Courses

This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's calendars page.

Students must choose a major subject and may choose a minor subject. Students may also select from one of seven concentrations, which are offered to enhance a student's work in the major or minor and to focus work on a specific area of interest.

Concentrations are an intentional cluster of courses already offered by various academic departments or through general programs. These courses may also be cross-listed in several academic departments. Therefore, when registering for a course that counts toward a concentration, a student should register for the course listed in her major or minor department. If the concentration course is not listed in her major or minor department, the student may enroll in any listing of that course.

Fall 2022 FILM

Course Title Schedule/Units Meeting Type Times/Days Location / Instruction Mode Instr(s)
ARTW B266-001 Screenwriting 1Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM W Russian Center Seminar Room
In Person
Torday,D., Torday,D.
Film Screening: 4:00 PM- 7:00 PM SU Carpenter Library 25
In Person
ENGL B205-001 Introduction to Film 1Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTH English House Lecture Hall
In Person
Dabashi,P.
HIST B284-001 Movies and America: The Past Lives Forever 1Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Old Library 224
In Person
Ullman,S.
RUSS B258-001 Soviet and Eastern European Cinema of the 1960s 1Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Dalton Hall 25
In Person
Harte,T.

Spring 2023 FILM

Course Title Schedule/Units Meeting Type Times/Days Location / Instruction Mode Instr(s)
ARTD B220-001 Screendance: Movement and the Camera 1Semester / 1 LEC: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTH Goodhart Hall Music Room
In Person
Dept. staff, TBA
ENGL B213-001 Global Cinema 1Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:40 PM- 4:00 PM MW In Person Dabashi,P.
ENGL B357-001 A Star is Born: Race, Gender, and Celebrity 1Semester / 1 Lecture: 11:40 AM- 1:00 PM MW In Person Dabashi,P.
HART B235-001 Critical Approaches to Visual Representation: Identification in the Cinema 1Semester / 1 Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:00 AM MWF Carpenter Library 25
In Person
Feliz,M., Feliz,M., Teaching Assistant,T., Teaching Assistant,T.
LEC: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM SU In Person
HART B380-001 Topics in Film Studies: Contemp Art & Film/Phila 1Semester / 1 LEC: 12:10 PM- 3:00 PM TH In Person King,H.
HART B420-001 Praxis Fieldwork Seminar: Museum Studies Fieldwork 1Semester / 1 LEC: 2:10 PM- 4:00 PM M Old Library 104
In Person
Feliz,M., Scott,M.
RUSS B365-001 Russian and Soviet Film Culture 1Semester / 1 Lecture: 12:10 PM- 1:00 PM MWF Russian Center Conference Room
In Person
Rojavin,M.

Fall 2023 FILM

(Class schedules for this semester will be posted at a later date.)

2022-23 Catalog Data: FILM

ARTD B220 Screendance: Movement and the Camera

Spring 2023

This course is a practical introduction to Screendance for students interested in extending their experience or interest in dance and movement into a new realm. Also known as dancefilm, cinedance, videodance and/or dance for the camera, Screendance connects film (and filmmaking) with dance (and dancemaking) in an evolving hybrid performative practice. For both the maker and audience, the inquiry is the adventure of discovering what the coming together of dance and screen can be. Screendance can be described as diverse, global, emergent, alive, active, trans-media, continually evolving. Through class screenings, exercises, readings and discussion, students will learn approaches to combining dance and the moving image. Students will work alone and in small collaborative groups to create their own works integrating dance and video. Through creative projects, students will develop their own cinematic style and an increased proficiency with both filming and editing movement.

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Counts Toward Film Studies

Back to top

ARTW B266 Screenwriting

Fall 2022

An introduction to screenwriting. Issues basic to the art of storytelling in film will be addressed and analyzed: character, dramatic structure, theme, setting, image, sound. The course focuses on the film adaptation; readings include novels, screenplays, and short stories. Films adapted from the readings will be screened. In the course of the semester, students will be expected to outline and complete the first act of an adapted screenplay of their own.

