This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's calendars page.

Fall 2019

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
ENGL B104-001The Global Short StorySemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHEnglish House IBeard,L.
ENGL B222-001"Afro-Futurism"Semester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWEnglish House IBeard,L.
ENGL B227-001Writing Love in the African DiasporaSemester / 1Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHEnglish House IISullivan,M.
ENGL B230-001Disabled Women's Life WritingSemester / 1Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:30 AM MWEnglish House IIMullaney,C.
ENGL B250-001Methods of Literary StudySemester / 1Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTHTaylor,J.
ENGL B262-001Survey in African American LiteratureSemester / 1Lecture: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTHEnglish House IBeard,L.
ENGL B281-001Rethinking the Golden Age of Children's LiteratureSemester / 1Lecture: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTHEnglish House IIFlower,C.
ENGL B289-001Topics in the Ellery Yale Wood Collection: The FantasticSemester / 1LEC: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHDalton Hall 25Flower,C.
ENGL B310-001Confessional PoetrySemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM WEnglish House IIHedley,J.
ENGL B335-001Beyond the HumanSemester / 1Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHTratner,M.
ENGL B345-001Topics in Narrative Theory: Theory of the Ethnic NovelSemester / 1LEC: 11:40 AM- 1:00 PM MWEnglish House IHarford Vargas,J.
ENGL B398-001Senior SeminarSemester / 1Lecture: 2:20 PM- 4:00 PM MDalton Hall 300Dept. staff, TBA
ARTW B260-001Writing Short Fiction ISemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHEnglish House IIIAllingham,S.
ARTW B262-001Playwriting ISemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM THEnglish House IIIFeldman,L.
ARTW B264-001News and Feature WritingSemester / 1Lecture: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM TEnglish House IIFerrick,T.
ARTW B266-001ScreenwritingSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM WEnglish House IIITorday,D.
ARTW B269-001Writing for ChildrenSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM WDalton Hall 6Jensen,C.
ARTW B361-001Writing Poetry IISemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM TEnglish House IIMatthews,D.
CSTS B201-001Cleopatra: Passion, Power, and PoliticsSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWDalton Hall 2Baertschi,A.
HART B112-001Art, Death, and the AfterlifeSemester / 1Lecture: 11:10 AM-12:00 PM MWFCarpenter Library 25Shi,J., Teaching Assistant,T.

Spring 2020

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
ENGL B205-001Introduction to FilmSemester / 1Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTHBryant,S.
ENGL B210-001Renaissance Literature: Performances of GenderSemester / 1Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MWHedley,J.
ENGL B220-001Writing in Theory/Writing in PracticeSemester / 1Lecture: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTHCallaghan,J.
ENGL B226-001PostmodernismSemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHTratner,M.
ENGL B231-001Theorizing Affect, Watching TelevisionSemester / 1Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHBryant,S.
ENGL B236-001Latina/o Culture and the Art of MigrationSemester / 1Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:30 AM MWHarford Vargas,J.
ENGL B250-001Methods of Literary StudySemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWHarford Vargas,J.
ENGL B250-002Methods of Literary StudySemester / 1Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTHSullivan,M.
ENGL B374-001African-American ChildhoodsSemester / 1Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:30 AM MWFlower,C.
ENGL B390-001Medieval RaceSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWTaylor,J.
ENGL B399-001Senior EssaySemester / 1Lecture: Date/Time TBADept. staff, TBA
ARTW B159-001Introduction to Creative WritingSemester / 1Lecture: Date/Time TBAMatthews,D.
ARTW B233-001Writing for Radio and PodcastSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM TTorday,D.
ARTW B260-001Writing Short Fiction ISemester / 1Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHSullivan,M.
ARTW B261-001Writing Poetry ISemester / 1Lecture: Date/Time TBAOka,C.
ARTW B364-001Longer Fictional FormsSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM W
COML B293-001The Play of InterpretationSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWSeyhan,A.
EALC B345-001Topics in East Asian CultureSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM THO'Kane,B.
HART B334-001Topics in Film StudiesSemester / 1Lecture: 12:10 PM- 2:00 PM TKing,H.

Fall 2020

(Class schedules for this semester will be posted at a later date.)

2019-20 Catalog Data

ENGL B103 American Futures: Literatures of New World Fantasy
Not offered 2019-20
This 100-level seminar for freshmen and sophomores offers a taste of the reading and writing practices of the English major. It is not required for the major, but counts. Freshmen and sophomores may take only one 100-level course. In this course we will take a trans-historical look at American fantasies about the Beginning with with Columbus' letters to the Queen of Spain, we will move through the Salem Witch trials and fears of devilish possession, Indian Captivity narratives and the Western, the Ghost Dance religion, free-love, feminist, black and socialist utopian movements, space-exploration fantasies, and end with close attention to the emergent literary genres of Afro- and Native-futurism. We will practice close reading and the writing and discussion skills necessary to an English major, through engagement with how questions of race and colonialism have driven American future-fantasies from first contact to Star Trek and beyond.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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ENGL B104 The Global Short Story
Fall 2019
The majority of the most provocative and interesting English-language literary production at the current moment hails from African nations, India, Oceania and their diasporae throughout the world. A significant number of major international literary prizes have been awarded to members of these writing communities who cross borders, continents, passport identities, and traditions in their experiments with narration, place, politics, and the creolization of English. The late Nigerian novelist and memoirist Chinua Achebe said of the English language, in particular: "Do not be fooled by the fact that we may write in English because we intend to do unheard of things with it."
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Africana Studies

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ENGL B106 Romance to Bromance
Not offered 2019-20
This course examines the ongoing popularity of romance, examining the genre from the Middle Ages to contemporary romantic comedies. In doing so, we will pay particular attention to the gender politics romance produces, supports, and challenges, exploring how various historical moments and media conceptualize love, desire, sex, and marriage. Texts will include Chaucer's _Troilus and Criseyde_, Marlowe's _Hero and Leander_, Richard Hurd's eighteenth-century _Letters on Chivalry and Romance_, and nineteenth-century bodice rippers. We will also discuss the ongoing publication of Harlequin romances, the popularity of romantic comedy in film (from the 1930s to now) as well as the reimagining of romance tropes and male intimacy in films like "Brokeback Mountain" and buddy comedies.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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ENGL B107 Staging American Families
Not offered 2019-20
This 100-level seminar for freshmen and sophomores offers a taste of the reading and writing practices of the English major. It is not required for the major, but counts toward it. Freshmen and sophomores may take only one 100-level course. Modern and contemporary American drama often takes as its focus the family in its various iterations: nuclear families; lost families; imagined families; explosive marriages; rebel children; siblings in conflict. This course will focus on dramatizations of the family in 20th- and 21st-century American plays. We will explore how staged family dynamics are shaped by performances of gender, class and race. The course offers opportunities to develop abilities that contribute to success in the English major: close reading, active discussion, critical writing.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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ENGL B201 Chaucer: Canterbury Tales
Not offered 2019-20
Access to and skill in reading Middle English will be acquired through close study of the Tales. Exploration of Chaucer's narrative strategies and of a variety of critical approaches to the work will be the major undertakings of the semester.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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ENGL B202 Understanding Poetry
Not offered 2019-20
This course is for students who wish to develop their skills in reading and writing about poetry. It will provide grounding in traditional prosody (i.e., in reading accentual, syllabic, and accentual-syllabic verse), as well as tactics for reading and understanding the breath-based or image-based prosody of free verse. This is not a chronological survey of English poetry, but the syllabus has been put together with an eye to sampling the riches of the English poetic tradition and calling attention to some of its most important moments. The goal of the course is for you to become capable readers, interpreters and critics of poetry in a wide variety of voices and styles. There are no pre-requisites--except an interest in poetry! You will be expected to attend class regularly, come prepared, and participate actively in class discussions and activities. Papers will be short, but will add up to about twenty-five pages of critical writing over the course of the semester. There will also be one or two creative assignments, and a short in-class presentation of your "favorite poem."
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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ENGL B202 The Language of Loss: Mourning and Melancholia in Elegy
Not offered 2019-20
Elegy is the genre of poetry tasked with performing the work of mourning in the aftermath of profound loss. Elegies are crucial for our understanding of literary history because in addition to coping with individual loss they address larger themes and problems about literature, including what form mourning should take in verse. These poems range from meditating on the vision of someone dying to lamenting the loss of a fellow poet, and they take on excruciating subjects such as the loss of a child or coming to terms with the violent death of a beloved person. An elegy can be both intensely personal and political, forcing us to confront our own mortality and the grief of others. This course examines the rich history of this genre, starting with Elizabethans, including Ben Jonson's heartbreaking poem "On My First Son," and ending with Helen Macdonald's recent memoir, H is for Hawk, that connects her own personal grief with the glo bal ecological crisis. Our readings will address a wide array of social and cultural contexts from the problem of faith in the Victorian period to the AIDS epidemic of the 1980s and 1990s. We will also consider how the genre of elegy extends beyond poetic form to include narrative and memoir. Major elegies might include Milton's Lycidas, Thomas Gray's "Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard," Percy Shelley's Adonais, Alfred Lord Tennyson's In Memoriam, Donald Hall's Without, Joan Didion's In the Year of Magical Thinking, and Anne Carson's Nox. We will also engage shorter works by Shakespeare, John Donne, Anne Bradstreet, William Wordsworth, John Keats, Emily Dickinson, Walt Whitman, Christina Rossetti, Thomas Hardy, Anne Sexton, Claude McKay, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Elizabeth Bishop, Theodore Roethke, John Berryman, Mark Doty, Li-Young Lee, Marilyn Hacker, and others. In addition to these primary texts, we will touch on theories of loss and mourning, including the work of Sigmund Freud and Judith Butler
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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ENGL B205 Introduction to Film
Spring 2020
This course is intended to provide students with the tools of critical film analysis. Through readings of images and sounds, sections of films and entire narratives, students will cultivate the habits of critical viewing and establish a foundation for focused work in film studies. The course introduces formal and technical units of cinematic meaning and categories of genre and history that add up to the experiences and meanings we call cinema. Although much of the course material will focus on the Hollywood style of film, examples will be drawn from the history of cinema. Attendance at weekly screenings is mandatory.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Visual Studies

