This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's calendars page.

Fall 2020

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
HIST B101-001The Historical ImaginationSemester / 1Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MWKale,M.
HIST B102-001Introduction to African CivilizationsSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWTaylor Hall FNgalamulume,K.
HIST B212-001Pirates, Travelers, and Natural Historians: 1492-1750Semester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHGallup-Diaz,I.
HIST B234-001An Introduction to Middle Eastern HistorySemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWSalikuddin,R.
HIST B236-001African History since 1800: Africa since 1800Semester / 1LEC: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MWNgalamulume,K.
HIST B243-001Topics: Atlantic Cultures: Maroon SocietiesSemester / 1LEC: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTHGallup-Diaz,I.
HIST B258-001British Empire: Imagining IndiasSemester / 1Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHKale,M.
HIST B303-001Topics in American History: Radical MovementsSemester / 1LEC: 1:10 PM- 3:30 PM TUllman,S.
HIST B325-001Topics in Social History: History of SexualitySemester / 1LEC: 12:10 PM- 2:00 PM MUllman,S.
HIST B337-001Topics in African History: Hist of Global Health AfricaSemester / 1LEC: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM TNgalamulume,K.
HIST B398-001Approaches to Historical PraxisSemester / 1Lecture: 12:10 PM- 2:00 PM FDept. staff, TBA
HIST B403-001Supervised WorkSemester / 1Dept. staff, TBA
CITY B250-001Topics: Growth & Spatial Organization of the CitySemester / 1Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MWCohen,J.
CITY B345-001Advanced Topics in Environment and Society: The City and NatureSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 3:30 PM WLee,M.
CSTS B205-001Greek HistorySemester / 1Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MWEdmonds,R.

Spring 2021

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION INSTR(S)
HIST B156-001The Long 1960'sSemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHUllman,S.
HIST B242-001American Politics and Society: 1945 to the PresentSemester / 1Lecture: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTHUllman,S.
HIST B299-001Exploring HistorySemester / 1Lecture: 12:10 PM- 2:00 PM FCarpenter Library 15Ullman,S.
HIST B403-001Supervised WorkSemester / 1Dept. staff, TBA
EALC B131-001Chinese CivilizationSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWJiang,Y.
EALC B264-001Human Rights in ChinaSemester / 1Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MWJiang,Y.
ENGL B359-001Dead PresidentsSemester / 1Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:30 AM MWSchneider,B.
HART B218-001Byzantine Textiles in Life and DeathSemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHWalker,A.

Fall 2021

(Class schedules for this semester will be posted at a later date.)

2020-21 Catalog Data

HIST B101 The Historical Imagination
Fall 2020
Explores some of the ways people have thought about, represented, and used the past across time and space. Introduces students to modern historical practices and debates through examination and discussion of texts and archives that range from scholarly monographs and documents to monuments, oral traditions, and other media.
Critical Interpretation (CI)

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HIST B102 Introduction to African Civilizations
Fall 2020
The course is designed to introduce students to the history of African and African Diaspora societies, cultures, and political economies. We will discuss the origins, state formation, external contacts, and the structural transformations and continuities of African societies and cultures in the context of the slave trade, colonial rule, capitalist exploitation, urbanization, and westernization, as well as contemporary struggles over authority, autonomy, identity and access to resources. Case studies will be drawn from across the continent.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward International Studies

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HIST B123 The Early Medieval World
Not offered 2020-21
The first of a two-course sequence introducing medieval European history. The chronological span of this course is from the early 4th century and the Christianization of the Roman Empire to the early 10th century and the disintegration of the Carolingian Empire. This course number was previously HIST B223.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Middle Eastern Studies

