be applied to a variety of legal questions. We will begin with an introduction, which will encompass the definition of the area, the scope of the field, and an overview of the relevant methods used in the practice of forensic psychology. We will then consider a number of legal questions for which judges and attorneys can be informed by forensic psychological evaluation; these legal questions will include criminal, civil, and family law. Prerequisite: PSYC B105 or H100.

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PSYC B231 Health Psychology
Not offered 2017-18
This course will provide an overview of the field of health psychology using lecture, exams, videos, assignments, and an article critique. We will examine the current definition of health psychology, as well as the theories and research behind many areas in health psychology (both historical and contemporary). The course will focus on specific health and social psychological theories, empirical research, and applying the theory and research to real world situations. Prerequisite: Introductory Psychology (PSYC B105) or Foundations of Psychology (PSYC H100)
Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Health Studies
Counts toward Museum Studies

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PSYC B240 Evolution of Human Nature
Not offered 2017-18
Explores human nature as a product of evolutionary processes. The course will begin by introducing the evolutionary perspective and the roles of sex and mating strategies within the context of the animal kingdom. Topics will include the evolutionary origins of altruism, social structures, language, domestic and intergroup violence, and religion. Prerequisite: ANTH101, BIOL110/B111, ECON105, PSYCB105, PSYCH100, SOCL102, or permission of instructor

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PSYC B250 Autism Spectrum Disorders
Spring 2018
Focuses on theory of and research on Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Topics include the history of autism; classification and diagnosis; epidemiology and etiology; major theories; investigations of sensory and motor atypicalities, early social communicative skills, affective, cognitive, symbolic and social factors; the neuropsychology of ASD; and current approaches to intervention. Prerequisite: Introductory Psychology (PSYC 105).
Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Child and Family Studies

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PSYC B260 The Psychology of Mindfulness
Not offered 2017-18
This course focuses on psychological theory and research on mindfulness and meditative practices. Readings and discussion will introduce students to modern conceptualizations and implementation of mindfulness practices that have arisen in the West. Students will be encouraged to engage in mindfulness activities as part of their involvement in this course.
Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Health Studies

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PSYC B271 How to Build a Mind: An Introduction to Cognitive Science
Not offered 2017-18
Cognitive Science is the study of mind and mental phenomenon, both natural and artificial. It is an interdisciplinary field of study encompassing psychology, philosophy, computer science, neuroscience, and linguistics. Specific topics to be explored in this course include the nature and definition of mind, memory, perception, emotions, morality, intelligence, and consciousness. No prior knowledge or experience with any of the subfields is assumed or necessary.

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PSYC B282 Laboratory in Cognitive Psychology
Fall 2017
This laboratory course will provide hands-on experience in designing and conducting research in cognitive psychology, with an emphasis on the study of memory and cognition. Over the semester, students will have the opportunity to develop specific research skills, such as understanding how to design a study appropriate to a research question, collecting data, conducting and interpreting statistical analyses, writing about research, etc. Other goals include practicing and further developing critical thinking skills and communicating research ideas and results both verbally and in writing. Students will be exposed to behavioral and electrophysiological (EEG, ERP) techniques to study memory and cognition. The course will culminate with a final project in which students design and conduct a novel experiment, analyze the data, and prepare an APA style research report. This class is a writing intensive class and, as a .5 unit class, is designed to meet half of the writing requirement in the major. Prerequisite: Psych 205 (Methods and Statistics); Suggested preparation: Psych 212 (Human Cognition) is helpful, but not required.
Scientific Investigation (SI)

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PSYC B283 Laboratory in Developmental Psychology
Spring 2018
This laboratory course is designed to provide students with hands-on exposure to the principles and practices that guide scientific research on human psychological development. We will examine the crucial steps in the scientific research process, including developing research questions and hypotheses, identifying an appropriate research design, insuring measurement reliability and validity, collecting and analyzing data, and communicating results. Special attention will be given to the research topics and methodological approaches important to the interdisciplinary field of developmental cognitive neuroscience, which aims to elucidate the neurological changes underlying psychological development. Through lab activities and group projects, students will gain specific exposure to the use of neuroimaging methods to examine developmental questions. Prerequisite: Psych 105 (Introductory Psychology) and Psych 205 (Methods and Statistics); Suggested preparation: Psych 206 (Developmental Psychology) is helpful, but not required.
Scientific Investigation (SI)

