Courses

This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's calendars page.

Spring 2024 NEUR

Course Title Schedule/Units Meeting Type Times/Days Location Instr(s)
NEUR B398-001 Senior Thesis in Neuroscience Semester / 1 LEC: 1:10 PM-2:30 PM F Bettws Y Coed 100
Dept. staff, TBA
NEUR B398-002 Senior Thesis in Neuroscience Semester / 1 LEC: 2:25 PM-3:45 PM TH Bettws Y Coed 100
Dept. staff, TBA
BIOL B111-001 Biological Exploration II Semester / 1 Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:00 AM MWF Park 180
Baumgarten,J., Davis,G.
BIOL B111-002 Biological Exploration II Semester / 1 Lecture: 11:10 AM-12:00 PM MWF Park 180
Baumgarten,J., Davis,G.
BIOL B111-00A Biological Exploration II Semester / 1 Laboratory: 1:10 PM-4:00 PM M Park 20
Betters,M.
BIOL B111-00B Biological Exploration II Semester / 1 Laboratory: 1:40 PM-4:30 PM T Park 20
Betters,M.
BIOL B111-00C Biological Exploration II Semester / 1 Laboratory: 1:10 PM-4:00 PM W Park 20
Betters,M.
BIOL B111-00D Biological Exploration II Semester / 1 Laboratory: 1:10 PM-4:00 PM F Park 20
Betters,M.
BIOL B111-00Z Biological Exploration II 1 Betters,M.
BIOL B202-001 Neurobiology Semester / 1 LEC: 8:40 AM-10:00 AM MW Park 229
Wengert,E.
BIOL B344-001 Sensory Physiology Semester / 1 Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTH Park 227
Weber,A.
ECON B253-001 Introduction to Econometrics Semester / 1 Lecture: 12:55 PM-2:15 PM TTH Dalton Hall 2
Anti,S.
MATH B104-001 Basic Probability and Statistics Semester / 1 Lecture: 2:40 PM-4:00 PM MW Park 25
Kasius,P.
MATH B104-002 Basic Probability and Statistics Semester / 1 LEC: 2:40 PM-4:00 PM MW Carpenter Library 21
Cheng,L.
PSYC B105-001 Introductory Psychology Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM-2:30 PM TTH Old Library 224
Peterson,L.
PSYC B105-002 Introductory Psychology Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM-2:30 PM MW Taylor Hall F
Le,T.
PSYC B205-001 Research Methods and Statistics Semester / 1 Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTH Dalton Hall 300
Thapar,A.
PSYC B205-00A Research Methods and Statistics Semester / 1 Laboratory: 10:10 AM-11:30 AM F Canaday Computer Lab
Thapar,A.
PSYC B205-00B Research Methods and Statistics Semester / 1 Laboratory: 1:10 PM-2:30 PM F Canaday Computer Lab
Thapar,A.
PSYC B205-00Z Research Methods and Statistics 1
PSYC B218-001 Behavioral Neuroscience Semester / 1 Lecture: 12:55 PM-2:15 PM TTH Taylor Hall F
Grafe,L.
PSYC B287-001 Laboratory in Cognitive Neuroscience Semester / 0.5 LEC: 2:25 PM-3:45 PM T Bettws Y Coed 131
Thapar,A.
PSYC B323-001 Advanced Topics in Cognitive Neuroscience Semester / 1 Lecture: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM M Bettws Y Coed 127
Litovsky,C.
PSYC B327-001 Adolescent Development Semester / 1 Lecture: 9:10 AM-12:00 PM F Bettws Y Coed 127
Albert,D.
PSYC B344-001 Early Childhood Experiences & Mental Health Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM-4:00 PM T Bettws Y Coed 127
Mukerji,C.
PSYC B344-002 Early Childhood Experiences & Mental Health Semester / 1 Lecture: 1:10 PM-4:00 PM M Old Library 102
Mukerji,C.

Fall 2024 NEUR

(Class schedules for this semester will be posted at a later date.)

Spring 2025 NEUR

(Class schedules for this semester will be posted at a later date.)

