This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's master calendar.

Fall 2017

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
RUSS B001-001Elementary Russian IntensiveSemester / 1.5Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:00 AM MWFRussian Center Conference RoomHarte,T., Stavis,J.
Lecture: 9:55 AM-10:45 AM TTHRussian Center Conference Room
RUSS B101-001Intermediate RussianSemester / 1Lecture: 9:10 AM-10:00 AM MWFRussian Center Conference RoomGrigoryan,B.
Lecture: 8:55 AM- 9:45 AM TTHRussian Center Conference Room
RUSS B201-001Advanced RussianSemester / 1Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:00 AM MWFDalton Hall 212AWalsh,I.
Lecture: 9:55 AM-10:45 AM TTHDalton Hall 212A
RUSS B206-001Dostoevsky in TranslationSemester / 1LEC: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWRussian Center Conference RoomGrigoryan,B.
RUSS B254-001Russian Culture and CivilizationSemester / 1Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MWRussian Center Conference RoomWalsh,I.
RUSS B258-001Soviet and Eastern European Cinema of the 1960sSemester / 1Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHDalton Hall 1Harte,T., Harte,T.
Film Screening: 7:00 PM- 9:00 PM MCarpenter Library 25
RUSS B342-001Russian Culture TodaySemester / 1Lecture: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTHCarpenter Library 13Walsh,I.
RUSS B390-001Russian for Pre-Professionals ISemester / 1Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:00 AM MWFRussian Center Seminar RoomRojavin,M.
RUSS B403-001Supervised WorkSemester / 1Dept. staff, TBA
RUSS B403-001Supervised WorkSemester / 1Dept. staff, TBA
FREN B213-001Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the HumanitiesSemester / 1Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:00 AM MWFCollege Hall 224Sanquer,M., Sanquer,M., Sanquer,M.
TA Session: 9:10 AM-10:00 AM FCollege Hall 118
TA Session: 11:10 AM-12:00 PM FCollege Hall 116

Spring 2018

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
RUSS B002-001Elementary Russian IntensiveSemester / 1.5Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:00 AM MWFRussian Center Conference RoomHarte,T., Stavis,J., Stavis,J.
Lecture: 9:55 AM-10:45 AM TTHRussian Center Conference Room
RUSS B102-001Intermediate RussianSemester / 1Lecture: 9:10 AM-10:00 AM MWFRussian Center Seminar RoomGrigoryan,B.
Lecture: 8:55 AM- 9:45 AM TTHRussian Center Seminar Room
RUSS B202-001Advanced RussianSemester / 1Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:00 AM MWFRussian Center Seminar RoomWalsh,I.
Lecture: 9:55 AM-10:45 AM TTHRussian Center Seminar Room
RUSS B214-001Anna Karenina and the Tasks of LiteratureSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWRussian Center Seminar RoomGrigoryan,B.
RUSS B277-001Nabokov in TranslationSemester / 1Lecture: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTHTaylor Hall CHarte,T.
RUSS B365-001Russian and Soviet Film CultureSemester / 1Lecture: 11:10 AM-12:00 PM MWFRussian Center Conference RoomRojavin,M.
RUSS B380-001Seminar in Russian Studies: Alice in Wonderland in Russian CultureSemester / 1Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MWRussian Center Seminar RoomWalsh,I.
RUSS B391-001Russian for Pre-Professionals IISemester / 1Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:00 AM MWFTaylor Hall BRojavin,M.
RUSS B398-001Senior EssaySemester / 1

Fall 2018

(Class schedules for this semester will be posted at a later date.)