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PSYC B284 Health Psychology Lab
Not offered 2017-18
This laboratory/writing intensive/scientific inquiry quarter course will provide a hands-on experience conducting health psychology research and writing APA-style manuscripts. Students will be exposed to various aspects of the scientific process such as: literature reviews, hypothesis-generation, data collection, analysis, writing (drafting and polishing), peer-reviewing, and oral dissemination of scientific findings. The course will focus on biopsychosocial theory and challenge students to apply the theory to their own research project(s) and write papers on the results. Suggested Preparation: PSYC B205.
Scientific Investigation (SI)

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PSYC B285 Laboratory in Cultural Psychology
Fall 2017
This writing-intensive laboratory course will provide students an opportunity to learn the entire process of psychological research in a small scale. Students will formulate research questions within the area of cultural psychology, review the relevant literature, collect, code, and analyze data, and produce APA-style manuscripts. This lab course will expose students to qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-method approaches to investigating research questions in cultural psychology. Prerequisites: Psych 105 (Introductory Psychology) and Psych 205 (Methods and Statistics);Suggested preparation: Psych 224 (Cross Cultural Psychology) is helpful, but not required.
Scientific Investigation (SI)

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PSYC B288 Laboratory in Social Psychology
Spring 2018
This laboratory course will offer experience in designing and conducting research in social psychology, statistical analysis of research results, and research reporting in the style of a journal article in psychology. Each student will participate in two research projects. This is a 0.5 unit course that meets for the full semester. Suggested Preparation: Statistics (PSYC 205 or equivalent).
Quantitative Readiness Required (QR)
Scientific Investigation (SI)

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PSYC B289 Laboratory in Clinical Psychology
Fall 2017
At its core, this laboratory course is designed to explore how it is that psychologists come to know (or think they know) things and how they communicate what they think they know. The class focuses on the scientific principles and practices underlying research in psychology with an emphasis on techniques and topics important to the subfield of clinical psychology. This course is intended to provide hands-on training in how to conduct research. Through lab activities and class projects, students will learn about important methodological issues and steps in the research process including how to identify important questions, measurement issues such as reliability and validity, different modes of data collection, and how to collect, analyze, and interpret data. This class is a writing intensive class and, as a .5 unit class, is designed to meet half of the writing requirement in the major. Prerequisite: Psych 205 (Methods and Statistics); Suggested preparation: Psych 209 (Abnormal Psychology) is helpful, but not required.
Quantitative Readiness Required (QR)
Scientific Investigation (SI)

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PSYC B303 Portraits of Maladjustment in Classic Children's Novels
Spring 2018
This writing-intensive seminar (maximum enrollment = 16 students) .5 unit course deals with critical analysis of how various forms of psychological maladjustment and health are depicted in selected classic novels for children. Many such novels were written in the Victorian period. Long before developmental psychopathology was a scientific discipline, its main questions were insightfully probed by 19th and early 20th century novelists in books such as "The Secret Garden." In this course, each book will be analyzed for the literary devices used to portray healthy adjustment and maladjustment, the implicit theories of psychological causation captured in the narratives, and the ways the novelist depicts life experiences that bring about mental health and personal growth. Each book will be discussed in its historical/literary contexts, and compared with current views drawn from psychological research. The course integrates literary analysis of classic children's novels with important concepts derived from the field of developmental psychopathology.
Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Health Studies

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PSYC B310 Advanced Developmental Psychology
Not offered 2017-18
This course details theory and research relating to the development of children and adolescents with family, school, and cultural contexts. We examine topics including (but not limited to): developmental theory, infant perception, language, attachment, self-awareness, social cognition, symbolic thought, memory, parent-child relations, peer relations, and gender issues. Prerequisite: PSYC 206 or permission of the instructor.

