Courses

This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's calendars page.

Fall 2022 HIST

Course Title Schedule/Units Meeting Type Times/Days Location / Instruction Mode Instr(s)
HIST B102-001 Introduction to African Civilizations 1Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MW In Person Ngalamulume,K.
HIST B156-001 The Long 1960's 1Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTH Dalton Hall 300
In Person
Ullman,S.
HIST B226-001 Topics in 20th Century European History: Human Rights:Theory & Practice 1Semester / 1 LEC: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTH In Person Kurimay,A.
HIST B234-001 An Introduction to Middle Eastern History 1Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MW Carpenter Library 25
In Person
Salikuddin,R.
HIST B265-001 Colonial Encounters in the Americas 1Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MW In Person Gallup-Diaz,I.
HIST B284-001 Movies and America: The Past Lives Forever 1Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Old Library 224
In Person
Ullman,S., Ullman,S.
Film Screening: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM W Old Library 224
In Person
HIST B319-001 Topics in Modern European History: Growing Up in Communism 1Semester / 1 LEC: 9:10 AM-12:00 PM T In Person Kurimay,A.
HIST B325-001 Topics in Social History: Radical Movements 1Semester / 1 LEC: 1:10 PM- 3:30 PM W Taylor Hall B
In Person
Ullman,S.
HIST B337-001 Topics in African History: Cities, Epidemics, Pandemics 1Semester / 1 LEC: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM T Dalton Hall 1
In Person
Ngalamulume,K.
HIST B371-001 Topics in Atlantic History: The Early Modern Pirate in Fact and Fiction 1Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 3:00 PM T In Person Gallup-Diaz,I.
HIST B398-001 Approaches to Historical Praxis 1Semester / 1 Lecture: 12:10 PM- 2:00 PM F In Person Dept. staff, TBA
HIST B403-001 Supervised Work 1Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA
HIST B403-001 Supervised Work 1Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA
ARCH B244-001 Great Empires of the Ancient Near East 1Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTH Carpenter Library 25
In Person
Dept. staff, TBA
CITY B250-001 Topics: Growth & Spatial Org of Cities: Patterns, change, and agency 1Semester / 1 LEC: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MW In Person Cohen,J.
EALC B263-001 The Chinese Revolution 1Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MW Taylor Hall D
In Person
Jiang,Y.
EALC B325-001 Topics in Chinese History and Culture: Legal Culture in Chinese History 1Semester / 1 LEC: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MW Taylor Hall D
In Person
Jiang,Y.
MEST B302-001 The Legacy of Genghis Khan: The Mongols & Their Successors 1Semester / 1 Lecture: 12:10 PM- 2:00 PM M Carpenter Library 15
In Person
Salikuddin,R.

Spring 2023 HIST

Course Title Schedule/Units Meeting Type Times/Days Location / Instruction Mode Instr(s)
HIST B101-001 The Historical Imagination 1Semester / 1 LEC: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MW In Person Kale,M.
HIST B200-001 The Atlantic World 1492-1800 1Semester / 1 In Person Gallup-Diaz,I.
HIST B226-001 Topics in 20th Century European History 1Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH In Person Ngalamulume,K.
HIST B236-001 African History since 1800 1Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MW Taylor Hall E
In Person
Ngalamulume,K.
HIST B299-001 Exploring History 1Semester / 1 Lecture: 12:10 PM- 2:00 PM F In Person Ullman,S.
HIST B337-001 Topics in African History 1Semester / 1 Lecture: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM T In Person Ngalamulume,K.
HIST B403-001 Supervised Work 1Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA
HIST B403-001 Supervised Work 1Semester / 1 Dept. staff, TBA
EALC B131-001 Chinese Civilization 1Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MW Taylor Hall D
In Person
Jiang,Y.
EALC B200-001 Major Seminar: Methods and Approaches 1Semester / 1 Lecture: 12:10 PM- 2:00 PM T Old Library 118
In Person
Kwa,S.
EALC B264-001 Human Rights in China 1Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MW Taylor Hall D
In Person
Jiang,Y.
GERM B223-001 Topics in German Cultural Studies: Under Surveillance: From ETA Hoffmann to Christa W 1Semester / 1 LEC: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MW In Person Strair,M.
HART B310-001 Topics in Medieval Art 1Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM W Carpenter Library 13
In Person
Dept. staff, TBA
MEST B200-001 Introduction to Middle Eastern Studies 1Semester / 1 Lecture: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM W Carpenter Library 25
In Person
Salikuddin,R.
MEST B303-001 The Art and Architecture of Islamic Spirituality 1Semester / 1 Lecture: 12:10 PM- 2:00 PM W Carpenter Library 25
In Person
Salikuddin,R.

