Courses

This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's calendars page.

Students must choose a major subject and may choose a minor subject. Students may also select from one of seven concentrations, which are offered to enhance a student's work in the major or minor and to focus work on a specific area of interest.

Concentrations are an intentional cluster of courses already offered by various academic departments or through general programs. These courses may also be cross-listed in several academic departments. Therefore, when registering for a course that counts toward a concentration, a student should register for the course listed in her major or minor department. If the concentration course is not listed in her major or minor department, the student may enroll in any listing of that course.

Spring 2024 CFSM

Course Title Schedule/Units Meeting Type Times/Days Location Instr(s)
ANTH B102-001 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM-2:30 PM MW Carpenter Library 21
Fioratta,S.
ANTH B102-002 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Taylor Hall E
McLaughlin-Alcock,C.
EDUC B200-001 Community Learning Collaborative: Practicing Partnership Semester / 1 Lecture: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM M Dalton Hall 300
Price,E.
EDUC B250-001 Literacies and Education Semester / 1 Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTH Bettws Y Coed 127
Cohen,J.
PSYC B209-001 Clinical Psychology Semester / 1 Lecture: 8:25 AM-9:45 AM TTH Dalton Hall 300
Conlin,S.
PSYC B211-001 Lifespan Development Semester / 1 Lecture: 12:55 PM-2:15 PM TTH Carpenter Library 21
Baird,J.
PSYC B327-001 Adolescent Development Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:10 AM-12:00 PM F Bettws Y Coed 127
Albert,D.
PSYC B344-001 Early Childhood Experiences & Mental Health Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM-4:00 PM T Bettws Y Coed 127
Mukerji,C.
PSYC B344-002 Early Childhood Experiences & Mental Health Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM-4:00 PM M Old Library 102
Mukerji,C.
SOCL B225-001 Women in Society Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:25 PM-3:45 PM TTH Dalton Hall 300
Montes,V.
SOCL B258-001 Sociology of Education Semester / 1 Lecture: 8:25 AM-9:45 AM TTH Dalton Hall 119
Karen,D.

Fall 2024 CFSM

Course Title Schedule/Units Meeting Type Times/Days Location Instr(s)
ANTH B102-001 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM-2:30 PM TTH Fioratta,S.
ANTH B312-001 Anthropology of Reproduction Semester / 1 Lecture: 12:10 PM-2:00 PM M Dalton Hall 2
Pashigian,M.
EDUC B301-001 Curriculum and Pedagogy Seminar Semester / 1 Lecture: 7:10 PM-9:30 PM T Wilson,C.
PSYC B209-001 Clinical Psychology Semester / 1 Lecture: 10:10 AM-12:00 PM TH Mukerji,C.
PSYC B322-001 Culture and Development Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM-4:00 PM T Bettws Y Coed 239
Wang,L.
PSYC B352-001 Advanced Topics in Developmental Psychology: Children and Identity: Understanding Self and Othe Semester / 1 LEC: 1:10 PM-4:00 PM M Baird,J.
SOCL B225-001 Women in Society Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:40 PM-4:00 PM TTH Montes,V.

Spring 2025 CFSM

Course Title Schedule/Units Meeting Type Times/Days Location Instr(s)
ANTH B102-001 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM-2:30 PM MW Fioratta,S.
ANTH B102-002 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology Semester / 1 Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:30 AM TTH McLaughlin-Alcock,C.
ANTH B213-001 Anthropology of Food Semester / 1 Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:30 AM MW Fioratta,S.
EDUC B200-001 Community Learning Collaborative: Practicing Partnership Semester / 1 Lecture: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM M Bettws Y Coed 127
Wilson,C.
EDUC B266-001 Geographies of School and Learning: Urban Education Reconsidered Semester / 1 Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:30 AM TTH Bettws Y Coed 127
Zuckerman,K.
ENGL B271-001 Transatlantic Childhoods in the 19th Century Semester / 1 Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:30 AM MW Flower,C.
SOCL B205-001 Social Inequality Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM-2:30 PM MW Cox,A.

