Courses

This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's calendars page.

Fall 2022 ITAL

Course Title Schedule/Units Meeting Type Times/Days Location / Instruction Mode Instr(s)
ITAL B001-001 Beginning Italian I 1Semester / 1 Lecture: 8:10 AM- 9:00 AM MWF Dalton Hall 10
In Person
Zipoli,L., Zipoli,L.
Lecture: 7:55 AM- 8:45 AM TTH Dalton Hall 10
In Person
ITAL B001-002 Beginning Italian I 1Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:10 AM-10:00 AM MWF Carpenter Library 15
In Person
Genovese,G., Genovese,G.
Lecture: 8:55 AM- 9:45 AM TTH Carpenter Library 15
In Person
ITAL B001-003 Beginning Italian I 1Semester / 1 Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:00 AM MWF Carpenter Library 15
In Person
Genovese,G., Genovese,G.
Lecture: 9:55 AM-10:45 AM TTH Carpenter Library 15
In Person
ITAL B101-001 Intermediate Italian through Culture I 1Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Dalton Hall 2
In Person
Zipoli,L.
ITAL B200-001 Pathways to Proficiency 1Semester / 1 Lecture: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTH Dalton Hall 10
In Person
Bozzato,D.
ITAL B209-001 Love, Magic, and Women Warriors: Renaissance Romance 1Semester / 1 LEC: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTH Taylor Hall, Seminar Room
In Person
Zipoli,L.
ITAL B316-001 Mountaineering Heroes: Masculinity and Nation-building 1Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM W Carpenter Library 17
In Person
Benetollo,C.
ITAL B398-001 Senior Seminar 1Semester / 1 In Person Dept. staff, TBA

Spring 2023 ITAL

Course Title Schedule/Units Meeting Type Times/Days Location / Instruction Mode Instr(s)
ITAL B002-001 Beginning Italian II 1Semester / 1 Lecture: 8:10 AM- 9:00 AM MWF In Person Zipoli,L., Zipoli,L.
Lecture: 7:55 AM- 8:45 AM TTH In Person
ITAL B002-002 Beginning Italian II 1Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:10 AM-10:00 AM MWF In Person Genovese,G., Genovese,G.
Lecture: 8:55 AM- 9:45 AM TTH In Person
ITAL B002-003 Beginning Italian II 1Semester / 1 Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:00 AM MWF In Person Genovese,G., Genovese,G.
Lecture: 9:55 AM-10:45 AM TTH In Person
ITAL B102-001 Intermediate Italian through Culture II 1Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH In Person Zipoli,L.
ITAL B233-001 Translating Italian: A Workshop 1Semester / 1 Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTH In Person Bozzato,D.
ITAL B302-001 Italo Calvino transnational writer 1Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM W In Person Benetollo,C.
ITAL B324-001 Diversity, Gender, and Queerness in Modern Italian Poetry 1Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM T In Person Zipoli,L.
ITAL B399-001 Senior Conference 1Semester / 1 In Person Dept. staff, TBA
FREN B213-001 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities 1Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH In Person Crucifix,E.

Fall 2023 ITAL

(Class schedules for this semester will be posted at a later date.)

2022-23 Catalog Data: ITAL

ITAL B001 Beginning Italian I

Fall 2022

The course is for students with no previous knowledge of Italian. It aims at giving the students a complete foundation in the Italian language, with particular attention to oral and written communication. The course will be conducted in Italian and will involve the study of all the basic structures of the language--phonological, grammatical, syntactical--with practice in conversation, reading, composition. Readings are chosen from a wide range of texts, while use of the language is encouraged through role-play, debates, songs, and creative composition

Course does not meet an Approach

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ITAL B002 Beginning Italian II

Spring 2023

This course is the continuation of ITAL B001 and is intended for students who have started studying Italian the semester before. It aims at giving the students a complete foundation in the Italian language, with particular attention to oral and written communication. The course will be conducted in Italian and will involve the study of all the basic structures of the language--phonological, grammatical, syntactical--with practice in conversation, reading, composition. Readings are chosen from a wide range of texts, while use of the language is encouraged through role-play, debates, songs, and creative composition. Prerequisite: ITAL B001 or placement.