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Counts Toward Film Studies

Back to top

ENGL B213 Global Cinema

Spring 2023

This course introduces students to one possible history of global cinema. We will discuss and analyze a variety of filmmakers and film movements from around the world. Students will be exposed to the discipline of film studies as it is specifically related to the cinema of East Asia, South Asia, Africa, Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East. We will study these works with special emphasis on film language, aesthetics, and politics, as well as film style and genre. Along the way, we will explore a number of key terms and concepts, including colonialism, postcolonialism, form, realism, surrealism, futurism, orientalism, modernity, postmodernity, hegemony, the subaltern, and globalization. Filmmakers will include, among others, Wong Kar-wai, Satyajit Ray, Shirin Neshat, Fernando Mereilles, Agnès Varda, and Werner Herzog.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Counts Toward Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

HART B235 Critical Approaches to Visual Representation: Identification in the Cinema

Spring 2023

This course is writing intensive. An introduction to the analysis of film and other lensed, time-based media through particular attention to the role of the spectator. Why do moving images compel our fascination? How exactly do spectators relate to the people, objects, and places that appear on the screen? Wherein lies the power of images to move, attract, repel, persuade, or transform their viewers? Students will be introduced to film theory through the rich and complex topic of identification. We will explore how points of view are framed by the camera in still photography, film, television, video games, and other media. Prerequisite: one course in History of Art at the 100-level or permission of the instructor. Enrollment preference given to majors and minors in History of Art and Film Studies. Fulfills Film Studies Introductory or Theory course requirement. This course was formerly numbered HART B110; students who previously completed HART B110 may not repeat this course.

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Counts Toward Counts toward Film Studies

Counts Toward Counts toward Visual Studies

Back to top

RUSS B238 Topics: The History of Cinema 1895 to 1945

Not offered 2022-23

This is a topics course. Course content varies.

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Counts Toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Counts Toward Counts toward Film Studies

Counts Toward Counts toward Visual Studies

Back to top

EALC B240 Topics in Chinese Film

Section 001 (Spring 2022): Films of Wong Kar-Wai

Not offered 2022-23

This is a topics course. Course content varies.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Counts Toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Counts Toward Counts toward Film Studies

Counts Toward Counts toward Visual Studies

Back to top

COML B242 German Encounters w East Asia: A Transnational Cinema Course

Not offered 2022-23

Due to increased mobility in the age of globalization, the encounter between East and West has shifted from the imaginary to the real. Actual encounters provide the potential for debunking cultural myths and prejudices that an orientalist lens tended to produce. East and West both carry their own traditions, value systems, and distinct cultural identities. This sparks conflicts, but also generates mutual interest. In present-day Germany, the Asian-German connection constitutes a neglected aspect of multicultural discourses and thus deserves more scrutiny. This transnational film course focuses specifically on encounters between German-speaking countries and East Asia. Using film as the main medium, this course touches on prominent issues such as orientalism, race, gender, class, nation, and identity, which have been much studied by literary and cultural critics in recent years.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Counts Toward East Asian Languages and Cultures

Counts Toward Film Studies

Back to top

SPAN B252 Compassion, Indignation, and Anxiety in Latin American Film

Not offered 2022-23

Stereotypically, Latin Americans are viewed as "emotional people"--often a euphemism to mean irrational, impulsive, wildly heroic, fickle. This course takes this expression at face value to ask: Are there particular emotions that identify Latin Americans? And, conversely, do these "people" become such because they share certain emotions? Can we find a correlation between emotions and political trajectories? To answer these questions, we will explore three types of films that seem to have, at different times, taken hold of the Latin American imagination and feelings: melodramas (1950s-1960s), documentaries (1970s-1990s), and "low-key" comedies (since 2000s.)

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Counts Toward Counts toward Film Studies

Counts Toward Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

Back to top

ITAL B325 Literature and Film, Literature into Films and Back

Not offered 2022-23

This course is a critical analysis of Modern Italian society through cinematic production and literature, from the Risorgimento to the present. According to Alfred Hitchock's little stories, two goats were eating the reel of a movie taken from a famous novel. "I liked the book better," says one to the other. While at times we too chew on movies taken from books, our main objective will not be to compare books and films, but rather to explore the more complex relation between literature and cinema: how text is put into film, how cultural references operate with respect to issues of style, technique, and perspective. We will discuss how cinema conditions literary imagination, and how literature leaves its imprint on cinema. We will "read" films as "literary images" and "see" novels as "visual stories". Students will become acquainted with literary sources through careful readings; on viewing the corresponding film, students will consider how narrative and descriptive textual elements are transposed into cinematic audio/visual elements. An important concern of this course will be to analyze the particularity of each film/book in relation to a set of themes -gender, death, class, discrimination, history, migration- through close textual analysis. We shall use contemporary Film theory and critical methodology to access these themes.