2023-24 Catalog Data: NEUR

NEUR B398 Senior Thesis in Neuroscience

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NEUR B399 Neuroscience Senior Capstone

This course will survey empirical studies from several subdisciplines within the field of neuroscience (eg behavioral, cognitive, computational, molecular, etc) that advance our understanding of the brain. Through exposure to a diversity of approaches, it is hoped that students will be reminded that the boundaries that define the disciplines of neuroscience are blurred, and that it is the language of all these subdisciplines, that continue the advance of modern neuroscience. Each section of the course (defined by a given subdiscipline and relevant empirical articles) will culminate with a visit from a current researcher in that subdiscipline whose studies continue to advance our understanding of the brain. The visiting researcher will lead an in-class discussion about their research, as well as the path they took to get to their current position.

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BIOL B110 Biological Exploration I

Fall 2023

BIOL B110 is an introductory-level course designed to encourage students to explore the field of biology at multiple levels of organization: molecular, cellular, organismal and population. Each course will explore these areas of biology through a unifying theme. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours a week. In Fall 2023, BIOL B110 will explore the ways the central dogma of molecular biology relates to the biochemical basis of human traits through the lens of biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, and molecular biology. The laboratory portion of the course will explore the fundamentals of molecular and cellular biology through scientific research, with an emphasis on scientific process and experimental design. Topics include genetically modified organisms, stem cell biology, and molecular biological techniques.

Scientific Investigation (SI)

Counts Toward Biochemistry & Molecular Bio

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BIOL B111 Biological Exploration II

Spring 2024

BIOL B111 is an introductory-level course designed to encourage students to explore the field of biology at multiple levels of organization: molecular, cellular, organismal and ecological. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours a week. Spring 2023: BIOL B111 will explore how organisms interact with and adapt to their environments, both abiotic and biotic. Topics to be investigated include development, physiology, photosynthesis, ecology (population, community and ecosystem), and evolution. The laboratory portion of the course will explore the fundamentals of organismal biology through scientific research, with an emphasis on the scientific process and experimental design.

Scientific Investigation (SI)

Counts Toward Biochemistry & Molecular Bio

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BIOL B202 Neurobiology

Spring 2024

An introduction to the nervous system and its broad contributions to function. The class will explore fundamentals of neural anatomy and signaling, sensory and motor processing and control, nervous system development and examples of complex brain functions. Lecture three hours a week. Prerequisite: One semester of BIOL 110-111 or permission of instructor.

Scientific Investigation (SI)

Counts Toward Neuroscience

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BIOL B217 Biomechanics

Not offered 2023-24

This course integrates anatomy, physiology, neuromechanics, and physics to understand the principles that govern animal and human movement. Concepts will highlight the interdisciplinary nature of biomechanics that must be used to study the mechanics of movement, from running, walking, flying, to swimming. Students will develop fundamental quantitative skills for biological problem-solving and be exposed to the field of comparative biomechanics. Prerequisite: One semester of BIOL 110-111, or permission of instructor.

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BIOL B228 Drosophila as a model for neurogenetics

Not offered 2023-24

This course will allow students to gain firsthand experience in how to use the Drosophila melanogaster model to perform original research in neurogenetics. Students will be provided with a novel gene to study and assess the role of these genes in a diversity of behavioral assays. The course will be a mixture of lecture, laboratory activity, paper discussion, and student presentation. One semester of BIOL B110-111 or permission of instructor.

Writing Attentive

Scientific Investigation (SI)

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BIOL B305 Sleep and Biological Rhythms

Not offered 2023-24

This seminar course will survey our current understanding of chronobiology and sleep at the molecular, cellular, and organismal level. Classes will be a mixture of lecture, discussion, and student presentations based on both historical and current primary literature. Prerequisite: PSYC H217, PSYC B218, or BIOL B202 or permission of instructor.

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BIOL B338 Advanced Topics in Neurobiology: Learning and Memory

Not offered 2023-24

This course broadly surveys the diverse array of topics, model organisms, and approaches within the field of learning and memory. The goal is to help students develop the necessary background to understand current literature in the field. This will be achieved through a combination of lectures, discussions, and presentations based on original research in the literature. PSYC H217, PSYC B218, or BIOL B202 or permission of instructor

Course does not meet an Approach

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BIOL B344 Sensory Physiology

Spring 2024

How do animals sense the world around them? How does an animal's physiology shape its experience of the world? In this class, we will cover the processes underlying animal sensing, including the senses familiar to us - vision (seeing), audition (hearing), somatosensation (touch), olfaction (smell), and gustation (taste) - as well as those we lack, such as electroreception and magnetoreception. The course will focus on the structures and transduction mechanisms that convert sensory signals in the outside world to neural signals. We will highlight commonalities across sensory systems in divergent organisms, as well as examine how animals have evolved unique sensory systems suited to their particular environments.