Fall 2023 HIST

(Class schedules for this semester will be posted at a later date.)

2022-23 Catalog Data: HIST

HIST B101 The Historical Imagination

Spring 2023

Explores some of the ways people have thought about, represented, and used the past across time and space. Introduces students to modern historical practices and debates through examination and discussion of texts and archives that range from scholarly monographs and documents to monuments, oral traditions, and other media.

Critical Interpretation (CI)

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HIST B102 Introduction to African Civilizations

Fall 2022

The course is designed to introduce students to the history of African and African Diaspora societies, cultures, and political economies. We will discuss the origins, state formation, external contacts, and the structural transformations and continuities of African societies and cultures in the context of the slave trade, colonial rule, capitalist exploitation, urbanization, and westernization, as well as contemporary struggles over authority, autonomy, identity and access to resources. Case studies will be drawn from across the continent.

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Counts Toward Africana Studies

Counts Toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Counts Toward International Studies

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HIST B124 High and Late Middle Ages

Not offered 2022-23

This course will cover the second half of the European Middle Ages, often called the High and Late Middle Ages, from roughly 1000-1400. The course has a general chronological framework, and is based on important themes of medieval history. These include feudalism and the feudal economy; the social transformation of the millennium; monastic reform; the rise of the papacy; trade, exchange, and exploration; urbanism and the growth of towns. The course number was previously HIST B224.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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HIST B156 The Long 1960's

Fall 2022

The 1960s has had a powerful effect on recent US History. But what was it exactly? How long did it last? And what do we really mean when we say "The Sixties?" This term has become so potent and loaded for so many people from all sides of the political spectrum that it's almost impossible to separate fact from fiction; myth from memory. We are all the inheritors of this intense period in American history but our inheritance is neither simple nor entirely clear. Our task this semester is to try to pull apart the meaning as well as the legend and attempt to figure out what "The Sixties" is (and what it isn't) and try to assess its long term impact on American society.

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Counts Toward Africana Studies

Counts Toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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HIST B200 The Atlantic World 1492-1800

Spring 2023

The aim of this course is to provide an understanding of the way in which peoples, goods, and ideas from Africa, Europe. and the Americas came together to form an interconnected Atlantic World system. The course is designed to chart the manner in which an integrated system was created in the Americas in the early modern period, rather than to treat the history of the Atlantic World as nothing more than an expanded version of North American, Caribbean, or Latin American history.

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Counts Toward Africana Studies

Counts Toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

Counts Toward International Studies

Counts Toward Peace, Justice and Human Rights

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HIST B212 Pirates, Travelers, and Natural Historians: 1492-1750

Not offered 2022-23

In the early modern period, conquistadors, missionaries, travelers, pirates, and natural historians wrote interesting texts in which they tried to integrate the New World into their existing frameworks of knowledge. This intellectual endeavor was an adjunct to the physical conquest of American space, and provides a framework though which we will explore the processes of imperial competition, state formation, and indigenous and African resistance to colonialism.

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Counts Toward Africana Studies

Counts Toward Environmental Studies

Counts Toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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HIST B226 Topics in 20th Century European History

Section 001 (Fall 2022): Human Rights:Theory & Practice
Section 001 (Fall 2021): National Proj, Socialist Dream

Fall 2022, Spring 2023

This is a topics course. Course content varies.

Current topic description: What are the origins of human rights? Are human rights universal? This course examines the history of human rights, as a set of ideas and as a motivation for social action from the French Revolution to the present. Concentrating on the role of human rights in European history, the course considers how ideas about rights motivated political and social change and looks at how different groups defined and fought for rights, either for themselves or others. From the birth of the first NGO to the establishment of the United Nations we will discuss such issues as humanitarianism, genocide, internationalism, abolition, torture, colonialism, activism and lgtbq rights. Throughout the class we will consider the differences between ideas about human rights and how those ideas have been implemented at different times, different places, and by different actors. In doing so, the course will trace the historical evolution of international human rights.

