This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's calendars page.

Fall 2020

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
HART B104-001Critical Approaches to Visual Representation: The Classical TraditionSemester / 1Lecture: 11:10 AM-12:00 PM MWFCarpenter Library 25Cast,D., Teaching Assistant,T.
HART B110-001Critical Approaches to Visual Representation: Identification in the CinemaSemester / 1Lecture: 11:10 AM-12:00 PM MWFDalton Hall 1Department staff,T., Feliz,M., Teaching Assistant,T.
Film Screening: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM SU
HART B230-001Renaissance ArtSemester / 1Lecture: 4:10 PM- 5:30 PM MTHDalton Hall 300Wojciechowski,A.
HART B233-001Nineteenth-Century ArtSemester / 1Lecture: 11:10 AM-12:30 PM MTHTaylor Hall EMcKee,C.
HART B281-001Museum Studies: History, Theory, PracticeSemester / 1Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM TFScott,M.
HART B323-001Topics in Renaissance and Baroque ArtSemester / 1LEC: 2:40 PM- 5:30 PM TGoodhart Hall BCast,D.
HART B334-001Topics in Film Studies: The PresentSemester / 1LEC: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM THKing,H.
HART B350-001Topics in Modern Art: Identity in Film & Video ArtSemester / 1LEC: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM TBettws Y Coed 127Feliz,M.
HART B398-001Senior Conference ISemester / 1Lecture: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM THCarpenter Library 25Dept. staff, TBA
HART B403-001Supervised WorkSemester / 1Dept. staff, TBA
HART B603-001Advanced Research MethodsSemester / 1Lecture: 9:30 AM-11:00 AM TKing,H.
HART B610-001Topics in Medieval Art: Surveying ByzantiumSemester / 1LEC: 8:30 PM-10:00 PM THDalton Hall 2Walker,A.
HART B630-001Topics in Renaissance and Baroque Art: MannerismSemester / 1LEC: 2:30 PM- 4:00 PM TBettws Y Coed 239Cast,D.
HART B701-001Supervised WorkSemester / 1Lecture: Date/Time TBACast,D.
HART B701-002Supervised WorkSemester / 1Lecture: Date/Time TBAMcKee,C.
HART B701-003Supervised WorkSemester / 1Lecture: Date/Time TBAWalker,A.
HART B701-004Supervised WorkSemester / 1Lecture: Date/Time TBASaltzman,L.
HART B701-005Supervised WorkSemester / 1
HART B701-006Supervised WorkSemester / 1
ARCH B215-001Classical ArtSemester / 1Lecture: 9:40 AM-10:30 AM MWFOld Library 110Donohue,A.
ARCH B634-001Problems in Classical ArtSemester / 1Lecture: 2:30 PM- 4:00 PM TDalton Hall 2Donohue,A.
CITY B254-001History of Modern ArchitectureSemester / 1Lecture: 9:40 AM-11:00 AM MTHLee,M.
CITY B306-001Advanced Fieldwork Techniques: Places in TimeSemester / 1Lecture: 2:40 PM- 5:30 PM THDalton Hall 119Cohen,J.
ENGL B336-001Topics in Film: Cinematic VoiceSemester / 1
RUSS B238-001Topics: The History of Cinema 1895 to 1945: Silent Film: From U.S. to Soviet Russia& BeyondSemester / 1LEC: 11:10 AM-12:30 PM TFPark 180Harte,T.

Spring 2021

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
HART B102-001Critical Approaches to Visual Representation: Naturalism and the Supernatural in South Asian ArtSemester / 1Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:00 AM MWFHoughteling,S., Teaching Assistant,T.
HART B111-001Landscapes, Art, and Racial EcologiesSemester / 1Lecture: 11:10 AM-12:00 PM MWFMcKee,C., Teaching Assistant,T.
HART B218-001Byzantine Textiles in Life and DeathSemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHWalker,A.
HART B253-001Survey of Western ArchitectureSemester / 1Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTHCast,D., Teaching Assistant,T.
HART B260-001Modern ArtSemester / 1Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHWojciechowski,A.
HART B266-001The Global PresentSemester / 1Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTHSaltzman,L.
HART B272-001Since 1960: Contemporary Art and TheorySemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHFeliz,M.
HART B316-001Museum Studies Fieldwork SeminarSemester / 1Lecture: 12:10 PM- 2:00 PM THoughteling,S., Scott,M.
HART B326-001Special Topics in Art of the Black Atlantic: Performances/Black PersonhoodSemester / 1LEC: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM WMcKee,C.
HART B334-001Topics in Film StudiesSemester / 1Lecture: 12:10 PM- 2:00 PM THFeliz,M.
HART B345-001Topics in Material Culture: Textiles of AsiaSemester / 1LEC: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM WHoughteling,S.
HART B380-001Topics in Contemporary Art: Monuments and MemorySemester / 1LEC: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM THSaltzman,L.
HART B399-001Senior Conference IISemester / 1Lecture: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM TDept. staff, TBA
HART B403-001Supervised WorkSemester / 1Dept. staff, TBA
HART B626-001Special Topics in Art of the Black Atlantic: Performances/Black PersonhoodSemester / 1LEC: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM WMcKee,C.
HART B646-001Topics in Material Culture: Textiles of South AsiaSemester / 1LEC: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM WHoughteling,S.
HART B680-001Topics in Contemporary Art: Monuments and MemorySemester / 1LEC: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM THSaltzman,L.
HART B701-001Supervised WorkSemester / 1Lecture: Date/Time TBACast,D.
HART B701-002Supervised WorkSemester / 1Lecture: Date/Time TBAMcKee,C.
HART B701-003Supervised WorkSemester / 1Lecture: Date/Time TBAWalker,A.
HART B701-004Supervised WorkSemester / 1Lecture: Date/Time TBASaltzman,L.
HART B701-005Supervised WorkSemester / 1Lecture: Date/Time TBAHoughteling,S.
ARCH B102-001Introduction to Classical ArchaeologySemester / 1Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:00 AM MWFLindenlauf,A., Teaching Assistant,T.
ARCH B359-001Topics in Classical Art and ArchaeologySemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 3:30 PM TDonohue,A.
CHEM B208-001Topics in Art AnalysisSemester / 1Lecture: 9:10 AM-12:00 PM FDepartment staff,T., Walker,A., Weldon,M.
Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM F
CITY B190-001The Form of the City: Urban Form from Antiquity to the PresentSemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH
CITY B190-00AThe Form of the City: Urban Form from Antiquity to the PresentSemester / 1Discussion: 11:30 AM-12:20 PM TLee,M.
CITY B190-00BThe Form of the City: Urban Form from Antiquity to the PresentSemester / 1Discussion: 1:10 PM- 2:00 PM TLee,M.
CITY B190-00CThe Form of the City: Urban Form from Antiquity to the PresentSemester / 1Discussion: 10:10 AM-11:00 AM WLee,M.
CITY B377-001Topics in Modern Architecture: Writing ArchitectureSemester / 1LEC: 1:10 PM- 3:30 PM THCohen,J.
ENGL B205-001Introduction to FilmSemester / 1Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MWBryant,S.
Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MW
FREN B213-001Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the HumanitiesSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWCrucifix,E.