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ENGL B208 Big Books of American Literature
Not offered 2019-20
This course focuses on the "big books" of mid-19th-century American literature, viewed through the lenses of contemporary theory and culture. Throughout the course, as we explore the role that classics play in the construction of our culture, we will consider American literature as an institutional apparatus, under debate and by no means settled. This will involve a certain amount of antidisciplinary work: interrogating books as naturalized objects, asking how they reproduce conventional categories and how we might re-imagine the cultural work they perform. We will look at the problems of exceptionalism as we examine traditional texts relationally, comparatively, and interactively.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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ENGL B210 Renaissance Literature: Performances of Gender
Spring 2020
Readings chosen to highlight the construction and performance of gender identity during the period from 1550 to 1650 and the ways in which the gender anxieties of 16th- and 17th-century men and women differ from, yet speak to, our own. Texts will include plays, poems, prose fiction, diaries, and polemical writing of the period.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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ENGL B211 The Lives of Nineteenth-Century Monsters
Not offered 2019-20
This course explores the centrality of monstrosity to the nineteenth-century British novel. Our work will involve placing these monsters in the tradition of the Gothic in order to understand the cultural, social, and literary metaphors they represent. In some cases, we will read about monsters with hideous bodies, but our work will also include reading about monstrosity that is kept hidden from view. To aid our work--and to provide adequate protection--we will read about the sublime, the uncanny, and the other topics that monstrosity veils and exposes such as gender and sexuality. Literary texts might include Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, James Hogg's The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner, Jane Austen's Northanger Abbey, Emily Brontë's Wuthering Heights, George Eliot's The Lifted Veil, Thomas Hardy's Tess of the d'Urbervilles, Bram Stoker's Dracula, Robert Louis Stevenson's Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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ENGL B212 Renaissance Erotic Poetry
Not offered 2019-20
Even when it was concerned with elevated topics like religion, politics, or community, Renaissance poetry was deeply embodied, working through abstract topics in frank and fleshy figures. This class will serve as an introduction to Renaissance lyric, focusing on the erotic dimensions of early modern poetics. Along the way, we'll discuss topics of interest within gender and sexuality studies and queer theory. Authors will include Wyatt, Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, Marvell, Herbert, Rochester, and Milton.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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ENGL B214 Refuse and Refusal in Victorian Literature
Not offered 2019-20
The florid wealth of Britain in the nineteenth century was fed by income from slave trade, industrial exploitation, and imperial expansion. It was also an era that was horrified by its own growth; abolitionism, the women's suffrage movement, the arts and crafts movement, the inception of the welfare state were all nineteenth century protests against the waste of human life and spirit. The noun "refuse" finds etymological root in the concept of that which is "despised, rejected . . . outcast." This course will touch down on key events, debates and literatures that brought the figures of the outcast and the resister into sharp relief.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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ENGL B215 Early Modern Crime Narratives: Vice, Villains, and Law
Not offered 2019-20
This course taps into our continuing collective obsession with criminality, unpacking the complicated web of feelings attached to crime and punishment through early modern literary treatments of villains, scoundrels, predators, pimps, witches, king-killers, poisoners, mobs, and adulterers. By reading literary accounts of vice alongside contemporary and historical theories of criminal justice, we will chart the deep history of criminology and track competing ideas about punishment and the criminal mind. This course pays particular attention the ways that people in this historical moment mapped criminality onto dynamics of gender, race, sexuality, disability, religion, and mental illness according to cultural conventions very different from our own. Authors may include Shakespeare, Marlowe, Massinger, Middleton, Dekker, Webster, and Behn.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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ENGL B216 Narrativity and Hip Hop
Not offered 2019-20
This course explores narrative and poetic forms and themes in hip-hop culture. Through close, intensive analysis of hip-hop lyrics, as well as audiovisual performance and visual art, we will consider how rappers and hip-hop artists from the late twentieth century onward have used the form to extend, further, and complicate key concerns of literature in general, and African American and African Diaspora literature in particular. We will explore key texts in hip hop from the late 1970s to the current moment. Reading these texts alongside short fiction by writers such as Gayl Jones, Octavia Butler, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, Victor LaValle, Kiese Laymon, Ivelisse Rodriguez, Regina Bradley and others, we will consider how themes of socioeconomic mobility, gender and sexuality, queer and feminist critique, and intersectional political engagement animate artists' narrative and poetic strategies across genre and media. Written work will include regular in-class presentations, short creative assignments, three short papers, and a final project. As a part of the Philly program, the course will take place in Center City, Philadelphia. Along with course readings, we will engage directly with writers, artists, and events that help shape Philadelphia's vibrant hip-hop and literature scene. For additional information see the program's website https://www.brynmawr.edu/philly-program
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Africana Studies

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ENGL B217 Narratives of Latinidad
Not offered 2019-20
This course explores how Latina/o writers fashion bicultural and transnational identities and narrate the intertwined histories of the U.S. and Latin America. We will focus on topics of shared concern among Latino groups such as struggles for social justice, the damaging effects of machismo and racial hierarchies, the politics of Spanglish, and the affective experience of migration. By analyzing a range of cultural production, including novels, poetry, testimonial narratives, films, activist art, and essays, we will unpack the complexity of Latinidad in the Americas.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies

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ENGL B220 Writing in Theory/Writing in Practice
Spring 2020
This Praxis course is designed for students interested in teaching or tutoring writing at the high-school or college level. The course focuses on understanding the relationship between high school and college-level writing. Readings focus on the theory and pedagogy of writing, on literacy issues, and on writing culture.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Praxis Program

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ENGL B222 "Afro-Futurism"
Fall 2019
The study of "Afro-Futurism" is the cultural, artistic, and political exploration of African and diasporan visions and critiques of the past, present and future. It presents worlds inflected by the ancient conjurations of African forebears, chattel slaves, and free African Americans from the 19th to the 21st century. The supranatural worlds of Afro-Futurism brings into sharp focus the laws of both nature and society. It has given birth to a revision of the science fiction and fantasy genres by writers such as Nnedi Okorafor, Octavia Butler, Nalo Hopkinson, Tomi Adeyeni, and Deji Bryce Olukotun. Prerequisites: Contemporary enrollment in or completion of the Emily Balch Seminar, its Haverford equivalent, or College permission to bypass either.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Africana Studies