Current topic description:

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Counts Toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Counts Toward Health Studies

Counts Toward International Studies

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HIST B231 Medicine, Magic & Miracles in the Middle Ages

Not offered 2022-23

A lecture and discussion course on the therapeutic systems (humoral theory, faith healing, natural magic), the medical marketplace, and the social context for understanding health and disease in the medieval period. Topics covered include Greek, Arabic, and Latin medical textual traditions, the rise of hospitals and public health, and the Black Death.

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Counts Toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Counts Toward Health Studies

Counts Toward Middle Eastern/Central Asian/North African Studies

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HIST B234 An Introduction to Middle Eastern History

Fall 2022

This course serves as an introduction to the history of the modern Middle East. We will also explore the narratives and debates that have shaped the field of Middle East history. Topics include orientalism, colonialism, political reform, social, cultural, and intellectual movements, nationalism, and the Cold War. Readings will be drawn from the fields of history, anthropology, politics, and literature.

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Counts Toward International Studies

Counts Toward Middle Eastern/Central Asian/North African Studies

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HIST B236 African History since 1800

Section 001 (Fall 2021): Africa since 1800

Spring 2023

The course analyzes the history of Africa in the last two hundred years in the context of global political economy. We will examine the major themes in modern African history, including the 19th-century state formation, expansion, or restructuration; partition and resistance; colonial rule; economic, social, political, religious, and cultural developments; nationalism; post-independence politics, economics, and society, as well as conflicts and the burden of disease. The course will also introduce students to the sources and methods of African history.

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Counts Toward Africana Studies

Counts Toward International Studies

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HIST B237 Themes in Modern African History

Not offered 2022-23

This is a topics course. Course content varies

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Counts Toward Africana Studies

Counts Toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Counts Toward Museum Studies

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HIST B238 From Bordellos to Cybersex History of Sexuality in Modern Europe

Not offered 2022-23

This course is a detailed examination of the changing nature and definition of sexuality in Europe from the late nineteenth century to the present. Throughout the semester we critically examine how understandings of sexuality changed--from how it was discussed and how authorities tried to control it to how the practice of sexuality evolved. Focusing on both discourses and lived experiences, the class will explore sexuality in the context of the following themes; prostitution and sex trafficking, the rise of medicine with a particular attention to sexology, psychiatry and psychoanalysis; the birth of the homo/hetero/bisexual divide; the rise of the "New Woman"; abortion and contraception; the "sexual revolution" of the 60s; pornography and consumerism; LGBTQ activism; concluding with considering sexuality in the age of cyber as well as genetic technology. In examining these issues we will question the role and influence of different political systems and war on sexuality. By paying special attention to the rise of modern nation-states, forces of nationalism, and the impacts of imperialism we will interrogate the nature of regulation and experiences of sexuality in different locations in Europe from the late nineteenth century to the present.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Counts Toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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HIST B241 America 1890-1945

Not offered 2022-23

This course focuses on the first half of the twentieth century in the United States. An intense period of violent struggle over race, immigration, labor, income inequality, gender, and the very survival of American democracy in the face of global fascism, the early years of the twentieth century set the stage for the American society of today. One cannot fully understand what has happened to the U.S. right now without spending time in the first 40 years of the twentieth century.

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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HIST B242 American Politics and Society: 1945 to the Present

Not offered 2022-23

How did we get here? This course looks at the stunning transformation of America after WWII. From a country devastated by economic crisis and wedded to isolationism prior to the war, America turned itself into an international powerhouse. Massive grass roots resistance forced the United States to abandon its system of racial apartheid, to open opportunities to women, and to reinvent its very definition as it incorporated immigrants from around the world. Simultaneously, American music and film broke free from their staid moorings and permanently altered international culture. Finally, through the "War on Terror", starting after 9/11, America initiated an aggressive new foreign policy that has shattered traditional rules of warfare and reoriented global politics. We will explore the political, social, and cultural factors that have driven modern American history. Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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HIST B243 Topics: Atlantic Cultures

Section 001 (Spring 2022): Maroon Communities - New World

Not offered 2022-23

This is a topics course. Course content varies.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Counts Toward Africana Studies

Counts Toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Counts Toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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HIST B253 Themes in Modern Europe: Europe in the Global Age

