This page displays the schedule of Bryn Mawr courses in this department for this academic year. It also displays descriptions of courses offered by the department during the last four academic years.

For information about courses offered by other Bryn Mawr departments and programs or about courses offered by Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges, please consult the Course Guides page.

For information about the Academic Calendar, including the dates of first and second quarter courses, please visit the College's calendars page.

Fall 2021

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION / INSTRUCTION MODE INSTR(S)
SOCL B102-001Society, Culture, and the IndividualSemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHCarpenter Library 21
In Person
Cox,A.
SOCL B225-001Women in SocietySemester / 1Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHTaylor Hall D
In Person
Montes,V.
SOCL B235-001Mexican-American CommunitiesSemester / 1Lecture: 12:55 PM- 2:15 PM TTHDalton Hall 119
In Person
Montes,V.
SOCL B264-001Sociology of ChildhoodSemester / 1Lecture: 2:25 PM- 3:45 PM TTHTaylor Hall E
In Person
Cox,A.
SOCL B265-001Quantitative MethodsSemester / 1Lecture: 11:40 AM- 1:00 PM MWDalton Hall 119
In Person
Wright,N.
SOCL B276-001Making Sense of RaceSemester / 1Lecture: 10:10 AM-11:30 AM MWDalton Hall 119
In Person
Sledge,P.
SOCL B302-001Social TheorySemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM WDalton Hall 25
In Person
Sledge,P.
SOCL B303-001Junior Conference: Discipline-Based Intensive WritingSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM MDalton Hall 2
In Person
Montes,V.
SOCL B309-001Sociology of ReligionSemester / 1Lecture: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM MDalton Hall 2
In Person
Wright,N.
SOCL B317-001Comparative Social Policy: Cuba, China, US, ScandinaviaSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM MOld Library 104
In Person
Karen,D., Karen,D.
Weekly Meeting: 9:00 AM-10:00 AM FDalton Hall 2
In Person
SOCL B323-001Communes, Co-ops, and Collectives: Alternative OrganizationsSemester / 1Lecure: 1:10 PM- 3:30 PM FDalton Hall 1
In Person
Cox,A.
SOCL B398-001Senior ConferenceSemester / 1Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTHTaylor Hall C
In Person
Dept. staff, TBA
SOCL B403-001Supervised WorkSemester / 1Dept. staff, TBA
SOCL B403-001Supervised WorkSemester / 1Dept. staff, TBA
EDUC B266-001Critical Issues in Urban EducationSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWIn PersonZuckerman,K.

Spring 2022

COURSE TITLE SCHEDULE/
UNITS
MEETING TYPE TIMES/DAYS LOCATION / INSTRUCTION MODE INSTR(S)
SOCL B102-001Society, Culture, and the IndividualSemester / 1Lecture: 9:55 AM-11:15 AM TTHDalton Hall 300
In Person
Harris,L., Wright,N.
SOCL B217-001The Family in Social ContextSemester / 1Lecture: 11:40 AM- 1:00 PM MWIn PersonWright,N.
SOCL B251-001Queering UtopiaSemester / 1Lecture: 11:25 AM-12:45 PM TTHIn PersonSledge,P.
SOCL B258-001Sociology of EducationSemester / 1Lecture: 8:25 AM- 9:45 AM TTHIn PersonKaren,D.
SOCL B302-001Social TheorySemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM WDalton Hall 119
In Person
Wright,N.
SOCL B303-001Junior Conference: Discipline-Based Intensive WritingSemester / 1Lecture: 7:10 PM-10:00 PM MDalton Hall 119
In Person
Wright,N.
SOCL B326-001Feminist Perspectives on HlthSemester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 4:00 PM THIn PersonSledge,P.
SOCL B338-001The Black Diaspora in the US: African and Caribbean Communities.Semester / 1Lecture: 1:10 PM- 3:30 PM FIn PersonOsirim,M.
SOCL B398-001Senior ConferenceSemester / 1Lecture: 11:40 AM- 1:00 PM MWIn PersonDept. staff, TBA
SOCL B403-001Supervised WorkSemester / 1Dept. staff, TBA
SOCL B403-001Supervised WorkSemester / 1Dept. staff, TBA
SOCL B420-001Praxis Fieldwork Seminar: Social JusticeSemester / 1LEC: 9:10 AM-11:00 AM WIn PersonKaren,D.
EDUC B266-001Critical Issues in Urban EducationSemester / 1LEC: 1:10 PM- 2:30 PM MWIn PersonZuckerman,K.