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ENGL B225 Contemporary Life Writing: Form and Theory
Not offered 2019-20
In this course, we will explore contemporary forms of life writing. The term "writing" will be used flexibly to encompass self-representation in visual forms (including comics, photography, and video). We will begin by considering myth and archives in Alison Bechdel's Fun Home and Theresa Hak Kyung Cha's Dictée; our next unit will address how life writing represents the lives of others. The last half of the course focuses on the genre of autotheory, or life writing that has become a form of theorizing (about gender, sexuality, race, and biopolitics, among other topics) in its own right.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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ENGL B226 Postmodernism
Spring 2020
To be modern is to be new; to be post-modern is then to be "after the new," in other words to exist after everything new has already been done. What does it mean for authors, filmmakers and artists to feel that all their works and all the people represented in them are not original, but are rather entirely copies or simulations? This strange belief emerged in the 1970s, and this course will examine the way it has led to some intriguing works of literature, film and art. Starting with Andy Warhol's versions of Campbell's soup cans and Jeffrey Koons' balloon sculptures, we will move to movies such as Spike Jonze's Being John Malkovich and The Wachowski Brothers' The Matrix, and finally to books about people whose personalities and even their bodies seem to be composed of images and texts from past eras--Salvador Plascensia's The People of Paper; Arundhati Roy's The God of Small Things, and Jorge Borges' Labyrinths. To help us understand these works, we will use three main critical theorists: Jean Baudrillard, Fredric Jameson and Linda Hutcheon.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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ENGL B227 Writing Love in the African Diaspora
Fall 2019
This course explores how various forms of love are imagined in contemporary writing of the African Diaspora. From parent-child affections, to romance and marriage, to the closeness between friends, "love" is a central theme in literature and a crucial part of how we define humanity. Focusing on contemporary texts such as Justin Torres's We the Animals, Mariama Bâ's So Long a Letter, Ama Ata Aidoo's Our Sister Killjoy, Dee Rees's Pariah, Toni Morrison's Love, and the works of poets and lyricists including Yusef Komunyakaa, Warsan Shire, Messy Maya, and Cardi B, we will consider how various forms of intimacy are written and read in the African Diaspora. We will read these works alongside key short works from earlier moments in Afrodiasporic literature, as well as theoretical and critical texts in Diaspora feminism, sexuality studies, affect theory, and queer theory to consider several questions: What do literary love relationships reveal about cultural notions of gender, sexuality, class, (dis)ability, embodiment and spirituality? How are intimacy and human connection evoked differently through magic realism, experimentalism, and other Diasporic poetic and aesthetic techniques? What forms and media do black artists use to evoke the love of place, nation and home? What visions of love do these black writers develop, and how do such visions impact how freedom is imagined in Afrodiasporic literature?
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Africana Studies

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ENGL B227 Poverty and Precarious Lives on Screen
Not offered 2019-20
The cinema and the mainstream film industry have been well suited to depicting glamour, opulence, and wealth. But what about the widespread condition of being poor and living on the brink of being even worse off? In this course, we will explore cinematic depictions of poverty and inequality to ask whether and how films can go beyond romanticizing poverty or merely rehearsing rags-to-riches narratives. How does the awareness of poverty shape aesthetic form in film? What are the social and political implications of how cinema treats the condition of being poor? Subtopics will include: the Great Depression and Hollywood; social realism and fantasies of escape; representing labor in late capitalism; global inequality and a "world" cinema; and precarity in the 21st-century U.S. Film will include Gold Diggers of 1933, Sullivan's Travels, Ratcatcher, Slumdog Millionaire, Wendy and Lucy, and Beasts of the Southern Wild.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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ENGL B229 Movies and Mass Politics
Not offered 2019-20
Movies and mass politics emerged together, altering entertainment and government in strangely similar ways. Fascism and Communism claimed an inherent relation to the masses and hence to movies; Hollywood rejected such claims. We will examine films that allude to Communism and Fascism, seeking to understand how they join in political debates and comment upon the mass experience of movie going.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Visual Studies

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ENGL B230 Disabled Women's Life Writing
Fall 2019
Drawing on recent "feminist disability studies" scholarship, this course considers what role disability plays in women's life writing. We will begin by assessing how, historically, women have been represented as disabled--from Aristotle and Freud's assertion that women were "deformed" versions of men to Edward H. Clarke's belief that women were not biologically fit to be educated. We'll ask: how do the genres of memoir, autobiography, or life writing push back against these gender prescriptions and offer new definitions of what it means to be a disabled woman? How do lesbian and trans identities map onto disability experience? And how do these accounts change both before and after the disability rights movement? Possible course texts include: The Diary of Alice James, Charlotte Perkins Gilman's "The Yellow Wallpaper," Helen Keller's The Story of My Life, Katherine Butler Hathaway's The Little Locksmith, Audre Lorde's The Cancer Journals, and Terry Galloway's Mean Little deaf Queer.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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ENGL B230 Topics in American Drama
Not offered 2019-20
Considers American plays of the 20th century, reading major playwrights of the canon alongside other dramatists who were less often read and produced. Will also study later 20th century dramatists whose plays both develop and resist the complex foundation established by canonical American playwrights and how American drama reflects and responds to cultural and political shifts. Considers how modern American identity has been constructed through dramatic performance, considering both written and performed versions of these plays.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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ENGL B231 Theorizing Affect, Watching Television
Spring 2020
This course examines television through the lens of affect theory. Within humanities scholarship, the turn toward affect has offered new ways to study the cultural, economic, and political functions of literature and art. In our wider cultural moment, television programming has become a source of shared fascination. The course will pair readings from affect studies (by scholars such as Lauren Berlant and Sianne Ngai) with select examples of television shows (including Black Mirror, Mad Men, and The Wire). We will also read scholarly and public writing about television and consider the interplay between cultural feelings and televisual forms such as seriality, situation comedy, and bottle episodes.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Film Studies

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ENGL B233 Spenser and Milton
Not offered 2019-20
The course is equally divided between Spenser's Faerie Queene and Milton's Paradise Lost, with additional short readings from each poet's other work.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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ENGL B234 Postcolonial Literature in English
Not offered 2019-20
This course will survey a broad range of novels and poems written while countries were breaking free of British colonial rule. Readings will also include cultural theorists interested in defining literary issues that arise from the postcolonial situation.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Africana Studies

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ENGL B236 Latina/o Culture and the Art of Migration
Spring 2020
Gloria Anzaldúa has famously described the U.S.-Mexico border as an open wound and the border culture that arises from this fraught site as a third country. This course will explore how Chicana/os and Latina/os creatively represent different kinds of migrations across geo-political borders and between cultural traditions to forge transnational identities and communities. We will use cultural production as a lens for understanding how citizenship status, class, gender, race, and language shape the experiences of Latin American migrants and their Latina/o children. We will also analyze alternative metaphors and discourses of resistance that challenge anti-immigrant rhetoric and reimagine the place of undocumented migrants and Latina/os in contemporary U.S. society. Over the course of the semester, we will probe the role that literature, art, film, and music can play in the struggle for migrants' rights and minority civil rights, querying how the imagination and aesthetics can contribute to social justice. We will examine a number of different genres, as well as read and apply key theoretical texts on the borderlands and undocumented migration.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies

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ENGL B239 African American Poetry
Not offered 2019-20
This course explores the work of black poets in the Americas. Focusing on a range of poetic forms from the 18th century through the present, we will consider key questions that have animated the works of black poets in North America and the Caribbean, and how they have used poetic strategy to engage these questions. How do black poets explore black political and social life in various historical and geographical contexts? How do they use particular formal strategies (for example, form poetry, free verse, narrative poetry, and experimental modes) to interrogate notions of blackness? How do political movements around gender, class, and sexuality factor in? As we approach these questions, we will consider important critical conversations on African American poetry and poetics, examining how both well-known and underexplored poets use form to complicate blackness and imagine various forms of freedom. Our work will take us through several poetic genres and forms, including print works, performance poetry, hip hop music, and digital media. Throughout our analysis, we will consider how discourses on gender, sexuality, class, national and transnational identity, and other engagements with difference shape black poetic expression, both historically and in our current moment.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies

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ENGL B244 Unsettling Literacy
Not offered 2019-20
These two linked courses, co-designed by teachers in the Education Program and English Department, offer the Bi-Co alongside three placement sites-- a correctional facility, a re-entry program, and a youth art and advocacy project--as comparative contexts for experiences and reflections on the meanings of "literacy": What gives us access, to texts and selves? What are the outcomes of such educational processes? Do we imagine "learning our letters," in Frederick Douglas's words, as providing "the pathway from slavery to freedom," and/or (as claimed by a contemporary criminologist) as "training good workers for a problematic system"? How might "literacy" take on different meanings in different contexts? Does it enable learners to fill roles in stratified, normalizing institutions, and/or give us increased leeway in living our lives--perhaps even opening up what educator Jean Anyon calls "radical possibilities"? Placements will involve a weekly off-campus commitment of 3-4 hours. For more info, see https://serendip.brynmawr.edu/oneworld/unsettling-literacies/unsettling-...
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Praxis Program

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ENGL B249 Love and Madness in Victorian Poetry
Not offered 2019-20
We commonly associate Victorian Britain with great works of fiction by writers such as Charles Dickens and Charlotte Brontë. However, the development of Victorian poetry over the same period of time, roughly 1830-1901, is a frequently overlooked site of immense creativity. This course will cover a broad array of topics from the Victorian Poetess to the Pre-Raphaelite School with a particular emphasis on the innovation of the dramatic monologue. Unlike the Romantic lyric, the dramatic monologue enables us to hear directly from a diversity of speakers who are frequently lovesick and mad. From murderers to narcissistic painters, the dramatic monologue represents the nuances of human thought that surface in language. Readings will include texts by Alfred Tennyson, Robert Browning, Elizabeth Barret Browning, Christina Rossetti, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, William Morris, George Meredith, Matthew Arnold, Augusta Webster, Amy Levy, and Oscar Wilde.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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ENGL B250 Methods of Literary Study
Fall 2019, Spring 2020
We will explore the power of language in a variety of linguistic, historical, disciplinary, social, and cultural contexts, focusing on the power of the written word to provide a foundational basis for the critical and creative analysis of literary studies. This course will help to broaden our ideas of what texts and language accomplish socially, historically, and aesthetically. Students will thus refine their faculties of reading closely, writing incisively and passionately, asking productive questions, producing their own compelling interpretations, and listening to the insights offered by others. Prerequisite: One English course or permission of instructor. English Majors and Minors must take this class before their senior year. Not appropriate for freshmen.
Course does not meet an Approach