Not offered 2022-23

This course is a survey of Europe from the seventeenth century to the present. Throughout the semester we will look at the people, events, and major themes that shaped the history of modern Europe. We will cover a large number of topics, from social movements and political ideologies, to national identities and gender norms. We will examine what we mean when we speak of "Europe" and we will place Europe within the context of the wider, global world. Through the use of primary sources, students will also learn the skills and techniques necessary in the work of a historian. We will examine how historians write, interpret, and construct histories from a series of facts, and what place these histories have in our contemporary world.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Counts Toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Counts Toward International Studies

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HIST B256 Disciplining Bodies in Motion: Migration & Colonial Modernity

Not offered 2022-23

Migration and borderlands dominate headlines as well as the everyday experiences of millions of people around the world, as vast numbers of human bodies move through spaces interrupted by variously-contested and regulated natural barriers (rivers, seas, mountains, deserts, etc.) and barricades (social, cultural and psychic as well as physical) constructed by not only States, but by a wide range of "non-State actors" as well. Notably, since 1984, according to the U.S. Department of Labor, the majority of migrants to this country have been women, a trend that is also evident elsewhere (within as well as across national borders). While migration arguably is a characteristic feature of humanity across time and space, this course will situate our current transnational conjuncture in the long duree of global migration engendered by developments at the turn of the 16th century, focusing on the migration of "labor" from the Indian subcontinent to the Pacific and Indian Oceans, the Persian Gulf, Africa, the Caribbean, the Americas, Britain, and Europe. Focusing on indentured and contract labor migration from British India, we will consider if and how the historically-contingent and sometime politically opportunistic and transactional tactics, regulations, protocols around these "labor" migrations contributed simultaneously to naturalizing and also obscuring gendered assumptions about work and (whether performed within, between or outside their spaces, still predicated on) households, (geographical) mobility, and the bodies (profoundly gendered, "raced," and hierarchized) that engage in all three. To what degree have techniques of governance (measuring, surveilling) practiced and routinized through the various colonial empires of the 19th and 20th centuries informed the production and circulation of knowledge (specifically academic disciplines like History) the naturalization of analytical and descriptive categories like labor, race and class -- and vice versa? .

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Counts Toward International Studies

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HIST B257 British Empire I: Capitalism and Slavery

Not offered 2022-23

Focusing on the Atlantic slave trade and the slave plantation mode of production, this course explores English colonization, and the emergence and the decline of British Empire in the Americas and Caribbean from the 17th through the late 20th centuries. It tracks some of the intersecting and overlapping routes--and roots--connecting histories and politics within and between these "new" world locations. It also tracks the further and proliferating links between developments in these regions and the histories and politics of regions in the "old" world, from the north Atlantic to the South China sea.

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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HIST B258 British Empire: Imagining Indias

Not offered 2022-23

This course considers ideas about and experiences of "modern" India, i.e., India during the colonial and post-Independence periods (roughly 1757-present). While "India" and "Indian history" along with "British empire" and "British history" will be the ostensible objects of our consideration and discussions, the course proposes that their imagination and meanings are continually mediated by a wide variety of institutions, agents, and analytical categories (nation, religion, class, race, gender, to name a few examples). The course uses primary sources, scholarly analyses, and cultural productions to explore the political economies of knowledge, representation, and power in the production of modernity.

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Counts Toward International Studies

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HIST B265 Colonial Encounters in the Americas

Fall 2022

The course explores the confrontations, conquests and accommodations that formed the "ground-level" experience of day-to-day colonialism throughout the Americas. The course is comparative in scope, examining events and structures in North, South and Central America, with particular attention paid to indigenous peoples and the nature of indigenous leadership in the colonial world of the 18th century.

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Counts Toward Africana Studies

Counts Toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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HIST B268 Telling Bryn Mawr Histories: Topics, Sources, and Methods

Not offered 2022-23

The course covers historical research practices and methods, and will familiarize participants with the College's curatorial and archival collections, so that each student might frame an individual research project.

