Courses

This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's calendars page.

Fall 2024 LING

Course Title Schedule/Units Meeting Type Times/Days Location Instr(s)
CMSC B325-001 Computational Linguistics Semester / 1 Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:30 AM MW Park 245
Kumar,D., Kumar,D.
Laboratory: 1:10 PM-2:30 PM M Park 231

Spring 2025 LING

Course Title Schedule/Units Meeting Type Times/Days Location Instr(s)
LING B114-001 Introduction to Semantics Semester / 1 Lecture: 11:40 AM-1:00 PM TTH Payne,A.
LING B281-001 Semantics II Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM-2:30 PM TTH Payne,A.
SPAN B216-001 Introducción a la lingüística hispánica Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM-2:30 PM MW Berard,K.

Fall 2025 LING

(Class schedules for this semester will be posted at a later date.)

2024-25 Catalog Data: LING

LING B101 Introduction to Linguistics

Not offered 2024-25

An introductory survey of linguistics as a field. This course examines the core areas of linguistic structure (morphology, phonology, syntax, semantics), pragmatics, and language variation in relation to language change. The course provides rudimentary training in the analysis of language data, and focuses on the variety of human language structures and on the question of universal properties of language.

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LING B105 Language and Place

Not offered 2024-25

This project-based course focuses on hands-on research in a small group setting in order to collaboratively come to understand the relationship between a place and the languages of that place. In Spring 2022 the course will be part of a 360 and will focus on Nicaragua. Through seeking to understand the languages of Nicaragua, their histories and social dynamics, students will also learn basics of linguistics, especially historical linguistics and sociolinguistics. Spanish language a plus, though not required.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Counts Toward Latin American,Iberian,Latinx

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LING B113 Introduction to Syntax

Not offered 2024-25

Introduces the investigation of sentence structures in human language, emphasizing insights from linguists over the past 40 years. The class will develop increasingly complex theory starting with basic assumptions and seeing where they lead. Students will gain a clearer understanding of grammar, develop and refine skills of analysis, writing, and argumentation. We will focus on English, occasionally using other languages to look at ways human languages are similar and how they differ.

Course does not meet an Approach

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

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LING B114 Introduction to Semantics

Spring 2025

This course is designed to introduce you to the formal study of meaning in language: semantics. We will discuss elements of word meaning, formal logic, generative semantics, and pragmatics, slowly building our theory as we incorporate new linguistic phenomena from multiple human languages. No linguistic or logic background is assumed, but we will be using tools from set theory, model theory, and syntax in order to construct semantic analyses.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Scientific Investigation (SI)

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LING B281 Semantics II

Spring 2025

This course is intended to familiarize you with original research in semantics. We will spend the first few weeks reviewing (or learning) the basic terms and tools of formal pragmatics and compositional semantics, including lambda calculus and event semantics. From there, we will read and discuss a selection of research articles in semantics and pragmatics, culminating in a final project for each student that investigates their own original research question related to meaning in language.

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

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LING B399 Senior Thesis Seminar

This seminar exposes students to linguistic research methods and guides them through the conceptualization of a topic, the research, and the writing of a senior thesis. All linguistics majors must write their senior thesis in this seminar or Ling S100 or S195.

Writing Intensive

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ANTH B246 The Everyday Life of Language: Field Research in Linguistic Anthropology

Not offered 2024-25

The goal of this course is to develop an awareness of how language operates in various interactional and other (eg. ritual, performance, political) contexts that we commonly experience. The focus will be on gaining hands-on experience in doing linguistic anthropological data collection and analysis, and putting the results of individual student projects together as part of initiating an ongoing, multi-year project. Topics that students explore ethnographically may include: language and gender; language, race and social indexicality; sociolinguistic variation; codeswitching; register and social stance; language and social media. Student research will involve ethnographic observation, audio-recording of spoken discourse, conducting interviews, and learning how to create a transcript to use as the basis for ethnographic analysis. Students will work in parallel on individual projects cohering around a particular topic, and class time will be used to discuss the results and synthesize insights that develop from bringing different ethnographic contexts together. For the praxis component of the course, students will use the experience they have gained to generate ideas for components of a middle school/high school language arts curriculum that incorporates linguistic anthropology concepts and student-driven research on language.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Counts Toward Gender/Sex Studies (Min/Conc)

Counts Toward Praxis Program

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CMSC B325 Computational Linguistics

Fall 2024

Introduction to computational models of understanding and processing human languages. How elements of linguistics, computer science, and artificial intelligence can be combined to help computers process human language and to help linguists understand language through computer models. Topics covered: syntax, semantics, pragmatics, generation and knowledge representation techniques. Prerequisite: CMSC B151 , or CMSC H106 or CMSC H107, and CMSC B231 or CMSC H231 or MATH B231 or MATH H231, or permission of instructor.

Counts Toward Neuroscience

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SPAN B216 Introducción a la lingüística hispánica

Spring 2025

A survey of the field of Hispanic linguistics. We will explore the sounds and sound patterns of Spanish (phonetics and phonology), how words are formed (morphology), the structure and interpretation of sentences (syntax and semantics), language use (pragmatics), the history and dialects of the Spanish language, and second language acquisition. Prerequisite: SPAN B120 or permission of the instructor. Critical Interpretation (CI)

Critical Interpretation (CI)

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flowers

Contact Us

Linguistics

Jane Chandlee
she/her/hers 
Associate Professor and Haverford Chair of Linguistics (TriCo)
Chase 103C
(610) 795-3371
jchandlee@haverford.edu​​​​​​​

Kim Minor
Administrative Assistant
Chase Hall, 2nd floor
610-795-1701
kminor@haverford.edu