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ENGL B252 Disability Studies; Disability Stories
Not offered 2019-20
This course will introduce students to the field of disability studies by examining depictions of disability in literature. We will discuss foundational texts in the field and consider key terms including access, ableism, medicalization, representation, and prosthesis. These critical texts will be read alongside literature, primarily from the Victorian period, that represents blindness, deafness, speech impairments, and other forms of disability. Together we will question the historical construction of disability and various bodily, mental, and communicatory norms. The course will conclude by turning to contemporary memoir and poetry to illuminate the intersections of disability studies with other identity-based fields.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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ENGL B255 Food and the Transnational City
Not offered 2019-20
Cities have been crucial sites of cultural innovation, social interaction, and identity formation, often most visibly in food and foodways. Using three cities as case studies--New York, New Orleans, and Los Angeles--"Food and the Transnational City" explores how transnational migration and urbanism have shaped and reshaped eating, shopping, and cooking patterns, and how cities and foodways together reshaped and reflected broader patterns of identity and belonging. How have food and foodways been mobilized in constructions of national, regional, ethnic, and racial heritage? How have cooking and eating patterns for various groups been transformed by migration and immigration? How have consumer spaces operated as sites of kinship, community, assimilation, and resistance? Students will draw on theory and historical scholarship to read a wide range of literary and cultural texts, including cookbooks, travel writing, print and television commercials, art and photography, documentaries, and short fiction. NOTE: This course is part of the Foodways and Migration 360, however students who do not wish to enroll in the 360 may also take this class.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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ENGL B260 Origin Stories: Human Perspectives on Beginnings
Not offered 2019-20
This course is part of the "Origin Stories" 360. It will begin with an examination of "Western" origin stories and philsosophies of progress and history, with the intention of both historicizing and "making strange" the cultural inheritances most prevalent in Europe and post-contact North America. We will then turn to an in-depth analysis of the Diné Bahane', or "Story of the People," the creation cycle of the Navajo, focusing attention on a geographically specific and temporally non-linear philosophy of origin and continuity. We will conclude with a series of contemporary Science Fiction and Fantasy engagements with the problem of origin, asking how we continue to reinvent our beginnings, and why. Throughout the course we will turn our attention to origin stories from various parts of the world that might specifically illuminate the science in the other two courses.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

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ENGL B262 Survey in African American Literature
Fall 2019
English 262 is a topics course that allows for multiple themes to be taught. Each topic will have its own description and students may enroll for credit in the course as long as the topics vary.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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ENGL B267 The Romantic Imagination
Not offered 2019-20
Many of our contemporary ideas about both the imagination and the power of art to change the world originate from British Romantic literature. These ideas developed in a short but intensely creative period of literary and cultural history spanning from the 1790s to the 1820s. This is an age of political upheaval, scientific discovery, and social revolution. We will foreground our discussion of these radical transformations in art and politics by reading the prose of Edmund Burke, Mary Wollstonecraft, and William Godwin. We will then examine the rise of Romanticism in the poetry of William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge by focusing on their groundbreaking text _Lyrical Ballads_. We will use this poetry to define the power of what these writers called the "imagination." The course will then turn toward the later Romantics, who responded to these artistic and political ideals in surprising ways. Readings may include Percy By sshe Shelley's _The Cenci_, John Keats's Odes, and Lord Byron's _Childe Harold's Pilgrimage_. Our study of verse will be complemented by fiction writers of the period such as Jane Austen and Mary Shelley. An assortment of critical texts will enable us to situate these works in their cultural, social, and literary contexts.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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ENGL B269 Medieval Bodies
Not offered 2019-20
The Middle Ages imagined the physical body as the site of moral triumph and failure and as the canvas to expose social ills. The course examines medical tracts, saint's lives, poetry, theological texts, and representations of the Passion. Discussion topics range from plague and mercantilism to the legal and religious depiction of torture. Texts by Boccaccio, Chaucer, Dante, and Kempe will be supplemented with contemporary readings on trauma theory and embodiment.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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ENGL B270 American Girl: Childhood in U.S. Literatures, 1690-1935
Not offered 2019-20
This course will focus on the "American Girl" as a particularly contested model for the nascent American. Through examination of religious tracts, slave and captivity narratives, literatures for children and adult literatures about childhood, we will analyze U. S. investments in girlhood as a site for national self-fashioning.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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ENGL B271 Transatlantic Childhoods in the 19th Century
Not offered 2019-20
This class explores what we can see anew when we juxtapose American and British experiences of, and responses to, emergent ideas and ideals of childhood in the child-obsessed nineteenth century. After setting up key eighteenth-century concepts and contexts for what French historian Philippe Ariès called the "invention of childhood," we'll explore the ways in which children came to be defined between 1800 and 1900, in relation to such categories as law, labor, education, sex, play, and psychology, through examinations of both "literary" works and texts and artifacts from a range of other discourses and spheres. We'll move between American and British examples, aiming to track the commonalities at work in the two nations and the effects of marked structural differences. Here we'll be especially attentive to chattel slavery in the U.S., and to the relations, and non-relations, between the racialized notions of childhood produced in this country and those which arise out of Britain's sharply stratified class landscape. If race and class are produced differently, we'll also consider the degree to which British and American histories and representations of boyhood and girlhood converge and diverge across the period. We'll close with reflections on the ways in which a range of literary genres on the cusp of modernism form themselves in and through the new discourses of childhood and evolving figures of the child.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Child and Family Studies

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ENGL B272 Queer of Color Critique
Not offered 2019-20
Queer of color critique (QoCC) is a mode of criticism with roots in women of color feminism, post-structuralism, critical race theory, and queer studies. QoCC focuses on "intersectional" analyses. That is, QoCC seeks to integrate studies of race, sexuality, gender, class, and nationalism, and to show how these categories are co-constitutive. In so doing, QoCC contends that a focus on gay rights or reliance on academic discourse is too narrow. QoCC therefore addresses a wide set of issues from beauty standards to terrorism and questions the very idea of "normal." This course introduces students to the ideas of QoCC through key literary and film texts.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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ENGL B279 Introduction to African Literature
Not offered 2019-20
Taking into account the oral, written, aural, and visual forms of African "texts" over several thousand years, this course will explore literary production, intertextuality, translation, and audience/critical reception. Representative works to be studied include oral traditions, the Sundiata and Mwindo epics, the plays of Wole Soyinka and his Burden of History, the Muse of Forgiveness; and the work of Sembène Ousmane, Bessie Head, Ayi Kwei Armah, Mariama Bâ, Naguib Mahfouz, Ngugi wa Thiong'o, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Yvonne Vera, and others.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Africana Studies

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ENGL B281 Rethinking the Golden Age of Children's Literature
Fall 2019
Scholars often call the period between the 1850s and the 1910s the "Golden Age" of children's literature--an age producing such childhood stalwarts as Little Women, The Secret Garden, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, and Peter and Wendy. This class will offer an introduction to the critical study of Golden Age children's literature, while also asking that we rethink this age in two principal respects. Making use of the extensive holdings of the Ellery Yale Wood Collection of children's books, we will begin by questioning how the canon of children's literature came to be formed by studying established "classics" alongside children's books by contemporaneous (though traditionally "adult") writers such as Langston Hughes, Ann Petry, W.E.B. Dubois, and Paul Laurence Dunbar. Moreover, we will examine a recent critical turn in childhood studies that re-evaluates older notions of children's relationships to agency and identity.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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ENGL B282 Intro to Queer Studies: Theory, Representation, Community
Not offered 2019-20
The uncertain, shifting meaning of "queer" provides it with both utility and difficulty: does "queer" designate a type of desire, relation, political orientation, personal identity, or something else entirely? How does this change from the vantage of different historical moments, geographical locations, or individual subjectivities? How does queerness interact with identity categories such as race, gender, class, nationality, disability, and age? This course is an introduction to these questions and to queer studies, a field that destabilizes norms, particularly around gender and sexuality. We will consider how queer scholarship and activism rethinks notions of space, time, community, pop culture, and more. Our discussions will consider the bumpy evolution of queer from an adjective for personal eccentricity in the early twentieth century, to discriminatory slur by mid-century, to radical rallying cry during the HIV/AIDS epidemic, to unstable umbrella term and target for commodification today. We will read formative texts in the history and theory of sexuality, as well as contemporary queer theorists, and consider the institutionalization of a term that critiques that very process. These discussions will be grounded in cultural productions ranging from trans short fiction to Indigiqueer poetry, from gay cruising memoirs to lesbian graphic novels.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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ENGL B283 Transnational Writing
Not offered 2019-20
This course is a study in direct and indirect conversations between and among writers, eras, and continents involving narrative practitioners who may never have interacted in life or letters, but whose works, nevertheless, "speak" to each other in intertextual exchanges. Almost all the works were originally written in English. The yoked works are in groupings of no more than 5 to underscore and to intensify the dialogue and to allow adequate time for discussion and written analysis. As Kenyan Ngugi wa Thiong'o observes in The Wizard of the Crow: "Stories, like food, lose their flavor if cooked in a hurry."
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Africana Studies

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ENGL B289 Topics in the Ellery Yale Wood Collection
Section 001 (Fall 2019): The Fantastic
Fall 2019
This is a topics course built around current strengths in the Ellery Yale Wood children's book collection of Special Collections. Course content varies from semester to semester.
Current topic description: We will examine the origins of the "fantastic" in early folk and fairy tales, and trace the rise of ghost stories, fantasy novels, and general tales of magic in the 19th and 20th centuries.