2024-25 Catalog Data: CFSM

ANTH B102 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

Fall 2024, Spring 2025

This course will explore the basic principles and methods of sociocultural anthropology. Through field research, direct observation, and participation in a group's daily life, sociocultural anthropologists examine the many ways that people organize their social institutions and cultural systems, ranging from the dynamics of life in small-scale societies to the transnational circulation of people, commodities, technologies and ideas. Sociocultural anthropology examines how many of the categories we assume to be "natural," such as kinship, gender, or race, are culturally and socially constructed. It examines how people's perceptions, beliefs, values, and actions are shaped by broader historical, economic, and political contexts. It is also a vital tool for understanding and critiquing imbalances of power in our contemporary world. Through a range of topically and geographically diverse course readings and films, and opportunities to practice ethnographic methodology, students will gain new analytical and methodological tools for understanding cultural difference, social organization, and social change.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Counts Toward Child and Family Studies

Counts Toward Gender/Sex Studies (Min/Conc)

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ANTH B213 Anthropology of Food

Spring 2025

Food is part of the universal human experience. But everyday experiences of food also reveal much about human difference. What we eat is intimately connected with who we are, where we belong, and how we see the world. In this course, we will use a socio-cultural perspective to explore how food helps us form families, national and religious communities, and other groups. We will also consider how food may become a source of inequality, a political symbol, and a subject of social discord. Examining both practical and ideological meanings of food and taste, this course will address issues of identity, social difference, and cultural experience.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Counts Toward Child and Family Studies

Counts Toward Gender/Sex Studies (Min/Conc)

Counts Toward International Studies

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ANTH B312 Anthropology of Reproduction

Fall 2024

This course will examine how power in everyday life shapes reproductive behavior and how reproduction is culturally constructed. Through an examination of materials from different cultures, this course will look at how often competing interests within households, communities, states and institutions (at both the local and global levels) influence reproduction in society. We will explore the political economy of reproduction cross-culturally, how power and politics shape gendered reproductive behavior and how it is interpreted and used differently by persons, communities and institutions. Topics covered include but are not limited to the politics of family planning, mothering/parenting, abortion, pregnancy, pregnancy loss, fetal testing and biology and social policy in cross-cultural comparison. Prerequisite: ANTH 8102 (or ANTH H103) or permission of instructor. Haverford: Social Science (SO), Enrollment Cap: 15; Post Bacc Spaces: 2; If the course exceeds the enrollment cap the following criteria will be used for the lottery: Major/Minor/Concentration; Senior; Junior; Permission of Instructor.

Counts Toward Child and Family Studies

Counts Toward Gender/Sex Studies (Min/Conc)

Counts Toward Health Studies

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ANTH B343 Human Growth and Development and Life History

Not offered 2024-25

In this seminar we will examine various aspects of the human life history pattern, highly unusual among mammals, from a comparative evolutionary perspective. First, we will survey the fundamentals of life history theory, with an emphasis on primate life histories and socioecological pressures that influence them. Secondly, we will focus on unique aspects of human life history, including secondary altriciality of human infants, the inclusion of childhood and pubertal life stages in our pattern of growth and development, and the presence of a post-reproductive life span. Finally, we will examine fossil evidence from the hominin lineage used in reconstructing the evolution of the modern human life history pattern. Prerequisite: ANTH B101 or permission of instructor.