Course does not meet an Approach

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ITAL B101 Intermediate Italian through Culture I

Fall 2022

This course provides students with a broader basis for learning to communicate effectively and accurately in Italian. While the principal aspect of the course is to further develop language abilities, the course also imparts a foundation for the understanding of modern and contemporary Italy. Students will gain an appreciation for Italian culture and be able to communicate orally and in writing in a wide variety of topics. We will read newspaper and magazine articles to analyze aspects on modern and contemporary Italy. We will also view and discuss Italian films and internet materials.

Course does not meet an Approach

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ITAL B102 Intermediate Italian through Culture II

Spring 2023

This course provides students with a broader basis for learning to communicate effectively and accurately in Italian. While the principal aspect of the course is to further develop language abilities, the course also imparts a foundation for the understanding of modern and contemporary Italy. Students will gain an appreciation for Italian culture and be able to communicate orally and in writing in a wide variety of topics. We will read a novel to analyze aspects on modern and contemporary Italy. We will also view and discuss Italian films and internet materials. Prerequisite: ITAL B101 or placement.

Course does not meet an Approach

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ITAL B200 Pathways to Proficiency

Fall 2022

This is a language and culture course designed to offer advanced students of Italian the opportunity to strengthen their writing skills and conversational fluency. Throughout the semester, students will explore Italy's literature, cinema, history, and contemporary culture. Problems relating to syntax, morphology, and vocabulary will be addressed as they arise from compositions and selected reading passages. Grammar review will be contextualized to support the principal focus of the course, which is vocabulary building, written and oral skills straightening, and intercultural competency. This course is arranged thematically with units focused on issues such as LGBTQIA+ rights, changing standards of femininity and masculinity, race, migration, and disability. Each week students will explore the theme of the unit through different media: films, newspaper and magazine articles, novels, poems, songs, YouTube videos, blogs, etc. Prerequisite: ITAL102 or placement.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

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ITAL B209 Love, Magic, and Women Warriors: Renaissance Romance

Fall 2022

This course offers an overview of one of the great literary traditions of Renaissance Italy: that of chivalric poems narrating tales of war, love, and magic. Our readings will center on the two established masterpieces of the tradition, Ludovico Ariosto's romance Orlando furioso (The Madness of Orlando; 1532) and Torquato Tasso's epic Gerusalemme liberata (Jerusalem Delivered; 1581), but we will also look at a series of much lesser-known works by a queer and "irregular" author (Luigi Pulci), who inaugurated this genre in Florence, and by female poets of the later sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries (Moderata Fonte and Margherita Sarrocchi), who draw on Ariosto's and Tasso's texts for inspiration. Thematically, the course will focus on questions of diversity in political and religious ideologies, differing treatments of love and conceptions of the heroic, and the representation of sexuality and gender, which is exceptionally fluid and interesting in these works. The course is taught in English and is accessible also to students without a background in Renaissance literature and with no knowledge of Italian. Students who are interested to take this course towards a major in Italian will complete their assignments in Italian and will participate in an extra hour in Italian

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Counts Toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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ITAL B212 Italy Today

Not offered 2022-23

This is a topics course. Course content varies. This bridge class, taught in Italian, is designed to familiarize students with the shifting cultural panorama of present-day Italy (and its metamorphosing language) through a variety of readings by living authors, journalists, comic-book artists, intellectuals, and politicians.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Counts Toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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ITAL B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities

Not offered 2022-23

What is a postcolonial subject, a queer gaze, a feminist manifesto? And how can we use (as readers of texts, art, and films) contemporary studies on animals and cyborgs, object oriented ontology, zombies, storyworlds, neuroaesthetics? In this course we will read some pivotal theoretical texts from different fields, with a focus on race&ethnicity and gender&sexuality. Each theory will be paired with a masterpiece from Italian culture (from Renaissance treatises and paintings to stories written under fascism and postwar movies). We will discuss how to apply theory to the practice of interpretation and of academic writing, and how theoretical ideas shaped what we are reading. Class conducted in English, with an additional hour in Italian for students seeking Italian credit.