Critical Interpretation (CI)

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ENGL B290 Modernisms
Not offered 2019-20
This course will examine a range of works (novels, poems, paintings, and movies) that have been called "Modernist"--in general, these are works that are plotless, characterless, fragmented, eerie or just plain strange. The central question we will be exploring is, why did artists decide to create such distinctly unrealistic works? The course is organized as an exploration of several different lenses through which to view what was going on in the early twentieth century when modernism emerged; each lens presents a different theory of why new literary forms emerged. The course is organized as an exploration of several different lenses through which to view what was going on in the early twentieth century when modernism emerged; each lens presents a different theory of why new literary forms emerged. Critical Interpretation (CI)
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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ENGL B291 Networked Selfhood and the Novel
Not offered 2019-20
In this class, we will read a selection novels from the late-nineteenth century to the present alongside recent scholarship in media theory examining the shifting boundaries between the self and the publics we connect with online today. Our guiding theme will be "networked selfhood." On the one hand, networked selfhood involves conscious acts of authorship. We compose sketches of our lives for classmates, public figures, acquaintances we've met only once. On the other hand, networked selfhood entails a tacit understanding that very different portraits of our lives are being assembled by data brokers, government agencies, and Silicon Valley companies. The novels we read will offer lessons in how personhood can be configured differently. Novels allow the reader to see, for instance, contradictions between the inner and outer person, the character shared with the reader as opposed to the "self" that the character projects to her social world. In addition, we will conduct exercises that allow us to regain a measure of authorship over the portraits of our lives assembled by data brokers. Students will learn tactics for protecting against online harassment and surveillance.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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ENGL B293 Animal, Vegetable, Mineral: Medieval Ecologies
Not offered 2019-20
This course explores relationships between natural, non-human, and human agents in the Middle Ages. Reading natural philosophy, vernacular literature, and theological treatises, we examine how the Middle Ages understood supposedly "modern" environmental concepts like climate change, sustainability, animal rights, and protected land.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Environmental Studies

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ENGL B293 Critical Feminist Studies: An Introduction
Not offered 2019-20
Combines the study of specific literary texts with larger questions about feminist forms of theorizing. Three book length texts will be supplemented by on-line readings. Students will review current scholarship, identify their own stake in the conversation and define a critical question they want to pursue at length.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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ENGL B296 Introduction to Medieval Drama
Not offered 2019-20
Introduces students to the major types of dramatic production in the Middle Ages: mystery plays, morality plays, and miracle plays. Also examines early Protestant political drama know as "interludes" and the translation of medieval plays into contemporary films and novellas. Explores the construction of local communities around professional acting and production guilds, different strategies of performance, and the relationship between the medieval dramatic stage and other kinds of "stages."
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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ENGL B302 Moby Dick
Not offered 2019-20
"It was the whiteness of the whale that above all things appalled me," Ishmael muses as he tries to understand the monomaniacal hunt that drives Captain Ahab and his crew of whalers of every race and creed to their watery doom. Herman Melville's 1851 Moby Dick and historical and critical materials surrounding it, will be the entire subject of this course. An allegory of a nation charging toward Civil War, a nation founded on ideals of freedom and equality, but built on capitalist expansion, white supremacy, slavery and genocide, Moby Dick is hailed by many (and many who have never read it) as "The Great American Novel." But which America, whose America? Written for the generation that would fight the Civil War, how does this novel continue to describe America, today? By turns comic, tragic, epic, mundane, thuddingly literal and gorgeously spiritual and metaphysical, the novel rewards both intricate close reading and intense historical and critical analysis. We will take up questions of race, gender and sexuality, colonialism, the animal and the human, the oceanic, freedom, individuality, totalitarianism, capitalism, nation and belonging. Students will write a midterm and a final research paper.

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ENGL B305 Early Modern Trans Studies
Not offered 2019-20
This course will consider the deep histories of transgender embodiment by exploring literary, historical, medical, and religious texts from the Renaissance. Expect to read about alchemical hermaphrodites, gender-swapping angels, Ethiopian eunuchs, female husbands, trans saints, criminal transvestites, and genderqueer monks. We will consider together how these early modern texts speak to the historical, theoretical, and political concerns that animate contemporary trans studies. We will read texts by Crashaw, Donne, Shakespeare, Lyly, and Dekker as well as Susan Stryker, Dean Spade, Mel Chen, Paul Preciado, and Kadji Amin. Prerequisite: Students must have completed at least one 200-level class.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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ENGL B307 Philadelphia Freedom: Slavery, Liberty, Literature 1682-1899
Not offered 2019-20
Philadelphia, the City of Brotherly Love, a space of religious diversity, the hotbed of the American Revolution, the first large "free" city north of the slave states, a major center of free Black culture. In this course we will examine literature written in and about Philadelphia before the Civil War, exploring how and why Philadelphians engaged questions of freedom and non-freedom. Beginning with William Penn and the colonial city, moving through the literatures of Revolution and the Civil War, we will conclude with W. E. B. DuBois' The Philadelphia Negro. We will take two field trips to the city and students will be expected to pursue city-based research projects.
Counts toward Africana Studies

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ENGL B308 Islam and Europe in Premodern Literature
Not offered 2019-20
This course taps into early modern European literature's fascination with Islam as a point of entry into contemporary theoretical debates about religion, secularization, migration, race, and nationalism. We will address topics such as: the Crusades; the fall of Granada; conversion; anti-Semitism and Islamophobia; settler colonialism; blood purity laws; and piracy and privateering. Authors may include Camoes, Tasso, Massinger, Shakespeare, Marlowe, Cervantes, Ercilla, Percy, and de Hita.

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ENGL B310 Confessional Poetry
Fall 2019
Poetry written since 1950 that deploys an autobiographical subject to engage with the psychological and political dynamics of family life and with states of psychic extremity and mental illness. Poets will include Lowell, Ginsberg, Sexton, and Plath. The impact of this`movement' on late twentieth century American poetry will also receive attention. A prior course in poetry is desirable but not required.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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ENGL B314 Troilus and Criseyde
Not offered 2019-20
Examines Chaucer's magisterial Troilus and Criseyde, his epic romance of love, loss, and betrayal. We will supplement sustained analysis of the poem with primary readings on free will and courtly love as well as theoretical readings on gender and sexuality and translation. We will also read Boccaccio's Il Filostrato, Robert Henryson's Testament of Cresseid and Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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ENGL B320 Black Feminist Literature
Not offered 2019-20
This course explores contemporary black feminist literature and culture on a transnational stage. We will consider the works of prominent, emerging, and underexplored black feminist writers from various African diaspora locations, including South Africa, West Africa, Europe, North America, and the Caribbean. How do these writers engage with key currents in global black feminist politics, including understandings of gender, sexuality, class, nationality and colonialism? How do they complicate these discussions in their work? We will ground our exploration in close study of black feminist poetics--the specific formal and creative choices that black feminist poets, fiction writers, visual artists, hip hop artists, webseries producers and others use to examine gender end sexuality in their art. Paying particular attention to the work of queer and LGBTI+ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans* and Intersex) artists, we will consider the various meanings of t erms such as "black," "feminist," and "queer" in various parts of the African Diaspora. Our work will emphasize close analysis of black feminist writers' works, as well as collaborative exercises and invited in-class discussions with several contemporary black diasporic feminist artists themselves. Requirements include two short papers, regular response papers, and a final project.
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies

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ENGL B324 Topics in Shakespeare:
Not offered 2019-20
Films and play texts vary from year to year. The course assumes significant prior experience of Shakespearean drama and/or Renaissance drama.
Counts toward Film Studies

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ENGL B327 Childhood in Ruins
Not offered 2019-20
This course will examine twentieth-century children's literature and novels about childhood that consider the varied relationships between childhood and scenes of ruin. We will be exploring ruins both in the context of the built environment--including for instance urban blight, zones of warfare, and sites of colonization--as well as texts that deal with environmental ruin and an increasingly toxic natural landscape. Why do so many authors in the twentieth century choose to explore the thematics of ruin via the tropes of childhood? Moreover, what is the relationship between these landscapes and the embodied experiences of the children that traverse these spaces? We will take as an especial focus the idea of the city as a site of both geographical and individual ruination, using texts set in London and New York City as our case studies. Though we will consider the traditional associations of ruination with catastrophe and decay, we will also explore the ways in which children act as canny navigators of these spaces, actively reclaiming environments framed as irredeemable. Literary texts will be read alongside major theoretical works on spatial theory, urban studies, theories of embodiment, and childhood studies.