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EDUC B200 Community Learning Collaborative: Practicing Partnership

Spring 2025

Designed to be the first course for students interested in pursuing one of the options offered through the Education Program, this course is open to students exploring an interest in educational practice, theory, research, and policy. The course asks how myriad people, groups, and fields have defined the purpose of education, and considers the implications of conflicting definitions for generating new, more just, and more inclusive modes of "doing school". In collaboration with practicing educators, students learn practical and philosophical approaches to experiential, community-engaged learning across individual relationships and organizational contexts. Fieldwork in an area school or organization required

Writing Attentive

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Power, Inequity, and Justice (PIJ)

Counts Toward Africana Studies

Counts Toward Child and Family Studies

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EDUC B210 Perspectives on Special Education

Not offered 2024-25

The goal of this course is to introduce students to a range of topics, challenges and dilemmas that all teachers need to consider. Students will explore pedagogical strategies and tools that empower all learners on the neurological spectrum. Some of the topics covered in the course include how the brain learns, how past learning experiences impact teaching, how education and civil rights law impacts access to services, and how to create an inclusive classroom environment that welcomes and affirms all learners. The field of special education is vast and complex. Therefore, the course is designed as an introduction to the most pertinent issues, and as a launch pad for further exploration. Weekly fieldwork required.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Power, Inequity, and Justice (PIJ)

Counts Toward Child and Family Studies

Counts Toward Praxis Program

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EDUC B250 Literacies and Education

Not offered 2024-25

A critical exploration of what counts as literacy, who decides, and what the implications are for teaching and learning. Students explore both their own and others experiences of literacy through reading and writing about power, privilege, access and responsibility around issues of adult, ESL, cultural, multicultural, gendered, academic and critical literacies. Fieldwork required. Priority given first to those pursuing certification or a minor in educational studies.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Counts Toward Child and Family Studies

Counts Toward Praxis Program

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EDUC B266 Geographies of School and Learning: Urban Education Reconsidered

Spring 2025

This course examines issues, challenges, and possibilities of urban education in contemporary America. We use as critical lenses issues of race, class, and culture; urban learners, teachers, and school systems; and restructuring and reform. While we look at urban education nationally over several decades, we use Philadelphia as a focal "case" that students investigate through documents and school placements. Weekly fieldwork in a school required.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Power, Inequity, and Justice (PIJ)

Counts Toward Africana Studies

Counts Toward Child and Family Studies

Counts Toward Praxis Program

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EDUC B301 Curriculum and Pedagogy Seminar

Fall 2024

A consideration of theoretical and applied issues related to effective curriculum design, pedagogical approaches and related issues of teaching and learning. Fieldwork is required. Enrollment is limited to 15 with priority given first to students pursuing certification and second to seniors planning to teach.

Writing Intensive

Counts Toward Child and Family Studies

Counts Toward Praxis Program

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EDUC B302 Practice Teaching Seminar

Not offered 2024-25

Drawing on participants' diverse student teaching placements, this seminar invites exploration and analysis of ideas, perspectives and approaches to teaching at the middle and secondary levels. Taken concurrently with Practice Teaching. Open only to students engaged in practice teaching.

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ENGL B270 American Girl: Childhood in U.S. Literatures, 1690-1935

Not offered 2024-25

This course will focus on the "American Girl" as a particularly contested model for the nascent American. Through examination of religious tracts, slave and captivity narratives, literatures for children and adult literatures about childhood, we will analyze U. S. investments in girlhood as a site for national self-fashioning.

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ENGL B271 Transatlantic Childhoods in the 19th Century

Spring 2025

This class explores what we can see anew when we juxtapose American and British experiences of, and responses to, emergent ideas and ideals of childhood in the child-obsessed nineteenth century. After setting up key eighteenth-century concepts and contexts for what French historian Philippe Ariès called the "invention of childhood," we'll explore the ways in which children came to be defined between 1800 and 1900, in relation to such categories as law, labor, education, sex, play, and psychology, through examinations of both "literary" works and texts and artifacts from a range of other discourses and spheres. We'll move between American and British examples, aiming to track the commonalities at work in the two nations and the effects of marked structural differences. Here we'll be especially attentive to chattel slavery in the U.S., and to the relations, and non-relations, between the racialized notions of childhood produced in this country and those which arise out of Britain's sharply stratified class landscape. If race and class are produced differently, we'll also consider the degree to which British and American histories and representations of boyhood and girlhood converge and diverge across the period. We'll close with reflections on the ways in which a range of literary genres on the cusp of modernism form themselves in and through the new discourses of childhood and evolving figures of the child.