Fall 2022

(Class schedules for this semester will be posted at a later date.)

2021-22 Catalog Data

SOCL B102 Society, Culture, and the Individual
Fall 2021, Spring 2022
Sociology is the systematic study of society and social interaction. It involves what C. Wright Mills called the "sociological imagination," a way of seeing the relationship between individuals and the larger forces of society and history. In this course, we will practice using our sociological imaginations to think about the world around us. We will examine how social norms and structures are created and maintained, and we will analyze how these structures shape people's behavior and choices, often without their realizing it. After learning to think sociologically, we will examine the centrality of inequality in society, focusing specifically on the intersecting dimensions of race and ethnicity, gender, and class, and the role of social structures and institutions (such as the family and education) in society. Overall, this course draws our attention toward our own presuppositions-the things we take for granted in our everyday lives-and provides us with a systematic framework within which we can analyze those presuppositions and identify their effects..
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward International Studies

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SOCL B201 The Study of Gender in Society
Not offered 2021-22
The definition of male and female social roles and sociological approaches to the study of gender in the United States, with attention to gender in the economy and work place, the division of labor in families and households, and analysis of class and ethnic differences in gender roles. Of particular interest in this course is the comparative exploration of the experiences of women of color in the United States.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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SOCL B205 Social Inequality
Not offered 2021-22
In this course, we will explore the extent, causes, and consequences of social and economic inequality in the U.S. We will begin by discussing key theories and the intersecting dimensions of inequality along lines of income and wealth, race and ethnicity, and gender. We will then follow a life-course perspective to trace the institutions through which inequality is structured, experienced, and reproduced through the family, neighborhoods, the educational system, labor markets and workplaces, and the criminal justice system.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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SOCL B217 The Family in Social Context
Spring 2022
The family represents a fundamental and ubiquitous institution in the social world, providing norms and conveying values. This course focuses on current sociological research, seeking to understand how modern American families have transformed due to complex structural and cultural forces. We will examine family change from historical, social, and demographic perspectives. After examining the images, ideals, and myths concerning families, we will address the central theme of diversity and change. In what ways can sociology explain and document these shifts? What influences do law, technology, and medicine have on the family? What are the results of evolving views of work, gender, and parenting on family structure and stability? Prerequisite of one Social Science Course
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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SOCL B225 Women in Society
Fall 2021
In 2015, the world's female population was 49.6 percent of the total global population of 7.3 billion. According to the United Nations, in absolute terms, there were 61,591,853 more men than women. Yet, at the global scale, 124 countries have more women than men. A great majority of these countries are located in what scholars have recently been referring to as the Global South - those countries known previously as developing countries. Although women outnumber their male counterparts in many Global South countries, however, these women endure difficulties that have worsened rather than improving. What social structures determine this gender inequality in general and that of women of color in particular? What are the main challenges women in the Global South face? How do these challenges differ based on nationality, class, ethnicity, skin color, gender identity, and other axes of oppression? What strategies have these women developed to cope with the wide variety of challenges they contend with on a daily basis? These are some of the major questions that we will explore together in this class. In this course, the Global South does not refer exclusively to a geographical location, but rather to a set of institutional structures that generate disadvantages for all individuals and particularly for women and other minorities, regardless their geographical location in the world. In other words, a significant segment of the Global North's population lives under the same precarious conditions that are commonly believed as exclusive to the Global South. Simultaneously, there is a Global North embedded in the Global South as well. In this context, we will see that the geographical division between the North and the South becomes futile when we seek to understand the dynamics of the "Western-centric/Christian-centric capitalist/patriarchal modern/colonial world-system" (Grosfoguel, 2012). In the first part of the course, we will establish the theoretical foundations that will guide us throughout the rest of the semester. We will then turn to a wide variety of case studies where we will examine, for instance, the contemporary global division of labor, gendered violence in the form of feminicides, international migration, and global tourism. The course's final thematic section will be devoted to learning from the different feminisms (e.g. community feminism) emerging out of the Global South as well as the research done in that region and its contribution to the development of a broader gender studies scholarship. In particular, we will pay close attention to resistance, solidarity, and social movements led by women. Examples will be drawn from Latin America, the Caribbean, the US, Asia, and Africa.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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SOCL B229 Black America in Sociological Perspective
Not offered 2021-22
This course presents sociological perspectives on various issues affecting black America as a historically unique minority group in the United States: the legacy of slavery and the Jim Crow era; the formation of urban black ghettos; the civil rights reforms; the problems of poverty and unemployment; the problems of crime and other social problems; the problems of criminal justice; the continuing significance of race; the varied covert modern forms of racial discrimination; and the role of race in American politics. Prerequisite: at least one additional sociology course or permission of instructor. Course is not available to freshmen.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Child and Family Studies