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ENGL B330 Sidekicks: Natives in the American Literary Canon from Crusoe to Moby Dick
Not offered 2019-20
How have written Indians -- the Tontos, Fridays, Pocahontases and Queequegs of the American canon -- been adopted, mimicked, performed and undermined by Native American authors? This course will examine how canonical and counter-canonical texts invent and reinvent the place of the Indian across the continuing literary "discovery" of America from 1620 to the present. Readings include The Last of the Mohicans, The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven, Moby Dick and Robinson Crusoe. Critical texts, research presentations, written assignments and intensive seminar discussion will address questions of cultural sovereignty, mimesis, literacy versus orality, literary hybridity, intertextuality and citation.

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ENGL B333 Lesbian Immortal
Not offered 2019-20
Lesbian literature has repeatedly figured itself in alliance with tropes of immortality and eternity. Using recent queer theory on temporality, and 19th and 20th century primary texts, we will explore topics such as: fame and noteriety; feminism and mythology; epistemes, erotics and sexual seasonality; the death drive and the uncanny; fin de siecle manias for mummies and seances.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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ENGL B335 Beyond the Human
Fall 2019
This course will explore recent "materialist" approaches to literature which reject the notion that what is human is better than what is non-human. Generally what supposedly makes humans valuable is the mind, so we will look at works that treat the mind as just another body part. We will also read some critical theory that explains how valuing the mind over the body, the human over the animal, has been used to support racism, sexism, and colonialism--and has led to the destruction of the ecological system. The course will include both works that present the social, political, and biological horrors resulting from the separation of the non-human from the human, and works that imagine humans merging with nature. The reading in the course will include selections from books of "materialist" theory (such as Jane Bennett's Vibrant Matter: A Political Ecology of Things), novels (Frances Hodgson Burnett, The Secret Garden; Virginia Woolf, The Waves; Franz Kafka, Metamorphosis), nonfiction (Annie Dillard, Pilgrim at Tinker Creek), and movies (Ousmane Sembene, Xala).

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ENGL B336 Topics in Film
Section 001 (Spring 2019): Cinematic Voice
Not offered 2019-20
This is a topics course and description varies according to the topic.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Film Studies

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ENGL B338 Literate Images--Literature and Visual Culture
Not offered 2019-20
This course examines the complex and mutually-informing relationship between literature and images, especially in the nineteenth through twenty-first centuries. We will read broadly in visual culture to elucidate not only written texts, but also photographs, films, paintings, and graphic narratives. We will also consider images that are invisible or that cannot otherwise be seen. Our investigation will begin with questions that are both imaginative and ethical: How does a Victorian poem help us to understand the photographs taken by a contemporary serial killer? What can we see in the literary description of an image that cannot be seen in the image itself? Should we look at the last moments of a human life? The syllabus is divided into a series of foundational thematic units. We will begin the semester thinking about sight and how to look at an image in terms of narrative. To this end, we will read an account written by an art model who describes her experience of posing nude, a narrative that will inform our work with Laura Mulvey's influential essay, "Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema." This theoretical grounding in the gaze and its troubling power will help us to confront Robert Browning's dramatic monologues read with and against photographs taken by criminals. Our next unit will focus on definitions of reality and objectivity in images and narrative accounts of the Holocaust. Readings might include Primo Levi's The Drowned and the Saved, Art Spiegelman's Maus, Marianne Hirsch's The Generation of Postmemory, Susan Sontag's Regarding the Pain of Others, and Georges Didi-Huberman's Images in Spite of All. We then consider the problem of representation by drawing on the tradition of poetic ekphrasis to think about visualizing art in literature by John Keats, P. B. Shelley, W. H. Auden, Adam Kirsch, and Natasha Trethewey. Our next unit takes us into the media of reproduction, and we read Walter Benjamin and Roland Barthes along with a novel by W. G. Sebald. Our discussion continues as we address spectacle, surveillance, and consumption in the imagery and literature created in the aftermath of September 11th, including Art Spiegelman's In the Shadow of No Towers, W. J .T. Mitchell's Cloning Terror, Jonathan Crary's 24/7, and Judith Butler's Precarious Life. Our final unit takes us back to the foundation of the course--the relationship between art and illusion--that we find in Paul Auster's novel, The Book of Illusions, and E. H. Gombrich

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ENGL B339 Latina/o Culture and the Art of Migration
Not offered 2019-20
Gloria Anzaldúa has famously described the U.S.-Mexico border as an open wound and the border culture that arises from this fraught site as a third country. This course will explore how Chicana/os and Latina/os creatively represent different kinds of migrations across geo-political borders and between cultural traditions to forge transnational identities and communities. We will use cultural production as a lens for understanding how citizenship status, class, gender, race, and language shape the experiences of Latin American migrants and their Latina/o children. We will also analyze alternative metaphors and discourses of resistance that challenge anti-immigrant rhetoric and reimagine the place of undocumented migrants and Latina/os in contemporary U.S. society. Over the course of the semester, we will probe the role that literature, art, film, and music can play in the struggle for migrants' rights and minority civil rights, querying how the imagination and aesthetics can contribute to social justice. We will examine a number of different genres, as well as read and apply key theoretical texts on the borderlands and undocumented migration.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies

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ENGL B345 Topics in Narrative Theory
Section 001 (Fall 2019): Theory of the Ethnic Novel
Fall 2019
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: The aim of this seminar is to give you an in-depth understanding of the development of the ethnic novel in the 20th century. We will examine novels by Native Americans, Chicana/os, and African Americans, focusing on key formal innovations in their respective ethnic traditions

Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian and Latina/o Studies

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ENGL B361 Literature of Dissent
Not offered 2019-20
This course examines literary and historical texts engaged with the social, political, and religious upheavals in late medieval England, including the Black Death, the Hundred Years War, the Peasants' Revolt of 1381, the tyranny and deposition of Richard II, and religious repression. In doing so, this course asks students to think about relationships between literary production and political resistance, legal threat, and social change. In what ways can literature formulate and foment social dissent? How does literature comment on contemporary political, religious, or social controversies? What literary opportunities and forms emerged from the peculiar instability of this period? Suggested Preparation: At least one 200-level English or literature course.

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ENGL B362 African American Literature: Hypercanonical Codes
Not offered 2019-20
Intensive study of six 18th-21st century hypercanonical African American written and visual texts (and critical responses) with specific attention to the tradition's long use of speaking in code and in multiple registers simultaneously. Focus on language as a tool of opacity as well as transparency, translation, transliteration, invention and resistance. Previous reading required.
Counts toward Africana Studies

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ENGL B363 Toni Morrison and the Art of Narrative Conjure
Not offered 2019-20
A comprehensive study of Morrison's narrative experiments in fiction, this course traces her entire oeuvre from "Recitatif" to God Help the Child. We read the works in publication order with three main foci: Morrison-as-epistemologist questioning what it is that constitutes knowing and being known, Morrison-as-revisionary-teacher-of-reading-strategies, and Morrison in intertextual dialogue with several oral and literary traditions. In addition to critical essays, students complete a "Pilate Project" - a creative response to the works under study.
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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ENGL B364 Slum Fiction: From Dickens to The Wire
Not offered 2019-20
David Simon's acclaimed television show The Wire has repeatedly been related to the Victorian novel. This course links Victorian London and 20th-century Baltimore by studying: literary relations between Dickens and Poe; slum writing; the rise of the state institution; a genealogy of serial fiction from the nineteenth century novel to television drama.