Fall 2021

(Class schedules for this semester will be posted at a later date.)

2020-21 Catalog Data

HART B102 Critical Approaches to Visual Representation: Naturalism and the Supernatural in South Asian Art
Spring 2021
This course examines the representations of gods, plants, humans and animals in the Hindu, Buddhist, Jain and Islamic artistic traditions of India. It traces both the development of naturalistic representations, as well as departures and embellishments on naturalism in the painting, sculpture, architecture, metalwork and textiles of South Asia. The course will consider the spiritual, social, political and aesthetic motivations that led artists to choose naturalistic or supernatural forms of representation.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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HART B104 Critical Approaches to Visual Representation: The Classical Tradition
Fall 2020
An investigation of the historical and philosophical ideas of the classical, with particular attention to the Italian Renaissance and the continuance of its formulations throughout the Westernized world.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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HART B107 Critical Approaches to Visual Representation: Self and Other in the Arts of France
Not offered 2020-21
A study of artists' self-representations in the context of the philosophy and psychology of their time, with particular attention to issues of political patronage, gender and class, power and desire.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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HART B108 Critical Approaches to Visual Representation: Women, Feminism, and History of Art
Not offered 2020-21
An investigation of the history of art since the Renaissance organized around the practice of women artists, the representation of women in art, and the visual economy of the gaze.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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HART B110 Critical Approaches to Visual Representation: Identification in the Cinema
Fall 2020
An introduction to the analysis of film through particular attention to the role of the spectator. Why do moving images compel our fascination? How exactly do film spectators relate to the people, objects, and places that appear on the screen? Wherein lies the power of images to move, attract, repel, persuade, or transform its viewers? In this course, students will be introduced to film theory through the rich and complex topic of identification. We will explore how points of view are framed in cinema, and how those viewing positions differ from those of still photography, advertising, video games, and other forms of media. Students will be encouraged to consider the role the cinematic medium plays in influencing our experience of a film: how it is not simply a film's content, but the very form of representation that creates interactions between the spectator and the images on the screen. Film screenings include Psycho, Being John Malkovich, and others. Course is geared to freshman and those with no prior film instruction. Fulfills History of Art major 100-level course requirement, Film Studies minor Introductory course or Theory course requirement.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Visual Studies

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HART B111 Landscapes, Art, and Racial Ecologies
Spring 2021
This course uses art, visual, and material culture to trace the plantation's centrality to colonial and post-colonial environments in the Atlantic World from the eighteenth century to the present, as a site of environmental destruction as well as parallel ecologies engendered by African-descended peoples' aesthetic and botanical contestation. Objects to be considered include landscape painting, plantation cartography, scientific imagery, environmental art, and ecologically motivated science fiction.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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HART B112 Art, Death, and the Afterlife
Not offered 2020-21
This course aims to explore how art was used as a symbolic form to overcome death and to assure immortality in a variety of archaeological, philosophical, religious, sociopolitical, and historical contexts.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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HART B217 Introduction to Medieval Islamic Art and Architecture
Not offered 2020-21
This course traces the development of Islamic art and architecture beginning with the emergence of Islam in the early seventh century and ending with the Mongol invasion and the fall of the Abbasid Empire in the mid-thirteenth century. Special attention is paid to issues of particular importance to medieval Islamic art, including aniconism (the rejection of figural imagery in artistic production), the role of script as an expressive art form, and the relationship of early Islamic art to the artistic traditions of other late antique and medieval cultures. Prerequisites: At least one course in History of Art at the 100 or 200 level, or a course in Middle Eastern Studies at the 100 or 200 level is recommended but not required.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Middle Eastern Studies

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HART B218 Byzantine Textiles in Life and Death
Spring 2021
This course explores the manifold uses and meanings of textiles in early Byzantine visual and material culture as well as their afterlife as objects of collection and display in the modern era. Students will undertake original research on early Byzantine textiles from the collection of Philadelphia University. Assignments will develop skills in museological writing, including documentation for collection databases and object exhibitions. Prerequisites: Previous coursework in History of Art, Archaeology, Museum Studies, or History is recommended, but not required.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Middle Eastern Studies
Counts toward Museum Studies

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HART B226 Perspectives on African Art
Not offered 2020-21
This course is an exploration of a selected range of art that represent the role and place of art in Africa and demonstrate the changes in artwork over time. The course begins with an examination of what defines the art of Africa, and proceeds to seek an understanding of its philosophical underpinnings and aesthetics. It then conducts a cultural as well as an historical exploration of selected art traditions on the continent. The course will emphasize the diversity of African aesthetics as well as highlight the similarities and differences between African people within and across various artistic practices in secular and non-secular settings.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Museum Studies
Counts toward Praxis Program