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PSYC B311 Personality and Social Contexts
Fall 2017
This course will explore how individual differences can explain variability in behavior and how individuals can also vary based on the social context. That is, we will examine how people behave across and within social contexts. The course will cover a variety of social psychological topics, such as motivation, prejudice and discrimination, and identity, and will be asking questions such as "Are there certain types of people who are more susceptible to stereotype threat?" and "In which situations are stereotype threat more or less likely to occur for men than women?"
Course does not meet an Approach

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PSYC B312 History of Modern American Psychology
Spring 2018
An examination of major 20th-century trends in American psychology and their 18th- and 19th-century social and intellectual roots. Topics include physiological and philosophical origins of scientific psychology; growth of American developmental, comparative, social, and clinical psychology; and the cognitive revolution. Prerequisite: any 200-level survey course.

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PSYC B314 Advanced Data Science:Regression & Multivariate Statistics
Spring 2018
This course is designed to improve your data science skills by introducing you to advanced statistical techniques that have become increasingly important in psychology and a variety of fields. The focus will be on understanding the advantages and limitations of regression approaches and multivariate analytic techniques that permit simultaneous prediction of multiple outcomes. Topics covered will include basic regression approaches, advanced regression strategies, structural equation modeling, factor analysis, measurement models, path modeling, modeling of longitudinal data sets, multilevel modeling approaches and growth curve modeling. Students will gain familiarity with these techniques by working with actual data sets. Prerequisites: Required: PSYCH Research Methods and Statistics 205 (BMC), Psych 200 (HC) Experimental Methods and Statistics, or BIOL B215 Experimental Design and Statistics. Students with good statistical preparation in math or other disciplines and some knowledge of core methods used in social science or health-related research should consult with the instructor to gain permission to take the class.

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PSYC B322 Culture and Development
Spring 2018
This course focuses on adolescents and their families in cultural, social, and ecological contexts. Topics include family dynamics, parent-adolescent relationship, socioeconomic status, immigration, social change, and globalization. Prerequisites: PSYC 105, and PSYC 206 or PSYC 224.
Counts toward Child and Family Studies

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PSYC B323 Advanced Topics in Cognitive Neuroscience
Section 001 (Spring 2017): The Emotional Brain
Not offered 2017-18
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Counts toward Neuroscience

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PSYC B325 Judgment and Decision-Making
Not offered 2017-18
This course will explore the psychology of reasoning and decision-making processes in depth. We will examine affective, cognitive, and motivational processes, as well as recent research in neuroscience. Among other topics, we will discuss notions of rationality and irrationality, accuracy, heuristics, biases, metacognition, evaluation, risk perception, and moral judgment. Prerequisites: ECONB136, ECONH203, PSYCB205 or PSYCH200, and PSYCB212, PSYCH260 or permission of instructor.

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PSYC B327 Adolescent Development
Fall 2017
Is adolescence a biologically distinct stage of life, or a social "holding ground" invented by modern culture for young people unready or unwilling to assume the responsibilities of adulthood? Are adolescents destined to make risky decisions because of their underdeveloped brains? At what age should they be held accountable as adults in a court of law? This course will explore these and other questions about the biological, social, and legal forces that define the boundaries and shape the experience of adolescents growing up in the modern world. Students will learn about: (1) historical changes in understanding and treatment of adolescents; (2) puberty-related biological changes marking the beginning of adolescence; (3) brain, behavioral, cognitive, and social development during adolescence; and (4) contemporary debates regarding age of adult maturity, and their implications for law and policy. Prerequisite: PSYC B206 (Developmental Psychology) or permission or instructor. PSYC B205 is recommended.
Current topic description: Mindfulness