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HIST B124 High and Late Middle Ages
Not offered 2020-21
This course will cover the second half of the European Middle Ages, often called the High and Late Middle Ages, from roughly 1000-1400. The course has a general chronological framework, and is based on important themes of medieval history. These include feudalism and the feudal economy; the social transformation of the millennium; monastic reform; the rise of the papacy; trade, exchange, and exploration; urbanism and the growth of towns. The course number was previously HIST B224.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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HIST B127 Indigenous Leaders 1492-1750
Not offered 2020-21
Studies the experiences of indigenous men and women who exercised local authority in the systems established by European colonizers. In return for places in the colonial administrations, these leaders performed a range of tasks. At the same time they served as imperial officials, they exercised "traditional" forms of authority within their communities, often free of European presence. These figures provide a lens through which early modern colonialism is studied.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies
Counts toward Peace, Justice and Human Rights

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HIST B128 Crusade, Conversion and Conquest
Not offered 2020-21
A thematic focus course exploring the nature of Christian religious expansion and conflict in the medieval period. Based around primary sources with some background readings, topics include: early medieval Christianity and conversion; the Crusades and development of the doctrines of "just war" and "holy war"; the rise of military order such as the Templars and the Teutonic Kings; and later medieval attempts to convert and colonize Eastern Europe.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Middle Eastern Studies

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HIST B129 The Religious Conquest of the Americas
Not offered 2020-21
The course examines the complex aspects of the European missionization of indigenous people, and explores how two traditions of religious thought/practice came into conflict. Rather than a transposition of Christianity from Europe to the Americas, something new was created in the contested colonial space.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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HIST B156 The Long 1960's
Spring 2021
The 1960s has had a powerful effect on recent US History. But what was it exactly? How long did it last? And what do we really mean when we say "The Sixties?" This term has become so potent and loaded for so many people from all sides of the political spectrum that it's almost impossible to separate fact from fiction; myth from memory. We are all the inheritors of this intense period in American history but our inheritance is neither simple nor entirely clear. Our task this semester is to try to pull apart the meaning as well as the legend and attempt to figure out what "The Sixties" is (and what it isn't) and try to assess its long term impact on American society.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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HIST B200 The Atlantic World 1492-1800
Not offered 2020-21
The aim of this course is to provide an understanding of the way in which peoples, goods, and ideas from Africa, Europe. and the Americas came together to form an interconnected Atlantic World system. The course is designed to chart the manner in which an integrated system was created in the Americas in the early modern period, rather than to treat the history of the Atlantic World as nothing more than an expanded version of North American, Caribbean, or Latin American history.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies
Counts toward International Studies

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HIST B212 Pirates, Travelers, and Natural Historians: 1492-1750
Fall 2020
In the early modern period, conquistadors, missionaries, travelers, pirates, and natural historians wrote interesting texts in which they tried to integrate the New World into their existing frameworks of knowledge. This intellectual endeavor was an adjunct to the physical conquest of American space, and provides a framework though which we will explore the processes of imperial competition, state formation, and indigenous and African resistance to colonialism.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Environmental Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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HIST B215 Europe and the Other 1492-1800
Not offered 2020-21
This course will introduce students to process through which Europeans created systems and categories of difference into which they placed Indigenous, African, and Asian peoples between the years 1492 and 1815. Topics of study include Indigenous leaders, slave and free communities, and cultural mediators on colonial frontiers.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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HIST B218 Memories, Memorials, and Representations of World War I
Not offered 2020-21
The course considers the historical origins and experience of Word War I from a social and cultural perspective. We will think about why some people anticipated and willingly went to war while others were caught by surprise and also, how the experience of war differed on the home front and battlefront. Second, the course will look at the political, social, economic, and cultural consequences of the so-called, Great War. How did the end of the war affect people at the individual and community levels as well as nations as a whole? Finally, we will examine the various historical factors that influence how (and when) WWI has been remembered in modern Europe.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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HIST B226 Topics in 20th Century European History
Section 001 (Spring 2020): A Global History of Sports
Not offered 2020-21
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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HIST B231 Medicine, Magic & Miracles in the Middle Ages
Not offered 2020-21
A lecture and discussion course on the therapeutic systems (humoral theory, faith healing, natural magic), the medical marketplace, and the social context for understanding health and disease in the medieval period. Topics covered include Greek, Arabic, and Latin medical textual traditions, the rise of hospitals and public health, and the Black Death.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Health Studies
Counts toward Middle Eastern Studies