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Counts Toward Africana Studies

Counts Toward Child and Family Studies

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ENGL B348 Medieval Childhoods

Not offered 2024-25

This course examines childhood and adolescence in the Middle Ages, exploring both texts for children and those that portray childhood. We will consider adolescent sexuality, royal primogeniture, childhood education and apprenticeship, and theologies of infancy. Readings will include lullabies; early educational texts; nativity plays; chivalric training guides; poetry written by children; and instructional manuals for toys.

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PSYC B203 Educational Psychology

Not offered 2024-25

Topics in the psychology of human cognitive, social, and affective behavior are examined and related to educational practice. Issues covered include learning theories, memory, attention, thinking, motivation, social/emotional issues in adolescence, and assessment/learning disabilities. This course provides a Praxis Level II opportunity. Classroom observation is required. Prerequisite: PSYC B105 (Introductory Psychology)

Course does not meet an Approach

Counts Toward Child and Family Studies

Counts Toward Praxis Program

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PSYC B209 Clinical Psychology

Fall 2024

This course examines the experience, origins and consequences of psychological difficulties and problems. Among the questions we will explore are: What do we mean by abnormal behavior or psychopathology? What are the strengths and limitations of the ways in which psychopathology is assessed and classified? What are the major forms of psychopathology? How do psychologists study and treat psychopathology? How is psychopathology experienced by individuals? What causes psychological difficulties and what are their consequences? How do we integrate social, biological and psychological perspectives on the causes of psychopathology? Do psychological treatments (therapies) work? How do we study the effectiveness of psychology treatments? Prerequisite: Introductory Psychology (PSYC B105 or H100). Please note that this course was previously known as "Abnormal Psychology" and has now been renamed "Clinical Psychology" and can not be repeated for credit.

Course does not meet an Approach

Power, Inequity, and Justice (PIJ)

Counts Toward Child and Family Studies

Counts Toward Health Studies

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PSYC B211 Lifespan Development

Not offered 2024-25

A topical survey of psychological development across the lifespan, focusing on the interaction of personal and environmental factors in the ontogeny of perception, language, cognition, and social interactions within the family and with peers. Topics include developmental theories; infant perception; attachment; language development; theory of mind; memory development; peer relations and the family as contexts of development; identity and the adolescent transition; adult personality; cognition in late adulthood; and dying with dignity. Prerequisite: PSYC B105 or PSYC H100. Interested students can take this course or PSYC B206, but not both

Course does not meet an Approach

Counts Toward Child and Family Studies

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PSYC B322 Culture and Development

Fall 2024

This course focuses on children's development in cultural, social, and ecological contexts. Topics include socio-emotional development, parent-child relationship, socioeconomic status, immigration, social change, and globalization. Prerequisites: PSYC 105, and PSYC 206 or PSYC 224

Counts Toward Child and Family Studies

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PSYC B327 Adolescent Development

Not offered 2024-25

Is adolescence a biologically distinct stage of life, or a social "holding ground" invented by modern culture for young people unready or unwilling to assume the responsibilities of adulthood? Are adolescents destined to make risky decisions because of their underdeveloped brains? At what age should they be held accountable as adults in a court of law? This course will explore these and other questions about the biological, social, and legal forces that define the boundaries and shape the experience of adolescents growing up in the modern world. Students will learn about: (1) historical changes in understanding and treatment of adolescents; (2) puberty-related biological changes marking the beginning of adolescence; (3) brain, behavioral, cognitive, and social development during adolescence; and (4) contemporary debates regarding age of adult maturity, and their implications for law and policy. Prerequisite: PSYC B206 (Developmental Psychology) or PSYC B211 (Lifespan Development) or permission or instructor. PSYC B205 is recommended.