2017-18 Catalog Data

RUSS B001 Elementary Russian Intensive
Fall 2017
Study of basic grammar and syntax. Fundamental skills in speaking, reading, writing, and oral comprehension are developed. Eight hours a week including conversation sections and language laboratory work.
Course does not meet an Approach

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RUSS B002 Elementary Russian Intensive
Spring 2018
Study of basic grammar and syntax. Fundamental skills in speaking, reading, writing, and oral comprehension are developed. Eight hours a week including conversation sections and language laboratory work.
Course does not meet an Approach

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RUSS B101 Intermediate Russian
Fall 2017
Continuing development of fundamental skills with emphasis on vocabulary expansion in speaking and writing. Readings in Russian classics and contemporary works. Five hours a week
Course does not meet an Approach

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RUSS B102 Intermediate Russian
Spring 2018
Continuing development of fundamental skills with emphasis on vocabulary expansion in speaking and writing. Readings in Russian classics and contemporary works. Five hours a week.
Course does not meet an Approach

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RUSS B106 Intensive Survival Russian
Not offered 2017-18
This course will be an intensive "crash" course in Russian for those enrolled in the 360 who have no prior experience studying or speaking Russian (those in the 360 who have studied the Russian language in the past will be expected to take a concurrent Russian language course at the College). This course will entail 5 hrs./week of elementary language instruction in Russian, with special emphasis on speaking skills needed for the trip.

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RUSS B201 Advanced Russian
Fall 2017
Intensive practice in speaking and writing skills using a variety of modern texts and contemporary films and television. Emphasis on self-expression and a deeper understanding of grammar and syntax. Five hours a week.
Course does not meet an Approach

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RUSS B202 Advanced Russian
Spring 2018
Intensive practice in speaking and writing skills using a variety of modern texts and contemporary films and television. Emphasis on self-expression and a deeper understanding of grammar and syntax. Five hours a week.
Course does not meet an Approach

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RUSS B206 Dostoevsky in Translation
Fall 2017
This course provides a dynamic and comprehensive survey of Fyodor Dostoevsky's career. We will study the formal and thematic dimensions of his works in detail and contextualize his oeuvre in relation to such areas as Russian and European literary, intellectual, cultural, and political history; the relevant secular and religious philosophical traditions and currents; Dostoevsky's own rather storied biography; his frequently polemical (but always robust) responses to West European cultural and intellectual trends; the reception of his works both in Russia and abroad, and their impact on foundational theoretical approaches to the study of literature broadly and the novel especially. Readings include Notes from Underground, Crime and Punishment, The Brothers Karamazov, and a number of celebrated short works. All readings in English translation.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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RUSS B209 Russia and the East: Siberia in Russian Culture
Not offered 2017-18
"We are Asians!," famously declared the Russian poet Aleksandr Blok in 1918. Russian culture has long celebrated the nation's close ties to the east as well as its ancient eastern heritage. From the time of Genghis Khan and the Mongolian yoke's invasion of Kievan Rus' in the 13th century to the present day and Vladimir Putin's ongoing geopolitical pivot to the east, Russia has grappled with its eastern roots, its vast eastern expanse, and Sino-Russian relations. This course will explore a wide variety of cultural manifestations of Russia's eastern orientation: Russian philosophy at the turn into the 20th century that emphasized Russia's eastern, mystical focus; Russian symbolist poetry and prose that amplified Russia's ties to the East; silent cinema of the 1920s that linked revolution to the East; non-fiction accounts of penal colonies and work camps scattered throughout Siberia (with particular emphasis on the work of Chekhov, Solzhenitsyn, Shalamov); late Soviet fiction probing life in rural Siberia; and contemporary Russian fiction that revisits Russia's eastern mysticism. Exploring Russia's ties to the East from a variety of historical, artistic, and social perspectives, this course aims to explore Russian culture's Eurasian essence.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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RUSS B214 Anna Karenina and the Tasks of Literature
Spring 2018
This course takes Lev Tolstoy's Anna Karenina as its centerpiece and most sustained point of interest. We will begin with a few of Tolstoy's important early works (notably, his Childhood. Boyhood. Youth.), then read Anna Karenina slowly and in detail, identifying its chief formal and thematic characteristics and thinking about the novel's aesthetics in relation to the ethical questions it raises. These questions traverse a broad range of topics from marital infidelity and legally recognized forms of kinship to a critique of Russian imperial geopolitics and military interventions from a standpoint that prefigures Tolstoy's late-in-life radical pacifism. Next, we will read three novels (Gustave Flaubert's Madame Bovary, Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter, Alexander Pushkin's Eugene Onegin) that, much as they predate Tolstoy's masterpiece, help us bring the central preoccupations of Anna Karenina into sharper focus. We will conclude the course with Tolstoy's late short works, a short story by Anton Chekhov, and Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway, which we will contemplate as a reply to and a potential re-writing of Anna Karenina, since the English modernist famously declared that she had "nearly every scene of Anna Karenina branded in [her.]" All readings in English.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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RUSS B217 The Cinema of Andrei Tarkovsky
Not offered 2017-18
This course will probe the cinematic oeuvre of the great Soviet filmmaker Andrei Tarkovsky, who produced some of the most compelling, significant film work of the 20th century. Looking at not only Tarkovsky's films but also those films that influenced his work, we will explore the aesthetics, philosophy, and ideological pressure underlying Tarkovsky's unique brand of cinema.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Film Studies