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HIST B234 An Introduction to Middle Eastern History
Fall 2020
This course serves as an introduction to the history of the modern Middle East. We will also explore the narratives and debates that have shaped the field of Middle East history. Topics include orientalism, colonialism, political reform, social, cultural, and intellectual movements, nationalism, and the Cold War. Readings will be drawn from the fields of history, anthropology, politics, and literature.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward International Studies
Counts toward Middle Eastern Studies

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HIST B236 African History since 1800
Section 001 (Fall 2020): Africa since 1800
Fall 2020
The course analyzes the history of Africa in the last two hundred years in the context of global political economy. We will examine the major themes in modern African history, including the 19th-century state formation, expansion, or restructuration; partition and resistance; colonial rule; economic, social, political, religious, and cultural developments; nationalism; post-independence politics, economics, and society, as well as conflicts and the burden of disease. The course will also introduce students to the sources and methods of African history.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward International Studies

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HIST B237 Themes in Modern African History
Section 001 (Spring 2020): Public History in Africa
Not offered 2020-21
This is a topics course. Course content varies
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Museum Studies

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HIST B238 From Bordellos to Cybersex History of Sexuality in Modern Europe
Not offered 2020-21
This course is a detailed examination of the changing nature and definition of sexuality in Europe from the late nineteenth century to the present. Throughout the semester we critically examine how understandings of sexuality changed--from how it was discussed and how authorities tried to control it to how the practice of sexuality evolved. Focusing on both discourses and lived experiences, the class will explore sexuality in the context of the following themes; prostitution and sex trafficking, the rise of medicine with a particular attention to sexology, psychiatry and psychoanalysis; the birth of the homo/hetero/bisexual divide; the rise of the "New Woman"; abortion and contraception; the "sexual revolution" of the 60s; pornography and consumerism; LGBTQ activism; concluding with considering sexuality in the age of cyber as well as genetic technology. In examining these issues we will question the role and influence of different political systems and war on sexuality. By paying special attention to the rise of modern nation-states, forces of nationalism, and the impacts of imperialism we will interrogate the nature of regulation and experiences of sexuality in different locations in Europe from the late nineteenth century to the present.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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HIST B241 America 1890-1945
Not offered 2020-21
This course focuses on the first half of the twentieth century in the United States. An intense period of violent struggle over race, immigration, labor, income inequality, gender, and the very survival of American democracy in the face of global fascism, the early years of the twentieth century set the stage for the American society of today. One cannot fully understand what has happened to the U.S. right now without spending time in the first 40 years of the twentieth century.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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HIST B242 American Politics and Society: 1945 to the Present
Spring 2021
How did we get here? This course looks at the stunning transformation of America after WWII. From a country devastated by economic crisis and wedded to isolationism prior to the war, America turned itself into an international powerhouse. Massive grass roots resistance forced the United States to abandon its system of racial apartheid, to open opportunities to women, and to reinvent its very definition as it incorporated immigrants from around the world. Simultaneously, American music and film broke free from their staid moorings and permanently altered international culture. Finally, through the "War on Terror", starting after 9/11, America initiated an aggressive new foreign policy that has shattered traditional rules of warfare and reoriented global politics. We will explore the political, social, and cultural factors that have driven modern American history. Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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HIST B243 Topics: Atlantic Cultures
Section 001 (Fall 2020): Maroon Societies
Fall 2020
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: The course explores the process of self-emancipation by slaves in the early modern Atlantic World. What was the nature of the communities that free blacks forged? What were their relationships to the empires from which they had freed themselves? How was race constructed in the early modern period? Did conceptions of race change over time? Through readings and discussion we will investigate the establishment of autonomous African settlements and cultures throughout the Americas, and examine the nature of local autonomy within a strife-torn world of contending empires and nation-states. Taking a comparative approach, we shall examine developments in North America, South America, the Caribbean, and Brazil.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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HIST B245 Topics in Modern US History
Not offered 2020-21
This is a topics course addressing public history in the U.S.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Museum Studies
Counts toward Praxis Program