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SOCL B232 A Sociological Journey to Immigrant Communities in Philly
Not offered 2021-22
This course will use the lenses of sociology to critically and comparatively examine various immigrant communities living in greater Philadelphia. It will expose students to the complex historical, economic, political, and social factors influencing (im)migration, as well as how migrants and the children of immigrants develop their sense of belonging and their homemaking practices in the new host society. In this course, we will probe questions of belonging, identity, homemaking, citizenship, transnationalism, and ethnic entrepreneurship and how individuals, families, and communities are transformed locally and across borders through the process of migration. This course also seeks to interrogate how once in a new country, immigrant communities not only develop a sense of belonging but also how they reconfigure their own identities while they transform the social, physical, and cultural milieus of their new communities of arrival. To achieve these ends, this course will engage in a multidisciplinary approach consisting of materials drawn from such disciplines as cultural studies, anthropology, history, migration studies, and sociology to examine distinct immigrant communities that have arrived in Philadelphia over the past 100 years. Although this course will also cover the histories of migrant communities arriving in the area in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, a greater part of the course will focus on recent migrant communities, mainly from Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Caribbean and arriving in the area of South Philadelphia. A special focus will be on the Mexican American migrant community that stands out among those newly arrived migrant communities.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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SOCL B235 Mexican-American Communities
Fall 2021
For its unique history, the number of migrants, and the two countries' proximity, Mexican migration to the United States represents an exceptional case in world migration. There is no other example of migration with more than 100 years of history. The copious presence of migrants concentrated in a host country, such as we have in the case of the 11.7 million Mexican migrants residing in the United States, along with another 15 million Mexican descendants, is unparalleled. The 1,933-mile-long border shared by the two countries makes it one of the longest boundary lines in the world and, unfortunately, also one of the most dangerous frontiers in the world today. We will examine the different economic, political, social and cultural forces that have shaped this centenarian migration influx and undertake a macro-, meso-, and micro-levels of analysis. At the macro-level of political economy, we will investigate the economic interdependency that has developed between Mexico and the U.S. over different economic development periods of these countries, particularly, the role the Mexican labor force has played to boosting and sustaining both the Mexican and the American economies. At the meso-level, we will examine different institutions both in Mexico and the U.S. that have determined the ways in which millions of Mexican migrate to this country. Last, but certainly not least, we will explore the impacts that both the macro-and meso-processes have had on the micro-level by considering the imperatives, aspirations, and dreams that have prompted millions of people to leave their homes and communities behind in search of better opportunities. This major life decision of migration brings with it a series of social transformations in family and community networks, this will look into the cultural impacts in both the sending and receiving migrant communities. In sum, we will come to understand how these three levels of analysis work together.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies
Counts toward Praxis Program