Counts toward Health Studies

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PSYC B331 Health Behavior and Context
Not offered 2017-18
This seminar will be devoted to a discussion of theory and research in health psychology. We will investigate both historical and contemporary perspectives on the psychology of wellness and illness. We will begin with a consideration of how psychosocial forces influence health cognitions, behaviors, and physiological processes. The second half of the course will focus on contextual factors, interventions, and emerging topics in research. We will debate the question of whether/how psychological forces influence health outcomes. Prerequisite: PSYC B105 and PSYC B231 or PSYC B208, or by permission of the instructor.
Counts toward Health Studies

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PSYC B351 Developmental Psychopathology
Not offered 2017-18
This course will examine emotional and behavioral disorders of children and adolescents, including autism, attention deficit disorder, conduct disorder, phobias, obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression, anorexia, and schizophrenia. Major topics covered will include: contrasting models of psychopathology; empirical and categorical approaches to assessment and diagnosis; outcome of childhood disorders; risk, resilience, and prevention; and therapeutic approaches and their efficacy .Prerequisite: PSYC 206 or 209.
Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Health Studies
Counts toward Neuroscience

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PSYC B353 Advanced Topics in Clinical Psychology
Section 001 (Fall 2017): Mindfulness
Fall 2017
This course provides an in-depth examination of research and theory in a particular area of clinical psychology. Topics will vary from year to year.
Current topic description: This course focuses on psychological theory and research on mindfulness and meditative practices. Readings and discussion will introduce students to modern conceptualizations and implementation of mindfulness practices that have arisen in the West.

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PSYC B354 Asian American Psychology
Not offered 2017-18
This course will provide an overview of the nature and meaning of being Asian American in the United States. We will examine the history, struggle, and success of Asian Americans, drawing upon psychological theory and research, interdisciplinary ethnic studies scholarship, and memoirs. Students will also learn to evaluate the media portrayal of Asian Americans while examining issues affecting Asian American communities such as stereotypes, discrimination, family relationships, dating/marriage, education, and health disparities. Prerequisite: Introduction to Psychology (Psych 105) is required, Research Methods and Statistics (Psych 205) is recommended..

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PSYC B355 Neurobiology of Anxiety, Stress and Anxiety Disorders
Not offered 2017-18
A seminar course examining the neurobiological basis of fear and anxiety and the stress that is often associated with these emotions. We will also consider anxiety and stress disorders including generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, specific phobias, obsessive compulsive disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Implications for various forms of therapy for anxiety disorders, including psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy, will be addressed. Prerequisite: PSYC B218, PSYC B209, BIOL B202 or permission of instructor.
Counts toward Neuroscience

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PSYC B358 Political Psychology of Ethnic Conflict
Not offered 2017-18
This seminar explores the common interests of psychologists and political scientists in ethnic identification and ethnic-group conflict. Rational choice theories of conflict from political science will be compared with social psychological theories of conflict that focus more on emotion and essentializing. Each student will contribute a 200-300 word post in response to a reading or film assignment each week. Students will represent their posts in seminar discussion of readings and films. Each student will write a final paper analyzing the origins and trajectory of a case of violent ethnic conflict chosen by agreement with the instructor. Grading includes posts, participation in discussion, and the final paper. Prerequisite: PSYC B208, or PSYC B120, or PSYC B125, or one 200 level course in political science, or instructor's permission.
Counts toward Peace, Justice and Human Rights

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PSYC B375 Movies and Madness: Abnormal Psychology Through Films
Fall 2017
This writing-intensive seminar (maximum enrollment = 16 students) deals with critical analysis of how various forms of psychopathology are depicted in films. The primary focus of the seminar will be evaluating the degree of correspondence between the cinematic presentation and current research knowledge about the disorder, taking into account the historical period in which the film was made. For example, we will discuss how accurately the symptoms of the disorder are presented and how representative the protagonist is of people who typically manifest this disorder based on current research. We will also address the theory of etiology of the disorder depicted in the film, including discussion of the relevant intellectual history in the period when the film was made and the prevailing accounts of psychopathology in that period. Another focus will be how the film portrays the course of the disorder and how it depicts treatment for the disorder. This cinematic presentation will be evaluated with respect to current research on treatment for the disorder as well as the historical context of prevailing treatment for the disorder at the time the film was made. Prerequisite: PSYC B209.
Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Film Studies