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HIST B256 Disciplining bodies in motion:migration & colonial modernity
Not offered 2020-21
Migration and borderlands dominate headlines as well as the everyday experiences of millions of people around the world, as vast numbers of human bodies move through spaces interrupted by variously-contested and regulated natural barriers (rivers, seas, mountains, deserts, etc.) and barricades (social, cultural and psychic as well as physical) constructed by not only States, but by a wide range of "non-State actors" as well. Notably, since 1984, according to the U.S. Department of Labor, the majority of migrants to this country have been women, a trend that is also evident elsewhere (within as well as across national borders). While migration arguably is a characteristic feature of humanity across time and space, this course will situate our current transnational conjuncture in the long duree of global migration engendered by developments at the turn of the 16th century, focusing on the migration of "labor" from the Indian subcontinent to the Pacific and Indian Oceans, the Persian Gulf, Africa, the Caribbean, the Americas, Britain, and Europe. Focusing on indentured and contract labor migration from British India, we will consider if and how the historically-contingent and sometime politically opportunistic and transactional tactics, regulations, protocols around these "labor" migrations contributed simultaneously to naturalizing and also obscuring gendered assumptions about work and (whether performed within, between or outside their spaces, still predicated on) households, (geographical) mobility, and the bodies (profoundly gendered, "raced," and hierarchized) that engage in all three. To what degree have techniques of governance (measuring, surveilling) practiced and routinized through the various colonial empires of the 19th and 20th centuries informed the production and circulation of knowledge (specifically academic disciplines like History) the naturalization of analytical and descriptive categories like labor, race and class -- and vice versa? .
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward International Studies

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HIST B257 British Empire I: Capitalism and Slavery
Not offered 2020-21
Focusing on the Atlantic slave trade and the slave plantation mode of production, this course explores English colonization, and the emergence and the decline of British Empire in the Americas and Caribbean from the 17th through the late 20th centuries. It tracks some of the intersecting and overlapping routes--and roots--connecting histories and politics within and between these "new" world locations. It also tracks the further and proliferating links between developments in these regions and the histories and politics of regions in the "old" world, from the north Atlantic to the South China sea.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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HIST B258 British Empire: Imagining Indias
Fall 2020
This course considers ideas about and experiences of "modern" India, i.e., India during the colonial and post-Independence periods (roughly 1757-present). While "India" and "Indian history" along with "British empire" and "British history" will be the ostensible objects of our consideration and discussions, the course proposes that their imagination and meanings are continually mediated by a wide variety of institutions, agents, and analytical categories (nation, religion, class, race, gender, to name a few examples). The course uses primary sources, scholarly analyses, and cultural productions to explore the political economies of knowledge, representation, and power in the production of modernity.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward International Studies