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SOCL B246 Sociology of Migration: A Cross-Cultural Overview of Contemporary Challenges
Not offered 2021-22
The twenty-first century began much as the twentieth century did for the United States with high levels of immigration. This has affected not only the nation, but the discipline of sociology. Just as early twentieth century Chicago School sociology focused on immigration and settlement issues, so too the first decade of the twenty-first century shows a flurry of sociological imagination devoted to immigration scholarship. This course will center on the key texts, issues, and approaches coming out of this renovated sociology of immigration, but we will also include approaches to the study of immigration from history, anthropology, and ethnic studies. While we will consider comparative and historical approaches, our focus will be on the late twentieth century through the present, and we will spend a good deal of time focusing on the longest running labor migration in the world, Mexican immigration to the U.S., as well as on Central American migrant communities in the U.S. Students with an interest in contemporary U.S. immigration will be exposed to a survey of key theoretical approaches and relevant issues in immigration studies in the social sciences. Current themes, such as globalization, transnationalism, gendered migration, immigrant labor markets, militarization of the U.S.-Mexican border, U.S. migration policy, the new second generation and segmented assimilation, and citizenship will be included.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Latin American, Iberian, and Latinx Studies

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SOCL B251 Queering Utopia
Spring 2022
What if? This question is at the heart of both social theory and speculative fiction. Theory and fiction both serve as ways through which to make sense of social life and to imagine alternatives. Within the traditions of feminist and queer thought, utopian and dystopian fiction have been utilized as a means by which to imagine the outcomes of various social processes and alternative gender/sexuality systems. This medium is also useful for exploring the ways in which gender and sexuality are not only integral to individual identity but also to the structure of social life itself. In this course we will analyze the challenges to the status quo asserted by feminist theorists and queer theorists alongside a comparison with indigenous systems of gender. We will also consider the various implications for everyday life of these theories as presented through the lens of speculative fiction. We will compare works of fiction with works of social theory to think through the ways in which gender and sexuality structure social life as well as the ways in which we do, undo, and resist gender in everyday life. Over the course of the semester, we will contemplate work by Samuel R. Delany; Michael Warner; Margaret Atwood; Ursula Le Guin; Nikki Sullivan; Sara Ahmed, José Esteban Muñoz, Laura Mamo, and more.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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SOCL B256 Media, Race and Social Movements
Not offered 2021-22
In 2015, Ava DuVernay's historical drama Selma about the 1960s US Civil Rights Movement was nominated for four Golden Globe Awards. Fifty years after the Selma to Montgomery March, narratives about the movement and its leaders still capture widespread public attention and cultural legitimation. Public figures often appeal to our collective memory of the Civil Rights movements and its leaders when they ask us to take positions on hot-button social issues like school funding, mass incarceration, health care coverage, and reproductive rights. But the median age of the US population is 37.8, meaning that at least half of Americans have no personal recollection of the movement. Instead, we share a collective imaginary of the Civil Rights Movement and other formative historical moments in our national history, based on what we have learned from teachers, books, movies, music and countless other secondary sources. Media provides us access to knowledge - including knowledge about what ideas, institutions, and figures are important to our culture and identities. However, in order to receive that knowledge, we must interpret it through a shared cultural language that is also influenced by the media we consume, the relationships we have, and the institutions we rely upon. In this sociology course, we will work toward a shared understanding of the American media ecosystem by comparing and critiquing coverage of social movements from a range of media sources, including social media and international citizen journalism. We will focus in particular on how racial frames impact this ecosystem.
Inquiry into the Past (IP)

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SOCL B257 Marginals and Outsiders: The Sociology of Deviance
Not offered 2021-22
An examination of non-normative and criminal behavior viewed from the standpoint of different theoretical perspectives on deviance (e.g., social strain, anomie, functionalism, social disorganization, symbolic interaction, and Marxism) with particular emphasis on social construction and labeling perspectives; and the role of subcultures, social movements and social conflicts in changing the normative boundaries of society. Topics include robbery, homicide, Black inner city violence, sexual deviance, prostitution, white collar crime, drug addiction and mental disorders.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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SOCL B258 Sociology of Education
Spring 2022
Major sociological theories of the relationships between education and society, focusing on the effects of education on inequality in the United States and the historical development of primary, secondary, and post-secondary education in the United States. Other topics include education and social selection, testing and tracking, and micro- and macro-explanations of differences in educational outcomes. This is a Praxis II course; placements are in local schools.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Education
Counts toward Praxis Program