Counts Toward Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

EALC B240 Topics in Chinese Film

Section 001 (Spring 2022): Films of Wong Kar-Wai

Not offered 2022-23

This is a topics course. Course content varies.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Counts Toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Counts Toward Film Studies

Counts Toward Visual Studies

Back to top

EALC B240 Topics in Chinese Film

Section 001 (Spring 2022): Films of Wong Kar-Wai

Not offered 2022-23

This is a topics course. Course content varies.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Counts Toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Counts Toward Counts toward Film Studies

Counts Toward Counts toward Visual Studies

Back to top

HART B170 History of Narrative Cinema, 1945 to the present

Not offered 2022-23

This course surveys the history of narrative film from 1945 through contemporary cinema. We will analyze a chronological series of styles and national cinemas, including Classical Hollywood, Italian Neorealism, the French New Wave, and other post-war movements and genres. Viewings of canonical films will be supplemented by more recent examples of global cinema. While historical in approach, this course emphasizes the theory and criticism of the sound film, and we will consider various methodological approaches to the aesthetic, socio-political, and psychological dimensions of cinema. Readings will provide historical context, and will introduce students to key concepts in film studies such as realism, formalism, spectatorship, the auteur theory, and genre studies. Fulfills the history requirement or the introductory course requirement for the Film Studies minor. This course was formerly numbered HART B299; students who previously completed HART B299 may not repeat this course.

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Counts Toward Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

ENGL B205 Introduction to Film

Fall 2022

This course is intended to provide students with the tools of critical film analysis. Through readings of images and sounds, sections of films and entire narratives, students will cultivate the habits of critical viewing and establish a foundation for focused work in film studies. The course introduces formal and technical units of cinematic meaning and categories of genre and history that add up to the experiences and meanings we call cinema. Although much of the course material will focus on the Hollywood style of film, examples will be drawn from the history of cinema. Attendance at weekly screenings is mandatory.

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Counts Toward Film Studies

Counts Toward Visual Studies

Back to top

ENGL B213 Global Cinema

Spring 2023

This course introduces students to one possible history of global cinema. We will discuss and analyze a variety of filmmakers and film movements from around the world. Students will be exposed to the discipline of film studies as it is specifically related to the cinema of East Asia, South Asia, Africa, Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East. We will study these works with special emphasis on film language, aesthetics, and politics, as well as film style and genre. Along the way, we will explore a number of key terms and concepts, including colonialism, postcolonialism, form, realism, surrealism, futurism, orientalism, modernity, postmodernity, hegemony, the subaltern, and globalization. Filmmakers will include, among others, Wong Kar-wai, Satyajit Ray, Shirin Neshat, Fernando Mereilles, Agnès Varda, and Werner Herzog.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Counts Toward Film Studies

Back to top

ENGL B231 Theorizing Affect, Watching Television

Not offered 2022-23

This course examines television through the lens of affect theory. Within humanities scholarship, the turn toward affect has offered new ways to study the cultural, economic, and political functions of literature and art. In our wider cultural moment, television programming has become a source of shared fascination. The course will pair readings from affect studies (by scholars such as Lauren Berlant and Sianne Ngai) with select examples of television shows (including Black Mirror, Mad Men, and The Wire). We will also read scholarly and public writing about television and consider the interplay between cultural feelings and televisual forms such as seriality, situation comedy, and bottle episodes.

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Counts Toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Counts Toward Film Studies

Back to top

RUSS B238 Topics: The History of Cinema 1895 to 1945

Not offered 2022-23

This is a topics course. Course content varies.

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Counts Toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Counts Toward Counts toward Film Studies

Counts Toward Counts toward Visual Studies

Back to top

EALC B240 Topics in Chinese Film

Section 001 (Spring 2022): Films of Wong Kar-Wai

Not offered 2022-23

This is a topics course. Course content varies.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Counts Toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Counts Toward Counts toward Film Studies

Counts Toward Counts toward Visual Studies

Back to top

ARTW B266 Screenwriting

Fall 2022

An introduction to screenwriting. Issues basic to the art of storytelling in film will be addressed and analyzed: character, dramatic structure, theme, setting, image, sound. The course focuses on the film adaptation; readings include novels, screenplays, and short stories. Films adapted from the readings will be screened. In the course of the semester, students will be expected to outline and complete the first act of an adapted screenplay of their own.

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Counts Toward Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

ENGL B336 Topics in Film

Section 001 (Fall 2021): Cinematic Voice

Not offered 2022-23

This is a topics course and description varies according to the topic.