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HIST B263 Impact of Empire: Britain 1858-1960
Not offered 2020-21
Is empire (on the British variant of which, in its heyday, the sun reportedly never set) securely superseded (as some have confidently asserted) or does it endure and, if so, in what forms and domains? Focusing on the expanding British colonial empire from the 17th century on, this course considers its impact through the dynamics of specific commodities' production, and consumption (sugar and tea, for example, but also labor and governance), their cultures (from plantations and factories to households to the state), and their disciplinary technologies (including domesticity, the nation, and discourses on history and modernity).
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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HIST B264 Passages from India: 1800-Present
Not offered 2020-21
This course explores the histories and effects of migration from the Indian subcontinent to far-flung destinations across the globe. It starts with the circular migrations of traders, merchants, and pilgrims in the medieval period from the Indian subcontinent to points east (in southeast Asia) and west (eastern Africa). However, the focus of the course is on modern migrations from the subcontinent, from the indentured labor migrations of the British colonial period (to Africa, the Caribbean, and the South Pacific) to the post-Independence emigrations from the new nations of the subcontinent to Britain, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and the United States.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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HIST B265 Colonial Encounters in the Americas
Not offered 2020-21
The course explores the confrontations, conquests and accommodations that formed the "ground-level" experience of day-to-day colonialism throughout the Americas. The course is comparative in scope, examining events and structures in North, South and Central America, with particular attention paid to indigenous peoples and the nature of indigenous leadership in the colonial world of the 18th century.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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HIST B268 Telling Bryn Mawr Histories: Topics, Sources, and Methods
Not offered 2020-21
The course covers historical research practices and methods, and will familiarize participants with the College's curatorial and archival collections, so that each student might frame an individual research project.
Course does not meet an Approach

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HIST B270 The History of the Book with Digital Methods
Not offered 2020-21
This course aims to interrogate the cultural history of books from the earliest printed books in western society (incunables) to e-books in the modern era. While this course is designed to give students a sense of how books, broadly construed, evolved between the 15th century and the present, it places an emphasis on books as material objects, the generative processes of book creation, and the human labor driving said processes, with an eye to how cultural and social hierarchies (i.e., race, class, and gender) structure interaction with books. This class is also designed to give students perspective on the various ways scholars of various disciplines, archivists, librarians, conservators, and collectors think about books. This is a discussion and activity-heavy class that will alternate between close examination of archival holdings in Bryn Mawr College's Special Collections and critical making activities. Critical making activities are designed to help students understand book making processes, and may involve printing demos, paper marbling, or simple bookbinding. Students will be exposed to various digital tools throughout the semester and propose and complete a digital final project based on primary research.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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HIST B274 Focus: Topics in Modern US History
Section 001 (Spring 2020): Leisure and Society: Tourism & Class
Section 002 (Spring 2020): Leisure and Society: Baseball & Class
Not offered 2020-21
This is a topics course in 20th century America social history. Topics vary by half semester
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Museum Studies
Counts toward Praxis Program

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HIST B284 Movies and America: The Past Lives Forever
Not offered 2020-21
Movies are one of the most important means by which Americans come to know - or think they know--their own history. We look to old movies to tell us about a world we never knew but think we can access through film. And Hollywood often reaches into the past to tell a good story. How can we understand the impact of our love affair with movies on our understanding of what happened in this country? In this course we will examine the complex cultural relationship between film and American historical self-fashioning.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Film Studies
Counts toward Visual Studies

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HIST B286 Topics in the British Empire
Not offered 2020-21
This is a topics course covering various "topics" in the study of the British Empire. Course content varies.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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HIST B292 Women in Britain since 1750
Not offered 2020-21
Focusing on contemporary and historical narratives, this course explores the ongoing production, circulation and refraction of discourses on gender and nation as well as race, empire and modernity since the mid-18th century. Texts will incorporate visual material as well as literary evidence and culture and consider the crystallization of the discipline of history itself.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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HIST B298 Politics of Food
Not offered 2020-21
Politics shapes what appears on our plates as well as where we set our table. It all has a history. In America with its confounding combination of engorging bounty and tragic poverty, food represents a special nexus of the political and the personal. This course looks at the history and politics of eating, producing, and consuming food in the United States. Course topics include how food shaped both external and internal migrations to the United States; how American foreign policy from the Cold War to today helps us understand global food and refugee crises; the history and politics of food aid, and the transformation of food consumption in modern America.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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HIST B299 Exploring History
Spring 2021
This course is designed to introduce history majors to the debates governing the production of historical knowledge which dominate the discipline. Although undergraduates often read history monographs as finished and "complete" projects, in fact each of these works is always deeply contested - both in terms of method and product. The goal of this course is to not only reinforce habits of critical textual reading but to provide students the tools to critically "read" the entire project of writing history. Required for History Majors.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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HIST B303 Topics in American History
Section 001 (Fall 2019): American "Fascisms"
Section 001 (Fall 2020): Radical Movements
Fall 2020
This is a topics course. Course content varies. Recent topics have included medicine, advertising, and history of sexuality. Course may be repeated for credit.
Current topic description: Americans have often resisted perceived oppression through radical means. Although commonly erased by history or marginalized in memory as ineffective, in fact radical movements have profoundly transformed the course of American history. The seminar focuses on key radical movements and actors from the ante bellum era through today.