Counts Toward Child and Family Studies

Counts Toward Health Studies

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PSYC B344 Early Childhood Experiences & Mental Health

Not offered 2024-25

Development represents a unique period during which the brain shows enhanced plasticity, the important ability to adapt and change in response to experiences. During development, the brain may be especially vulnerable to the impacts of harmful experiences (e.g., neglect or exposure to toxins) and also especially responsive to the effects of positive factors (e.g., community resilience or clinical interventions). This seminar will explore how childhood experiences "get under the skin," shaping neurobiological systems and exerting lasting effects on mental health and well-being. We will examine theoretical models of how early experiences shape development, considering the proposed mechanisms by which different features of childhood environments could shape psychological risk and resilience. We will evaluate the scientific evidence for these models and then apply this knowledge to consider what strategies for intervention-- at the level of the child, family, and society-- could help reduce psychopathology and promote well-being. There is no textbook required for this course. We will read, critically evaluate, and discuss empirical journal articles and explore the implications of this scientific literature for public policy. Prerequisites: PSYC B209 or PSYC B206 or PSYC B218 or permission from instructor; PSYC B205 highly recommended

Counts Toward Child and Family Studies

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PSYC B352 Advanced Topics in Developmental Psychology

Section 001 (Fall 2023): Children and Identity: Understanding Self and Othe
Section 001 (Fall 2024): Children and Identity: Understanding Self and Othe

Fall 2024

This is a topics course. Topics vary. Prerequisite: PSYC 206 or PSYC B211 or the consent of the instructor.

Current topic description: How do children come to understand themselves and other people? This seminar explores young children's developing social cognition and the factors that influence this development. Topics include self-awareness, gender identity, and the emotional self, as well as children's perception and understanding of gender, race, morality, and other social constructs in others. We will examine these topics with the goals of understanding (a) the development of young children's identity and social thinking, (b) the role of socialization in this development, and (c) the implications of children's social cognition for their participation in the social world. This seminar, which will be driven by evidence-based, student-led discussion, is aimed at developing an integrated understanding of the literature and generating ideas for future inquiry.

Course does not meet an Approach

Counts Toward Child and Family Studies

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PSYC B354 Asian American Psychology

Not offered 2024-25

This course will provide an overview of the nature and meaning of being Asian American in the United States. We will examine the history, struggle, and success of Asian Americans, drawing upon psychological theory and research, interdisciplinary ethnic studies scholarship, and memoirs. Students will also learn to evaluate the media portrayal of Asian Americans while examining issues affecting Asian American communities such as stereotypes, discrimination, family relationships, dating/marriage, education, and health disparities. Prerequisite: Introduction to Psychology (Psych 105) is required, Research Methods and Statistics (Psych 205) is recommended..

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SOCL B205 Social Inequality

Spring 2025

In this course, we will explore the extent, causes, and consequences of social and economic inequality in the U.S. We will begin by discussing key theories and the intersecting dimensions of inequality along lines of income and wealth, race and ethnicity, and gender. We will then follow a life-course perspective to trace the institutions through which inequality is structured, experienced, and reproduced through the family, neighborhoods, the educational system, labor markets and workplaces, and the criminal justice system.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Counts Toward Child and Family Studies

Counts Toward Gender/Sex Studies (Min/Conc)

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SOCL B217 The Family in Social Context

Not offered 2024-25

The family represents a fundamental and ubiquitous institution in the social world, providing norms and conveying values. This course focuses on current sociological research, seeking to understand how modern American families have transformed due to complex structural and cultural forces. We will examine family change from historical, social, and demographic perspectives. After examining the images, ideals, and myths concerning families, we will address the central theme of diversity and change. In what ways can sociology explain and document these shifts? What influences do law, technology, and medicine have on the family? What are the results of evolving views of work, gender, and parenting on family structure and stability? Prerequisite of one Social Science Course