Course does not meet an Approach

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HIST B274 Focus: Topics in Modern US History

Not offered 2022-23

This is a topics course in 20th century America social history. Topics vary by half semester

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Counts Toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Counts Toward Museum Studies

Counts Toward Praxis Program

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HIST B280 History of Witchcraft and Magic

Not offered 2022-23

This course examines the social, cultural, and legal history of witchcraft and magic throughout European history. We will examine the values and attitudes that have influenced beliefs about witchcraft and the supernatural, both historically and in the present day. This course will pay specific attention to the role of gender and sexuality in the history of witchcraft, as the vast majority of individuals charged in the witch hunts of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries were indeed women. We will also study accusations of witchcraft, breaking down the power dynamics and assumptions at play behind the witch trials, and the effects of these trials on gender relations in European society. This class will track the intersections of magic and science throughout the early modern period, and the reconciliation of belief systems during the Enlightenment. We will carry our analysis into the modern period, touching on Victorian spiritualism and mysticism, the emergence of Neo-Paganism, and the return to the figure of the goddess. Our final foray will be and examination of the political "witch-hunts" of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries and the enduring trope of the "witch" in modern political culture.

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Counts Toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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HIST B284 Movies and America: The Past Lives Forever

Fall 2022

Movies are one of the most important means by which Americans come to know - or think they know--their own history. We look to old movies to tell us about a world we never knew but think we can access through film. And Hollywood often reaches into the past to tell a good story. How can we understand the impact of our love affair with movies on our understanding of what happened in this country? In this course we will examine the complex cultural relationship between film and American historical self-fashioning.

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Counts Toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Counts Toward Film Studies

Counts Toward Visual Studies

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HIST B292 Women in Britain since 1750

Not offered 2022-23

Focusing on contemporary and historical narratives, this course explores the ongoing production, circulation and refraction of discourses on gender and nation as well as race, empire and modernity since the mid-18th century. Texts will incorporate visual material as well as literary evidence and culture and consider the crystallization of the discipline of history itself.

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Counts Toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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HIST B299 Exploring History

Spring 2023

This course is designed to introduce history majors to the debates governing the production of historical knowledge which dominate the discipline. Although undergraduates often read history monographs as finished and "complete" projects, in fact each of these works is always deeply contested - both in terms of method and product. The goal of this course is to not only reinforce habits of critical textual reading but to provide students the tools to critically "read" the entire project of writing history. Required for History Majors.

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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HIST B303 Topics in American History

Section 001 (Fall 2021): The Lost Decade

Not offered 2022-23

This is a topics course. Course content varies. Recent topics have included medicine, advertising, and history of sexuality. Course may be repeated for credit.

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HIST B307 Topics in European and Britain Cultural History

Section 001 (Fall 2021): Urban Histories in 19th Century Britain.
Section 001 (Spring 2022): Women and Work

Not offered 2022-23

This is a topics course. Course content varies.

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HIST B319 Topics in Modern European History

Section 001 (Fall 2022): Growing Up in Communism
Section 001 (Fall 2021): History of Fascism

Fall 2022

This is a topics course. Course content varies.

Current topic description: This course explores European communism as a lived experience from the 1930s until the disintegration of the Soviet Union in 1991. It examines various aspects of life in the socialist Eastern Block ranging from education, youth culture, Communist Party life, law and policing to leisure, consumerism, disability, sex and romance. Beyond looking at how life was lived during communism the course will also ask how life under communism has been remembered, represented, and understood since the end of the Cold War. Prerequisite: at least one course in History.

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HIST B325 Topics in Social History

Section 001 (Fall 2021): Food Politics
Section 001 (Spring 2022): Queer American History
Section 001 (Fall 2022): Radical Movements

Fall 2022

This a topics course that explores various themes in American social history. Course content varies. Course may be repeated.

Current topic description: Americans have often resisted oppression through radical means. Although commonly erased by history or marginalized in memory as ineffective or even the cause of great tragedies, in fact radical individuals and movements have profoundly transformed the course of American history. This seminar focuses on key radical movements and actors from the ante bellum era through today. We will explore narratives of personalities, events, and national crises. This class will focus on politics rather than culture and on those usually characterized historically as left wing.

Counts Toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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HIST B337 Topics in African History

Section 001 (Fall 2021): Cities, Epidemics, Pandemics
Section 001 (Fall 2022): Cities, Epidemics, Pandemics

Fall 2022, Spring 2023

This is a topics course. Topics vary.