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RUSS B221 The Serious Play of Pushkin and Gogol
Not offered 2017-18
This course explores major contributions to the modern Russian literary tradition by its two founding fathers, Aleksander Pushkin and Nikolai Gogol. Comparing short stories, plays, novels, and letters written by these pioneering artists, the course addresses Pushkin's and Gogol's shared concerns about human freedom, individual will, social injustice, and artistic autonomy, which each author expressed through his own distinctive filter of humor and playfulness. No knowledge of Russian is required.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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RUSS B223 Russian and East European Folklore
Not offered 2017-18
This interdisciplinary course introduces students to major issues in Russian and East European folklore including epic tales, fairy tales, calendar and life-cycle rituals, and folk beliefs. The course also presents different theoretical approaches to the interpretation of folk texts as well as emphasizes the influence of folklore on literature, music, and art. No knowledge of Russian is required.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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RUSS B235 The Social Dynamics of Russian
Not offered 2017-18
An examination of the social factors that influence the language of Russian conversational speech, including contemporary Russian media (films, television, and the Internet). Basic social strategies that structure a conversation are studied, as well as the implications of gender and education on the form and style of discourse. Prerequisite: RUSS B201, RUSS 102 also required if taken concurrently with RUSS 201.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

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RUSS B238 Topics: The History of Cinema 1895 to 1945
Section 001 (Spring 2017): Silent Film: From U.S. to Soviet Russia& Beyond
Not offered 2017-18
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Film Studies

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RUSS B254 Russian Culture and Civilization
Fall 2017
A history of Russian culture--its ideas, its value and belief systems--from the origins to the present that integrates the examination of works of literature, art, and music.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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RUSS B258 Soviet and Eastern European Cinema of the 1960s
Fall 2017
This course examines 1960s Soviet and Eastern European "New Wave" cinema, which won worldwide acclaim through its treatment of war, gender, and aesthetics. Films from Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Poland, Russia, and Yugoslavia will be viewed and analyzed, accompanied by readings on film history and theory. All films shown with subtitles; no knowledge of Russian or previous study of film required.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Film Studies

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RUSS B271 Chekhov: His Short Stories and Plays in Translation
Not offered 2017-18
A study of the themes, structure and style of Chekhov's major short stories and plays. The course will also explore the significance of Chekhov's prose and drama in the English-speaking world, where this masterful Russian writer is the most staged playwright after Shakespeare. All readings and lectures in English.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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RUSS B277 Nabokov in Translation
Spring 2018
A study of Vladimir Nabokov's writings in various genres, focusing on his fiction and autobiographical works. The continuity between Nabokov's Russian and English works is considered in the context of the Russian and Western literary traditions. All readings and lectures in English.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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RUSS B321 The Serious Play of Pushkin and Gogol
Not offered 2017-18
This course explores major contributions to the modern Russian literary tradition by its two founding fathers, Aleksander Pushkin and Nikolai Gogol. Comparing short stories, plays, novels, and letters written by these pioneering artists, the course addresses Pushkin's and Gogol's shared concerns about human freedom, individual will, social injustice, and artistic autonomy, which each author expressed through his own distinctive filter of humor and playfulness. The course is taught jointly with Russian 221; students enrolled in 321 will meet with the instructor for an additional hour to study texts in the original Russian.