Counts Toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Counts Toward Film Studies

Back to top

ENGL B357 A Star is Born: Race, Gender, and Celebrity

Spring 2023

This course will explore the concept of celebrity in cinema and cinematic culture from the standpoint of race and gender. Focusing on, but not limiting ourselves to, the classical Hollywood cinema (about the 1910s to the 1960s), we will approach the topic of stardom from theoretical and institutional perspectives. We will quickly discover that the study of celebrity opens out onto broad questions about the distinction between art and reality. What is the distinction, for instance, between a person and a character? What is it about celebrities that makes this question especially salient? What are we doing, precisely, when we identify with a character on screen, and, moreover, when that character is played by someone extremely famous? What are the racial, sexual, and gendered performances that go into the construction of celebrity? What political operations are at work in the formal construction of identification? Under what circumstances is identification something to be complicated, challenged, or avoided altogether? Celebrity also seems to hold within it the promise of its own demise. The extremely famous, for instance, are susceptible to infamy--or worse, irrelevance. How do race, gender, and sexuality intersect with fame's fundamental fragility, the way that celebrity seems to court obsolescence? We will examine these and other questions by way of classical and contemporary stars such as Josephine Baker, Bette Davis, Marlene Dietrich, Greta Garbo, Judy Garland, Anna May Wong, Beyoncé, and Lady Gaga.

Counts Toward Film Studies

Back to top

HART B380 Topics in Film Studies

Section 001 (Spring 2023): Contemp Art & Film/Phila
Section 001 (Spring 2022): Transitional Objects: Between Old and New Media

Spring 2023

This is a topics course. Course content varies. Prerequisite: one course in History of Art at the 100- or 200-level or permission of the instructor. Enrollment preference given to majors and minors in History of Art and Film Studies.This course was formerly numbered HART B334; students who previously completed HART B334 may not repeat this course.

Current topic description: This course will explore the vibrant contemporary art world of the city of Philadelphia--a city uniquely positioned to attract artists with its many top-tier fine art schools, world-class museums, affordable living and studio spaces, and thriving network of artist-run galleries and exhibition spaces. Some of our sessions will take the form of seminar discussions with readings in the theory and history of contemporary art and film at the Tri-Co Philly campus, while some will involve visits to local museums, galleries, cinemas, and art institutes, and meetings with arts professionals. We will discuss whether the distinction between film and other forms of lensed, moving imagery on the one hand and contemporary art on the other continues to matter, whether from a conceptual, institutional, or economic perspective. Site visits are subject to change but may include the Philadelphia Academy of Fine Arts, the Institute of Contemporary Art, the Fabric Workshop and Museum, Vox Populi, and BlackStar Film Festival. Prerequisite: prior coursework in the History of Art, Film Studies, and/or Visual or Film Studies. Requirements: strong, active participation in discussions and meetings with guests, final research paper of 8-10 pages. This course will be taught in Philadelphia as part of the Tri-Co Philly Program.

Course does not meet an Approach

Counts Toward Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

EALC B240 Topics in Chinese Film

Section 001 (Spring 2022): Films of Wong Kar-Wai

Not offered 2022-23

This is a topics course. Course content varies.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Counts Toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Counts Toward Counts toward Film Studies

Counts Toward Counts toward Visual Studies

Back to top

GNST B255 Video Production

Not offered 2022-23

This course will explore aesthetic strategies utilized by low-budget film and video makers as each student works throughout the semester to complete a 7-15 minute film or video project. Course requirements include weekly screenings, reading assignments, and class screenings of rushes and roughcuts of student projects. Prerequisites: Some prior film course experience necessary, instructor discretion.

Course does not meet an Approach

Counts Toward Counts toward Film Studies

Counts Toward Counts toward Visual Studies

Back to top

RUSS B258 Soviet and Eastern European Cinema of the 1960s

Fall 2022

This course examines 1960s Soviet and Eastern European "New Wave" cinema, which won worldwide acclaim through its treatment of war, gender, and aesthetics. Films from Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Poland, Russia, and Yugoslavia will be viewed and analyzed, accompanied by readings on film history and theory. All films shown with subtitles; no knowledge of Russian or previous study of film required.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Counts Toward Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

HIST B284 Movies and America: The Past Lives Forever

Fall 2022

Movies are one of the most important means by which Americans come to know - or think they know--their own history. We look to old movies to tell us about a world we never knew but think we can access through film. And Hollywood often reaches into the past to tell a good story. How can we understand the impact of our love affair with movies on our understanding of what happened in this country? In this course we will examine the complex cultural relationship between film and American historical self-fashioning.