Current topic description: In the recent decades, the world has experienced an increasing threat for public health from the emerging infectious diseases that have provoked epidemics and pandemics. The course will focus on the impact of epidemics and pandemics on cities in Africa. We will discuss the issues of public health history, social and cultural history of disease as well as the issues of the history of medicine. We will examine the histories of global initiatives to control disease in Africa from an interdisciplinary perspective (history, and social and biomedical sciences), using case studies from across the continent. We will explore various themes, such as the anxiety and panic caused by the disease outbreaks; the state, medical, and popular responses; the politics of disease control; the conflicts of interests between the interests of commerce, public health, and civil liberties; and the health disparities within cities. We will focus on the colonial and postcolonial cities in Africa. We will also explore the questions regarding the sources of African history and their quality.

Counts Toward Africana Studies

Counts Toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Counts Toward Health Studies

Counts Toward International Studies

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HIST B339 The Making of the African Diaspora 1450-1800

Not offered 2022-23

This course explores the emergence, development, and challenges to the ideologies of whiteness and blackness, that have been in place from the colonial period to the present. Through the reading of primary and secondary sources, we will explore various ways through which enslaved people imagined freedom, personal rights, community membership, and some of the paths they created in order to improve their experiences and change the social order. In an attempt to have a comparative approach, we will look at particular events and circumstances that took place in few provinces in the Americas, with an emphasis on Latin America and the Caribbean. The course will also look at the methodological challenges of studying and writing history of people who in principle, were not allowed to produce written texts. Throughout, we will identify and underscore the contribution that people of African descent have made to the ideas of rights, freedom, equality, and democracy.

Counts Toward Africana Studies

Counts Toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Counts Toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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HIST B364 Medieval Robots

Not offered 2022-23

A reading and research seminar focused on different examples of artificial life in medieval cultures. Primary sources will be from a variety of genres, and secondary sources will include significant theoretical works in art history, critical theory and science studies. Prerequisite: at least one course in medieval history, or the permission of the instructor.

Counts Toward Middle Eastern/Central Asian/North African Studies

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HIST B371 Topics in Atlantic History: The Early Modern Pirate in Fact and Fiction

Fall 2022

This course will explore piracy in the Americas in the period 1550-1750. We will investigate the historical reality of pirates and what they did, and the manner in which pirates have entered the popular imagination through fiction and films. Pirates have been depicted as lovable rogues, anti-establishment rebels, and enlightened multiculturalists who were skilled in dealing with the indigenous and African peoples of the Americas. The course will examine the facts and the fictions surrounding these important historical actors.

Counts Toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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HIST B398 Approaches to Historical Praxis

This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to consider different ways of "doing history." In conversation with the professor and using the resources of the College (archivists, librarians, digital specialists, Praxis Program) students will articulate a historical question, research it, and produce a final project. This project may be a final research paper, but might also take the more public form of a digital project, an exhibit, a short film, or an internship in a local museum, oral history center, or archive.

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HIST B403 Supervised Work

Optional independent study, which requires permission of the instructor and the major adviser.

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HIST B403 Supervised Work

Optional independent study, which requires permission of the instructor and the major adviser.

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HIST B425 Praxis III: Independent Study

Praxis III courses are Independent Study courses and are developed by individual students, in collaboration with faculty and field supervisors. A Praxis courses is distinguished by genuine collaboration with fieldsite organizations and by a dynamic process of reflection that incorporates lessons learned in the field into the classroom setting and applies theoretical understanding gained through classroom study to work done in the broader community.

Counts Toward Praxis Program

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ARCH B208 Ancient Near Eastern History

Not offered 2022-23

This course will explore some of the key historical figures, events and inventions that shaped Ancient Near Eastern societies and traditions. We will consider the impact that the modern disciplines of ancient near eastern archaeology and history have had on our understanding of this region. We will also discuss how the ancient history and more recent colonial past of this region has impacted upon and shaped our modern interpretations of this region.

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Counts Toward Counts toward Middle Eastern/Central Asian/North African Studies

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ARCH B244 Great Empires of the Ancient Near East

Fall 2022

A survey of the history, material culture, political and religious ideologies of, and interactions among, the five great empires of the ancient Near East of the second and first millennia B.C.E.: New Kingdom Egypt, the Hittite Empire in Anatolia, the Assyrian and Babylonian Empires in Mesopotamia, and the Persian Empire in Iran.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Counts Toward Counts toward Middle Eastern/Central Asian/North African Studies

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CITY B250 Topics: Growth & Spatial Org of Cities

Section 001 (Fall 2022): Patterns, change, and agency

Fall 2022

This is a topics course. Course content varies.