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SOCL B262 Public Opinion
Not offered 2021-22
This course explores public opinion: what it is, how it is measured, how it is shaped, and how it changes over time. Specific attention is given to the role of elites, the mass media, and religion in shaping public opinion. Examples include racial/ethnic civil rights, abortion, gay/lesbian/transgendered sexuality, and inequalities.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Inquiry into the Past (IP)
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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SOCL B263 Dimensions of Power: Micro, Meso, and Macro
Not offered 2021-22
What is power? How does it operate at different levels in society--through one-on-one interactions, organizational and societal (class, race/ethnic, gender) structures, and cultural norms? In this course, we will explore these questions by reading about sociological understandings of power and applying those theories to our everyday lives. As part of this course, students will collect qualitative data and analyze it based on theories of power. No prior data-collection experience is necessary.
Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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SOCL B264 Sociology of Childhood
Fall 2021
In this course, we will examine childhood from a sociological perspective focusing on how children shape and are shaped by their social worlds. We will begin by considering childhood as an historically constructed category that has changed over time and place. We will next focus on three institutions that are key agents of childhood socialization: the family, the school, and peers. Finally, we will study topics that may be considered problems of childhood: commercialization, the medicalization of aspects of children's life experiences, and school discipline. Throughout the course, we will consider how children's lives are shaped by broader systems of inequality based on race, class, and gender.
Course does not meet an Approach

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SOCL B265 Quantitative Methods
Fall 2021
An introduction to the conduct of empirical, especially quantitative, social science inquiry. In consultation with the instructor, students may select research problems to which they apply the research procedures and statistical techniques introduced during the course. Using SPSS, a statistical computer package, students learn techniques such as cross-tabular analysis, ANOVA, and multiple regression. Required of Bryn Mawr Sociology majors and minors. Non-sociology majors and minors with permission of instructor.
Quantitative Methods (QM)
Quantitative Readiness Required (QR)
Counts toward Introduction to Data Science

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SOCL B268 Environmental Sustainability
Not offered 2021-22
This course relates a broadly construed understanding of environmental sustainability to the historical development of the major concepts and developments in sociology. It situates the development of sociology as responding to major social problems in the natural and built environment, and demonstrates how the key theoretical developments and empirical findings of sociology are crucial in understanding how these problems develop, persist, and are addressed or fail to be addressed. Conceptually, it begins with the radical environmental changes at the dawn of modernity that gave rise to European sociology and the massive urban social problems experienced in rapidly changing urban areas that gave rise to American sociology. Empirically, it moves through a series of more contemporary case studies of environmental problems (including both single-event "disasters" and ongoing slowly developing ever-present realities) that demonstrate both the context for sociology's development and the promise sociology offers in understanding environmental problems. The course will have a global focus drawing on case studies from North America, South America, Europe, Africa, with special attention given to East Asia.
Course does not meet an Approach

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SOCL B269 Sociology of Race
Not offered 2021-22
This course is an introduction to thinking about race sociologically. It will cover major sociological theories about race and racism, the construction and persistence of racial inequalities, and subtopics on racial dynamics in the United States. Subtopics will include: education, environment, police and prisons, fear and love, and popular culture.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

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SOCL B270 Refugee Families: Global Systems in Crisis?
Not offered 2021-22
This course approaches the global refugee crisis from a sociological vantage point. The course begins by asking who is considered a refugee and how this category is constructed. We will examine how refugee families fit within the nation-state system and how forced migration fits within larger trends in migration and globalization. We then follow refugee families and the institutions that shape their trajectories from waiting in refugee camps and cities in neighboring countries to the possibility of more durable solutions through return migration to their home country (repatriation), local integration, or resettlement. How do the dynamics of family shape--and change in--the process? In the last section of the class, we focus on the integration of refugees and asylum-seekers in the U.S. and Europe. Along the way, we will consider refugee agency and self-reliance, as well as the constraints and inequalities they face while navigating global refugee systems.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)