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Counts Toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Counts Toward Counts toward Film Studies

Counts Toward Counts toward Visual Studies

Back to top

ITAL B325 Literature and Film, Literature into Films and Back

Not offered 2022-23

This course is a critical analysis of Modern Italian society through cinematic production and literature, from the Risorgimento to the present. According to Alfred Hitchock's little stories, two goats were eating the reel of a movie taken from a famous novel. "I liked the book better," says one to the other. While at times we too chew on movies taken from books, our main objective will not be to compare books and films, but rather to explore the more complex relation between literature and cinema: how text is put into film, how cultural references operate with respect to issues of style, technique, and perspective. We will discuss how cinema conditions literary imagination, and how literature leaves its imprint on cinema. We will "read" films as "literary images" and "see" novels as "visual stories". Students will become acquainted with literary sources through careful readings; on viewing the corresponding film, students will consider how narrative and descriptive textual elements are transposed into cinematic audio/visual elements. An important concern of this course will be to analyze the particularity of each film/book in relation to a set of themes -gender, death, class, discrimination, history, migration- through close textual analysis. We shall use contemporary Film theory and critical methodology to access these themes.

Counts Toward Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

ENGL B336 Topics in Film

Section 001 (Fall 2021): Cinematic Voice

Not offered 2022-23

This is a topics course and description varies according to the topic.

Counts Toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Counts Toward Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

FREN B208 La diversité dans le cinéma français contemporain

Not offered 2022-23

Until the closing years of the 20th century, ethnic diversity was virtually absent from French cinema. While Francophone directors from Northern and Sub-Saharan Africa debunked colonialism and neocolonialism in their films, minorities hardly appeared on French screens. Movies were made by white filmmakers for a white audience. Since the 1980's and the 1990's, minorities have become more visible in French films. Are French Blacks and Arabs portrayed in French cinema beyond stereotypes, or are they still objects of a euro-centric gaze? Have minorities gained agency in storytelling, not just as actors, but as directors? What is the national narrative at play in the recent French films that focus on diversity? Is it still "us against them", or has the new generation of French filmmakers found a way to include the different components of French identity into a collective subject? From Bouchareb to Gomis, from Kechiche to Benyamina and Jean-Baptiste, this course will map out the visual fault lines of the French self and examine the prospects for a post-republican sense of community. This course will be taught in French. Open to non-majors. There will be a weekly screening on Sunday, 7:00pm-9:00pm.

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Counts Toward Africana Studies

Counts Toward Film Studies

Back to top

FREN B223 The Fire Every Time: Cinematic Rebels Across the Atlantic

Not offered 2022-23

Cinema, as an art form, can be seen as a rebellion against reality. Then again, cinema as mass entertainment with uber-industrial might can yield the most contagious legitimization of power and social norms. Can filmmakers be genuine agents of change and social justice? Do their creations have the power to disrupt the status quo? If so, how are some films designed to subvert systemic normalization and disseminated forms of domination? In this course, we will map out rebellious modern (post WW2) cinema from both sides of the Atlantic. Setting aside chronology and conventional delimitations, we will go back and forth across genres (war film, thriller, ghost story, social realism, drama…) between contemporary and older avatars of cinematic resistance, between documentary and fiction, and between France, the U.S., West Africa and Latin America. We will investigate a series of films that focus on non-compliance and individual resilience in the face of systemic adversity, while sharing a common oppositional ethos applied to different forms of domination/violence: anticolonialism, anti-capitalism, antiracism, as well as ecology, pacifism and a critique of carceral institutions. For each of them, we will study how the style of cinematography is designed not just to support a narrative, but as a counter-language aimed at subverting the conservative grammar codes of the mainstream. This course will be taught in English. Prerequisites: FREN 102 or 105 only for students taking this for French credit with additional hour.

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Counts Toward Film Studies

Back to top

COML B242 German Encounters w East Asia: A Transnational Cinema Course

Not offered 2022-23

Due to increased mobility in the age of globalization, the encounter between East and West has shifted from the imaginary to the real. Actual encounters provide the potential for debunking cultural myths and prejudices that an orientalist lens tended to produce. East and West both carry their own traditions, value systems, and distinct cultural identities. This sparks conflicts, but also generates mutual interest. In present-day Germany, the Asian-German connection constitutes a neglected aspect of multicultural discourses and thus deserves more scrutiny. This transnational film course focuses specifically on encounters between German-speaking countries and East Asia. Using film as the main medium, this course touches on prominent issues such as orientalism, race, gender, class, nation, and identity, which have been much studied by literary and cultural critics in recent years.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Counts Toward Counts toward East Asian Languages and Cultures

Counts Toward Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

GNST B255 Video Production

Not offered 2022-23

This course will explore aesthetic strategies utilized by low-budget film and video makers as each student works throughout the semester to complete a 7-15 minute film or video project. Course requirements include weekly screenings, reading assignments, and class screenings of rushes and roughcuts of student projects. Prerequisites: Some prior film course experience necessary, instructor discretion.