Writing Attentive

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CHEM B103 General Chemistry I

Fall 2023

This is an introductory course in chemistry, open to students with no previous chemistry experience. Topics include aqueous solutions and solubility; the electronic structure of atoms and molecules; chemical reactions and energy; intermolecular forces. Examples discussed in lecture and laboratory include applications of the material to environmental sciences, material science and biological chemistry. Lecture three hours, recitation one hour and laboratory three hours a week. Prerequisite: Quantitative Readiness Required.

Quantitative Methods (QM)

Quantitative Readiness Required (QR)

Scientific Investigation (SI)

Counts Toward Biochemistry & Molecular Bio

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ECON B253 Introduction to Econometrics

Fall 2023, Spring 2024

An introduction to econometric terminology and reasoning. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, and statistical inference. Particular emphasis is placed on regression analysis and on the use of data to address economic issues. The required computational techniques are developed as part of the course. Class cannot be taken if you have taken H203 or H204. Prerequisites: ECON B105 and a 200-level elective. ECON H201 does not count as an elective.

Quantitative Methods (QM)

Counts Toward Data Science

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MATH B104 Basic Probability and Statistics

Fall 2023, Spring 2024

This course introduces key concepts in descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include summary statistics, graphical displays, correlation, regression, probability, the Law of Large Numbers, expected value, standard error, the Central Limit Theorem, hypothesis testing, sampling procedures, bias, and the use of statistical software.

Quantitative Methods (QM)

Quantitative Readiness Required (QR)

Counts Toward Data Science

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PSYC B105 Introductory Psychology

Fall 2023, Spring 2024

How do biological predispositions, life experiences, culture, and other social forces contribute to individual differences in human and animal behavior? This biopsychosocial theme will be examined in domains such as perception, cognition, learning, motivation, emotion, and social interaction thereby providing an overview of psychology's many areas of inquiry. The laboratory component of the course provides students opportunities to engage in data collection, research design, data analysis, and scientific writing in the psychological sciences. Students sign up for a laboratory component during the first week of class (laboratory times are typically held for 2 hours per week; (four weekday evening times and one weekend time.

Quantitative Readiness Required (QR)

Scientific Investigation (SI)

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PSYC B205 Research Methods and Statistics

Fall 2023, Spring 2024

An introduction to research design, general research methodology, and the analysis and interpretation of data. Emphasis will be placed on issues involved with conducting psychological research. Topics include descriptive and inferential statistics, research design and validity, analysis of variance, and correlation and regression. Each statistical method will also be executed using computers. Lecture three hours, laboratory 90 minutes a week.

Quantitative Methods (QM)

Scientific Investigation (SI)

Counts Toward Data Science

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PSYC B212 Human Cognition

Fall 2023

This course provides an overview of the field of Cognitive Psychology, the branch of psychology that studies how we think. Over the semester we will survey classic and contemporary theory and findings on a wide range of mental processes that we use every day - from attention and memory to language and problem solving - and our goal will be to understand how the human mind works! Prerequisite: PSYC B105 or H100 (Introductory Psychology), or instructor's permission.

Scientific Investigation (SI)

Counts Toward Neuroscience

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PSYC B218 Behavioral Neuroscience

Spring 2024

This course will introduce students to the field of behavioral neuroscience. The first part of the course will familiarize students with the brain and neuronal communication. Then, we will delve into brain-behavior relationships. Topics covered will include: sex behavior, hunger, sleep, emotion, and psychopathology. Classic and state-of-the-art neuroscience research methodologies leading to this knowledge will be highlighted. Students will learn course content through lectures, readings, and digital media. To culminate the course, students will write a literature review on a topic of their choosing within the field of behavioral neuroscience. Lecture three hours a week. Prerequisite: Introductory Psychology (PSYC B101 or PSYC H100) or NEUR H100