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SOCL B276 Making Sense of Race
Fall 2021
What is the meaning of race in contemporary US and global society? How are these meanings (re)produced, resisted, and refused? What meanings might we desire or imagine as alternatives? In this course, we will approach these questions through an array of sources while tracking our own thinking about and experiences of raced-ness. Course material will survey sociological notions of the social construction of race, empirical studies of lived experiences of race, and creative fiction and non-fiction material intended to catalyze thinking about alternative possibilities.
Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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SOCL B302 Social Theory
Fall 2021, Spring 2022
This course focuses primarily on the works of classical social theorists. The theorists include: George Herbert Meade, Emile Durkheim, Karl Marx, and Max Weber; and secondarily their influences on the works of more contemporary theorists: C. Wright Mills, Shulamith Firestone, Antonio Gramsci, Erving Goffman, Randall Collins, Robert Bellah, Howard Becker, and Pierre Bourdieu. Among the theoretical conceptions examined: culture, religion, the sacred, power, authority, modernization, deviance, bureaucracy, social stratification, social class, status groups, social conflict, and social conceptions of the self.

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SOCL B303 Junior Conference: Discipline-Based Intensive Writing
Fall 2021, Spring 2022
This course will introduce students to a range of qualitative methods in the discipline and will require students to engage, through reading and writing, a wide range of sociological issues. The emphasis of the course will be to develop a clear, concise writing style, while maintaining a sociological focus. Substantive areas of the course will vary depending on the instructor. Prerequisite: Required of and limited to Bryn Mawr Sociology Major, Junior Standing

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SOCL B309 Sociology of Religion
Fall 2021
This course will investigate what sociology offers to an historical and contemporary understanding of religion. Most broadly, the course explores how religion has fared under the conditions of modernity given widespread predictions of secularization yet remarkably resilient and resurgent religious movements the world over. The course is structured to alternate theoretical approaches to religion with specific empirical cases that illustrate, test, or contradict the particular theories at hand. It focuses primarily on the West, but situated within a global context.

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SOCL B317 Comparative Social Policy: Cuba, China, US, Scandinavia
Fall 2021
This course will examine different countries' policy choices to address different societal challenges. Four societal types - socialist (Cuba), post-socialist (China), capitalist (US), and social-democratic (Scandinavia) - will be studies to help us understand how these different kinds of societies conceive of social problems and propose and implement attempted solutions. We will examine particular problems/solutions in four domains: health/sports; education; environment; technological development. As we explore these domains, we will attend to methodological issues involved in making historical and institutional comparisons
Counts toward Introduction to Data Science
Counts toward Education
Counts toward Health Studies

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SOCL B321 The Black American Intellectual Community
Not offered 2021-22
This seminar explores an important but neglected subject in the study of race relations: the social role of the black American intellectual community. Viewing black intellectuals from the perspective of the sociology of knowledge, it examines the patterns of development and conflict in the black American intellectual community, extending from the early 20th century to the early 21st century. It will examine the social and historical contexts and influences that shaped their world views as they confronted the issues of racism, racial integration, black social problems, black culture, and black identity - issues that were framed through rival and often antagonistic black ideological movements: black nationalism, liberal civil rights activism, communism, new left radicalism, political conservatism, and afro-centrism. Among the black intellectuals whose ideas and influence will be considered in the seminar: Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. DuBois, Marcus Garvey, Alain Locke, James Weldon Johnson, Langston Hughes, Claude McKay, Richard Wright, E. Franklin Frazier, Horace Cayton, Zora Neal Hurston, Paul Robeson, Ralph Ellison, Kenneth Clark, James Baldwin, Harold Cruise, Bayard Rustin, Stokely Carmichael, Angela Davis, Eldridge Cleaver, Nikki Giovanni, Amiri Baraka, Malcom X, and Taneshi Coates.
Counts toward Africana Studies