Course does not meet an Approach

Counts Toward Film Studies

Counts Toward Visual Studies

Back to top

GNST B302 Topics in Video Production

Not offered 2022-23

This is a topics course. Course content varies.

Counts Toward Film Studies

Back to top

HART B170 History of Narrative Cinema, 1945 to the present

Not offered 2022-23

This course surveys the history of narrative film from 1945 through contemporary cinema. We will analyze a chronological series of styles and national cinemas, including Classical Hollywood, Italian Neorealism, the French New Wave, and other post-war movements and genres. Viewings of canonical films will be supplemented by more recent examples of global cinema. While historical in approach, this course emphasizes the theory and criticism of the sound film, and we will consider various methodological approaches to the aesthetic, socio-political, and psychological dimensions of cinema. Readings will provide historical context, and will introduce students to key concepts in film studies such as realism, formalism, spectatorship, the auteur theory, and genre studies. Fulfills the history requirement or the introductory course requirement for the Film Studies minor. This course was formerly numbered HART B299; students who previously completed HART B299 may not repeat this course.

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Counts Toward Film Studies

Back to top

ENGL B205 Introduction to Film

Fall 2022

This course is intended to provide students with the tools of critical film analysis. Through readings of images and sounds, sections of films and entire narratives, students will cultivate the habits of critical viewing and establish a foundation for focused work in film studies. The course introduces formal and technical units of cinematic meaning and categories of genre and history that add up to the experiences and meanings we call cinema. Although much of the course material will focus on the Hollywood style of film, examples will be drawn from the history of cinema. Attendance at weekly screenings is mandatory.

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Counts Toward Counts toward Film Studies

Counts Toward Counts toward Visual Studies

Back to top

HART B235 Critical Approaches to Visual Representation: Identification in the Cinema

Spring 2023

This course is writing intensive. An introduction to the analysis of film and other lensed, time-based media through particular attention to the role of the spectator. Why do moving images compel our fascination? How exactly do spectators relate to the people, objects, and places that appear on the screen? Wherein lies the power of images to move, attract, repel, persuade, or transform their viewers? Students will be introduced to film theory through the rich and complex topic of identification. We will explore how points of view are framed by the camera in still photography, film, television, video games, and other media. Prerequisite: one course in History of Art at the 100-level or permission of the instructor. Enrollment preference given to majors and minors in History of Art and Film Studies. Fulfills Film Studies Introductory or Theory course requirement. This course was formerly numbered HART B110; students who previously completed HART B110 may not repeat this course.

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Counts Toward Film Studies

Counts Toward Visual Studies

Back to top

RUSS B238 Topics: The History of Cinema 1895 to 1945

Not offered 2022-23

This is a topics course. Course content varies.

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Counts Toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Counts Toward Counts toward Film Studies

Counts Toward Counts toward Visual Studies

Back to top

ENGL B336 Topics in Film

Section 001 (Fall 2021): Cinematic Voice

Not offered 2022-23

This is a topics course and description varies according to the topic.

Counts Toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Counts Toward Counts toward Film Studies

Back to top

HART B380 Topics in Film Studies

Section 001 (Spring 2023): Contemp Art & Film/Phila
Section 001 (Spring 2022): Transitional Objects: Between Old and New Media

Spring 2023

This is a topics course. Course content varies. Prerequisite: one course in History of Art at the 100- or 200-level or permission of the instructor. Enrollment preference given to majors and minors in History of Art and Film Studies.This course was formerly numbered HART B334; students who previously completed HART B334 may not repeat this course.

Current topic description: This course will explore the vibrant contemporary art world of the city of Philadelphia--a city uniquely positioned to attract artists with its many top-tier fine art schools, world-class museums, affordable living and studio spaces, and thriving network of artist-run galleries and exhibition spaces. Some of our sessions will take the form of seminar discussions with readings in the theory and history of contemporary art and film at the Tri-Co Philly campus, while some will involve visits to local museums, galleries, cinemas, and art institutes, and meetings with arts professionals. We will discuss whether the distinction between film and other forms of lensed, moving imagery on the one hand and contemporary art on the other continues to matter, whether from a conceptual, institutional, or economic perspective. Site visits are subject to change but may include the Philadelphia Academy of Fine Arts, the Institute of Contemporary Art, the Fabric Workshop and Museum, Vox Populi, and BlackStar Film Festival. Prerequisite: prior coursework in the History of Art, Film Studies, and/or Visual or Film Studies. Requirements: strong, active participation in discussions and meetings with guests, final research paper of 8-10 pages. This course will be taught in Philadelphia as part of the Tri-Co Philly Program.

