Courses

This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's calendars page.

Spring 2024 LING

Course Title Schedule/Units Meeting Type Times/Days Location Instr(s)
LING B113-001 Introduction to Syntax Semester / 1 Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTH Taylor Hall D
Payne,A.
ANTH B246-001 The Everyday Life of Language: Field Research in Linguistic Anthropology Semester / 1 Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTH Dalton Hall 6
Weidman,A.

Fall 2024 LING

(Class schedules for this semester will be posted at a later date.)

Spring 2025 LING

(Class schedules for this semester will be posted at a later date.)

2023-24 Catalog Data: LING

LING B101 Introduction to Linguistics

Not offered 2023-24

An introductory survey of linguistics as a field. This course examines the core areas of linguistic structure (morphology, phonology, syntax, semantics), pragmatics, and language variation in relation to language change. The course provides rudimentary training in the analysis of language data, and focuses on the variety of human language structures and on the question of universal properties of language.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

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LING B105 Language and Place

Fall 2023

This project-based course focusses on hands-on research in a small group setting in order to collaboratively come to understand the relationship between a place and the languages of that place. In Spring 2022 the course will be part of a 360 and will focus on Nicaragua. Through seeking to understand the languages of Nicaragua, their histories and social dynamics, students will also learn basics of linguistics, especially historical linguistics and sociolinguistics. Spanish language a plus, though not required.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Counts Toward Latin American,Iberian,Latinx

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LING B113 Introduction to Syntax

Spring 2024

Introduces the investigation of sentence structures in human language, emphasizing insights from linguists over the past 40 years. The class will develop increasingly complex theory starting with basic assumptions and seeing where they lead. Students will gain a clearer understanding of grammar, develop and refine skills of analysis, writing, and argumentation. We will focus on English, occasionally using other languages to look at ways human languages are similar and how they differ.

Course does not meet an Approach

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LING B200 Multilingualism and Second Language Acquisition

Not offered 2023-24

It is estimated that at least 60% of the world population speaks more than one language, while this is true of only around 15-20% of Americans. Misconceptions about multilingualism, multidialectalism, and language learning are common in American society, and these can often lead to bias and discrimination. This course examines these topics from a variety of sociocognitive angles, including language learning, language processing, dialectal variation, language contact, language and identity, and language policy. The following types of questions will be considered: What do multilingual speakers' linguistic resources mean to them? What are the linguistic 'rules' of code-switching? How is learning languages as a child different from learning languages as an adult? Can you 'forget' a language you once knew? How can public policies discourage or support multilingualism? This is a seminar-style course that will use a mix of discussion, lecture, and interactive activities to give students a strong foundation in both classical and recent research on these topics while also inviting students to explore personal curiosities and multilingualism in their own lives. It is also a writing intensive course that will guide students to analyze the style and structure of academic works, offer low-stakes opportunities to improve writing skills, and provide feedback on how to polish written work into a strong final version. Prerequisites: At least one previous Linguistics course (any course)

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LING B399 Senior Thesis Seminar

This seminar exposes students to linguistic research methods and guides them through the conceptualization of a topic, the research, and the writing of a senior thesis. All linguistics majors must write their senior thesis in this seminar or Ling S100 or S195.

Writing Intensive

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ANTH B246 The Everyday Life of Language: Field Research in Linguistic Anthropology

Spring 2024

The goal of this course is to develop an awareness of how language operates in various interactional and other (eg. ritual, performance, political) contexts that we commonly experience. The focus will be on gaining hands-on experience in doing linguistic anthropological data collection and analysis, and putting the results of individual student projects together as part of initiating an ongoing, multi-year project. Topics that students explore ethnographically may include: language and gender; language, race and social indexicality; sociolinguistic variation; codeswitching; register and social stance; language and social media. Student research will involve ethnographic observation, audio-recording of spoken discourse, conducting interviews, and learning how to create a transcript to use as the basis for ethnographic analysis. Students will work in parallel on individual projects cohering around a particular topic, and class time will be used to discuss the results and synthesize insights that develop from bringing different ethnographic contexts together. For the praxis component of the course, students will use the experience they have gained to generate ideas for components of a middle school/high school language arts curriculum that incorporates linguistic anthropology concepts and student-driven research on language.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Counts Toward Gender/Sex Studies (Min/Conc)

Counts Toward Praxis Program

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ANTH B281 The Power in Language: Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology

Not offered 2023-24

This course provides an introduction to the concepts and methods of linguistic anthropology, which can help us understand the role language plays in constructing identities, creating social and political hierarchies, and shaping understandings and experiences of the world. The course considers topics relevant to the everyday life of language in the U.S. context, including the relationship between language and gender, race, and socioeconomic inequality, and uses ethnographic materials from a variety of cultural contexts to explore three perspectives that are central to linguistic anthropology. These are: language, power, and the linguistic market: how different languages and the ways of speaking get associated with particular social groups and become valued or devalued; linguistic ideologies and semiotic processes: how language as a system of signs becomes meaningful, to whom, and in what ways; poetics and performance: how people "do things with words" and how the non-referential (sonic, poetic) aspects of language matter.

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

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CMSC B325 Computational Linguistics

Not offered 2023-24

Introduction to computational models of understanding and processing human languages. How elements of linguistics, computer science, and artificial intelligence can be combined to help computers process human language and to help linguists understand language through computer models. Topics covered: syntax, semantics, pragmatics, generation and knowledge representation techniques. Prerequisite: CMSC B151 , or CMSC H106/H107, and CMSC 231, or permission of instructor.

Counts Toward Neuroscience

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SPAN B216 Introducción a la lingüística hispánica

Not offered 2023-24

A survey of the field of Hispanic linguistics. We will explore the sounds and sound patterns of Spanish (phonetics and phonology), how words are formed (morphology), the structure and interpretation of sentences (syntax and semantics), language use (pragmatics), the history and dialects of the Spanish language, and second language acquisition. Prerequisite: SPAN B120 or permission of the instructor. Critical Interpretation (CI)

Critical Interpretation (CI)

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flowers

Contact Us

Linguistics

Jane Chandlee
she/her/hers 
Associate Professor and Haverford Chair of Linguistics (TriCo)
Chase 103C
(610) 795-3371
jchandlee@haverford.edu​​​​​​​

Kim Minor
Administrative Assistant
Chase Hall, 2nd floor
610-795-1701
kminor@haverford.edu