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ENGL B374 African-American Childhoods
Spring 2020
This course explores the literatures of African-American childhood from the late nineteenth century until the present day. We will explore "classic" works of children's literature by authors such as Paul Laurence Dunbar, Langston Hughes, Gwendolyn Brooks, Ann Petry, Walter Dean Myers, Virginia Hamilton, Jacqueline Woodson, James Baldwin, Paule Marshall, June Jordan, Angie Thomas and others-- alongside artifacts from a range of other spheres such as textbooks, chapbooks, and the overall rise of a new child-centered periodical culture at the turn of the twentieth century. We will pay especial attention to the ways in which the intertwined categories of literacy and property have shaped racialized notions of childhood in the United States. In addition to close textual analysis, we will engage with major theoretical works in the field of childhood and identity studies, while also investigating firsthand what can be learned via the physical examination of children's books held in Bryn Mawr's Ellery Yale Wood Collection.
Counts toward Africana Studies

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ENGL B377 James Joyce
Not offered 2019-20
Most of this course will be devoted to reading one wild, amazing book: Ulysses. The book talks about almost everything, so it can seem hard to just sit down and read it on your own--and that is one of the things that is wonderful about it: it makes reading a collaborative experience. That is how the class will run: each of us will become a resource for everyone else, just by holding on to our own ways of thinking and reading and talking with each other. We will also read a book that borrows extensively from Ulysses: the graphic novel Fun Home, by Alison Bechdel.

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ENGL B379 The African Griot(te)
Not offered 2019-20
English 379 is a capstone topics course in the study of two or more distinguished African writers who have made significant contributions to African literary production. The focus changes from one semester to the next so that students may re-enroll in the course for credit. The specific focus of each semester's offering of the course is outlined separately.
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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ENGL B381 Post-Apartheid Literature
Not offered 2019-20
South African texts from several language communities which anticipate a post-apartheid polity and texts by contemporary South African writers which explore the complexities of life in "the new South Africa." Several films emphasize the minefield of post-apartheid reconciliation and accountability.
Counts toward Africana Studies

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ENGL B390 Medieval Race
Spring 2020
Examines how late medieval writers understood racial, cultural, and ethnic differences, exploring how "race" can be understood as multiple systems of power that link together cultural and religious identities, the body, and performance. Focuses on medieval vocabularies and depictions of racial and cultural difference, community-formation, and "foreignness."

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ENGL B398 Senior Seminar
Required preparation for ENGL 399 (Senior Essay). Through weekly seminar meetings and regular writing and research assignments, students will design a senior essay topic or topics of their choice, frame exciting and practical questions about it, and develop a writing plan for its execution. Students will leave the course with a departmentally approved senior essay prospectus, an annotated bibliography on their chosen area of inquiry, and 10 pages of writing towards their senior essay. Students must pass the course to enroll in ENGL 399.

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ENGL B399 Senior Essay
Supervised independent writing project required of all English majors. Students must successfully complete ENGL 398 (Senior Conference) and have their Senior Essay prospectus approved by the department before they enroll in ENGL 399.

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ENGL B403 Supervised Work
Advanced students may pursue independent research projects. Permission of the instructor and major adviser is required.

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ARTT B356 Endgames: Theater of Samuel Beckett
Not offered 2019-20
An exploration of Beckett's theater work conducted through both reading and practical exercises in performance techniques. Points of special interest include the monologue form of the early novels and its translation into theater, Beckett's influences (particularly silent film) and collaborations, and the relationship between the texts of the major dramatic works and the development of both modern and postmodern performance techniques.

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ARTW B159 Introduction to Creative Writing
Spring 2020
This course is for students who wish to experiment with three genres of creative writing: short fiction, poetry and drama, and techniques specific to each of them. Priority will be given to interested first- and second-year students; additional spaces will be made available to upper-year students with little or no experience in creative writing. Students will write or revise work every week; roughly four weeks each will be devoted to short fiction, poetry, and drama. There will be individual conferences with the instructor to discuss their progress and interests. Half of class time will be spent discussing student work and half will be spent discussing syllabus readings.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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ARTW B233 Writing for Radio and Podcast
Spring 2020
This course will explore the craft of writing for audio sources by focusing on the skills, process and techniques necessary to the generation and production of radio and podcast pieces. Using the information-gathering tools of a journalist, the analytical tools of an essayist and the technical tools of a prose writer, students will study contemporary and historical radio and podcasts in the interest of creating their own pieces. The central focus of the course will be weekly visits from current radio writers, producers and on-air personalities, including local and national NPR producers, commentators and reporters.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Creative Writing
Counts toward Counts toward Praxis Program

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ARTW B260 Writing Short Fiction I
Fall 2019, Spring 2020
An introduction to fiction writing, focusing on the short story. Students will consider fundamental elements of fiction and the relationship of narrative structure, style, and content, exploring these elements in their own work and in the assigned readings in order to develop an understanding of the range of possibilities open to the fiction writer. Weekly readings and writing exercises are designed to encourage students to explore the material and styles that most interest them, and to push their fiction to a new level of craft, so that over the semester their writing becomes clearer, more controlled, and more absorbing.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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ARTW B261 Writing Poetry I
Spring 2020
In this course students will learn to "read like a writer," while grappling with the work of accomplished poets, and providing substantive commentary on peers' work. Through diverse readings, students will examine craft strategies at work in both formal and free verse poems, such as diction, metaphor, imagery, lineation, metrical patterns, irony, and syntax. The course will cover shaping forms (such as elegy and pastoral) as well as given forms, such as the sonnet, ghazal, villanelle, etc. Students will discuss strategies for conveying the literal meaning of a poem (e.g., through sensory description and clear, compelling language) and the concealed meaning of a text (e.g., through metaphor, imagery, meter, irony, and shifts in diction and syntax). By the end of the course, students will have generated new material, shaped and revised draft poems, and significantly grown as writers by experimenting with various aspects of craft.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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ARTW B262 Playwriting I
Fall 2019
An introduction to playwriting through a combination of reading assignments, writing exercises, discussions about craft and ultimately the creation of a complete one-act play. Students will work to discover and develop their own unique voices as they learn the technical aspects of the craft of playwriting. Short writing assignments will complement each reading assignment. The final assignment will be to write an original one-act play.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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ARTW B264 News and Feature Writing
Fall 2019
Students in this class will learn how to develop, report, write, edit and revise a variety of news stories, beginning with the basics of reporting and writing the news and advancing to longer-form stories, including personality profiles, news features and trend stories, and concluding with point-of-view journalism (columns, criticism, reported essays). The course will focus heavily on work published in The Philadelphia Inquirer and The New York Times. Several working journalists will participate as guest speakers to explain their craft. Students will write stories that will be posted on the class blog, the English House Gazette.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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ARTW B265 Creative Nonfiction
Not offered 2019-20
This course will explore the literary expressions of nonfiction writing by focusing on the skills, process and craft techniques necessary to the generation and revision of literary nonfiction. Using the information-gathering tools of a journalist, the analytical tools of an essayist and the technical tools of a fiction writer, students will produce pieces that will incorporate both factual information and first person experience. Readings will include a broad group of writers ranging from E.B. White to Anne Carson, George Orwell to David Foster Wallace, Joan Didion to James Baldwin, among many others.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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ARTW B266 Screenwriting
Fall 2019
An introduction to screenwriting. Issues basic to the art of storytelling in film will be addressed and analyzed: character, dramatic structure, theme, setting, image, sound. The course focuses on the film adaptation; readings include novels, screenplays, and short stories. Films adapted from the readings will be screened. In the course of the semester, students will be expected to outline and complete the first act of an adapted screenplay of their own.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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ARTW B269 Writing for Children
Fall 2019
In this course, students have the opportunity to hone the craft of writing for children and young adults. Through reading, in-class discussion, peer review of student work, and private conferences with the instructor, we will examine the specific requirements of the picture book, the middle-grade novel, and the young adult novel. This analytical study of classic and contemporary literature will inspire and inform students' creative work in all aspects of storytelling, including character development, plotting, world building, voice, tone, and the roles of illustration and page composition in story narration.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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ARTW B360 Writing Short Fiction II
Not offered 2019-20
An exploration of approaches to writing short fiction designed to strengthen skills of experienced student writers as practitioners and critics. Requires writing at least five pages each week, workshopping student pieces, and reading texts ranging from realist stories to metafictional experiments and one-page stories to the short novella, to explore how writers can work within tight confines. Suggested Preparation: ARTW B260 or work demonstrating equivalent expertise in writing short fiction. Students without the ARTW B260, must submit a writing sample of 10-15 pages in length (prose fiction) to the Creative Writing Program during the preregistration period to be considered for this course.

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ARTW B361 Writing Poetry II
Fall 2019
This course assumes that reading and writing are inextricably linked, and that the only way to write intelligent and interesting poetry is to read as much of it as possible. Writing assignments will be closely connected to syllabus reading, including an anthology prepared by the instructor, and may include working in forms such as ekphrastic poems (i.e. poems about works of visual art or sculpture), dramatic monologues, prose poems, translations, imitations and parodies. Suggested Preparation: ARTW B261 or work demonstrating equivalent familiarity with the basic forms of poetry in English. For students without ARTW B261, a writing sample of 5-7 poems must be submitted to the instructor to be considered for this course.