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Counts Toward Africana Studies

Counts Toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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ITAL B216 Body and Mind

Not offered 2022-23

In this course, we will explore representations of the relationship between body and mind, starting from 19th-century Russian novels that conceptualize love as a physical ailment and ending with the history of Alzheimer's disease. Talking about the relationship between body and mind will allow us to investigate how gender roles and models of womanhood and masculinity shaped the evolution of modern sciences, from psychiatry to obstetrics. Investigating how bodies have been (and continue to be) read, we will discuss systems created to police societies by cataloguing bodies, from Lombroso's phrenology to modern fingerprinting and face recognition softwares. Finally, we will consider how our understanding of the relationship between body and mind has changed over time. Many of the theories we will discuss during the semester are now considered outdated pseudo-science - but how can we conceptualize the difference between science and pseudo-science? As new categories and disease designations appear to substitute the old ones, which are the implications of creating a label for a constellation of existing symptoms? The course will be taught entirely in English. There will be an optional hour in Italian for students of Italian.

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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ITAL B217 Gendered Violence in Italy: How many women are killed?

Not offered 2022-23

How many women are killed in Italy? How many women suffer abuse at the hands of their partner? Data shows one in seven in Italy have suffered gendered abuse. In many regions, victims have nowhere to turn for shelter. This course will examine domestic and sexual assault in intimate relationships from a feminist analysis. Historical, theoretical, and sociological perspectives on gender violence will be critically analyzed through criminology research, literature, and theory. Course context will focus on dominance and control as a co-factor of gender, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic class, age, sexuality, nationality, and other variables. Therefore, the course will highlight the differential impact of gender violence on women of color, lesbians, older women, adolescent girls, immigrants and marginalized and disenfranchised women. Domestic and sexual violence in contemporary Italy will also be reviewed and analyzed in the context of international contexts. This course will be taught in Italian. Prerequisite: ITAL 102 or permission from instructor

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Counts Toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Counts Toward Praxis Program

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ITAL B233 Translating Italian: A Workshop

Spring 2023

This course fosters students' translating skills on a variety of literary, scientific, journalist, and cinematic texts, which focus on issues of gender and sexuality, race, migration, and disability. In addition, it offers a review and a comparative study of Italian and English grammars, syntaxes, and styles. During the semester students will acquire technical skills and understand the difficulties and complexities of translation. They will question the role culture plays in translation, how authors and their translators negotiate the meaning, and the limits and consequences of inaccurate translations. In addition to refining their vocabulary, students will strengthen their reading and writing skills in Italian. This course is taught in Italian. Prerequisite: ITAL 102 or permission from the instructor. Prerequisite: ITAL 102 or permission of instructor.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

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ITAL B302 Italo Calvino transnational writer

Spring 2023

Italo Calvino is one of the best-known Italian writers in the world - but in addition to being the author of numerous novels and short stories, Calvino was a translator, and editor and - perhaps most importantly - a reader. His activity provides us with a window into the Italian editorial landscape and its connection with foreign literary markets and traditions. Analyzing Calvino's letters to his colleagues at the publishing house Einaudi, his famous risvolti, introductions, and book reviews, we will reflect on the journey of texts from their selection and translation, to their publication, to their promotion and reception. We will discuss books as complex and stratified objects, reflecting on how editorial choices shape the reception and interpretation of a text. In exploring Calvino's engagement with other people's books, we will focus on the international dimension of his work, his personal and professional connections with France - where he lived for several years - with South America, Russia, and the United States. Such an emphasis on Calvino as a transnational reader and writer reflects and illuminates the peculiarity of the Italian editorial and literary ecosystem, in which translation has a central role.

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ITAL B303 Boccaccio, the Plague, and Epidemic illness: Literature and Medicine

Not offered 2022-23

What are the responses to human suffering during outbreaks of epidemic illness? How can literature be a valuable tool for plague prevention in time of pestilence? This class explores crucial questions on how narrative works in medical contexts, with a focus on the Decameron and the black plague of 1348. Giovanni Boccaccio is the first writer to unite the literary topos of narration during a life-threatening situation with an historical epidemic context in Medieval Italy. How does he tell his stories in time of illness and death? How do writers and other storytellers respond to dominant versions of health and medicine? Taught in Italian.