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PSYC B395 Psychopharmacology
Spring 2018
A study of the role of drugs in understanding basic brain-behavior relations. Topics include the pharmacological basis of motivation and emotion; pharmacological models of psychopathology; the use of drugs in the treatment of psychiatric disorders such as anxiety, depression, and psychosis; and the psychology and pharmacology of drug addiction. Prerequisite: PSYC B218 or BIOL B202 or PSYC H217 or permission of instructor.
Counts toward Health Studies
Counts toward Neuroscience

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PSYC B398 Senior Thesis
Senior psychology majors who are doing a thesis should register for Senior Thesis (PSYC B398) with their adviser for both the Fall and Spring semester. Students will receive one unit per semester. Prerequisite: Psychology major.

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PSYC B399 Senior Seminar
This seminar is intended to serve as a capstone experience for senior psychology majors who have opted not to do a senior thesis. The focus of the seminar will be on analyzing the nature of public discourse (coverage in newspapers, magazines, on the internet) on a variety of major issues, identifying material in the psychological research literature relating to these issues, and to the extent possible relating the public discourse to the research.

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PSYC B401 Supervised Research in Neuroscience
Laboratory or field research on a wide variety of topics. Students should consult with faculty members to determine their topic and faculty supervisor, early in the semester prior to when they will begin.
Counts toward Neuroscience

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PSYC B401 Supervised Research in Neuroscience
Laboratory or field research on a wide variety of topics. Students should consult with faculty members to determine their topic and faculty supervisor, early in the semester prior to when they will begin.
Counts toward Neuroscience

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PSYC B403 Supervised Research
Laboratory or field research on a wide variety of topics. Students should consult with faculty members to determine their topic and faculty supervisor, early in the semester prior to when they will begin.

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PSYC B403 Supervised Research
Laboratory or field research on a wide variety of topics. Students should consult with faculty members to determine their topic and faculty supervisor, early in the semester prior to when they will begin.

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PSYC B425 Praxis III: Independent Study
Praxis III courses are Independent Study courses and are developed by individual students, in collaboration with faculty and field supervisors. A Praxis courses is distinguished by genuine collaboration with fieldsite organizations and by a dynamic process of reflection that incorporates lessons learned in the field into the classroom setting and applies theoretical understanding gained through classroom study to work done in the broader community.
Counts toward Praxis Program

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PSYC B499 Junior Brown Bag
Majors are also required to attend a one-hour, weekly brown bag in the junior year for one semester. This requirement is designed to sharpen students' analytical and critical thinking skills, to introduce students to faculty members' areas of research, to provide additional opportunities for student-faculty interactions, and to build a sense of community.

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PSYC B508 Social Psychology
Not offered 2017-18
Provides an introduction to basic social psychological theories and research. Topics covered include: group dynamics, stereotypes and group conflict, attitude measurement, and attitudes and behavior. An emphasis is placed on research methods in the study of social psychology.

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PSYC B612 Historical Issues in Clinical Developmental Psychology
Not offered 2017-18
Familiarizes students with 20th century developments in clinical psychology and with the 18th and 19th century social and intellectual trends from which they emerged. Topics include: Mesmerism and the rise of dynamic psychiatry in Europe and America; changing patterns in the institutionalization of the insane; the Bost Group (James, Prince, Sidis) and the development of abnormal psychology and psychotherapy; the American reception of psychoanalysis; the Mental Hygiene and Child Guidance movements; the growth of psychometrics; personality theories and theorists; and trends in the professionalization of clinical psychology after WWII.

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PSYC B701 Supervised Work
Fall 2017, Spring 2018

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BIOL B401 Supervised Research in Neuroscience
Laboratory or library research under the supervision of a member of the Neuroscience committee. Required for those with the concentration. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
Counts toward Counts toward Neuroscience

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