Course does not meet an Approach

Counts Toward Film Studies

Back to top

HART B420 Praxis Fieldwork Seminar

Section 001 (Spring 2023): Museum Studies Fieldwork

In this Praxis course, students will learn to critically evaluate augmented and virtual reality (AR/VR) applications by developing their own AR/VR museum installation. The classroom component will include readings, guest lectures, and discussion topics in public history, conceptual art, and museum studies, and critical exploration of AR/VR and location-based technologies currently used in these fields. The majority of this course consists of a fieldwork component, in which students will develop an augmented- or virtual-reality installation of their own. Students will learn project management, design thinking, Unity development, and other digital competencies needed to successfully develop their museum installation. Prior experience with programming and/or Unity is advantageous but not required. If you are unsure about whether this course would work for you, please contact us or attend an info session. Pre-registered students should attend an info session on November 27 at 4PM in Canaday 315 to complete their Praxis learning plan.

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HIST B284 Movies and America: The Past Lives Forever

Fall 2022

Movies are one of the most important means by which Americans come to know - or think they know--their own history. We look to old movies to tell us about a world we never knew but think we can access through film. And Hollywood often reaches into the past to tell a good story. How can we understand the impact of our love affair with movies on our understanding of what happened in this country? In this course we will examine the complex cultural relationship between film and American historical self-fashioning.

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Counts Toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Counts Toward Film Studies

Counts Toward Visual Studies

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PSYC B375 Movies and Madness: Abnormal Psychology Through Films

Not offered 2022-23

This writing-intensive seminar (maximum enrollment = 16 students) deals with critical analysis of how various forms of psychopathology are depicted in films. The primary focus of the seminar will be evaluating the degree of correspondence between the cinematic presentation and current research knowledge about the disorder, taking into account the historical period in which the film was made. For example, we will discuss how accurately the symptoms of the disorder are presented and how representative the protagonist is of people who typically manifest this disorder based on current research. We will also address the theory of etiology of the disorder depicted in the film, including discussion of the relevant intellectual history in the period when the film was made and the prevailing accounts of psychopathology in that period. Another focus will be how the film portrays the course of the disorder and how it depicts treatment for the disorder. This cinematic presentation will be evaluated with respect to current research on treatment for the disorder as well as the historical context of prevailing treatment for the disorder at the time the film was made. Prerequisite: PSYC B209.

Counts Toward Counts toward Child and Family Studies

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RUSS B258 Soviet and Eastern European Cinema of the 1960s

Fall 2022

This course examines 1960s Soviet and Eastern European "New Wave" cinema, which won worldwide acclaim through its treatment of war, gender, and aesthetics. Films from Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Poland, Russia, and Yugoslavia will be viewed and analyzed, accompanied by readings on film history and theory. All films shown with subtitles; no knowledge of Russian or previous study of film required.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Critical Interpretation (CI)

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ITAL B325 Literature and Film, Literature into Films and Back

Not offered 2022-23

This course is a critical analysis of Modern Italian society through cinematic production and literature, from the Risorgimento to the present. According to Alfred Hitchock's little stories, two goats were eating the reel of a movie taken from a famous novel. "I liked the book better," says one to the other. While at times we too chew on movies taken from books, our main objective will not be to compare books and films, but rather to explore the more complex relation between literature and cinema: how text is put into film, how cultural references operate with respect to issues of style, technique, and perspective. We will discuss how cinema conditions literary imagination, and how literature leaves its imprint on cinema. We will "read" films as "literary images" and "see" novels as "visual stories". Students will become acquainted with literary sources through careful readings; on viewing the corresponding film, students will consider how narrative and descriptive textual elements are transposed into cinematic audio/visual elements. An important concern of this course will be to analyze the particularity of each film/book in relation to a set of themes -gender, death, class, discrimination, history, migration- through close textual analysis. We shall use contemporary Film theory and critical methodology to access these themes.