Current topic description:Patterns, change, and agency: This course explores morphological patterns and types within the evolving city, focusing upon forms associated with functions and populations, their disposition in urban space, and the forces that shaped them.

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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CITY B345 Advanced Topics in Environment and Society

Section 001 (Fall 2021): The City and Nature

Not offered 2022-23

This is a topics course. Topics vary.

Course does not meet an Approach

Counts Toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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EALC B131 Chinese Civilization

Spring 2023

A broad chronological survey of Chinese culture and society from the Bronze Age to the 1800s, with special reference to such topics as belief, family, language, the arts and sociopolitical organization. Readings include primary sources in English translation and secondary studies.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Counts Toward Counts toward East Asian Languages and Cultures

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EALC B200 Major Seminar: Methods and Approaches

Spring 2023

This course is a writing intensive course for EALC majors and minors to introduce some foundational ideas and concepts in the study of East Asia. Beginning with close readings of primary source texts, students are introduced to the philosophy and culture of China, and its subsequent transmission and adaptation across the vast geographical area that is commonly referred to as "East Asia." Students will gain familiarity with methods in this interdisciplinary field and develop skills in the practice of close critical analysis, bibliography, and the formulation of a research topic. Required of EALC majors and minors. Majors should take this course before the senior year. Prerequisite: One year of Chinese or Japanese.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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EALC B263 The Chinese Revolution

Fall 2022

Places the causes and consequences of the 20th century revolutions in historical perspective, by examining its late-imperial antecedents and tracing how the revolution has (and has not) transformed China, including the lives of such key revolutionary supporters as the peasantry, women, and intellectuals.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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EALC B264 Human Rights in China

Spring 2023

This course will examine China's human rights issues from a historical perspective. The topics include diverse perspectives on human rights, historical background, civil rights, religious practice, justice system, education, as well as the problems concerning some social groups such as migrant laborers, women, ethnic minorities and peasants.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Counts Toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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EALC B325 Topics in Chinese History and Culture

Section 001 (Fall 2021): Legal Culture in Chinese History
Section 001 (Fall 2022): Legal Culture in Chinese History

Fall 2022

This is a topics course. Course content varies.

Current topic description: This seminar explores legal culture in Chinese history with an emphasis on the imperial age. Topics includes philosophical foundation of legal culture; evolution of legal institutions; the role of law in the founding of the Chinese empire, stabilizing government, regulating family, structuring society, defining gender, and transforming the people. This course meets the College requirements for "Approaches to Inquiry" in "Cross-cultural Analysis" and "Inquiry into the Past.

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ENGL B359 Dead Presidents

Not offered 2022-23

Framed by the extravagant funerals of Presidents Washington and Lincoln, this course explores the cultural importance of the figure of the President and the Presidential body, and of the 19th-century preoccupations with death and mourning, in the U.S. cultural imaginary from the Revolutionary movement through the Civil War.

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GERM B223 Topics in German Cultural Studies

Section 001 (Fall 2021): Seeing and Being Seen
Section 001 (Spring 2023): Under Surveillance: From ETA Hoffmann to Christa W

Spring 2023

Section 001 (Fall 2021): Seeing and Being Seen Section 001 (Spring 2023): Under Surveillance: From ETA Hoffmann to Christa W This is a topics course. Course content varies. Recent topics include Remembered Violence, Global Masculinities, and Crime and Detection in German. Current topic description (spring 2023): Taught in English. This course investigates different cultures of hyper-visibility and shifting notions of the power of the gaze and spectatorship as tied to techniques of social observation and control. It explores their connections to different modes of artistic and literary production before and after the rise of modern authoritarian states and technologies of mass surveillance. Starting in the eighteenth century, physiognomy emerges not only as a technique of reading faces, but as a popular pastime whose sinister afterlife becomes a foundation for Nazi racial science. Haunting tales from Romantic and Gothic authors invoke a supernatural surveillance that give rise to compelling genres and allow readers to visualize a modern, uncertain depth of subjectivity and nature of reality. Towards the beginning of the twentieth century, the flaneur's ambulatory gaze mobilizes a new experience of city life as other visual technologies like photography and film become more ubiquitous. Around the same time, the hyper-visibility of hysterical women inspire innovative forms of narration that intertwine exhibitionism, voyeurism, and a gendered critique of the gaze. And finally, the mass surveillance by the state - both real and imagined- prompts us to look more carefully at the powers afforded to visibility and invisibility, and the literary representations of those powers. Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC) Critical Interpretation (CI) Writing Attentive