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HART B230 Renaissance Art
Fall 2020
A survey of painting in Florence and Rome in the 15th and 16th centuries (Giotto, Masaccio, Botticelli, Leonardo, Michelangelo, Raphael), with particular attention to contemporary intellectual, social, and religious developments.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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HART B233 Nineteenth-Century Art
Fall 2020
This course takes a transnational approach to the history of art from the Age of Revolution (beginning in the late-eighteenth century) through the industrial globalization of the late-nineteenth century. Lectures, readings and class discussions will engage key artistic and historical developments that shaped art and culture during this period.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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HART B240 The Global Baroque
Not offered 2020-21
Global Baroque" examines the Baroque style both within and beyond Europe, moving from Italy, France, Spain and Flanders to seventeenth-century India, Iran, Japan and China, the New World, the Ottoman Empire and the Kingdom of Kongo. We will study the role of Baroque art in early modern politics, religious missions and global trade; the emergence of princely collections of wonders and cartography; the flourishing of new and wondrous art materials; and the changing role of the artist and artisan in this period. We will consider the Baroque as an invitation for emotional engagement, as a style of power that was complicit in the violence of European colonialism, and as a tool of cultural reclamation used by artists across the world. As a class, we will work to construct an art history of "The Global Baroque" that also attends to the complex specificities of time and place.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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HART B248 Topics in Museum Studies
Section 001 (Fall 2019): Peruvian Textiles
Not offered 2020-21
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Museum Studies

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HART B253 Survey of Western Architecture
Spring 2021
The major traditions in Western architecture are illustrated through detailed analysis of selected examples from classical antiquity to the present. The evolution of architectural design and building technology, and the larger intellectual, aesthetic, and social context in which this evolution occurred, are considered.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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HART B260 Modern Art
Spring 2021
This course traces the history of modern art from the mid-nineteenth century through the mid-twentieth century. Lectures, readings and class discussions will engage key artistic and historical developments that shaped art and culture during the modern period.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Visual Studies

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HART B266 The Global Present
Spring 2021
America, Europe and beyond, from the 1950s to the present, in visual media and visual theory.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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HART B272 Since 1960: Contemporary Art and Theory
Spring 2021
Lectures and readings will examine major movements in contemporary art, including Pop Art, Minimalism, Conceptualism, Performance, Postmodernism, and Installation Art. We will examine the dialogue between visual works and critical texts by Roland Barthes, Claire Bishop, Frederic Jameson, Adrian Piper, and Kobena Mercer, among others.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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HART B274 History of Chinese Art
Not offered 2020-21
This course is a survey of the arts of China from Neolithic to the contemporary period, focusing on bronze vessels of the Shang and Zhou dynasties, the Chinese appropriation of Buddhist art, and the evolution of landscape and figure painting traditions.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Museum Studies

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HART B279 Exhibiting Africa: Art, Artifact and New Articulations
Not offered 2020-21
At the turn of the 20th century, the Victorian natural history museum played an important role in constructing and disseminating images of Africa to the Western public. The history of museum representations of Africa and Africans reveals that exhibitions--both museum exhibitions and "living" World's Fair exhibitions-- has long been deeply embedded in politics, including the persistent "othering" of African people as savages or primitives. While paying attention to stereotypical exhibition tropes about Africa, we will also consider how art museums are creating new constructions of Africa and how contemporary curators and conceptual artists are creating complex, challenging new ways of understanding African identities.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Museum Studies
Counts toward Visual Studies

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HART B281 Museum Studies: History, Theory, Practice
Fall 2020
Using the museums of Philadelphia as field sites, this course provides an introduction to the theoretical and practical aspects of museum studies and the important synergies between theory and practice. Students will learn: the history of museums as institutions of recreation, education and leisure; how the museum itself became a symbol of power, prestige and sometimes alienation; debates around the ethics and politics of collecting objects of art, culture and nature; and the qualities that make an exhibition effective (or not). By visiting exhibitions and meeting with a range of museum professionals in art, anthropology and science museums, this course offers a critical perspective on the inner workings of the museum as well as insights into the "new museology."
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Museum Studies
Counts toward Visual Studies

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HART B299 History of Narrative Cinema, 1945 to the present
Not offered 2020-21
This course surveys the history of narrative film from 1945 through contemporary cinema. We will analyze a chronological series of styles and national cinemas, including Classical Hollywood, Italian Neorealism, the French New Wave, and other post-war movements and genres. Viewings of canonical films will be supplemented by more recent examples of global cinema. While historical in approach, this course emphasizes the theory and criticism of the sound film, and we will consider various methodological approaches to the aesthetic, socio-political, and psychological dimensions of cinema. Readings will provide historical context, and will introduce students to key concepts in film studies such as realism, formalism, spectatorship, the auteur theory, and genre studies. Fulfills the history requirement or the introductory course requirement for the Film Studies minor.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Film Studies

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HART B300 The Curator in the Museum
Not offered 2020-21
This course provides an introduction to theoretical and practical aspects of museums and to the links between practice and theory that are the defining characteristic of the museum curator's work today. The challenges and opportunities confronting curators and their colleagues, peers, audiences, and constituents will be addressed through readings, discussions, guest presentations, writings, and individual and group projects.
Counts toward Museum Studies

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HART B301 Topics in Exhibition Strategies
Not offered 2020-21
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Counts toward Museum Studies
Counts toward Praxis Program

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HART B316 Museum Studies Fieldwork Seminar
Spring 2021
This course provides students a forum in which to ground, frame and discuss their hands-on work in museums, galleries, archives or collections. Whether students have arranged an internship at a local institution or want to pursue one in the Bryn Mawr College Collections, this course will provide a framework for these endeavors, coupling praxis with theory supported by readings from the discipline of Museum Studies. The course will culminate in a final poster presentation, an opportunity to reflect critically on the internship experience. Prior to taking the course, students will develop a Praxis Learning Plan through the LILAC office. All students will share a set syllabus, common learning objectives and readings, but will also be able to tailor those objectives to the specific museum setting or Special Collections project in which they are involved.
Counts toward Museum Studies
Counts toward Praxis Program