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FREN B223 The Fire Every Time: Cinematic Rebels Across the Atlantic

Not offered 2022-23

Cinema, as an art form, can be seen as a rebellion against reality. Then again, cinema as mass entertainment with uber-industrial might can yield the most contagious legitimization of power and social norms. Can filmmakers be genuine agents of change and social justice? Do their creations have the power to disrupt the status quo? If so, how are some films designed to subvert systemic normalization and disseminated forms of domination? In this course, we will map out rebellious modern (post WW2) cinema from both sides of the Atlantic. Setting aside chronology and conventional delimitations, we will go back and forth across genres (war film, thriller, ghost story, social realism, drama…) between contemporary and older avatars of cinematic resistance, between documentary and fiction, and between France, the U.S., West Africa and Latin America. We will investigate a series of films that focus on non-compliance and individual resilience in the face of systemic adversity, while sharing a common oppositional ethos applied to different forms of domination/violence: anticolonialism, anti-capitalism, antiracism, as well as ecology, pacifism and a critique of carceral institutions. For each of them, we will study how the style of cinematography is designed not just to support a narrative, but as a counter-language aimed at subverting the conservative grammar codes of the mainstream. This course will be taught in English. Prerequisites: FREN 102 or 105 only for students taking this for French credit with additional hour.

Critical Interpretation (CI)

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PSYC B375 Movies and Madness: Abnormal Psychology Through Films

Not offered 2022-23

This writing-intensive seminar (maximum enrollment = 16 students) deals with critical analysis of how various forms of psychopathology are depicted in films. The primary focus of the seminar will be evaluating the degree of correspondence between the cinematic presentation and current research knowledge about the disorder, taking into account the historical period in which the film was made. For example, we will discuss how accurately the symptoms of the disorder are presented and how representative the protagonist is of people who typically manifest this disorder based on current research. We will also address the theory of etiology of the disorder depicted in the film, including discussion of the relevant intellectual history in the period when the film was made and the prevailing accounts of psychopathology in that period. Another focus will be how the film portrays the course of the disorder and how it depicts treatment for the disorder. This cinematic presentation will be evaluated with respect to current research on treatment for the disorder as well as the historical context of prevailing treatment for the disorder at the time the film was made. Prerequisite: PSYC B209.

Counts Toward Child and Family Studies

Counts Toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

Counts Toward Film Studies

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RUSS B238 Topics: The History of Cinema 1895 to 1945

Not offered 2022-23

This is a topics course. Course content varies.

Inquiry into the Past (IP)

Counts Toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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Counts Toward Visual Studies

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RUSS B258 Soviet and Eastern European Cinema of the 1960s

Fall 2022

This course examines 1960s Soviet and Eastern European "New Wave" cinema, which won worldwide acclaim through its treatment of war, gender, and aesthetics. Films from Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Poland, Russia, and Yugoslavia will be viewed and analyzed, accompanied by readings on film history and theory. All films shown with subtitles; no knowledge of Russian or previous study of film required.

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Critical Interpretation (CI)

Counts Toward Film Studies

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RUSS B365 Russian and Soviet Film Culture

Spring 2023

This seminar explores the cultural and theoretical trends that have shaped Russian and Soviet cinema from the silent era to the present day. The focus will be on Russia's films and film theory, with discussion of the aesthetic, ideological, and historical issues underscoring Russia's cinematic culture. Taught in Russian. No previous study of cinema required, although RUSS 201 or the equivalent is required.

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SPAN B252 Compassion, Indignation, and Anxiety in Latin American Film

Not offered 2022-23

Stereotypically, Latin Americans are viewed as "emotional people"--often a euphemism to mean irrational, impulsive, wildly heroic, fickle. This course takes this expression at face value to ask: Are there particular emotions that identify Latin Americans? And, conversely, do these "people" become such because they share certain emotions? Can we find a correlation between emotions and political trajectories? To answer these questions, we will explore three types of films that seem to have, at different times, taken hold of the Latin American imagination and feelings: melodramas (1950s-1960s), documentaries (1970s-1990s), and "low-key" comedies (since 2000s.)

Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

Counts Toward Film Studies

Counts Toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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Contact Us

Film Studies Program

Old Library
Bryn Mawr College
101 N. Merion Avenue
Bryn Mawr, PA 19010-2899
Phone: 610-526-5334

Julien Suaudeau
Lecturer in French and Francophone Studies
Director, Film Studies Program
Phone: 610-526-6561
jsuaudeau@brynmawr.edu

Margaret Kelly, Administrative Assistant
Phone: 610-526-5334
mkelly01@brynmawr.edu