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SOCL B225 Women in Society

Fall 2024

In 2015, the world's female population was 49.6 percent of the total global population of 7.3 billion. According to the United Nations, in absolute terms, there were 61,591,853 more men than women. Yet, at the global scale, 124 countries have more women than men. A great majority of these countries are located in what scholars have recently been referring to as the Global South - those countries known previously as developing countries. Although women outnumber their male counterparts in many Global South countries, however, these women endure difficulties that have worsened rather than improving. What social structures determine this gender inequality in general and that of women of color in particular? What are the main challenges women in the Global South face? How do these challenges differ based on nationality, class, ethnicity, skin color, gender identity, and other axes of oppression? What strategies have these women developed to cope with the wide variety of challenges they contend with on a daily basis? These are some of the major questions that we will explore together in this class. In this course, the Global South does not refer exclusively to a geographical location, but rather to a set of institutional structures that generate disadvantages for all individuals and particularly for women and other minorities, regardless their geographical location in the world. In other words, a significant segment of the Global North's population lives under the same precarious conditions that are commonly believed as exclusive to the Global South. Simultaneously, there is a Global North embedded in the Global South as well. In this context, we will see that the geographical division between the North and the South becomes futile when we seek to understand the dynamics of the "Western-centric/Christian-centric capitalist/patriarchal modern/colonial world-system" (Grosfoguel, 2012). In the first part of the course, we will establish the theoretical foundations that will guide us throughout the rest of the semester. We will then turn to a wide variety of case studies where we will examine, for instance, the contemporary global division of labor, gendered violence in the form of feminicides, international migration, and global tourism. The course's final thematic section will be devoted to learning from the different feminisms (e.g. community feminism) emerging out of the Global South as well as the research done in that region and its contribution to the development of a broader gender studies scholarship. In particular, we will pay close attention to resistance, solidarity, and social movements led by women. Examples will be drawn from Latin America, the Caribbean, the US, Asia, and Africa.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Counts Toward Africana Studies

Counts Toward Child and Family Studies

Counts Toward Gender/Sex Studies (Min/Conc)

Counts Toward Latin American,Iberian,Latinx

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SOCL B232 A Sociological Journey to Immigrant Communities in Philly

Not offered 2024-25

This course will use the lenses of sociology to critically and comparatively examine various immigrant communities living in greater Philadelphia. It will expose students to the complex historical, economic, political, and social factors influencing (im)migration, as well as how migrants and the children of immigrants develop their sense of belonging and their homemaking practices in the new host society. In this course, we will probe questions of belonging, identity, homemaking, citizenship, transnationalism, and ethnic entrepreneurship and how individuals, families, and communities are transformed locally and across borders through the process of migration. This course also seeks to interrogate how once in a new country, immigrant communities not only develop a sense of belonging but also how they reconfigure their own identities while they transform the social, physical, and cultural milieus of their new communities of arrival. To achieve these ends, this course will engage in a multidisciplinary approach consisting of materials drawn from such disciplines as cultural studies, anthropology, history, migration studies, and sociology to examine distinct immigrant communities that have arrived in Philadelphia over the past 100 years. Although this course will also cover the histories of migrant communities arriving in the area in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, a greater part of the course will focus on recent migrant communities, mainly from Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Caribbean and arriving in the area of South Philadelphia. A special focus will be on the Mexican American migrant community that stands out among those newly arrived migrant communities.

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SOCL B258 Sociology of Education

Not offered 2024-25

Major sociological theories of the relationships between education and society, focusing on the effects of education on inequality in the United States and the historical development of primary, secondary, and post-secondary education in the United States. Other topics include education and social selection, testing and tracking, and micro- and macro-explanations of differences in educational outcomes. This is a Praxis II course; placements are in local schools.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Counts Toward Child and Family Studies

Counts Toward Praxis Program

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flowers

Contact Us

Child and Family Studies

Chloe Flower
Director of Child and Family Studies
cflower@brynmawr.edu