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HART B318 Cultural Property and Museums
Not offered 2020-21
This course examines cultural heritage and the concept of cultural property in relation to museums and collections. We will consider the development of national and international laws in the 20th and 21st centuries to protect cultural heritage, museum responsibilities, and case studies on topics including the looting of archaeological sites, the fate of art during war, nationalism and politics, restitution of art, and fakes and forgeries.
Counts toward Museum Studies

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HART B323 Topics in Renaissance and Baroque Art
Fall 2020
This is a topics course. Course content varies. Current topics description: This seminar is concerned with both the history and the historiography of Mannerism. The first subjects are the works of art produced in Italy in the XVIth century in various mediums and in various cultural centers that are described now as Mannerist. And we will be interested in the influence of these works in other countries in Europe, bound in their various ways to the Italian tradition. But we are concerned also, and very seriously, with the critical history of these works and the attention they have been given within the history of art, especially in Germany in the first years of this last century. We will also think about how far and how usefully the designation Mannerist, with or without a capital letter, can be used to speak of art at other moments and other cultural contexts. And it is this interest that will allow us to think about art beyond the XVIth century, from the first years of this last century, even to the present.

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HART B325 Care and Conservation of Contemporary Art
Not offered 2020-21
This course explores the ethics, principles, analysis and materials used in art conservation. Case studies, guest lectures, and museum visits will then introduce the unique problems involved in preserving, conserving and exhibiting contemporary art. There will be some hands on/lab component activities. Prerequisites: At least one previous HART course at Bryn Mawr College. Understanding of basic chemistry helpful.
Counts toward Museum Studies

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HART B326 Special Topics in Art of the Black Atlantic
Section 001 (Spring 2021): Performances/Black Personhood
Spring 2021
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: This course engages with a focused aspect of art produced in the Black Atlantic (a geographic formation including Africa, the Americas, the Caribbean, and Europe) with an emphasis on aesthetic objects produced by or about African and/or African-descended peoples. This is a topic driven course that is subject to change.

Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Africana Studies

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HART B334 Topics in Film Studies
Section 001 (Fall 2020): The Present
Fall 2020, Spring 2021
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: This course explores the ways in which technology has been represented in science fiction films.

Counts toward Film Studies

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HART B345 Topics in Material Culture
Section 001 (Spring 2020): Lives of South Asian Things
Section 001 (Spring 2021): Textiles of Asia
Spring 2021
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: This seminar will explore the myriad textile traditions of South Asia. While recent scholarship on South Asian textiles has emphasized the global dimensions of the luxury trade, this course will delve into more local questions including techniques of production, paths of circulation and contexts of reception. Through close study of woven objects and visits to the Penn Museum and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, this course will work closely with objects, while also considering theories of global exchange, materiality, and decorative arts.

Counts toward Museum Studies

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HART B350 Topics in Modern Art
Section 001 (Fall 2020): Identity in Film & Video Art
Section 001 (Spring 2020): Race/Identity in American Art
Fall 2020
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: This course addresses themes of identity in Film, Performance, and Video Art.

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HART B355 Topics in the History of London
Not offered 2020-21
Selected topics of social, literary, and architectural concern in the history of London, emphasizing London since the 18th century.

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HART B370 Topics in Chinese Art
Section 001 (Fall 2019): Visual and Material Perspectives on the Silk Road
Not offered 2020-21
This is a topics course. Course content varies.

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HART B373 Contemporary Art in Exhibition: Museums and Beyond
Not offered 2020-21
How does the collection and display of artwork create meanings beyond the individual art object? In recent decades, enormous shifts have occurred in exhibition design as artwork projected from the walls of the museum, moved outdoors to the space of the street, and eventually went online. We will study an array of contemporary exhibition practices and sites in their social and historical contexts, including the temporary exhibition, "the white cube," the "black box," museum installations, international biennials, and websites. During the seminar, we will examine how issues such as patronage, avant-gardism, globalization, and identity politics have progressively brought museums and other exhibition spaces into question.
Counts toward Museum Studies

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HART B374 Topics: Exhibition Seminar
Not offered 2020-21
This is a topics course. Course content varies. Students will gain practical experience in the production of an exhibition: conceiving a curatorial approach, articulating themes, writing didactics, researching a checklist, designing gallery layout, producing print and web materials, developing programs, and marketing the exhibit. Prerequisite: At least one previous HART course at Bryn Mawr College.
Counts toward Museum Studies

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HART B380 Topics in Contemporary Art
Section 001 (Fall 2019): Contemporary Art & Technology
Section 001 (Spring 2021): Monuments and Memory
Section 001 (Spring 2020): Photography and Its Afterlife
Section 002 (Fall 2019): Strategies of Remembrance
Spring 2021
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: This course will explore the ethics and aesthetics of commemorative practice.

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HART B398 Senior Conference I
A critical review of the discipline of art history in preparation for the senior thesis. Required of all senior majors.

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HART B399 Senior Conference II
A seminar for the discussion of senior thesis research and such theoretical and historical concerns as may be appropriate. Interim oral reports. Required of all majors; culminates in the senior thesis.

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HART B403 Supervised Work
Advanced students may do independent research under the supervision of a faculty member whose special competence coincides with the area of the proposed research. Consent of the supervising faculty member and of the major adviser is required.