Current topic description: Taught in English. This course investigates different cultures of hyper-visibility and shifting notions of the power of the gaze and spectatorship as tied to techniques of social observation and control. It explores their connections to different modes of artistic and literary production before and after the rise of modern authoritarian states and technologies of mass surveillance. Starting in the eighteenth century, physiognomy emerges not only as a technique of reading faces, but as a popular pastime whose sinister afterlife becomes a foundation for Nazi racial science. Haunting tales from Romantic and Gothic authors invoke a supernatural surveillance that give rise to compelling genres and allow readers to visualize a modern, uncertain depth of subjectivity and nature of reality. Towards the beginning of the twentieth century, the flaneur's ambulatory gaze mobilizes a new experience of city life as other visual technologies like photography and film become more ubiquitous. Around the same time, the hyper-visibility of hysterical women inspire innovative forms of narration that intertwine exhibitionism, voyeurism, and a gendered critique of the gaze. And finally, the mass surveillance by the state - both real and imagined- prompt us to look more carefully at the powers afforded to visibility and invisibility, and the literary representations of those powers.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Critical Interpretation (CI)

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HART B268 Telling Bryn Mawr Histories: Topics, Sources, and Methods

Not offered 2022-23

This course introduces students to archival and object-based research methods, using the College's built environment and curatorial and archival collections as our laboratory. Students will explore buildings, documents, objects, and themes in relation to the history of Bryn Mawr College. Students will frame an original group research project to which each student will contribute an individual component. Prerequisite: An interest in exploring and reinterpreting the institutional and architectural history of Bryn Mawr College and a willingness to work collaboratively on a shared project.

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Counts Toward Counts toward Museum Studies

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HART B310 Topics in Medieval Art

Spring 2023

This is a topics course. Course content varies. Prerequisite: one course in History of Art at the 100- or 200-level or permission of the instructor. Enrollment preference given to majors and minors in History of Art.

Course does not meet an Approach

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MEST B200 Introduction to Middle Eastern Studies

Spring 2023

This course introduces the interdisciplinary field of Middle Eastern Studies with a focus on analytical approaches, methods, and tools. Students consider the dynamics of the region in the premodern and modern periods and become familiar with the major issues and debates that dominate various disciplinary approaches to the Middle East. Readings include both important canonical and alternative scholarship in order to examine the limits and possibilities of the field.

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Counts Toward Counts toward International Studies

Counts Toward Counts toward Middle Eastern/Central Asian/North African Studies

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MEST B302 The Legacy of Genghis Khan: The Mongols & Their Successors

Fall 2022

This course examines the political, intellectual, and social history of Genghis Khan, the Ilkhanid Mongols, and their successors in the Middle East and Central Asia from the thirteenth century to the sixteenth century CE. We will consider the formation of new political norms, changing trends in trade, and an increasingly hybrid cultural and artistic production that characterize this period.

Counts Toward Counts toward Middle Eastern & Islamic Studies

Counts Toward Counts toward Middle Eastern/Central Asian/North African Studies

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MEST B303 The Art and Architecture of Islamic Spirituality

Spring 2023

This course examines how Muslim societies across time and space have used art and architecture in different ways to express and understand inner dimensions of spirituality and mysticism. Topics to be studied include: the calligraphical remnants of the early Islamic period; inscriptions found on buildings and gravestones; the majestic architecture of mosques, shrines, seminaries, and Sufi lodges; the brilliant arts of the book; the commemorative iconography and passion plays of Ashura devotion; the souvenir culture of modern shrine visitation; and the modern art of twenty-first century Sufism. Readings include works from history, religious studies, anthropology, sociology, and the history of art and architecture.

Course does not meet an Approach

Counts Toward Counts toward Middle Eastern/Central Asian/North African Studies

Counts Toward Counts toward Visual Studies

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Contact Us

Department of History

Old Library
Bryn Mawr College
101 N. Merion Avenue
Bryn Mawr, PA 19010-2899
Phone: 610-526-5332