Counts Toward Health Studies

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ITAL B308 Rome as Palimpsests: from Ruins to Virtual Reality

Not offered 2022-23

From the urban dream that Raphael confessed to pope Leo X in the middle of the Renaissance to the parkour on the top of the Colosseum in the Assassin's Creed videogames, Rome has always been both a memory and a vision: a place of nostalgia and endless potential. In this course we will investigate some crucial places, moments, and ideas in the modern history of this ancient capital of Western culture: XVI century Mannerist painting and the Pop Art of Piazza del Popolo, the early modern re-uses of the Colosseum and its cubic clone designed under fascism, the narrations of Romantic grand-tours and the ones of contemporary postcolonial authors. We will adopt a trans-historical and inter-disciplinary perspective, focusing on the main attempts to revive the glory of the ancient empire. We will try to understand weather Italy's capital is a museum to be preserved, an old laboratory of urban innovations, a cemetery, a sanctuary, or simply an amalgam of past and future, glory and misery, beauty and horror. For Italian majors you will have an additional hour for credit. Prerequisite: One two-hundred level course for students interested in taking the course towards Italian credits.

Counts Toward Museum Studies

Counts Toward Praxis Program

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ITAL B309 Renaissance Imagology--Tales, Visions & Maps of the Silk Road

Not offered 2022-23

Unlike those of most European nations, Italy's Renaissance was not an age of geographical expansion--as a matter of fact, Italy didn't even exist, as a nation, up until a century and a half ago. And yet, it was in Italian ports and courts that the geographical experiences and fantasies of cartographers, merchants, poets, painters, and narrators gave to Europe the cultural tools to imagine the world beyond the boundaries of its smallest continent. This collective, introvert work of invention and description fueled the defining atrocities of what we call modernity, from colonialism to the slave trade. It also produced fantastical (and yet incredibly detailed) accounts of supposedly transitional places, challenging what we today consider geographical knowledge and establishing a paradigm to experience the world without leaving one's room. In this course, we will try to understand the difference between reading about a place and experiencing it. We will study ports and courts as planetariums, poems as atlases, and maps as works of fiction. A large portion of the course will be devoted to Marco Polo's description of the silk road, to Italo Calvino's postmodern re-writing of Polo's real and fictional journeys, and to Venice as both the starting point and destination of such virtual experiences of the silk road. We will also consult Petrarch's travel guides to places that he only visited as a reader, read the Asian adventures of Ludovico Ariosto's paladins flying on the Hippogriff, and analyze masterpieces of early modern cartography such as the Cantino planisphere and the Fra Mauro globe, which we will see in Italy. Renaissance texts and images will be studied alongside 20th century works that they inspired: metaphysical paintings, avant-garde poems made out of place names, operas, and experimental novels. The last places we will visit are the ports that are considered, today, as parts of the so called "new silk road": Genova and Trieste. For students enrolling in the 360 cluster: No knowledge of Italian is required. For students enrolling only in this class, for Departmental credit: Completion of ITAL102 or instructor's permission.

Course does not meet an Approach

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ITAL B312 Black, Queer, Jewish Italy

Not offered 2022-23

This seminar approaches the two most studied phases of Italian history, the Renaissance and the 20th century, by placing what we call 'otherness' at the center of the picture rather than at its supposed margins. The main aim is to challenge traditional accounts of Italian culture, and to look at pivotal events and phenomena (the rise of Humanism, the rise of fascism, courtly culture, the two World Wars, 16th century art, futurism) from the point of view of black, queer, and Jewish protagonists, authors, and fictional characters. Our theoretical bedrock will be offered by modern and contemporary thinkers such as Fred Moten, Antonio Gramsci, Edie Segdwick, and Hannah Arendt. Our primary sources will come from cultural epicenters of Renaissance, Baroque, and late Modern Italy, such as Leo X papal court, fascist Ferrara, 17th century Venice, and colonial Libya. In class, we will adopt a trans-historical, intersectional, and interdisciplinary perspective inspired by Fred Moten's work, which will serve as the poetic common ground for our investigations. Themes and issues will be analyzed at the crossing of the two historical phases and of the three topics in exam, and the material will include historical and theoretical analyses, narrative texts, poems, films, and visual art. The course is taught in English. No previous knowledge of Italian is required, as readings will be in English translation. An additional hour in Italian will be offered for departmental credits. Students taking the course for departmental credit will also read part of the readings in the original language, and produce three short response-papers in Italian in lieu of the Midterm.