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HART B420 Praxis Fieldwork Seminar
In this Praxis course, students will learn to critically evaluate augmented and virtual reality (AR/VR) applications by developing their own AR/VR museum installation. The classroom component will include readings, guest lectures, and discussion topics in public history, conceptual art, and museum studies, and critical exploration of AR/VR and location-based technologies currently used in these fields. The majority of this course consists of a fieldwork component, in which students will develop an augmented- or virtual-reality installation of their own. Students will learn project management, design thinking, Unity development, and other digital competencies needed to successfully develop their museum installation. Prior experience with programming and/or Unity is advantageous but not required. If you are unsure about whether this course would work for you, please contact us or attend an info session. Pre-registered students should attend an info session on November 27 at 4PM in Canaday 315 to complete their Praxis learning plan.
Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Praxis Program

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HART B425 Praxis III
Students are encouraged to develop internship projects in the college's collections and other art institutions in the region.
Counts toward Praxis Program

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HART B603 Advanced Research Methods
Fall 2020
This is a workshop designed to support graduate students in the History of Art in independent research and writing projects at any stage. These include seminar papers and MA theses, preparing bibliographies and studying for preliminary exams, researching and writing a dissertation prospectus, or writing drafts of dissertation chapters. The primary purpose of this seminar and its timeslot are to help you pursue your academic work in an efficient, realistic, and mindful fashion. We will also use the seminar for professional development: discussion of teaching, abstracts and talks, fellowship applications, publishing, the job market, and service and leadership. This seminar is the sole regularly offered formal setting for you to receive this training. Finally, the seminar will provide a forum for practice talks and mock interviews. May be taken more than once for credit; mandatory for those beyond coursework except by permission of primary advisor.

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HART B610 Topics in Medieval Art
Section 001 (Fall 2020): Surveying Byzantium
Fall 2020
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: This course casts a critical eye on the question of how Byzantine art and architecture have been represented in surveys of art history, medieval art, and Byzantine art. In addition to reading survey texts themselves, students will consider scholarship that analyzes and critiques the representation of Byzantine art in these books and in the fields of art history and archaeology more broadly. The course provides a historiographic overview of Byzantine art history and also addresses questions of canon formation, the relationship of textbooks to current scholarship, and the role of museums and exhibitions in the interpretation and public presentation of Byzantine art.

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HART B626 Special Topics in Art of the Black Atlantic
Section 001 (Spring 2021): Performances/Black Personhood
Spring 2021
This is a topics course. Course content varies.

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HART B630 Topics in Renaissance and Baroque Art
Section 001 (Fall 2020): Mannerism
Fall 2020
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: This seminar is concerned with both the history and the historiography of Mannerism. The first subjects are the works of art produced in Italy in the XVIth century in various mediums and in various cultural centers that are described now as Mannerist. And we will be interested in the influence of these works in other countries in Europe, bound in their various ways to the Italian tradition. But we are concerned also, and very seriously, with the critical history of these works and the attention they have been given within the history of art, especially in Germany in the first years of this last century. We will also think about how far and how usefully the designation Mannerist, with or without a capital letter, can be used to speak of art at other moments and other cultural contexts. And it is this interest that will allow us to think about art beyond the XVIth century, from the first years of this last century, even to the present.

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HART B636 Vasari
Not offered 2020-21
This seminar focuses on Giorgio Vasari as painter and architect and above all as a founder of the Florentine Academy and the writer of the first modern history of the arts. Topics covered range across the arts of that time and then the questions any such critical accounting of the arts calls up, imitation, invention, the notion of the artist and however it is possible to capture in words what seems often to be beyond them.

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HART B639 Topics in Chinese Art
Section 001 (Spring 2020): Artful Things in Ancient China
Not offered 2020-21
This is a topics course. Course content varies.

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HART B640 Topics in Baroque Art
Not offered 2020-21
This is a topics course. Course content varies.

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HART B646 Topics in Material Culture
Section 001 (Spring 2021): Textiles of South Asia
Spring 2021
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: This seminar will explore the myriad textile traditions of South Asia. While recent scholarship on South Asian textiles has emphasized the global dimensions of the luxury trade, this course will delve into more local questions including techniques of production, paths of circulation and contexts of reception. Through close study of woven objects and visits to the Penn Museum and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, this course will work closely with objects, while also considering theories of global exchange, materiality, and decorative arts.

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HART B651 Topics: Interpretation and Theory
Section 001 (Fall 2019): Approaches to Abstraction
Not offered 2020-21
This is a topics course. Course content varies.

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HART B671 Topics in German Art
Not offered 2020-21
This is a topics course. Topics vary.

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HART B674 Topics: Exhibition Seminar
Not offered 2020-21
This is a topics course. Course content varies. Students will gain practical experience in the production of an exhibition: conceiving a curatorial approach, articulating themes, writing didactics, researching a checklist, designing gallery layout, producing print and web materials, developing programs, and marketing the exhibit. Students should be prepared to conduct independent research and to author a public-facing publication.

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HART B680 Topics in Contemporary Art
Section 001 (Spring 2021): Monuments and Memory
Section 001 (Spring 2020): Photography and Its Afterlife
Spring 2021
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: This course will explore the ethics and aesthetics of commemorative practice.

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HART B701 Supervised Work
Fall 2020, Spring 2021
Supervised Work

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ARCH B102 Introduction to Classical Archaeology
Spring 2021
A historical survey of the archaeology and art of Greece, Etruria, and Rome.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Museum Studies

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ARCH B205 Greek Sculpture
Not offered 2020-21
One of the best preserved categories of evidence for ancient Greek culture is sculpture. The Greeks devoted immense resources to producing sculpture that encompassed many materials and forms and served a variety of important social functions. This course examines sculptural production in Greece and neighboring lands from the Bronze Age through the fourth century B.C.E. with special attention to style, iconography and historical and social context.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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ARCH B206 Hellenistic and Roman Sculpture
Not offered 2020-21
This course surveys the sculpture produced from the fourth century B.C.E. to the fourth century C.E., the period, beginning with the death of Alexander the Great, that saw the transformation of the classical world through the rise of Rome and the establishment and expansion of the Roman Empire. Style, iconography, and production will be studied in the contexts of the culture of the Hellenistic kingdoms, the Roman appropriation of Greek culture, the role of art in Roman society, and the significance of Hellenistic and Roman sculpture in the post-antique classical tradition.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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ARCH B215 Classical Art
Fall 2020
A survey of the visual arts of ancient Greece and Rome from the Bronze Age through Late Imperial times (circa 3000 B.C.E. to 300 C.E.). Major categories of artistic production are examined in historical and social context, including interactions with neighboring areas and cultures; methodological and interpretive issues are highlighted.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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ARCH B219 Art and Archaeology of Late Antiquity
Not offered 2020-21
This class examines the art and archaeology of the late-antique Mediterranean, tracing various iterations of artistic and architectural experimentation as well as socio-political expression from the Late Roman world of the Tetrarchs (3rd century CE) to the first Islamic Dynasty, the Umayyads (7th century CE). We will explore how the vitality of classical styles and pagan beliefs mixed with the creative energies of other "indigenous" traditions - Egyptian, Arabic, Jewish, Gallic, etc., as well as those of the new church, so as to better understand the cultural plurality and vigor of this period formally considered a "Dark Age."
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Museum Studies