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HIST B319 Topics in Modern European History
Section 001 (Fall 2019): Metropolis: A Cultural History
Not offered 2020-21
This is a topics course. Course content varies.

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HIST B325 Topics in Social History
Section 001 (Fall 2019): Civil War, Race, Amer. Memory
Section 001 (Fall 2020): History of Sexuality
Fall 2020
This a topics course that explores various themes in American social history. Course content varies. Course may be repeated.
Current topic description: This course addresses the social history of sexual practices, social and governmental regulation of sex, and the changing cultural meaning of sex in the U.S. from the 16th century to present. Topics include the intersection of race, sexuality, and settler colonialism, transgender history, the history of reproductive rights, sexuality as commodity, and the social power present in the relationship between sexuality and disease.

Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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HIST B327 Topics in Early American History
Section 001 (Spring 2020): Settler Colonialism in the Americas 1500-1800
Not offered 2020-21
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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HIST B337 Topics in African History
Section 001 (Fall 2019): Hist of Global Health Africa
Section 001 (Fall 2020): Hist of Global Health Africa
Fall 2020
This is a topics course. Topics vary.
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Health Studies

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HIST B357 Topics in British Empire
Section 001 (Fall 2019): Capitalism and Slavery
Not offered 2020-21
This is a topics course. Topics vary.

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HIST B368 Topics in Medieval History
Not offered 2020-21
This is a topics course. Topics vary.

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HIST B371 Topics in Atlantic History: The Early Modern Pirate in Fact and Fiction
Not offered 2020-21
This course will explore piracy in the Americas in the period 1550-1750. We will investigate the historical reality of pirates and what they did, and the manner in which pirates have entered the popular imagination through fiction and films. Pirates have been depicted as lovable rogues, anti-establishment rebels, and enlightened multiculturalists who were skilled in dealing with the indigenous and African peoples of the Americas. The course will examine the facts and the fictions surrounding these important historical actors.
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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HIST B373 Topics: History of the Middle East
Not offered 2020-21
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Middle Eastern Studies

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HIST B398 Approaches to Historical Praxis
This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to consider different ways of "doing history." In conversation with the professor and using the resources of the College (archivists, librarians, digital specialists, Praxis Program) students will articulate a historical question, research it, and produce a final project. This project may be a final research paper, but might also take the more public form of a digital project, an exhibit, a short film, or an internship in a local museum, oral history center, or archive.

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HIST B403 Supervised Work
Optional independent study, which requires permission of the instructor and the major adviser.

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HIST B425 Praxis III: Independent Study
Praxis III courses are Independent Study courses and are developed by individual students, in collaboration with faculty and field supervisors. A Praxis courses is distinguished by genuine collaboration with fieldsite organizations and by a dynamic process of reflection that incorporates lessons learned in the field into the classroom setting and applies theoretical understanding gained through classroom study to work done in the broader community.
Counts toward Praxis Program

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 B323 Memoria y Guerra Civil
Not offered 2020-21
A look into the Spanish Civil War and its wide-ranging international significance as both the military and ideological testing ground for World War II. This course examines the endurance of myths related to this conflict and the cultural memory it has produced along with the current negotiations of the past that is taking place in democratic Spain. Prerequisite: at least one SPAN 200-level course.