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ARTW B362 Playwriting II
Not offered 2019-20
This course challenges students of playwriting to further develop their unique voices and improve their technical skills in writing for the stage. We will examine how great playwrights captivate a live audience through their mastery of character, story and structure. Through a combination of weekly reading assignments, playwriting exercises, theater explorations, artist-driven feedback, and discussions of craft, this class will facilitate each student's completion of an original, full-length play. Prerequisite: ARTW 262; or suitable experience in directing, acting or playwriting; or submission of a work sample of 10 pages of dialogue. All students must complete the Creative Writing preregistration questionnaire during preregistration to be considered for the course.

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ARTW B364 Longer Fictional Forms
Spring 2020
An advanced workshop for students with a strong background in fiction writing who want to write longer works: the long short story, novella and novel. Students will write intensively, and complete a long story, novel or novella (or combination thereof) totaling up to 20,000 words. Students will examine the craft of their work and of published prose. Suggested Preparation: ARTW B260 or proof of interest and ability. For students without ARTW B260, students must submit a writing sample of 10-15 pages in length (prose fiction) to the Creative Writing Program during the preregistration period to be considered for this course.

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COML B293 The Play of Interpretation
Spring 2020
Designated theory course. A study of the methodologies and regimes of interpretation in the arts, humanistic sciences, and media and cultural studies, this course focuses on common problems of text, authorship, reader/spectator, and translation in their historical and formal contexts. Literary, oral, and visual texts from different cultural traditions and histories will be studied through interpretive approaches informed by modern critical theories. Readings in literature, philosophy, popular culture, and film will illustrate how theory enhances our understanding of the complexities of history, memory, identity, and the trials of modernity.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward International Studies

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COML B398 Theories and Methods in Comparative Literature
This course, required of all senior comparative literature majors in preparation for writing the senior thesis in the spring semester, has a twofold purpose: to review interpretive approaches informed by critical theories that enhance our understanding of literary and cultural texts; and to help students prepare a preliminary outline of their senior theses. Throughout the semester, students research theoretical paradigms that bear on their own comparative thesis topics in order to situate those topics in an appropriate critical context. This is a required for majors and minors.

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CSTS B201 Cleopatra: Passion, Power, and Politics
Fall 2019
Cleopatra VII, the last ruler of Ptolemaic Egypt (69-30 BCE), has been a figure of continuous fascination and political resonance for over 2000 years. She was the most famous and enigmatic person in the ancient Mediterranean world while she was alive and, since then, she has been re-imagined by countless poets, dramatists, philosophers, filmmakers, musicians, and artists of all types. In this course, we will examine both the historical Cleopatra and her reception in various media in subsequent cultures and societies. In the first part, we will carefully study the ancient literary and material evidence to learn all we can about the real Cleopatra and the tumultuous times in which she lived. In the second part, we will then consider a selection of medieval, early modern, and contemporary representations of Cleopatra, ranging from Chaucer to Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra to HBO's series Rome and the use of Cleopatra in present-day advertising. Throughout our readings, we will focus on issues such as female agency and power in a man's world, beauty and the femme fatale, east vs. west, and politics and propaganda.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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EALC B240 Topics in Chinese Film
Not offered 2019-20
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

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EALC B255 Understanding Comics: Introduction to Reading the Graphic No
Not offered 2019-20
The graphic narrative form has proliferated at a breathtaking rate in the last several decades. Called "comics," "graphic novels," and many other terms in between, these word-image hybrids have been embraced by both popular and critical audiences. But what is a graphic novel? How do we conceive of these texts and, more importantly, how do we read, interpret and write about them? This course is focused on approaches to reading the graphic novel, with a focus on a subgenre called the "literary comic." Our first approach is to consider different kinds of primary source texts and ask if and how they fulfill our understanding of the graphic narrative. This consideration will include various test cases, from wordless comics, to texts used as images, to the many varieties of word-image hybrids that are called comic books. Our second approach is to examine different scholarly approaches to analyzing graphic narratives, base d in different disciplines such as memoir studies, trauma studies, visual and material culture, history, semiotics, and, especially, narratology. Primary source readings include texts by Ware, Barry, Clowes, and Burns. Secondary readings include Hirsch, McCloud, Barthes, Iser, and Groensteen.Three short assignments due during the semester, and a final project due at the end of exam period (see description below). Students will also rotate responsibilities for starting discussions with small presentations aimed at discussing readings in depth. Students taking this course for their major in EALC or COML should meet with the instructor to discuss specific requirements.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

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EALC B310 Advanced Readings in the Graphic Narrative
Not offered 2019-20
This advanced seminar focuses on critical and theoretical approaches to the graphic novel. In the past several decades, a genre of "auteur comics" has emerged from the medium that are highly literary with a deep engagement between form and meaning. This seminar focuses on weekly close readings of such graphic novels with rigorous analysis of form and content. Primary text readings are supplemented with readings from literary theory, visual studies, and philosophy. Participants are expected to be comfortable with the application of literary critical theory and visual studies theory to texts. There are no prerequisites for the course, but due to the quantity and complexity of the reading material, some background in literary study is necessary. Students interested in taking this course in fulfillment of a major requirement in Comparative Literature or East Asian Languages and Cultures will need to discuss with me prior to enrollment. Preference given to students who have taken EALC B255.
Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Counts toward East Asian Languages and Cultures
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

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EALC B315 Spirits, Saints, Snakes, Swords: Women in East Asian Literature & Film
Not offered 2019-20
This interdisciplinary course focuses on a critical survey of literary and visual texts by and about Chinese women. We will begin by focusing on the cultural norms that defined women's lives beginning in early China, and consider how those tropes are reflected and rejected over time and geographical borders (in Japan, Hong Kong and the United States). No prior knowledge of Chinese culture or language necessary.
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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EALC B345 Topics in East Asian Culture
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Food and Power
Spring 2020
This is a topics course. Course contents vary.

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FREN B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Not offered 2019-20
By bringing together the study of major theoretical currents of the 20th century and the practice of analyzing literary works in the light of theory, this course aims at providing students with skills to use literary theory in their own scholarship. The selection of theoretical readings reflects the history of theory (psychoanalysis, structuralism, narratology), as well as the currents most relevant to the contemporary academic field: Post-structuralism, Post-colonialism, Gender Studies, and Ecocriticism. They are paired with a diverse range of short stories (Poe, Kafka, Camus, Borges, Calvino, Morrison, Djebar, Ngozi Adichie) that we discuss along with our study of theoretical texts. The class will be conducted in English with an additional hour in French for students wishing to take it for French credit.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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GERM B262 Topics: Film and the German Literary Imagination
Not offered 2019-20
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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HART B112 Art, Death, and the Afterlife
Fall 2019
This course aims to explore how art was used as a symbolic form to overcome death and to assure immortality in a variety of archaeological, philosophical, religious, sociopolitical, and historical contexts.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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HART B299 History of Narrative Cinema, 1945 to the present
Not offered 2019-20
This course surveys the history of narrative film from 1945 through contemporary cinema. We will analyze a chronological series of styles and national cinemas, including Classical Hollywood, Italian Neorealism, the French New Wave, and other post-war movements and genres. Viewings of canonical films will be supplemented by more recent examples of global cinema. While historical in approach, this course emphasizes the theory and criticism of the sound film, and we will consider various methodological approaches to the aesthetic, socio-political, and psychological dimensions of cinema. Readings will provide historical context, and will introduce students to key concepts in film studies such as realism, formalism, spectatorship, the auteur theory, and genre studies. Fulfills the history requirement or the introductory course requirement for the Film Studies minor.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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HART B306 Film Theory
Not offered 2019-20
An introduction to major developments in film theory and criticism. Topics covered include: the specificity of film form; cinematic realism; the cinematic "author"; the politics and ideology of cinema; the relation between cinema and language; spectatorship, identification, and subjectivity; archival and historical problems in film studies; the relation between film studies and other disciplines of aesthetic and social criticism. Each week of the syllabus pairs critical writing(s) on a central principle of film analysis with a cinematic example. Class will be divided between discussion of critical texts and attempts to apply them to a primary cinematic text. Prerequisite: A course in Film Studies (HART B110, HART B299, ENGL B205, or the equivalent from another college by permission of instructor).
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

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HART B334 Topics in Film Studies
Spring 2020
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: Digital imagery in relation to cinema, photography, and other media, questions of whether the digital marks a significant break from the analog. Enrollment priority will be given to History of Art majors and Film Studies minors in the senior year, and graduate students, who may take the course for 600-level credit.

Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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ITAL B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Section 001 (Fall 2018): Critical Theories
Not offered 2019-20
What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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RUSS B277 Nabokov in Translation
Not offered 2019-20
A study of Vladimir Nabokov's writings in various genres, focusing on his fiction and autobiographical works. The continuity between Nabokov's Russian and English works is considered in the context of the Russian and Western literary traditions. All readings and lectures in English.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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