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ARCH B225 The Art and Achaeology of Greco-Roman Egypt
Not offered 2020-21
This course examines the art and archaeology of Greco-Roman Egypt from the conquests of Alexander the Great in the 4th century BCE to the Late Roman Era, ca. 4th century CE.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Middle Eastern Studies

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ARCH B240 Archaeology and History of Ancient Mesopotamia
Not offered 2020-21
A survey of the material culture of ancient Mesopotamia, modern Iraq, from the earliest phases of state formation (circa 3500 B.C.E.) through the Achaemenid Persian occupation of the Near East (circa 331 B.C.E.). Emphasis will be on art, artifacts, monuments, religion, kingship, and the cuneiform tradition. The survival of the cultural legacy of Mesopotamia into later ancient and Islamic traditions will also be addressed.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Middle Eastern Studies

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ARCH B252 Pompeii
Not offered 2020-21
Introduces students to a nearly intact archaeological site whose destruction by the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in 79 C.E. was recorded by contemporaries. The discovery of Pompeii in the mid-1700s had an enormous impact on 18th- and 19th-century views of the Roman past as well as styles and preferences of the modern era. Informs students in classical antiquity, urban life, city structure, residential architecture, home decoration and furnishing, wall painting, minor arts and craft and mercantile activities within a Roman city.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Museum Studies

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ARCH B263 Roman Archaeology: Life in the City
Not offered 2020-21
This course explores the art and architecture of ancient Rome from the Republic through the Empire. By focusing on specific topics, such as residences, markets, religious life, death and entertainment, and by surveying a rich variety of available evidence that spans from architectural remains, inscriptions and monuments to paintings, architectural sculpture and mosaics, the course highlights the importance of art historical and archaeological inquiry for our understanding of urban life and experience in one of the greatest cities of the ancient world.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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ARCH B303 Classical Bodies
Not offered 2020-21
An examination of the conceptions of the human body evidenced in Greek and Roman art and literature, with emphasis on issues that have persisted in the Western tradition. Topics include the fashioning of concepts of male and female standards of beauty and their implications; conventions of visual representation; the nude; clothing and its symbolism; the athletic ideal; physiognomy; medical theory and practice; the visible expression of character and emotions; and the formulation of the "classical ideal" in antiquity and later times.
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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ARCH B306 Monumental Painting
Not offered 2020-21
The Mediterranean tradition of large-scale painting begins in prehistoric times and continues through Late Antiquity and beyond. Important examples survive on the walls of houses, tombs and other structures at sites in the Bronze Age Aegean, in Archaic, Classical and Hellenistic Anatolia, Macedonia, Magna Graecia, and Etruria, Rome and the famous sites of Pompeii and Hercul- aneum preserved by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius. Technical, artistic, cultural and interpretive issues will be considered.
Counts toward Counts toward Museum Studies

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ARCH B322 The Archaeology of the Roman Empire: Comparative Perspectives
Not offered 2020-21
An examination of the growth of the Roman Republic into the Roman Empire at its height, from its acquisitions of the Hellenistic kingdoms (second and first centuries, B.C.E.) to its domination of Europe, North Africa and the Near East.

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ARCH B359 Topics in Classical Art and Archaeology
Spring 2021
This is a topics course. Topics vary. A research-oriented course taught in seminar format, treating issues of current interest in Greek and Roman art and archaeology. 200-level coursework in some aspect of classical or related cultures, archeology, art history, or Cities, or related fields is strongly recommended.

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ARCH B605 The Concept of Style
Not offered 2020-21
This seminar examines the development and uses of concepts of "style" in the criticism, analysis, and historiography of textual and material culture. Particular attention is paid to the recognition and description of style, explanations of stylistic change, and the meanings attached to style, particularly but not exclusively in classical and related traditions.

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ARCH B615 Mystery Cults
Not offered 2020-21
An investigation of the phenomenon of mystery cults, their foundation and dispersal from the Classical through Hellensistic and early Roman periods. A study of the topography and monuments of specific cults and of representation of mysteries in sculpture and painting.

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ARCH B634 Problems in Classical Art
Fall 2020
This is a topics course. Topics vary. A seminar dealing with current issues in the art of ancient Greece and related traditions.

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CHEM B208 Topics in Art Analysis
Spring 2021
This is a topics course and topics will vary. All courses will cover a variety of methods of analysis of works of art centered around a specific theme. Using both completed case studies and their own analysis of objects in the Bryn Mawr College collection, students will investigate a number of instrumental methods of obtaining both quantitative and qualitative information about the manufacture, use and history of the objects. This course counts towards the major in History of Art.
Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts toward Counts toward Museum Studies