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ARCH B208 Ancient Near Eastern History
Not offered 2020-21
This course will explore some of the key historical figures, events and inventions that shaped Ancient Near Eastern societies and traditions. We will consider the impact that the modern disciplines of ancient near eastern archaeology and history have had on our understanding of this region. We will also discuss how the ancient history and more recent colonial past of this region has impacted upon and shaped our modern interpretations of this region.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Middle Eastern Studies

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ARCH B244 Great Empires of the Ancient Near East
Not offered 2020-21
A survey of the history, material culture, political and religious ideologies of, and interactions among, the five great empires of the ancient Near East of the second and first millennia B.C.E.: New Kingdom Egypt, the Hittite Empire in Anatolia, the Assyrian and Babylonian Empires in Mesopotamia, and the Persian Empire in Iran.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Middle Eastern Studies

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BIOL B214 The History of Genetics and Embryology
Not offered 2020-21
This course provides a general history of genetics and embryology in Germany, Britain and the United States from the late 19th to the mid-20th century. The course will include a focus on the role that women scientists and technicians played in the development of these sub-disciplines. We will look at the lives of well known and lesser-known individuals, asking how factors such as their educational experiences and mentor relationships influenced the roles these women played in the scientific enterprise. We will also examine specific scientific contributions in historical context, requiring a review of core concepts in genetics and developmental biology.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Scientific Investigation (SI)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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CITY B250 Topics: Growth & Spatial Organization of the City
Fall 2020
This is a topics course. Course content varies.
Current topic description: This course is intended as a venue for exploring the built fabric of cities over time -- observing larger scale topographies and armatures amid patterns of growth, distinctive built textures at the level of the block, and dominant building forms. Adopting an international range of examples, we will examine the effects of shaping forces and influential models, distributions of functions and populations, and purposeful ways that urban spaces have been represented, in order to learn to more effectively read the built form of cities.

Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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CITY B345 Advanced Topics in Environment and Society
Section 001 (Fall 2020): The City and Nature
Fall 2020
This is a topics course. Topics vary.
Current topic description: The City and Nature: The Environmental Transformation of Modern Cities: The class examines the emergence of the modern city in Europe and the Americas in relation to their natural environments in order to understand how "country" and "city" were and continue to be mutually constitutive spaces and concepts. Focusing on the era of the Industrial Revolution and the rise of capitalism, the class studies how the planning, building, and regulating of urban built environments were embedded in practices to control, manage, and consume natural resources, and ultimately define nature. An integral part of this subject also concerns the people who both affected and were affected by the decisions to construct and manipulate the terrain, as well as the institutions that were built to manage and define new social relations and public responsibilities of the modern city.

Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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CSTS B108 Roman Africa
Not offered 2020-21
In 146 BCE, Rome conquered and destroyed the North African city of Carthage, which had been its arch-enemy for generations, and occupied many of the Carthaginian settlements in North Africa. But by the second and third centuries CE, North Africa was one of the most prosperous and cultured areas of the Roman Empire, and Carthage (near modern Tunis) was one of the busiest ports in the Mediterranean. This course will trace the relations between Rome and Carthage, looking at the history of their mutual enmity, the extraordinary rise to prosperity of Roman North Africa, and the continued importance of the region even after the Vandal invasions of the fifth century.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies