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SOCL B322 Thinking with Trans: Theorizing Race and Gender
Not offered 2021-22
In 2017, philosopher Rebecca Tuvel published an article in the journal Hypatia outlining an argument for the existence of transracialism. This article came on the tail end of a great deal of controversy about the outing of NAACP leader, Rachel Dolezal; a woman born to white parents who identifies as black. In this course we will examine the social construction of race and gender as well as critique the biological assumptions that underpin both social structures. We will explore the theoretical power and pitfalls of the terms "transgender" and "transracial"- the similarities, differences, and tensions inherent in questioning taken for granted social structures that are fundamental to social organization and personal identity. We will explore the theoretical context of the terms "transracial" and "transgender," the various arguments for and against identity categories, and the lived experiences of individuals and groups who regularly transgress the boundaries of race and gender.
Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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SOCL B323 Communes, Co-ops, and Collectives: Alternative Organizations
Fall 2021
From schools to hospitals to grocery stores, most of the organizations we encounter and participate in throughout our lives are based on a hierarchical, bureaucratic form of organization. How did this form of organization come to be so common in U.S. society? And what are the alternatives? In this course, we will begin by exploring the origins, form, and proliferation of what Max Weber famously referred to as the "iron cage" of bureaucracy. Then we will focus on alternative forms of organization, such as communes, cooperatives, and collectives. How do these types of collectivist-democratic organizations differ from the rational-bureaucratic organizations with which we are most familiar? How are these alternative organizations structured? What makes them work--or not? From the Burning Man (anti)organization to mutual aid societies, democratic schools, farmer cooperatives, and feminist collectives, we will explore the ways in which alternative organizations can enforce the status quo or serve as catalysts for social change. Prerequisite: At least one social science course or permission of instructor.
Course does not meet an Approach

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SOCL B326 Feminist Perspectives on Hlth
Spring 2022
Increasingly, an individual's sense of self and worth as a citizen turns on their health identity. In this course we will draw on theories of gender, race, sexuality, medicalization, and biocitizenship to unravel the ways in which gender structures and medical institutions are mutually constitutive and to explore how this relationship, in turn, impacts individual identity. The course will take a global approach to feminist engagement with health issues with an emphasis on human rights and bodily autonomy.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Health Studies

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SOCL B327 Capital & Connections:A Network Approach to Social Structure
Not offered 2021-22
Is it better to have a tightly knit circle of friends or several compartmentalized groups? And better for what--social support, academic achievement, finding a job, coming up with a new idea, sparking a social movement? How might we study questions like these? In this course, we will explore the various ways of understanding social connections as a resource--as a form of capital--and we will learn how to collect and analyze data about networks to investigate the structure of social networks. In particular, we will learn how to think about advantages and disadvantages as resulting from the structure and composition of our social networks. Prerequisite: At least one social science course or permission of instructor.
Course does not meet an Approach
Counts toward Introduction to Data Science

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SOCL B331 Global Sociology: Capital, Power, and Protest in World-Historical Perspective
Not offered 2021-22
The last decades of the 20th century brought about a series of social, political, economic, and cultural changes that have reshaped our ways of understanding and thereby relating to the world. Globalization as a conceptual paradigm has assisted us in comprehending those changes and most importantly the impacts that those changes have brought to our lives individually and collectively. In this sense, globalization has not only stirred up a series of debates within the social sciences about its novelty, but has also become one of the most contested concepts, meaning that there are different and competing understandings of what the term means and how to assess the process. With this in mind, the objective of this course is to explore the distinct themes that make up what is referred to as the sociology of globalization. These include: globalization studies and theories of globalization; the global economy; political globalization; globalization and culture; transnational civil society/transnational social movements; globalization and gender/race/ethnicity; transnational migration; new global division of labor; and human consequences of globalization in the form of the so-called wasted lives (Bauman), to mention just a few. Linkages between social, political, and economic forces that play a role in shaping trends and problems will be analyzed through lectures, readings, discussions, case studies, and films shown in class. An intersectional perspective of race, class, nationality, and gender (among other social axes of oppression) will be used to demonstrate how various historically marginalized groups experience the impact of globalization. Finally, this course adopts a social justice framework with the intent to cultivate students as active agents of change. Prerequisite: Previous course in social science; permission of instructor.

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SOCL B338 The Black Diaspora in the US: African and Caribbean Communities.
Spring 2022
An examination of the socioeconomic experiences of immigrants who arrived in the United States since the landmark legislation of 1965. After exploring issues of development and globalization at "home" leading to migration, the course proceeds with the study of immigration theories. Major attention is given to the emergence of transnational identities and the transformation of communities, particularly in the northeastern United States.
Counts toward Africana Studies