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CITY B190 The Form of the City: Urban Form from Antiquity to the Present
Spring 2021
This course studies the city as a three-dimensional artifact. A variety of factors, geography, economic and population structure, politics, planning, and aesthetics are considered as determinants of urban form.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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CITY B253 Before Modernism: Architecture and Urbanism of the 18th and 19th Centuries
Not offered 2020-21
The course frames the topic of architecture before the impact of 20th century Modernism, with a special focus on the two prior centuries - especially the 19th - in ways that treat them on their own terms rather than as precursors of more modern technologies and forms of expression. The course will integrate urbanistic and vernacular perspectives alongside more familiar landmark exemplars. Key goals and components of the course will include attaining a facility within pertinent bibliographical and digital landscapes, formal analysis and research skills exercised in writing projects, class field-trips, and a nuanced mastery of the narratives embodied in the architecture of these centuries.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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CITY B254 History of Modern Architecture
Fall 2020
A survey of the development of modern architecture since the 18th century.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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CITY B255 Survey of American Architecture
Not offered 2020-21
This survey course examines architecture within the global framework of "the modern." Through an introduction to an architectural canon of works and figures, it seeks to foster a critical consideration of modernity, modernization, and modernism. The course explores each as a category of meaning that framed the theory and practice of architecture as a cultural, political, social, and technological enterprise. It also uses these conjugates to study the modes by which architecture may be said to have framed history. We will study practical and discursive activity that formed a dynamic field within which many of the contradictions of "the modern" were made visible (and visual) through architecture. In this course, we will engage architectural concepts and designs by studying drawings and buildings closely within their historical context. We will examine spheres of reception for architecture and its theoretical, discursive, and cultural life through a variety of media: buildings of course, but also journals, books, and film. We will also investigate architecture as a site and subject for critical inquiry. In particular, we will see what it may tell us about the globalization and politics of the twentieth century, and about history, theory, and criticism as epistemological tracks.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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CITY B306 Advanced Fieldwork Techniques: Places in Time
Fall 2020
A hands-on workshop for research into the histories of places, intended to bring students into contact with some of the raw materials of architectural and urban history. A focus will be placed on historical images and texts, and on creating engaging informational experiences that are transparent to their evidentiary basis.

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CITY B377 Topics in Modern Architecture
Section 001 (Spring 2021): Writing Architecture
Spring 2021
This is a topics course on modern architecture. Topics vary.
Current topic description: This course centers on reading and responding to different species of writing about buildings and dialogues on architecture. These include present and past architectural criticism and the values embodied in it, architectural history in well-researched narratives; theory and argument meant to frame future architecture; architectural biographies; writing aimed toward past or present vernaculars; and the language and strategies of architectural description. The course will reach out broadly, to places near and afar and writing both old and new, in meetings each week to discuss what we have found, read, and written.

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CITY B378 Formative Landscapes: The Architecture and Planning of American Collegiate Campuses
Not offered 2020-21
The campus and buildings familiar to us here at the College reflect a long and rich design conversation regarding communicative form, architectural innovation, and orchestrated planning. This course will explore that conversation through varied examples, key models, and shaping conceptions over time.

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CSTS B201 Cleopatra: Passion, Power, and Politics
Not offered 2020-21
Cleopatra VII, the last ruler of Ptolemaic Egypt (69-30 BCE), has been a figure of continuous fascination and political resonance for over 2000 years. She was the most famous and enigmatic person in the ancient Mediterranean world while she was alive and, since then, she has been re-imagined by countless poets, dramatists, philosophers, filmmakers, musicians, and artists of all types. In this course, we will examine both the historical Cleopatra and her reception in various media in subsequent cultures and societies. In the first part, we will carefully study the ancient literary and material evidence to learn all we can about the real Cleopatra and the tumultuous times in which she lived. In the second part, we will then consider a selection of medieval, early modern, and contemporary representations of Cleopatra, ranging from Chaucer to Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra to HBO's series Rome and the use of Cleopatra in present-day advertising. Throughout our readings, we will focus on issues such as female agency and power in a man's world, beauty and the femme fatale, east vs. west, and politics and propaganda.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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CSTS B324 Roman Architecture
Not offered 2020-21
The course gives special attention to the architecture and topography of ancient Rome from the origins of the city to the later Roman Empire. At the same time, general issues in architecture and planning with particular reference to Italy and the provinces from republic to empire are also addressed. These include public and domestic spaces,structures, settings and uses, urban infrastructure, the relationship of towns and territories, "suburban" and working villas, and frontier settlements. Prerequisite: ARCH 102.

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ENGL B205 Introduction to Film
Spring 2021
This course is intended to provide students with the tools of critical film analysis. Through readings of images and sounds, sections of films and entire narratives, students will cultivate the habits of critical viewing and establish a foundation for focused work in film studies. The course introduces formal and technical units of cinematic meaning and categories of genre and history that add up to the experiences and meanings we call cinema. Although much of the course material will focus on the Hollywood style of film, examples will be drawn from the history of cinema. Attendance at weekly screenings is mandatory.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

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ENGL B317 Materializing Disability: Text and Technology
Not offered 2020-21
Early disability activists, a group that was composed primarily wheelchair users, named the built environment--including curbs and flights of steps--as the cause of their disablement. People are not inherently disabled, they argued, but inaccessible spaces--or poorly conceived material environments--limit their mobility. Because we will be studying literature, we will turn our attention to the built environment of texts and imagine how the written word both enables and disables people with disabilities. When disabled people are unable to write or communicate by conventional means, what new writing practices do they imagine? What technologies might they rely on? From braille and talking books to American Sign Language poetry and screen-reader technology, disabled people have adapted texts to suit their needs while challenging what constitutes language. The course begins in the mid nineteenth century when Lennard Davis argues that disability emerges as a key concept in U.S. culture and proceeds through the mid twentieth-century civil rights movement when disabled people began to frame disability as a social identity. The course will travel across book history, technology, editorial theory, poetry, and performance to consider disability as a material and textual phenomenon. (Note: at the end of the term, students will design their own "edition" of a text with accessibility as the guiding force behind its design).
Course does not meet an Approach