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CSTS B205 Greek History
Fall 2020
This course traces the rise of the city-state (polis) in the Greek-speaking world beginning in the seventh-century BC down to its full blossoming in classical Athens and Sparta. Students should gain an understanding of the formation and development of Greek identity, from the Panhellenic trends in archaic epic and religion through its crystallization during the heroic defense against two Persian invasions and its subsequent disintegration during the Peloponnesian war. The class will also explore the ways in which the evolution of political, philosophical, religious, and artistic institutions reflect the changing socio-political circumstances of Greece. The latter part of the course will focus on Athens in particular: its rise to imperial power under Pericles, its tragic decline from the Peloponnesian War and its important role as a center for the teaching of rhetoric and philosophy. Since the study of history involves the analysis, evaluation, and synthesis of the sources available for the culture studied, students will concentrate upon the primary sources available for Greek history, exploring the strengths and weakness of these sources and the ways in which their evidence can be used to create an understanding of ancient Greece. Students should learn how to analyze and evaluate the evidence from primary texts and to synthesize the information from multiple sources in a critical way.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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CSTS B217 The Problem of Evil: Ancient Answers to a Difficult Question
Not offered 2020-21
What is evil, and where does it come from? Ostensibly simple questions that demand good answers. In this course, we shall investigate how ancient authors grappled with the deeply human problems posed by our experiences of both natural and moral evils. Students will read a wide range of texts from Archaic Greece through the early Middle Ages, including drama, philosophy, legal speeches, religious texts, and commentaries. Throughout the course, students will be encouraged to rethink their own understanding of this problem and will have the opportunity to consider a number of related thematic questions (e.g., "Why do bad things happen to good people; how can God exist if there is evil?"). Near the end of the course, we shall continue this conversation into the present, taking a closer look at some modern case-studies such as the Milgram experiment. The course includes a field trip to Eastern State Penitentiary in Philadelphia.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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EALC B131 Chinese Civilization
Spring 2021
A broad chronological survey of Chinese culture and society from the Bronze Age to the 1800s, with special reference to such topics as belief, family, language, the arts and sociopolitical organization. Readings include primary sources in English translation and secondary studies.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward East Asian Languages and Cultures

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EALC B200 Major Seminar: Methods and Approaches in East Asian Studies
Not offered 2020-21
This course introduces current and prospective majors to the scope and methods of East Asian Studies. It employs readings on East Asian history and culture as a platform for exercises in critical analysis, bibliography, cartography and the formulation of research topics and approaches. It culminates in a substantial research essay. Required of East Asian Studies majors, but open to others by permission, the course should be taken before the senior year. Prerequisite: One year of Chinese or Japanese.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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EALC B264 Human Rights in China
Spring 2021
This course will examine China's human rights issues from a historical perspective. The topics include diverse perspectives on human rights, historical background, civil rights, religious practice, justice system, education, as well as the problems concerning some social groups such as migrant laborers, women, ethnic minorities and peasants.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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EALC B325 Topics in Chinese History and Culture
Not offered 2020-21
This is a topics course. Course content varies.

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ENGL B359 Dead Presidents
Spring 2021
Framed by the extravagant funerals of Presidents Washington and Lincoln, this course explores the cultural importance of the figure of the President and the Presidential body, and of the 19th-century preoccupations with death and mourning, in the U.S. cultural imaginary from the Revolutionary movement through the Civil War.

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HART B218 Byzantine Textiles in Life and Death
Spring 2021
This course explores the manifold uses and meanings of textiles in early Byzantine visual and material culture as well as their afterlife as objects of collection and display in the modern era. Students will undertake original research on early Byzantine textiles from the collection of Philadelphia University. Assignments will develop skills in museological writing, including documentation for collection databases and object exhibitions. Prerequisites: Previous coursework in History of Art, Archaeology, Museum Studies, or History is recommended, but not required.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Counts toward Middle Eastern Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Museum Studies

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MEST B210 The Art and Architecture of Islamic Spirituality
Not offered 2020-21
This course examines how Muslim societies across time and space have used art and architecture in different ways to express and understand inner dimensions of spirituality and mysticism. Topics to be studied include: the calligraphical remnants of the early Islamic period; inscriptions found on buildings and gravestones; the majestic architecture of mosques, shrines, seminaries, and Sufi lodges; the brilliant arts of the book; the commemorative iconography and passion plays of Ashura devotion; the souvenir culture of modern shrine visitation; and the modern art of twenty-first century Sufism. Readings include works from history, religious studies, anthropology, sociology, and the history of art and architecture.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Middle Eastern Studies

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