Course does not meet an Approach

Counts Toward Neuroscience

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PSYC B286 Laboratory in Behavioral Neuroscience

Fall 2023

This writing-intensive laboratory course will provide students with experience in the design, implementation, analysis, and presentation of behavioral neuroscience research. Students will partake in experiments that explore the relationship between the brain and behavior, using Sprague Dawley rats as a model organism. Students should expect to write research reports on experiments performed in the lab, as well as give an oral presentation on research conducted. Prerequisites: (PSYCB105, PSYCB100 or NEUR100) AND Either (PSYCB205, PSYCH200, MATHH103, MATHH203, MATHB104, or ECONH203)

Writing Intensive

Scientific Investigation (SI)

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PSYC B287 Laboratory in Cognitive Neuroscience

Spring 2024

This writing-intensive laboratory course will provide students with hands-on experience in the design, implementation, analysis, and interpretation of the electrophysiological techniques used in cognitive neuroscience research. Students will read research articles, design an event-related potential (ERP) research project, learn to collect ERP data, conduct EEG/ERP data analysis to test original hypotheses using existing data, and write an APA-style paper. This is a .5 unit writing-intensive class that meets half of the writing requirement in the major.

Writing Intensive

Quantitative Readiness Required (QR)

Scientific Investigation (SI)

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PSYC B323 Advanced Topics in Cognitive Neuroscience

Section 001 (Spring 2023): Deciphering Language in the Human Brain

Spring 2024

This is a topics course. Course content varies.

Counts Toward Neuroscience

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PSYC B327 Adolescent Development

Spring 2024

Is adolescence a biologically distinct stage of life, or a social "holding ground" invented by modern culture for young people unready or unwilling to assume the responsibilities of adulthood? Are adolescents destined to make risky decisions because of their underdeveloped brains? At what age should they be held accountable as adults in a court of law? This course will explore these and other questions about the biological, social, and legal forces that define the boundaries and shape the experience of adolescents growing up in the modern world. Students will learn about: (1) historical changes in understanding and treatment of adolescents; (2) puberty-related biological changes marking the beginning of adolescence; (3) brain, behavioral, cognitive, and social development during adolescence; and (4) contemporary debates regarding age of adult maturity, and their implications for law and policy. Prerequisite: PSYC B206 (Developmental Psychology) or PSYC B211 (Lifespan Development) or permission or instructor. PSYC B205 is recommended.

Counts Toward Child and Family Studies

Counts Toward Health Studies

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PSYC B344 Early Childhood Experiences & Mental Health

Spring 2024

Development represents a unique period during which the brain shows enhanced plasticity, the important ability to adapt and change in response to experiences. During development, the brain may be especially vulnerable to the impacts of harmful experiences (e.g., neglect or exposure to toxins) and also especially responsive to the effects of positive factors (e.g., community resilience or clinical interventions). This seminar will explore how childhood experiences "get under the skin," shaping neurobiological systems and exerting lasting effects on mental health and well-being. We will examine theoretical models of how early experiences shape development, considering the proposed mechanisms by which different features of childhood environments could shape psychological risk and resilience. We will evaluate the scientific evidence for these models and then apply this knowledge to consider what strategies for intervention-- at the level of the child, family, and society-- could help reduce psychopathology and promote well-being. There is no textbook required for this course. We will read, critically evaluate, and discuss empirical journal articles and explore the implications of this scientific literature for public policy. Prerequisites: PSYC B209 or PSYC B206 or PSYC B218 or permission from instructor; PSYC B205 highly recommended

Counts Toward Child and Family Studies

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PSYC B395 Psychopharmacology

Not offered 2023-24

A study of the role of drugs in understanding basic brain-behavior relations. Topics include the pharmacological basis of motivation and emotion; pharmacological models of psychopathology; the use of drugs in the treatment of psychiatric disorders such as anxiety, depression, and psychosis; and the psychology and pharmacology of drug addiction. Prerequisite: PSYC B218 or BIOL B202 or PSYC H217 or permission of instructor.

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flowers

Contact Us

Laura Been

Chair of the Bi-Co Neuroscience Program
Haverford College
KINSC S408
370 Lancaster Avenue
Haverford, PA 19041
Phone: (610) 896-1310
lbeen@haverford.edu