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ENGL B336 Topics in Film
Section 001 (Fall 2020): Cinematic Voice
Fall 2020
This is a topics course and description varies according to the topic.
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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FREN B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Spring 2021
By bringing together the study of major theoretical currents of the 20th century and the practice of analyzing literary works in the light of theory, this course aims at providing students with skills to use literary theory in their own scholarship. The selection of theoretical readings reflects the history of theory (psychoanalysis, structuralism, narratology), as well as the currents most relevant to the contemporary academic field: Post-structuralism, Post-colonialism, Gender Studies, and Ecocriticism. They are paired with a diverse range of short stories (Poe, Kafka, Camus, Borges, Calvino, Morrison, Djebar, Ngozi Adichie) that we discuss along with our study of theoretical texts. The class will be conducted in English with an additional hour in French for students wishing to take it for French credit.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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GSEM B623 Figures of Resistance: Classical and Modern
Not offered 2020-21
The GSem will explore classical figures of resistance such as Prometheus, Antigone, Electra, Medea, and Lysistrata and their reception in modern art and cinema. The focus will be on films and other works of art that re-appropriate and transform the ancient characters and their stories. We will discuss in particular how modern filmmakers re-contextualize the classical figures to shed light on contemporary historical, political, and social issues. Films will include Tony Harrison, Prometheus (Great Britain, 1998), Liliana Cavani, The Year of the Cannibals (Italy, 1970), Amy Greenfield, Antigone/Rites of Passion (USA, 1991), Ingmar Bergman, Persona (Sweden, 1966), Miklós Jancsó, Electra, My Love (Hungary, 1974), Arthur Ripstein, Asi Es La Vida (Mexico, 2000), and Spike Lee, Chi-raq (USA, 2015). Readings will be drawn from texts on reception studies, film and gender theory, psychoanalysis, and political theory.

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GSEM B654 War and Peace in the Ancient World
Not offered 2020-21
For centuries history has been perceived, written and taught as a series of wars and periods of peace. Yet, the question remains: what does it mean when a city, a state or a nation is at war, and how do different cultures and societies conceptualize peace? This interdisciplinary seminar explores theories and practices of war and peace in the ancient world, examining the archaeological, epigraphic, and literary evidence. The archaeology of warfare will include battlefields, fortifications, arms and weapons, siege machines, war memorials, funerary monuments as well as the iconography of victors and victims. The literary sources that we will be reading, among them the Homeric epics, select passages from Greek and Roman historiography, philosophical and rhetorical works and ancient handbooks and manuals of warfare, will shed light on the recording of conflicts, the conduct of war, notions of power and peace, the depiction of leaders, the representation of violence, and strategies of commemoration. Investigating bodies of evidence, which are normally studied separately and within specific disciplinary formations, we aim to challenge the entrenched oppositions between archaeology, philology, and history and to engage in a discourse about the complex and changing conceptualizations of war and peace in the ancient world. We plan to have several guest lecturers. Students participating in this seminar will be expected to give oral presentations and to develop their special areas of interests in their research projects applying a variety of methods. No previous classics or archaeology training is required.

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ITAL B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities
Not offered 2020-21
What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies

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ITAL B308 Rome as Palimpsests: from Ruins to Virtual Reality
Not offered 2020-21
From the urban dream that Raphael confessed to pope Leo X in the middle of the Renaissance to the parkour on the top of the Colosseum in the Assassin's Creed videogames, Rome has always been both a memory and a vision: a place of nostalgia and endless potential. In this course we will investigate some crucial places, moments, and ideas in the modern history of this ancient capital of Western culture: XVI century Mannerist painting and the Pop Art of Piazza del Popolo, the early modern re-uses of the Colosseum and its cubic clone designed under fascism, the narrations of Romantic grand-tours and the ones of contemporary postcolonial authors. We will adopt a trans-historical and inter-disciplinary perspective, focusing on the main attempts to revive the glory of the ancient empire. We will try to understand weather Italy's capital is a museum to be preserved, an old laboratory of urban innovations, a cemetery, a sanctuary, or simply an amalgam of past and future, glory and misery, beauty and horror. For Italian majors you will have an additional hour for credit. Prerequisite: One two-hundred level course for students interested in taking the course towards Italian credits.
Counts toward Counts toward Museum Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Praxis Program

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ITAL B315 A Gendered History of the Avant-Garde
Not offered 2020-21
The very concept of 'avant-garde' is steeped in a masculine warlike imagery, and the founding manifesto of Futurism even glorifies 'contempt for the woman'. Yet, feminine, queer, androgynous, and non-binary perspectives on sexual identity played a central role -- from Rimbaud to current experimentalism -- in the development of what has been called 'the tradition of the new'. In this seminar we will explore such a paradoxical anti-traditional tradition through texts, images, sounds, and videos, adopting a historical prospective from early 20th century movements to the Neo-Avant-Garde. We will unearth the stories and works of great experimentalists who have been neglected because of their gender. We will deal with poems made up entirely of place names, of recorded noises, of typographical symbols. Taking advantage of the college's collection and library, we will try to read texts with no words, surreal stories, performances, objects, and we will make our own avant-garde experiments. Course taught in English, no previous knowledge of Italian required.
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Museum Studies

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ITAL B319 Multiculturalism and Diversity in Medieval Italy
Not offered 2020-21
This interdisciplinary course will reflect upon history, religion, literature, politics, and built environment of Italy from ca. 1000 to 1400. Italy was famous for its diverse cultural landscape of urban towers and fortified castles, its Mediterranean trade, and its ethnically and religiously differentiated voices. The course examines cross-cultural interactions played out through the patronage, production, and reception of works of art, literature, and architecture. Sites of patronage and production include the cities of Venice, Palermo, and Pisa. It counts towards Art History and City.

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MEST B210 The Art and Architecture of Islamic Spirituality
Not offered 2020-21
This course examines how Muslim societies across time and space have used art and architecture in different ways to express and understand inner dimensions of spirituality and mysticism. Topics to be studied include: the calligraphical remnants of the early Islamic period; inscriptions found on buildings and gravestones; the majestic architecture of mosques, shrines, seminaries, and Sufi lodges; the brilliant arts of the book; the commemorative iconography and passion plays of Ashura devotion; the souvenir culture of modern shrine visitation; and the modern art of twenty-first century Sufism. Readings include works from history, religious studies, anthropology, sociology, and the history of art and architecture.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Middle Eastern Studies

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RUSS B238 Topics: The History of Cinema 1895 to 1945
Section 001 (Fall 2020): Silent Film: From U.S. to Soviet Russia& Beyond
Fall 2020
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Visual Studies

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