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SOCL B342 Bodies in Social Life
Not offered 2021-22
Can social life exist without bodies? How can attention to the body influence our understanding of social processes of subjectivity, interaction, and practice? While the body has long been an "absent presence" in sociology, multiple approaches to theorizing and researching the body have emerged in recent decades. A sociological approach to the body and embodiment provides an opportunity to bridge the gap between everyday experience and analyses of broad social structures which can seem disconnected from daily life. In this course, we will examine the processes by which individual bodies are shaped by and, in turn, shape social life. Key questions to be explored include: how are bodies regulated by social forces; how do individuals perform the body and how does interactional context influence this performance; what is the meaning of the body in social life; and is there a "right" body? Suggested preparation: At least one course in the social sciences.
Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies
Counts toward Health Studies

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SOCL B358 Higher Education: Structure, Dynamics, Policy
Not offered 2021-22
This course examines the structure and dynamics of the "non-system" of higher education in the US in historical and comparative perspective. Focusing on patterns of access, graduation, and allocation into the labor market, the course examines changes over time and how these vary at different types of institutions and cross-nationally. Issues of culture, diversity (especially with respect to class, race/ethnic, and gender), and programming will be examined. The main theoretical debates revolve around the relationship between higher education and the society (does it reproduce or transform social structure) in which it is embedded. Prerequisites: at least one social science course or permission of instructor.

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SOCL B398 Senior Conference
This capstone course for the sociology major focuses on major concepts or areas in sociology and requires students to develop their analytical and synthetic skills as they confront both theoretical and empirical materials. The Key emphasis in the course will be on students' writing. Through a variety of assignments (of different lengths and purposes), students will practice the process (drafts) and elements (clarity and concision) of good writing. Specific topical content will vary by semester according to the expertise of the instructor and the interests of students. Writing Attentive.

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SOCL B403 Supervised Work
Students have the opportunity to do individual research projects under the supervision of a faculty member.

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SOCL B403 Supervised Work
Students have the opportunity to do individual research projects under the supervision of a faculty member.

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SOCL B420 Praxis Fieldwork Seminar
Section 001 (Spring 2022): Social Justice
Counts toward Praxis Program

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EDUC B266 Critical Issues in Urban Education
Fall 2021, Spring 2022
This course examines issues, challenges, and possibilities of urban education in contemporary America. We use as critical lenses issues of race, class, and culture; urban learners, teachers, and school systems; and restructuring and reform. While we look at urban education nationally over several decades, we use Philadelphia as a focal "case" that students investigate through documents and school placements. Weekly fieldwork in a school required.
Cross-Cultural Analysis (CC)
Counts toward Counts toward Africana Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Child and Family Studies
Counts toward Counts toward Praxis Program

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GNST B118 Gender, Sexuality, and Society
Not offered 2021-22
This course will introduce students to major concepts, questions, and events in the field of gender, sexuality, and feminist studies through a range of sources. Students will explore how meanings of gender and sexuality have changed over time and the ways that cultural and historical contexts shape these meanings. Particular attention will be given to the intersections of gender and sexuality with race, class, and other social locations in order to understand a range of identities and structures of inequality. This course will challenge you to question taken-for-granted notions of gender and to consider alternative ways to make sense of gender and sexuality. This course is equivalent to GNST 109 as a gateway to the minor. This course counts towards a Sociology elective.
Critical Interpretation (CI)
Counts toward Counts toward Gender and Sexuality Studies

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POLS B354 Comparative Social Movements: Power and Mobilization
Not offered 2021-22
A consideration of the conceptualizations of power and "legitimate" and "illegitimate" participation, the political opportunity structure facing potential activists, the mobilizing resources available to them, and the cultural framing within which these processes occur. Specific attention is paid to recent movements within and across countries, such as feminist, environmental, and anti-globalization movements, and to emerging forms of citizen mobilization, including transnational and global networks, electronic mobilization via social media, and collaborative policymaking institutions. Writing Attentive. Prerequisite: one course in POLS or SOCL or permission of instructor.
Counts toward Counts toward Environmental Studies

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POLS B374 Education Politics & Policy in the US
Not offered 2021-22
Studying education politics and policy provides insights into some central concerns of political science and highlights some tensions within the American political system such as: power & influence, government v markets, federalism, equity & accountability, and expertise & citizen participation. This seminar uses education politics as a window into these broader concerns
Counts toward Counts toward Child and Family Studies

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