Course does not meet an Approach

Counts Toward Africana Studies

Counts Toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Counts Toward International Studies

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ITAL B313 Primo Levi, the Writer

Not offered 2022-23

Today Primo Levi is one of the most widely read Italian writers of post-World War II in Italy and abroad. Even though still known primarily for his contributions to Holocaust testimony and theory, paradoxical as it may seem, the experience of Auschwitz and his need to tell proved to be the initial impulse that drove Levi to continue to write until his death as a critical engagement of the Western classical canon and civilization that in the end created Auschwitz. In addition to being a memoirist, he was a columnist, novelist, writer of short stories and fantasy tales, many of which touch on science fiction, a literary critic, poet, essayist, and he also tried his hand as translator (of Kafka's The Trial) and playwright. He has also been the subject of countless illuminating interviews, many of which have been translated into English. Levi is one of most prolific writers of our time, earning the right to be regarded simply as a well-respected writer, as he himself wished, with no other qualifications added. This course will be taught in Italian. Prerequisite: ITAL B102 or permission of instructor.

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ITAL B316 Mountaineering Heroes: Masculinity and Nation-building

Fall 2022

Narration is an intrinsic component of the practice of mountaineering: ascents are conducted in isolation and need to be documented in order to be validated. In the 20th century, with the professionalization of this practice, mountaineering narratives became widespread across a broad range of genres and platforms - from the memoirs of illustrious alpinists to novels and short stories, to propaganda material and articles in popular magazines. In this course, we will focus on Italian mountaineering heroes, exploring how their construction and evolution was shaped by models of masculinity and (less frequently) of womanhood, colonialism and nation-building ideals, and by shifting understandings of the relationship between humans and the environment. We will discus the symbolical and political role of alpine ascents in the Italian unification and in the first world war. We will study Fascist alpinists and the legacy of Fascist, individualist and white supremacist rhetoric in today's mountaineering narratives. At the same time, however, we will encounter groups of alpinists and climbers who challenged this rhetoric, seeking to reframe ascents as play, rather than conquest, influenced by youth movements and the novel American alpinism.All readings and class discussion will be in English. Students will have to option of attending an additional hour of class taught in Italian or in Russian

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ITAL B318 Falling Statues: myth-making in literature, politics and art

Not offered 2022-23

We have become accustomed to the rituals of the dismissal of the heroes of the past: we tear down statues, we rename buildings and places. But how did we get there? How, why and by whom are heroes constructed? When old heroes are questioned, what substitutes them? How are the raise and fall of heroes tied to shifting models of masculinity, womanhood, power and the state? In this course, we will explore these questions focusing on Italy and Russia, two countries that in the 19th and 20th century went through several cycles of construction and deconstruction of their political heroes. In the first part of the course, we will investigate the codification of the "type" of the freedom-fighter in the representations of the protagonists of 19th-century European revolutionary movements, focusing on the links between the Italian Risorgimento and the anti-Tsarist movement in Russia, culminating in the Bolshevik revolution of 1917. From the pamphlets that consecrated the Italian Garibaldi as the "hero of the two worlds" to the autobiographies of the Russian terrorists and the transcripts of their trials, we will investigate myth-making as a constitutive part of political movements and reflect on the models of masculinity and womanhood at the foundation of the "typical" revolutionary hero. In the second part of the semester, we will focus on Stalinism and Fascism, systems that exploited their revolutionary roots to mobilize supporters in favor of oppressive institutions. Finally, we will discuss the many ways in which 19th - and 20th-century heroes have been confronted, neutralized, dismantled - and the many ways in which their models still haunt us. We will focus on literary texts and political speeches, but we will also analyze propaganda posters, movies, paintings, photographs, monuments and even street names. For your final project, you will have the option of building on our class discussions to explore myth-making in contemporary movements or forms of deconstruction of existing heroes.

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ITAL B324 Diversity, Gender, and Queerness in Modern Italian Poetry

Spring 2023

This course offers an overview of one of the great literary traditions of post-unification Italy: that of modern and contemporary poetry. Our readings will center mostly on some major protagonists of this genre, like the Nobel prize-winning Eugenio Montale, Umberto Saba, and Pier Paolo Pasolini, but we will also look at a series of much lesser-known works by female, queer and transgender poets, like Sandro Penna, Amelia Rosselli, and Giovanna Cristina Vivinetto, who negotiated their own voices within this tradition. While thinking, discussing and writing in Italian, we will examine poetic texts in the original and with a specific focus on the representation of religious and racial "otherness", the language of expression, and gender perspectives. Our authors and texts will be contextualized in their historical and social background, in order to have an in-depth interdisciplinary exploration of Italy's 20th-21st century cultural life and gain insight on Italian Modernity as a whole. Elements of metrics and rhetoric will be used and explained in order to analyze poetry in its own essence.