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RUSS B342 Russian Culture Today
Fall 2017
This seminar focuses on current cultural trends in Russia, with special emphasis on the interplay between various artistic media and post-Soviet Russia's rapidly developing society. Students will be introduced to contemporary Russian literature, painting, television, film, and music while considering such topics as Russia's ambiguous attitude toward the West, the rise of violence in Russian society, and Russia's evaluation of the past. Prerequisite: RUSS 102 or the equivalent.

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RUSS B365 Russian and Soviet Film Culture
Spring 2018
This seminar explores the cultural and theoretical trends that have shaped Russian and Soviet cinema from the silent era to the present day. The focus will be on Russia's films and film theory, with discussion of the aesthetic, ideological, and historical issues underscoring Russia's cinematic culture. Taught in Russian. No previous study of cinema required, although RUSS 201 or the equivalent is required.

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RUSS B380 Seminar in Russian Studies
Section 001 (Spring 2018): Alice in Wonderland in Russian Culture
Spring 2018
An examination of a focused topic in Russian literature such as a particular author, genre, theme, or decade. Introduces students to close reading and detailed critical analysis of Russian literature in the original language. Readings in Russian. Some discussions and lectures in Russian. Prerequisites: RUSS 102 and one 200-level Russian literature course.

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RUSS B390 Russian for Pre-Professionals I
Fall 2017
This capstone to the overall language course sequence is designed to develop linguistic and cultural proficiency in Russian to the advanced level or higher, preparing students to carry out academic study or research in Russian in a professional field. Suggested Preparation: study abroad in Russia for at least one summer, preferably one semester; and/or certified proficiency levels of 'advanced-low' or 'advanced-mid' in two skills, one of which must be oral proficiency.

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RUSS B391 Russian for Pre-Professionals II
Spring 2018
Second part of year long capstone language sequence designed to develop linguistic and cultural proficiency to the "advanced level," preparing students to carry out advanced academic study or research in Russian in a professional field. Prerequisite: RUSS 390 or equivalent.

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RUSS B398 Senior Essay
Independent research project designed and conducted under the supervision of a departmental faculty member. May be undertaken in either fall or spring semester of senior year.

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RUSS B399 Senior Conference
Exploration of an interdisciplinary topic in Russian culture. Topic varies from year to year. Requirements may include short papers, oral presentations, and examinations.

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RUSS B403 Supervised Work

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RUSS B403 Supervised Work

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RUSS B701 Supervised Work
Not offered 2017-18

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FREN B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Section 001 (Fall 2016): Critic Approaches to the World
Fall 2017
By bringing together the study of major theoretical currents of the 20th century and the practice of analyzing literary works in the light of theory, this course aims at providing students with skills to use literary theory in their own scholarship. The selection of theoretical readings reflects the history of theory (psychoanalysis, structuralism, narratology), as well as the currents most relevant to the contemporary academic field: Post-structuralism, Post-colonialism, Gender Studies, and Ecocriticism. They are paired with a diverse range of short stories (Poe, Kafka, Camus, Borges, Calvino, Morrison, Djebar, Ngozi Adichie) that we discuss along with our study of theoretical texts. The class will be conducted in English with an additional hour in French for students wishing to take it for French credit.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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ITAL B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Not offered 2017-18
An examination in English of leading theories of interpretation from Classical Tradition to Modern and Post-Modern Time. This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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