Counts Toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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ITAL B325 Literature and Film, Literature into Films and Back

Not offered 2022-23

This course is a critical analysis of Modern Italian society through cinematic production and literature, from the Risorgimento to the present. According to Alfred Hitchock's little stories, two goats were eating the reel of a movie taken from a famous novel. "I liked the book better," says one to the other. While at times we too chew on movies taken from books, our main objective will not be to compare books and films, but rather to explore the more complex relation between literature and cinema: how text is put into film, how cultural references operate with respect to issues of style, technique, and perspective. We will discuss how cinema conditions literary imagination, and how literature leaves its imprint on cinema. We will "read" films as "literary images" and "see" novels as "visual stories". Students will become acquainted with literary sources through careful readings; on viewing the corresponding film, students will consider how narrative and descriptive textual elements are transposed into cinematic audio/visual elements. An important concern of this course will be to analyze the particularity of each film/book in relation to a set of themes -gender, death, class, discrimination, history, migration- through close textual analysis. We shall use contemporary Film theory and critical methodology to access these themes.

Counts Toward Film Studies

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ITAL B398 Senior Seminar

This course is open only to seniors in Italian and in Romance Languages. Under the direction of the instructor, each student prepares a senior thesis on an author or a theme that the student has chosen. By the end of the fall semester, students must have completed an abstract and a critical annotated bibliography to be presented to the department. See Thesis description. Prerequisite: This course is open only to seniors in Italian Studies and Romance Languages with a GPA of 3.7.

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ITAL B399 Senior Conference

Under the direction of the instructor, each student prepares a senior thesis on an author or a theme that the student has chosen. In April there will be an oral defense with members and majors of the Italian Department. See Thesis description. Prerequisite: This course is open only to seniors in Italian Studies and Romance Languages.

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ITAL B403 Supervised Work

Offered with approval of the Department.

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FREN B213 Theory in Practice:Critical Discourses in the Humanities

Spring 2023

By bringing together the study of major theoretical currents of the 20th century and the practice of analyzing literary works in the light of theory, this course aims at providing students with skills to use literary theory in their own scholarship. The selection of theoretical readings reflects the history of theory (psychoanalysis, structuralism, narratology), as well as the currents most relevant to the contemporary academic field: Post-structuralism, Post-colonialism, Gender Studies, and Ecocriticism. They are paired with a diverse range of short stories (Poe, Kafka, Camus, Borges, Calvino, Morrison, Djebar, Ngozi Adichie) that we discuss along with our study of theoretical texts. The class will be conducted in English with an additional hour in French for students wishing to take it for French credit.

Critical Interpretation (CI)

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HIST B238 From Bordellos to Cybersex History of Sexuality in Modern Europe

Not offered 2022-23

This course is a detailed examination of the changing nature and definition of sexuality in Europe from the late nineteenth century to the present. Throughout the semester we critically examine how understandings of sexuality changed--from how it was discussed and how authorities tried to control it to how the practice of sexuality evolved. Focusing on both discourses and lived experiences, the class will explore sexuality in the context of the following themes; prostitution and sex trafficking, the rise of medicine with a particular attention to sexology, psychiatry and psychoanalysis; the birth of the homo/hetero/bisexual divide; the rise of the "New Woman"; abortion and contraception; the "sexual revolution" of the 60s; pornography and consumerism; LGBTQ activism; concluding with considering sexuality in the age of cyber as well as genetic technology. In examining these issues we will question the role and influence of different political systems and war on sexuality. By paying special attention to the rise of modern nation-states, forces of nationalism, and the impacts of imperialism we will interrogate the nature of regulation and experiences of sexuality in different locations in Europe from the late nineteenth century to the present.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Counts Toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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flowers

Contact Us

Transnational Italian Studies Department

Old Library 103
Bryn Mawr College
101 N. Merion Avenue
Bryn Mawr, PA 19010-2899
Phone: 610-526-5198
Fax: 610-526-7479

Roberta Ricci, Chair
Phone: 610-526-5048
rricci@brynmawr.edu

Oliva Cardona, Program Assistant
Phone: 610-526-5198
ocardona@brynmawr.edu